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  • 1.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    et al.
    Division of Molecular Surface Physics and Nanoscience, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Division of Molecular Surface Physics and Nanoscience, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Division of Clinical Medicine, Department of Biomedicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Division of Molecular Surface Physics and Nanoscience, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Division of Clinical Medicine, Department of Biomedicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Division of Molecular Surface Physics and Nanoscience, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes2012In: Nanotechnology, ISSN 0957-4484, E-ISSN 1361-6528, Vol. 23, no 27, article id 275101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  • 2.
    Amruth, C.
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland.
    Luszczynska, Beata
    Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland.
    Szymanski, Marek Zdzislaw
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Ulanski, Jacek
    Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland.
    Albrecht, Ken
    Laboratory for Chemistry and Life Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan; JST-ERATO Yamamoto Atom Hybrid Project, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan; Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Yamamoto, Kimihisa
    Laboratory for Chemistry and Life Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan; Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Inkjet printing of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) dendrimer for OLEDs applications2019In: Organic electronics, ISSN 1566-1199, E-ISSN 1878-5530, Vol. 74, p. 218-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the inkjet printing of a novel OLED device with fully solution-processed organic layers that employ TADF material as an emitting layer. The ink was formulated using new TADF material, triazine core carbazole dendrimers with tert-butyl group at the periphery (tBuG2TAZ), dissolved in a mixture of two non-chlorinated solvents. The influence of the print resolution and the substrate temperature on morphology of the printed films was studied and optimized in ambient conditions. The optimized TADF dendrimer layer was then incorporated in the OLEDs as the emitting layer. The best-printed OLEDs exhibited a maximum current efficiency of 18 cd/A and maximum luminance of 6900 cd/m(2). Such values are comparable to the values obtained in spin coated devices made of the same TADF dendrimer. Further, the mobility of charge carriers extracted from transient electroluminescence measurements of printed OLEDs, when compared to reference OLEDs made by spin coating technique, showed similar values. Finally, we have demonstrated the possibility of patterning of emission the area of complex shapes merely by selectively printing the emission layer. These results demonstrate the potential application of the new dendrimer TADF emitters for the fabrication of efficient OLEDs by an inkjet printing technique.

  • 3.
    Amruth, C
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland.
    Szymański, Marek
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Łuszczyńska, Beata
    Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland.
    Ulański, Jacek
    Department of Molecular Physics, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland.
    Inkjet Printing of Super Yellow: Ink Formulation, Film Optimization, OLEDs Fabrication, and Transient Electroluminescence2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 8493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inkjet printing technique allows manufacturing low cost organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in ambient conditions. The above approach enables upscaling of the OLEDs fabrication process which, as a result, would become faster than conventionally used vacuum based processing techniques. In this work, we use the inkjet printing technique to investigate the formation of thin active layers of well-known light emitting polymer material: Super Yellow (poly(para-phenylene vinylene) copolymer). We develop the formulation of Super Yellow ink, containing non-chlorinated solvents and allowing stable jetting. Optimization of ink composition and printing resolution were performed, until good quality films suitable for OLEDs were obtained. Fabricated OLEDs have shown a remarkable characteristics of performance, similar to the OLEDs fabricated by means of spin coating technique. We checked that, the values of mobility of the charge carriers in the printed films, measured by transient electroluminescence, are similar to the values of mobility measured in spin coated films. Our contribution provides a complete framework for inkjet printing of high quality Super Yellow films for OLEDs. The description of this method can be used to obtain efficient printed OLEDs both in academic and in industrial settings.

  • 4.
    Andrén, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Länk, Nils Odebo
    Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sípová-Jungová, Hana
    Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jones, Steven
    Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Käll, Mikael
    Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Surface Interactions of Gold Nanoparticles Optically Trapped against an Interface2019In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 123, no 26, p. 16406-16414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particles that diffuse in close proximity to a surface are expected to behave differently than in free solution because the surface interaction will influence a number of physical properties, including the hydrodynamic, optical, and thermal characteristics of the particle. Understanding the influence of such effects is particularly important in view of the increasing interest in laser tweezing of colloidal resonant nanoparticles for applications such as nanomotors and optical printing and for investigations of unconventional optical forces. Therefore, we used total internal reflection microscopy to probe the interaction between a glass surface and individual similar to 100 nm gold nanoparticles trapped by laser tweezers. The results show that particles can be optically confined at controllable distances ranging between similar to 30 and similar to 90 nm from the surface, depending on the radiation pressure of the trapping laser and the ionic screening of the surrounding liquid. Moreover, the full particle-surface distance probability distribution can be obtained for single nanoparticles by analyzing temporal signal fluctuations. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with Brownian dynamics simulations that take the full force field and photothermal heating into account. At the observed particle-surface distances, translational friction coefficients increase by up to 60% compared to freely diffusing particles, whereas the rotational friction and thermal dissipation are much less affected. The methodology used here is general and can be adapted to a range of single nanoparticle-surface interaction investigations.

  • 5.
    Chatzidaki, Maria D.
    et al.
    Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece; MTM, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos
    Laboratory of Dairy Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Alexandraki, Voula
    Laboratory of Dairy Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Tsirvouli, Eirini
    Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Chakim, Zena
    Inst Biol Med Chem & Biotechnol, Athens, Greece.Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Ghazal, Aghiad
    Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mortensen, Kell
    Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Yaghmur, Anan
    Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salentinig, Stefan
    Laboratory for Biointerfaces, Department of Materials Meet Life, Empa. Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Papadimitriou, Vassiliki
    Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece.
    Tsakalidou, Effie
    Laboratory of Dairy Research, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Xenakis, Aristotelis
    Institute of Biology Medicinal Chemistry & Biotechnology, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece; MTM, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Microemulsions as Potential Carriers of Nisin: Effect of Composition on Structure and Efficacy2016In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 32, no 35, p. 8988-8998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions based on either refined olive oil (ROO) or sunflower oil (SO), distilled monoglycerides (DMG), and ethanol were used as nisin carriers in order to ensure its effectiveness as a biopreservative. This work presents experimental evidence on the effects of ethanol concentration, hydration, the nature of oil, and the addition of nisin on the nanostructure of the proposed inverse microemulsions as revealed by electrical conductivity measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Modeling of representative SAXS profiles was applied to gain further insight into the effects of ethanol and solubilized water content on the inverse swollen micelles' size and morphology. With increasing ethanol content, the overall size of the inverse micelles decreased, whereas hydration resulted in an increase in the micellar size due to the penetration of water into the hydrophilic core of the inverse swollen micelles (hydration-induced swelling behavior). The dynamic properties of the surfactant monolayer were also affected by the nature of the used vegetable oil, the ethanol content, and the presence of the bioactive molecule, as evidenced by EPR spin probing experiments. According to simulation on the experimental spectra, two populations of spin probes at different polarities were revealed. The antimicrobial effect of the encapsulated nisin was evaluated using the well diffusion assay (WDA) technique against Lactococccus lactis. It was found that this encapsulated bacteriocin induced an inhibition of the microorganism growth. The effect was more pronounced at higher ethanol concentrations, but no significant difference was observed between the two used vegetable oils (ROO and SO).

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