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  • 1.
    Arinell, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sahdo, Berolla
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Evans, Alina L.
    Faculty of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Hedmark University College, Evenstad, Norway; Section of Arctic Veterinary Medicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Tromsø, Norway.
    Arnemo, Jon M.
    Faculty of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Hedmark University College, Evenstad, Norway; Department of Wildlife Fish and Environmental Studies, Faculty of Forest Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Baandrup, Ulrik
    Department of Pathology, Vendsyssel Hospital, Hjørring, Denmark; Faculty of Medical Sciences, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) Seem Resistant to Atherosclerosis Despite Highly Elevated Plasma Lipids during Hibernation and Active State2012In: Clinical and Translational Science, ISSN 1752-8054, E-ISSN 1752-8062, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 269-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hibernation is an extreme physiological challenge for the brown bear (Ursus arctos) in which metabolism is based mainly on lipids. The study objective was to compare plasma lipids in hibernating and active free-ranging brown bears and relate them to arterial histopathology. Blood was drawn from seven immobilized free-ranging brown bears (three females, 23 years old) during hibernation in February and from the same bears while active in June and analyzed by enzymatic and automated hematology methods within 48 hours of sampling. Left anterior descending coronary arteries and aortic arches from 12 bears (six females, 1.512 years old) killed in hunting were examined by histopathology. Total plasma cholesterol decreased from hibernation to the active period (11.08 +/- 1.04 mmol/L vs. 7.89 +/- 1.96 mmol/L, P= 0.0028) as did triglyceride (3.16 +/- 0.62 mmol/L vs. 1.44 +/- 0.27 mmol/L, P= 0.00012) and LDL cholesterol (4.30 +/- 0.71 mmol/L vs. 2.02 +/- 1.03 mmol/L, P= 0.0075), whereas HDL cholesterol was unchanged. No atherosclerosis, fatty streaks, foam cell infiltration, or inflammation were seen in any arterial samples. Brown bears tolerate elevated cholesterol levels, obesity, physical inactivity, and circulatory slow flow during hibernation without signs of -atherosclerosis. This species might serve as a reverse translational model for atherosclerosis resistance.

  • 2.
    Caspillo, Nasim Reyhanian
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hitting the mark: studies of alterations in behaviour and fertility in ethinyl estradiol-exposed zebrafish and search related biomarkers2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, we have analysed the effects of EE2 on non-reproductive behaviours and fertility. We have showed that two doses of EE2 in male adult short-term exposures evokes opposite behaviours in the novel tank test. A lower dose induced increased bottom-dwelling, a sign of increased anxiety and a higher dose increased surface-dwelling, which would likely expose themselves to predation in a natural environment. Increased shoaling was observed in both exposures, possibly affecting feeding and reproduction opportunities. Fertility analysis of these fish demonstrated a complete inhibition of spawning in the highest dose group. To investigate mechanisms behind the spawning failure, we examined expression levels of genes involved in zebrafish sex differentiation and maintenance of gonadal function. We found downregulated transcription levels of male-predominant genes, suggesting a demasculinization of the testes contributing to functional sterility in these fish. We have demonstrated that non-reproductive behaviour in zebrafish is highly sensitive to EE2 exposure during development. After exposing male and female zebrafish to low doses of EE2 followed by remediation in clean water until adulthood, the fish displayed increased anxiety and shoaling behaviour, demonstrating persistent effects of EE2. Furthermore, behavioural effects were transferred to their progeny. Decreased fertilisation success of the developmentally exposed fish was observed in both sexes when mated to untreated animals of the opposite sex. These fertility effects persisted although the fish had a long remediation period, implying likely reduced fitness of fish populations in aquatic environments. Based on our findings on non-reproductive behaviours and fertility, we performed RNAsequencing analysis of the brain and testes in order to investigate possible biological mechanisms behind the persistent effects. There is a need for biomarkers allowing detection of both reversible and irreversible effects in animals exposed to estrogenic substances, hopefully contributing to better risk assessments for EDCs. Results from RNA-sequencing would serve as a basis for continued studies in pursuit of potential biomarkers.

    List of papers
    1. 17 alpha-Ethinyl estradiol affects anxiety and shoaling behavior in adult male zebra fish (Danio rerio)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>17 alpha-Ethinyl estradiol affects anxiety and shoaling behavior in adult male zebra fish (Danio rerio)
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    2011 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 105, no 1-2, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ethinyl estradiol is a potent endocrine disrupting compound in fish and ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. In this study, we exposed adult zebra fish (Danio rerio) males to 0,5 or 25 ng Ethinyl estradiol/L for 14 days and analyzed the effects on non-reproductive behavior. Effects of treatment of the exposed males was shown by vitellogenin induction, while brain aromatase (CYP 19B) activity was not significantly altered. Both concentrations of Ethinyl estradiol significantly altered the behavior in the Novel tank test, where anxiety is determined as the tendency to stay at the bottom when introduced into an unfamiliar environment. The effects were, however, opposite for the two concentrations. Fish that were exposed to 5 ng/L had longer latency before upswim, fewer transitions to the upper half and shorter total time spent in the upper half compared with control fish, while 25 ng Ethinyl estradiol treatment resulted in shorter latency and more and longer visits to the upper half. The swimming activity of 25, but not 5 ng-exposed fish were slightly but significantly reduced, and these fish tended to spend a lot of time at the surface. We also studied the shoaling behavior as the tendency to leave a shoal of littermates trapped behind a Plexiglas barrier at one end of the test tank. The fish treated with Ethinyl estradiol had significantly longer latency before leaving shoal mates and left the shoal fewer times. Further, the fish exposed to 5 ng/L also spent significantly less time away from shoal than control fish. Fertilization frequency was higher in males exposed to 5 ng/L Ethinyl estradiol when compared with control males, while no spawning was observed after treatment with 25 ng/L The testes from both treatment groups contained a normal distribution of spermatogenesis stages, and no abnormality in testis morphology could be observed. In conclusion, we have observed effects on two behaviors not related to reproduction in zebra fish males after treatment with Ethinyl estradiol, adding to the ecological consequences of contamination of aquatic environments with estrogenic substances. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Research subject
    Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-18647 (URN)10.1016/j.aquatox.2011.05.009 (DOI)000294317500005 ()
    Available from: 2011-09-30 Created: 2011-09-29 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
    2. Short-term treatment of adult male zebrafish (Danio Rerio) with 17α-ethinyl estradiol affects the transcription of genes involved in development and male sex differentiation.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short-term treatment of adult male zebrafish (Danio Rerio) with 17α-ethinyl estradiol affects the transcription of genes involved in development and male sex differentiation.
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    2014 (English)In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 164, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The synthetic estrogen 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) disturbs reproduction and causes gonadal malformation in fish. Effects on the transcription of genes involved in gonad development and function that could serve as sensitive biomarkers of reproductive effects in the field is, however, not well known. We have studied mRNA expression in testes and liver of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) males treated with 0, 5 or 25ng/L EE2for 14days. qPCR analysis showed that the mRNA expression of four genes linked to zebrafish male sex determination and differentiation, Anti-Mullerian Hormone, Double sex and mab-related protein, Sry-related HMG box-9a and Nuclear receptor subfamily 5 group number 1b were significantly decreased by 25ng/L, but not 5ng/L EE2 compared with the levels in untreated fish. The decreased transcription was correlated with a previously shown spawning failure in these males (Reyhanian et al., 2011. Aquat Toxicol 105, 41-48), suggesting that decreased mRNA expression of genes regulating male sexual function could be involved in the functional sterility. The mRNA level of Cytochrome P-45019a, involved in female reproductive development, was unaffected by hormone treatment. The transcription of the female-specific Vitellogenin was significantly induced in testes. While testicular Androgen Receptor and the Estrogen Receptor-alpha mRNA levels were unchanged, Estrogen receptor-beta was significantly decreased by 25ng/L EE2. Hepatic Estrogen Receptor-alpha mRNA was significantly increased by both exposure concentrations, while Estrogen Receptor-beta transcription was unaltered. The decreased transcription of male-predominant genes supports a demasculinization of testes by EE2 and might reflect reproductive disturbances in the environment.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York: Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    17 alpha-Ethinyl estradiol; Biomarker; Endocrine disruptors; Gene regulation; Gonads; Sex differentiation; Zebrafish
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Research subject
    Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35475 (URN)10.1016/j.cbpc.2014.04.003 (DOI)000337769100005 ()24747828 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84899872779 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Swedish Baltic Sea Foundation

    Stockholm County Council

    Available from: 2014-06-24 Created: 2014-06-24 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Developmental exposure of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol affects non-reproductive behavior and fertility as adults, and increases anxiety in unexposed progeny
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developmental exposure of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol affects non-reproductive behavior and fertility as adults, and increases anxiety in unexposed progeny
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    2015 (English)In: Hormones and Behavior, ISSN 0018-506X, E-ISSN 1095-6867, Vol. 73, p. 30-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to estrogenic endocrine disruptors (EDCs) during development affects fertility, reproductive and nonreproductive behavior in mammals and fish. These effects can also be transferred to coming generations. In fish, the effects of developmental EDC exposure on non-reproductive behavior are less well studied. Here, we analyze the effects of 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) on anxiety, shoaling behavior and fertility in zebrafish after developmental treatment and remediation in clean water until adulthood. Zebrafish embryos were exposed from day 1 to day 80 post fertilization to actual concentrations of 1.2 and 1.6 ng/L EE2. After remediation for 82 days non-reproductive behavior and fertilization success were analyzed in both sexes. Males and females from the 1.2 ng/L group, as well as control males and females, were bred, and behavior of the untreated F1 offspring was tested as adults. Developmental treatment with 12 and 1.6 ng/L EE2 significantly increased anxiety in the novel tank test and increased shoaling intensity in both sexes. Fertilization success was significantly reduced by EE2 in both sexes when mated with untreated fish of opposite sex. Progeny of fish treated with 1.2 ng/L EE2 showed increased anxiety in the novel tank test and increased light avoidance in the scototaxis test compared to control offspring. In conclusion, developmental exposure of zebrafish to low doses of EE2 resulted in persistent changes in behavior and fertility. The behavior of unexposed progeny was affected by their parents' exposure, which might suggest transgenerational effects.

    Keywords
    Endocrine disruptors, 17 alpha-Ethinylestradiol, Stress behavior, Developmental exposure, Zebrafish, Neuroendocrinology, Social behavior, Anxiety, F1 effects, Fertility
    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Research subject
    Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45884 (URN)10.1016/j.yhbeh.2015.05.014 (DOI)000360251800005 ()26072466 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84934983120 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Swedish Baltic Sea Foundation 1742/42/2008 1556/42/2011

    Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-21 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
    4. Testis transcriptome alterations in zebrafish (Danio rerio) with reduced fertility due to developmental exposure to 17α-ethinyl estradiol
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testis transcriptome alterations in zebrafish (Danio rerio) with reduced fertility due to developmental exposure to 17α-ethinyl estradiol
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Biological Topics
    Research subject
    Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47887 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    5. Persistent effects of developmental exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol on the zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain transcriptome and stress behavior
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Persistent effects of developmental exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol on the zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain transcriptome and stress behavior
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Zoology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45958 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-09-30 Created: 2015-09-30 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Desale, Prithviraj
    et al.
    Dr DY Patil Biotechnol & Bioinformat Inst, Dr DY Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Kashyap, Deboleena
    Dr DY Patil Biotechnol & Bioinformat Inst, Dr DY Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Nawani, Neelu
    Dr DY Patil Biotechnol & Bioinformat Inst, Dr DY Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
    Nahar, Noor
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Rahman, Aminur
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kapadnis, Balasaheb
    Dept Microbiol, Univ Pune, Pune, India.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Biosorption of nickel by Lysinibacillus sp BA2 native to bauxite mine2014In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 107, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current scenario of environmental pollution urges the need for an effective solution for toxic heavy metal removal from industrial wastewater. Bioremediation is the most cost effective process employed by the use of microbes especially bacteria resistant to toxic metals. In this study, Lysinibacillus sp. BA2, a nickel tolerant strain isolated from bauxite mine was used for the biosorption of Ni(II). Lysinibacillus sp. BA2 biomass had isoelectric point (pI) of 3.3. The maximum negative zeta potential value (-39.45) was obtained at pH 6.0 which was highly favourable for Ni(II) biosorption. 238.04 mg of Ni(II) adsorbed on one gram of dead biomass and 196.32 mg adsorbed on one gram of live biomass. The adsorption of Ni(II) on biomass increased with time and attained saturation after 180 mm with rapid biosorption in initial 30 min. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms could fit well for biosorption of Ni(II) by dead biomass while Langmuir isotherm provided a better fit for live biomass based on correlation coefficient values. The kinetic studies of Ni(II) removal, using dead and live biomass was well explained by second-order kinetic model. Ni(II) adsorption on live biomass was confirrned by SEM-EDX where cell aggregation and increasing irregularity of cell morphology was observed even though cells were in non-growing state. The FTIR analysis of biomass revealed the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups, which seem responsible for biosorption of Ni(II). The beads made using dead biomass of Lysinibacillus sp. BA2 could efficiently remove Ni(II) from effluent solutions. These microbial cells can substitute expensive methods for treating nickel contaminated industrial wastewaters.

  • 4.
    Högberg, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Forest Ecology, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ekblad, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Nordgren, Anders
    Department of Forest Ecology, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Plamboeck, Agneta H.
    Swedish Defence Research Agency Division of NBC-Defence, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Anders
    Department of Forest Ecology, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bhupinderpal-Singh, Singh
    Department of Forest Ecology, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Högberg, Mona
    Department of Forest Ecology, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Factors determining the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 in Boreal forests2005In: Stable isotopes and biosphere-atmosphere interactions: processes and biological controls / [ed] Lawrence B. Flanagan, James R. Ehleringer, Diane E. Pataki, Elsevier, 2005, p. 47-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of the isotopic composition of the CO2 respired from soils may reveal information about the important component of the ecosystem C balance. This is crucial, since a large terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO2 has been located in the northern hemisphere, and the vast boreal forests may be largely responsible. At the same time, boreal and arctic ecosystems have large amounts of C stored in the soil, and could potentially become a source of CO2 in a warmer climate promoting more rapid decomposition of soil organic matter. Furthermore, the northern hemisphere has complex dynamics in terms of annual fluctuations in both the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere and its δl3C. It is of utmost importance to understand the causes of this variability, since it interferes with the partitioning between the ocean and the terrestrial contributions in global models. This chapter aims to provide an update on the reviews by Flanagan and Ehleringer and Ehleringer et al. on the causation of the δ13C of the soil CO2 efflux and, in doing this, focuses on the boreal forests.

  • 5.
    Jacobsen, Annette
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Reference gene selection and validation for HT29 and VK2/E6E7 human epithelial cell lines treated with probiotic and pathogenic bacteria: HT29 and EK2/V6V7 reference gene selection2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of commensal bacteria to influence gene expression in host cells under the influence of pathogenic bacteria has already been demonstrated. Investigation of the extent of this interaction is important to understanding how bacteria can be used as probiotics in the future. Currently, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is the most sensitive tool for evaluating relative changes to gene expression levels. However as a result of its sensitivity an appropriate method of normalisation must be used to account for any variation incurred in preparatory experimental procedures. These variations may result from differences in the amount of starting material, quality of extracted RNA, or in the efficiency of the reverse transcriptase or polymerase enzymes. Although selection of an endogenous control gene is the preferred method of normalisation, this selection is often made without proper validation of the gene’s appropriateness for the study in question. In this study we used qPCR data and applied four different algorithms (genormPLUS, BestKeeper, Normfinder, and comparative ΔCq) to evaluate eight different genes as to their suitability as endogenous controls for use in studies involving HT29 (colonic) and VK2/E6E7 (vaginal) human mucosal epithelial cells treated with probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. We found phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) to be most appropriate for HT29 cells, and transmembrane protein 222 (TMEM222) to be the best choice for VK2/E6E7 cells. In both cell lines reference stability would be improved by use of multiple endogenous controls. This study provides recommendations for stable endogenous control genes for use in further studies involving HT29 and VK2/E6E7 cells after bacterial challenge.

  • 6.
    Lam, Monika M.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Characterization of PAC-contaminated soil with the focus on availability, leachability and biological activities2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Current risk assessments of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs)-contaminated soil are often based on the 16 priority PAHs and do not consider availability of PACs in soil sufficiently. This may lead to uncertainties of the assessment, since important contaminants can be overlooked and only a small fraction of contaminants is available for the uptake for organisms. The overall aim of this thesis was to develop a refined and enhanced analytical approach based on both chemical and bioassay analysis coupled to passive sampling with polyoxymethylene (POM) and leaching tests that can provide a more comprehensive picture of chemical pollution at PAC-contaminated sites. To achieve this, bioassay-specific relative potency factors (REPs) of PACs were determined for the H4IIE-luc bioassay, detecting AhR-mediated activity, and for the VM7luc4E2 transactivation assay, detecting ER-mediated activity for the use in potency-balance analysis. Results of uptake-experiments of PACs in earthworms and POM suggested that POM is a suitable tool to study availability of AhR and ER agonists in soil. Availability and mobility of PACs in soil were investigated by the use of POM and leaching tests. The results of potency-balance analysis showed that in soil samples, in POM-fractions or in leachates, a large fraction of AhR- or ER-agonists remained unexplained, despite the use of a large number of REPs. In addition, coupling of chemical and biological analysis to passive sampling or leaching tests revealed that only a small fraction of the total mass of PACs in the soil is available or leachable in soil. The results suggests that the use of only the total concentration in soil while ignoring unknown toxicants will lead to great uncertainties in the risk assessment. Therefore, effect-based screening using bioassays, taking availability and mobility of compounds into account, as well as a widened chemical analysis should be included in modern hazard- and risk assessment of PAH contaminated soils.

    List of papers
    1. Methylated PACs are more potent than their parent compounds: a study on AhR-mediated activity, degradability and mixture interactions in the H4IIE-luc assay
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methylated PACs are more potent than their parent compounds: a study on AhR-mediated activity, degradability and mixture interactions in the H4IIE-luc assay
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Biological Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64293 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-16Bibliographically approved
    2. Methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and/or their metabolites are important contributors to the overall estrogenic activity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soils
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and/or their metabolites are important contributors to the overall estrogenic activity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soils
    2018 (English)In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 385-397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study 42 polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) were investigated for their estrogenic potential using the VM7Luc4E2 transactivation assay. Relative potencies were determined for mass-balance analysis. In addition, compounds were tested in combination with the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist vertical bar C vertical bar 182,780 (vertical bar C vertical bar) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist/CYP1A1 inhibitor a-naphthoflavone. Luciferase induction and CYP1A1-dependent ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity were measured to assess whether the estrogenic activity was elicited by the compound itself and/or by its metabolites. Relative potencies ranged between 10(-7) and 10(-4). The ability of ICI to decrease luciferase activity stimulated by all compounds indicated that the induction responses were ER-dependent. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist/CYP1A1 inhibitor a-naphthoflavone decreased luciferase induction and EROD activity by several compounds, including the methylated chrysenes, suggesting that metabolites of these chemicals contributed to ER activation. Several PACs, such as acridine and its derivatives, appear to directly activate the ER. Furthermore, extracts of soils from industrial areas were examined using this bioassay, and estrogenic activity was detected in all soil samples. Mass-balance analysis using a combination of relative potencies and chemical analysis of the samples suggested that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs, such as 1-and 3-methylchrysene, are important contributors to the overall estrogenic activity. However, these results revealed that a considerable proportion of the estrogenic activity in the soil remained unexplained, indicating the presence of other significant estrogenic compounds.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2018
    Keywords
    Estrogen receptor–mediated activity; Relative potency; Metabolite; VM7Luc4E2 transactivation assay; Mass-balance analysis
    National Category
    Environmental Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61710 (URN)10.1002/etc.3958 (DOI)000423425700009 ()28834568 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041099349 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    Knowledge Foundation, 2013/0157
    Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Polyoxymethylene (POM) is a suitable tool for effect-based hazard assessment of PAC-contaminated soil
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polyoxymethylene (POM) is a suitable tool for effect-based hazard assessment of PAC-contaminated soil
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Biological Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64300 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-26Bibliographically approved
    4. Occurrence and leachability of polycyclic aromatic compounds in contaminated soils: Chemical and bioanalytical characterization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence and leachability of polycyclic aromatic compounds in contaminated soils: Chemical and bioanalytical characterization
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    2018 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 622-623, p. 1476-1484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    An important concern regarding sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) is the risk of groundwater contamination by release of the compounds from soils. The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence and leachability of 77 PACs including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatic compounds (NSO-PACs) among total aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists in soils from historical contaminated sites. A novel approach combining chemical and bioanalytical methods in combination with characterization of leachability by use of a column leaching test was used. Similar profiles of relative concentrations of PACs were observed in all soils, with parent PAHs accounting for 71 to 90% of total concentrations in soils. Contribution of oxy-PAHs, alkyl-PAHs and N-PACs ranged from 2 to 9%, 3 to 9% and 1 to 14%, respectively. Although the contributions of groups of PACs were small, some compounds were found in similar or greater concentrations than parent PAHs. Leachable fractions of 77 PACs from soils were small and ranged from 0.002 to 0.54%. Polar PACs were shown to be more leachable than parent PAHs. The contribution of analyzed PACS to overall AhR-mediated activities in soils and leachates suggests presence of other AhR agonists in soils, and a potential risk. Only a small fraction of AhR agonists was available in soils, indicating an overestimation of the risk if only total initial concentrations in soils would be considered in risk assessment. The results of the study strongly support that focus on 16US EPA PAHs may result in inadequate assessment of risk and hazard of PACs in complex environmental samples.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Alkyl-PAHs; Oxy-PAHs; NSO-heterocyclic compounds; Ah receptor; H4IIE-luc bioassay; Column leaching test
    National Category
    Environmental Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64301 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.015 (DOI)000426349000143 ()2-s2.0-85038841340 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    Knowledge Foundation, 2013/0157
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Applicera and Formas  210-2014-87 

    Canada Research Chair program  

    State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs  GDT20143200016 

    P.R. China  

    Chinese Academy of Sciences  

    Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the School of Biological Sciences of the University of Hong Kong  

    Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada  326415-07 

    Western Economic Diversification Canada  6578  6807  000012711 

    Canada Foundation for Infrastructure  

    Available from: 2018-01-16 Created: 2018-01-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Lam, Monika M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bülow, Rebecca
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Engwall, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Giesy, John P.
    University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Larsson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Methylated PACs are more potent than their parent compounds: a study on AhR-mediated activity, degradability and mixture interactions in the H4IIE-luc assayManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Lam, Monika M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Engwall, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Denison, Michael S.
    University of California, Davis, CA, USA.
    Giesy, John P.
    University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Larsson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Polyoxymethylene (POM) is a suitable tool for effect-based hazard assessment of PAC-contaminated soilManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Larsson, Tord
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Indirekt mätning av rördrommens Botaurus stellaris, trastsångarens Acrocephalus arundinaceus och näktergalens Luscinia luscinia ljudeffektsnivå2010In: Fåglar i Kvismaren: årsskrift 2009, Örebro: Föreningen Kvismare fågelstation , 2010, no 156Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to compare the sound power level of the following birds: Bittern (Botaurus stellaris), Great Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) and Thrush Nightingale (Luscinia luscinia). The results are achieved by using a new indirect measurement method. This method calculates measurements, using the frequency level of the singing birds as heard by the listening person and the distance of the bird from that same person. 

    In this instance, three examples are used for the calculations; Bittern at a distance of 10.4 km, Great Reed Warbler at a distance of 0.5 - 0.7km and Thrush Nightingale at a distance of 0.7km. The lowest sound power will be achieved, if the 'Bird sound spread' can be at 180 degs semi-circle radiating from the bird. At the chosen distances the following values are obtained: Bittern - 88 db, Thrush Nightingale - 74 db and Great Reed Warbler - 65 db. The biggest uncertainty in obtaining these measurements is the accuracy of the Sound Pressure Loudness Level on the Phonograph and the difficulties of the distance from the bird.

     

  • 10.
    Palmqvist, K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Campbell, D
    Mount Allison University, Sackville, Canada.
    Ekblad, Alf
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johansson, H
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Photosynthetic capacity in relation to nitrogen content and its partitioning in lichens with different photobionts1998In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 361-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the hypothesis that lichen species with a photosynthetic CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) use nitrogen more efficiently in photosynthesis than species without this mechanism. Total ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39) and chitin (the nitrogenous component of fungal cell walls), were quantified and related to photosynthetic capacity in eight lichens. The species represented three modes of CO2 acquisition and two modes of nitrogen acquisition, and included one cyanobacterial (Nostoc) lichen with a CCM and N2 fixation, four green algal (Trebouxia) lichens with a CCM but without N2 fixation and three lichens with green algal primary photobionts (Coccomyxa or Dictyochloropsis) lacking a CCM. The latter have N2-fixing Nostoc in cephalodia. When related to thallus dry weight, total thallus nitrogen varied 20-fold, chitin 40-fold, Chl a 5-fold and Rubisco 4-fold among the species. Total nitrogen was lowest in three of the four Trebouxia lichens and highest in the bipartite cyanobacterial lichen. Lichens with the lowest nitrogen invested a larger proportion of this into photosynthetic components, while the species with high nitrogen made relatively more chitin. As a result, the potential photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency was negatively correlated to total thallus nitrogen for this range of species. The cyanobacterial lichen had a higher photosynthetic capacity in relation to both Chl a and Rubisco compared with the green algal lichens. For the range of green algal lichens both Chl a and Rubisco contents were linearly related to photosynthetic capacity, so the data did not support the hypothesis of an enhanced photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency in green-algal lichens with a CCM.

  • 11.
    Pedro J, Aphalo
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Albert, Andreas
    Helmholtz Zentrum, München, Germany.
    McLeod, Andy
    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Heikkilä, Anu
    Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Gómez, Iván
    López Figueroa, Felix
    University Of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.
    Robson, T Matthew
    University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Strid, Åke
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Beyond the visible: a handbook of best practice in plant UV photobiology2012In: Handbook for research on the effects of ultraviolet radiation on plants / [ed] Pedro J Aphalo, Helsingfors universitet, 2012, 1, p. 35-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The writing of this handbook started 14 months ago and is the results of the work of six editors and sixteen authors. This version is a preprint prepared for the participants in the 2012 training school of the COST action 5 FA0906 ‘UV4growth’ at University of Málaga. We hope that you find the handbook useful, and that you will alert us of errors, and of difficult to understand sections or paragraphs. Please, send all such comments to mailto:pedro.aphalo@helsinki.fi?subject=TG1HandbookPre01feedback indicating page and line numbers. Many thanks for your help.

  • 12.
    Rabiei Far, Parisa
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Study on cytotoxic activity of chloroformic fractions from Astraceae family on a number of cancer cell lines2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer is considered as one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The standard treatments of cancer are surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It is significant that a number of currently used anti-cancer agents are derived from natural sources, including plants, marine organisms and micro-organisms. In Iran, because of its climate diversity numerous varieties of plants can grow. Many of these plants such as Glycyrrhizaglabra, Foeniculumvulgare and Polygonumspecies have shown to possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Asteraceae or Compositae family is famous for its tranquilizing effect, antifungal and cytotoxic activities. In frame of an ethnopharmacological project, local healers of some provinces of north east of Iran were interviewed by using questionnaire forms and could identify a number of herbs mainly from Astraceae family which are used for treatment traditionally in some areas of northern part of Iran. To screen the anti cancer effects of plants from this family, plants  were collected and extraction was done by using methanol maceration and finally extracts were tested for their toxicity toward a number of cancer cell lines by performing colorimetric cytotoxicity assay, extracts with high toxicity were sent for fractionation. The current study was aimed to identify the possible cytotoxic effect of two chloroformic fractions from Asteraceae family on four cancer cell lines (HepG2, HeLa, MN1 and MDD2) by using MTT colorimetric cytotoxicity assay. Results suggest that following 72 hours exposure, both fractions exhibited a substantial antiproliferative effect in all four tested cell lines. Moreover, concentration range for inducing 50% of cell death (IC50%) was determined. Our results point to a robust inhibitory effect of chloroformic fractions specifically toward HeLa cancer cell lines. These plants represent valuable resources for the development of potential anticancer agents.

  • 13.
    Rahman, Aminur
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bioremediation of Toxic Metals for Protecting Human Health and the Ecosystem2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy metal pollutants, discharged into the ecosystem as waste by anthropogenic activities, contaminate drinking water for millions of people and animals in many regions of the world. Long term exposure to these metals, leads to several lethal diseases like cancer, keratosis, gangrene, diabetes, cardio- vascular disorders, etc. Therefore, removal of these pollutants from soil, water and environment is of great importance for human welfare. One of the possible eco-friendly solutions to this problem is the use of microorganisms that can accumulate the heavy metals from the contaminated sources, hence reducing the pollutant contents to a safe level.

    In this thesis an arsenic resistant bacterium Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA, a chromium resistant bacterium Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA and a nickel resistant bacterium Lysinibacillus sp. BA2 were isolated and studied. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of these isolates are 500 mM sodium arsenate, 5.5 mM potassium chromate and 9 mM nickel chloride, respectively. The time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy analyses revealed that after 120 h of exposure, the intracellular accumulation of arsenic in B1-CDA and chromium in B2-DHA were 5.0 mg/g dwt and 320 μg/g dwt of cell biomass, respectively. However, the arsenic and chromium contents in the liquid medium were reduced to 50% and 81%, respectively. The adsorption values of BA2 when exposed to nickel for 6 h were 238.04 mg of Ni(II) per gram of dead biomass indicating BA2 can reduce nickel content in the solution to 53.89%. Scanning electron micrograph depicted the effect of these metals on cellular morphology of the isolates. The genetic composition of B1-CDA and B2-DHA were studied in detail by sequencing of whole genomes. All genes of B1-CDA and B2-DHA predicted to be associated with resistance to heavy metals were annotated.

    The findings in this study accentuate the significance of these bacteria in removing toxic metals from the contaminated sources. The genetic mechanisms of these isolates in absorbing and thus removing toxic metals could be used as vehicles to cope with metal toxicity of the contaminated effluents discharged to the nature by industries and other human activities.

    List of papers
    1. Isolation and characterization of a Lysinibacillus strain B1-CDA showing potential for bioremediation of arsenics from contaminated water
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isolation and characterization of a Lysinibacillus strain B1-CDA showing potential for bioremediation of arsenics from contaminated water
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 1349-1360Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this study was to identify and isolate arsenic resistant bacteria that can be used for removing arsenic from the contaminated environment. Here we report a soil borne bacterium, B1-CDA that can serve this purpose. B1-CDA was isolated from the soil of a cultivated land in Chuadanga district located in the southwest region of Bangladesh. The morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA analysis suggested that the isolate belongs to Lysinibacillus sphaericus. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of the isolate is 500mM (As) as arsenate. TOF-SIMS and ICP-MS analysis confirmed intracellular accumulation and removal of arsenics. Arsenic accumulation in cells amounted to 5.0mg g(-1) of the cells dry biomass and thus reduced the arsenic concentration in the contaminated liquid medium by as much as 50%. These results indicate that B1-CDA has the potential for remediation of arsenic from the contaminated water. We believe the benefits of implementing this bacterium to efficiently reduce arsenic exposure will not only help to remove one aspect of human arsenic poisoning but will also benefit livestock and native animal species. Therefore, the outcome of this research will be highly significant for people in the affected area and also for human populations in other countries that have credible health concerns as a consequence of arsenic-contaminated water.

    Keywords
    Pollution, toxic metals, arsenics, bioremediation, bacteria, bioaccumulation
    National Category
    Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Enviromental Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36537 (URN)10.1080/10934529.2014.928247 (DOI)000340370000002 ()25072766 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84905275614 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencySwedish Research Council Formas
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Nilsson-Ehle (The Royal Physiographic Society in Lund) foundation in Sweden

    Available from: 2014-09-16 Created: 2014-09-15 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium (VI) by a soil-borne bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioremediation of hexavalent chromium (VI) by a soil-borne bacterium, Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 1136-1147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Chromium and chromium containing compounds are discharged into the nature as waste from anthropogenic activities, such as industries, agriculture, forest farming, mining and metallurgy. Continued disposal of these compounds to the environment leads to development of various lethal diseases in both humans and animals. In this paper, we report a soil borne bacterium, B2-DHA that can be used as a vehicle to effectively remove chromium from the contaminated sources. B2-DHA is resistant to chromium with a MIC value of 1000 mu g mL(-1) potassium chromate. The bacterium has been identified as a Gram negative, Enterobacter cloacae based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene analysis. TOF-SIMS and ICP-MS analyses confirmed intracellular accumulation of chromium and thus its removal from the contaminated liquid medium. Chromium accumulation in cells was 320 mu g/g of cells dry biomass after 120-h exposure, and thus it reduced the chromium concentration in the liquid medium by as much as 81%. Environmental scanning electron micrograph revealed the effect of metals on cellular morphology of the isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that B2-DHA has the potential to reduce chromium significantly to safe levels from the contaminated environments and suggest the potential use of this bacterium in reducing human exposure to chromium, hence avoiding poisoning.

    Keywords
    Bioremediation, chromium, Enterobacter cloacae, human health, soil borne bacterium, tannery effluents
    National Category
    Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Enviromental Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45753 (URN)10.1080/10934529.2015.1047670 (DOI)000359339900006 ()26191988 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84937800926 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, AKT-2010-018Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, 229-2007-217
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Nilsson-Ehle (The Royal Physiographic Society in Lund) Foundation in Sweden

    Available from: 2015-09-09 Created: 2015-09-09 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Biosorption of nickel by Lysinibacillus sp BA2 native to bauxite mine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biosorption of nickel by Lysinibacillus sp BA2 native to bauxite mine
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 107, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The current scenario of environmental pollution urges the need for an effective solution for toxic heavy metal removal from industrial wastewater. Bioremediation is the most cost effective process employed by the use of microbes especially bacteria resistant to toxic metals. In this study, Lysinibacillus sp. BA2, a nickel tolerant strain isolated from bauxite mine was used for the biosorption of Ni(II). Lysinibacillus sp. BA2 biomass had isoelectric point (pI) of 3.3. The maximum negative zeta potential value (-39.45) was obtained at pH 6.0 which was highly favourable for Ni(II) biosorption. 238.04 mg of Ni(II) adsorbed on one gram of dead biomass and 196.32 mg adsorbed on one gram of live biomass. The adsorption of Ni(II) on biomass increased with time and attained saturation after 180 mm with rapid biosorption in initial 30 min. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms could fit well for biosorption of Ni(II) by dead biomass while Langmuir isotherm provided a better fit for live biomass based on correlation coefficient values. The kinetic studies of Ni(II) removal, using dead and live biomass was well explained by second-order kinetic model. Ni(II) adsorption on live biomass was confirrned by SEM-EDX where cell aggregation and increasing irregularity of cell morphology was observed even though cells were in non-growing state. The FTIR analysis of biomass revealed the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups, which seem responsible for biosorption of Ni(II). The beads made using dead biomass of Lysinibacillus sp. BA2 could efficiently remove Ni(II) from effluent solutions. These microbial cells can substitute expensive methods for treating nickel contaminated industrial wastewaters.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Lysinibacillus sp BA2, Heavy metals, Biosorption, Adsorption isotherm
    National Category
    Other Biological Topics
    Research subject
    Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51857 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoenv.2014.06.009 (DOI)000342122000036 ()25011123 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84903900011 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2016-08-29 Created: 2016-08-29 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Comparative genome analysis of Lysinibacillus B1-CDA, a bacterium that accumulates arsenics
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative genome analysis of Lysinibacillus B1-CDA, a bacterium that accumulates arsenics
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Genomics, ISSN 0888-7543, E-ISSN 1089-8646, Vol. 106, no 6, p. 384-392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, we reported an arsenic resistant bacterium Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA, isolated from an arsenic contaminated lands. Here, we have investigated its genetic composition and evolutionary history by using massively parallel sequencing and comparative analysis with other known Lysinibacillus genomes. Assembly of the sequencing reads revealed a genome of similar to 4.5 Mb in size encompassing similar to 80% of the chromosomal DNA. We found that the set of ordered contigs contains abundant regions of similarity with other Lysinibacillus genomes and clearly identifiable genome rearrangements. Furthermore, all genes of B1-CDA that were predicted be involved in its resistance to arsenic and/or other heavy metals were annotated. The presence of arsenic responsive genes was verified by PCR in vitro conditions. The findings of this study highlight the significance of this bacterium in removing arsenics and other toxic metals from the contaminated sources. The genetic mechanisms of the isolate could be used to cope with arsenic toxicity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Academic Press, 2015
    Keywords
    Toxic metals, Bioremediation, Lysinibacillus sphaericus B1-CDA, Genome sequencing, de novo assembly, Gene prediction
    National Category
    Environmental Sciences Environmental Biotechnology
    Research subject
    Enviromental Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47292 (URN)10.1016/j.ygeno.2015.09.006 (DOI)000365613100010 ()26387925 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84948102629 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) AKT-2010-018

    Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (FORMAS) 229-2007-217

    Nilsson-Ehle (The Royal Physio-graphic Society in Lund) foundation in Sweden

    Available from: 2016-01-05 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2018-12-07Bibliographically approved
    5. Genome analysis of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA: A bacterium resistant to chromium and/or other heavy metals
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome analysis of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA: A bacterium resistant to chromium and/or other heavy metals
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Biological Topics
    Research subject
    Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51858 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-29 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
  • 14.
    Rahman, Aminur
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nahar, Noor
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Olsson, Björn
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Jass, Jana
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Nawani, Neelu N.
    Dr. D. Y. Patil Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Institute, Dr. D. Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Tathawade, Pune, India.
    Ghosh, Sibdas
    Iona College, New Rochelle, NY, USA.
    Saha, Ananda K.
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Hossain, Khaled
    University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Mandal, Abul
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Genome analysis of Enterobacter cloacae B2-DHA: A bacterium resistant to chromium and/or other heavy metalsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Reyhanian Caspillo, Nasim
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Södertörn university.
    Porseryd, Tove
    Södertörn university.
    Volkova, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Södertörn university.
    Elabbas, Lubna
    Södertörn university.
    Källman, Thomas
    Uppsala university.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn university.
    Olsson, Per-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Porsch Hällström, Inger
    Södertörn university.
    Testis transcriptome alterations in zebrafish (Danio rerio) with reduced fertility due to developmental exposure to 17α-ethinyl estradiolManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Sundberg, Bodil
    et al.
    University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ekblad, Alf
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Näsholm, Torgny
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, K
    University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lichen respiration in relation to active time, temperature, nitrogen and ergosterol concentrations1999In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 119-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary

    1.Respiration in eight lichen species was related to thallus hydration status, externaltemperature and to total nitrogen, chitin and ergosterol concentrations. Chitin is anitrogenous and major compound of the fungal cell wall, and ergosterol is a sterol ofthe plasma membrane in fungi and sometimes in algae.2.Hydration of previously dry thalli resulted in an initially high rate of respiration.Both the amplitude of this resaturation respiration and the time required to reachsteady state varied among species. Generally, peak rates were one to three times higherthan steady-state rates, which were reached 3–7 h after hydration.3.Increases in external temperature also resulted in transient bursts in respiration.Again, both the amplitude of the burst and the time required to reach steady statevaried among species. Also depending on species, a temperature increase from 5 to 15 °Cresulted in two- to fivefold increases in steady-state respiration.4.Steady-state respiration, at optimal thallus hydration and a given temperature,varied three- to sixfold among the species, when related to thallus dry mass. This dif-ference correlated best (r2= 0·89) with their ergosterol concentration, where adoubling in ergosterol resulted in more than a doubling in respiration. Respirationcorrelated less well to total nitrogen or chitin.5.The chitin to ergosterol ratio varied more than one order of magnitude between thespecies, where species with high nitrogen concentrations had the highest ratio. Thisimplies that species with access to ample amounts of nitrogen can make more fungalcell walls in relation to plasma membrane surface area.

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