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  • 1. Buffam, Ishi
    et al.
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Temnerud, Johan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Morth, Carl-Magnus
    Bishop, Kevin
    Landscape-scale variability of acidity and dissolved organic carbon during spring flood in a boreal stream network2007In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, Vol. 112, no G1, G01022- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acidity is well known to influence stream biota, but the less well-studied spatial and temporal distributions of acidity are likely to play a larger ecological role than average values. We present data on spatial variability of chemical parameters contributing to acidity during winter baseflow and spring flood periods in Krycklan, a fourth-order boreal stream network in northern Sweden. Fifteen stream sites were monitored in subcatchments spanning 3 orders of magnitude in size and representing a wide range of percent wetland. At baseflow, pH ranged from 3.9 to 6.5 at the different sites. Baseflow dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration varied by an order of magnitude and was positively correlated with subcatchment percent wetland, resulting in high spatial variability in dissociated organic acids (OA(-)). During spring flood, DOC and OA(-) increased in forested sites and decreased in wetland sites, resulting in reduced spatial variability in their concentrations. In contrast, base cations and strong acid anions diluted throughout the stream network, resulting in decreased acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) at all sites. The spatial variability of base cations increased slightly with high flow. As a result of the changes in OA(-) and ANC, pH dropped at all but the most acidic site, giving a slightly narrowed pH range during spring flood (4.2-6.1). The transition from winter to spring flood stream chemistry could largely be explained by: (1) a shift from mineral to upper riparian organic soil flow paths in forested catchments and (2) dilution of peat water with snowmelt in wetland catchments.

  • 2. Long, A J
    et al.
    Smith, D E
    Mörner, Nils-Axel
    Dawson, S
    Final Report of the INQUA Shorelines Subcommission on Western Europe2005In: Journal of Coastal Research, ISSN 0749-0208, 43-51 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide a short report on the final year of the INQUA Shorelines Subcommission on Western Europe (2002-3). This includes a review of activities under four themes: sea-level changes in the next century; sea-level changes along a north-south transect from the uplifting coasts of Fennoseandanvia to the subsiding coasts of the North Sea and the Baltic, and the meta stable areas such as Portugal and France; comparisons between modeled and empirical observations of relative sea-level (RSL) change, and palaeo-tsunami and storm records. We conclude by providing a report on the final 2002 Annual Meeting including its field meeting at Greifswald and Mecklenburg-West Pomerania and provide a list of some recent publications by members of the INQUA Shorelines Subcommission.

  • 3. Mörner, Nils-Axel
    SEA LEVEL CHANGES PAST RECORDS AND FUTURE EXPECTATIONS2013In: Energy and Environment, ISSN 0958-305X, Vol. 24, no 3-4, 509-536 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The history and development of our understanding of sea level changes is reviewed. Sea level research is multi-fascetted and calls for integrated studies of a large number of parameters. Well established records indicate a post-LIA (1850-1950) sea level rise of 11 cm. During the same period of time, the Earth's rate of rotation experienced a slowing down (deceleration) equivalent to a sea level rise of about 10 cm. Sea level changes during the last 40-50 years are subjected to major controversies. The methodology applied and the views claimed by the IPCC are challenged. For the last 40-50 years strong observational facts indicate virtually stable sea level conditions. The Earth's rate of rotation records a mean acceleration from 1972 to 2012, contradicting all claims of a rapid global sea level rise, and instead suggests stable, to slightly falling, sea levels. Best estimates for future sea level changes up to the year 2100 are in the range of +5 cm +/- 15 cm.

  • 4. Mörner, Nils-Axel
    Some problems in the reconstruction of mean sea level and its changes with time2010In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, Vol. 221, no 1-2, 3-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ocean level is constantly changing and there are many different forcing functions. Today, we realize that a rise in one area may, in fact, correspond to a fall in another area. A number of problems or pit-falls in sea level analyses are highlighted; viz, the significance of shore morphology, the multiple possible causes of coastal erosion, the necessity to consider cyclic changes, not least the 18.6 tidal cycle and its relation to our tide-gauge records, the effects of redistribution of ocean water masses, the problems with many sea level curves based solely on isolation levels, and the problems of transferring time/depth graphs into rates of sedimentation and sea level rise without having investigated and calibrated for ongoing consolidation in the top-part of the sediment sequence; i.e. the zone of active compaction. Therefore, the necessity of multi-parameter analyses is strongly proposed. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA. All rights reserved.

  • 5. Mörner, Nils-Axel
    et al.
    Laborel, Jacques
    Dawson, Sue
    Submarine "Sandstorms" and Tsunami Events in the Indian Ocean2008In: Journal of Coastal Research, ISSN 0749-0208, Vol. 24, no 6, 1608-1611 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The December 26, 2004, disastrous tsunami event in the Indian Ocean may have come as a shock and even a surprise to the communities outside geosciences. However, tsunami events are a natural part of the geosystems in regions of submarine earthquakes, and they will continue to hit the region even in the future. Here we present evidence of former tsunami events both on Sri Lanka and on the Maldives. Submarine "sandstorms" driven by tsunami waves brought littoral deposits down into eaves 21 to 38 m below sea level. Radiocarbon dates allow the comparison with related tsunami signals in fens and lagoons, and historical documentation. The terrible December 26 event has raised a general awareness of tsunami events. It has also generated the installation of necessary warning systems. We are in urgent need, however, of a long-term tsunami chronology for a realistic tsunami hazards assessment.

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