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  • 1.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Image quality, measurement accuracy and patient experience2016Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-invasive diagnostic imaging of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is frequently carried out with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (MPS). CMR is the gold standard for the evaluation of scar after myocardial infarction and MPS the clinical gold standard for ischemia. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is at times difficult for patients and may induce anxiety while patient experience of MPS is largely unknown.

    Aims: To evaluate image quality in CMR with respect to the sequences employed, the influence of atrial fibrillation, myocardial perfusion and the impact of patient information. Further, to study patient experience in relation to MRI with the goal of improving the care of these patients.

    Method: Four study designs have been used. In paper I, experimental cross-over, paper (II) experimental controlled clinical trial, paper (III) psychometric crosssectional study and paper (IV) prospective intervention study. A total of 475 patients ≥ 18 years with primarily cardiac problems (I-IV) except for those referred for MRI of the spine (III) were included in the four studies.

    Result: In patients (n=20) with atrial fibrillation, a single shot steady state free precession (SS-SSFP) sequence showed significantly better image quality than the standard segmented inversion recovery fast gradient echo (IR-FGRE) sequence (I). In first-pass perfusion imaging the gradient echo-echo planar imaging sequence (GREEPI) (n=30) had lower signal-to-noise and contrast–to-noise ratios than the steady state free precession sequence (SSFP) (n=30) but displayed a higher correlation with the MPS results, evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively (II). The MRIAnxiety Questionnaire (MRI-AQ) was validated on patients, referred for MRI of either the spine (n=193) or the heart (n=54). The final instrument had 15 items divided in two factors regarding Anxiety and Relaxation. The instrument was found to have satisfactory psychometric properties (III). Patients who prior CMR viewed an information video scored significantly (lower) better in the factor Relaxation, than those who received standard information. Patients who underwent MPS scored lower on both factors, Anxiety and Relaxation. The extra video information had no effect on CMR image quality (IV).

    Conclusion: Single shot imaging in atrial fibrillation produced images with less artefact than a segmented sequence. In first-pass perfusion imaging, the sequence GRE-EPI was superior to SSFP. A questionnaire depicting anxiety during MRI showed that video information prior to imaging helped patients relax but did not result in an improvement in image quality.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Torbjörn
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    The development of ultrasound in radiology in Sweden2012Inngår i: Ultrasound in clinical diagnosis: from pioneering developments in Lund to global application in medicine / [ed] Bo Eklöf, Kjell Lindström, Stig Persson, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, s. 121-128Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 3.
    Banaem, Hossein Yousefi
    et al.
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Ahmadian, Alireza
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Saberi, Hooshangh
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Daneshmehr, Alireza
    University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
    Khodadad, Davood
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy2011Inngår i: International Conference on Graphic and Image Processing (ICGIP) / [ed] Yi Xie & Yanjun Zheng, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2011, Vol. 8285, artikkel-id 82851MKonferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  • 4.
    Cock, C.
    et al.
    Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park SA, Australia; School of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Doeltgen, S. H.
    Speech Pathology, School of Health Sciences, Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Omari, T.
    School of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; Human Physiology, Medical Science and Technology, Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Savilampi, Johanna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effects of remifentanil on esophageal and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) bolus transit in healthy volunteers using novel pressure-flow analysis2018Inngår i: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 30, nr 2, artikkel-id e13191Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Remifentanil is associated with subjective dysphagia and an objective increase in aspiration risk. Studies of opioid effects have shown decreased lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. We assessed bolus transit through the esophagus and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) during remifentanil administration using objective pressure-flow analysis.

    METHODS: Data from 11 healthy young participants (23±3 years, 7 M) were assessed for bolus flow through the esophagus and EGJ using high-resolution impedance manometry (Manoscan™, Sierra Scientific Instruments, Inc., LES Angeles, CA, USA) with 36 pressure and 18 impedance segments. Data were analyzed for esophageal pressure topography and pressure-flow analysis using custom Matlab analyses (Mathworks, Natick, USA). Paired t tests were performed with a P-value of < .05 regarded as significant.

    KEY RESULTS: Duration of bolus flow through (remifentanil/R 3.0±0.3 vs baseline/B 5.0 ± 0.4 seconds; P < .001) and presence at the EGJ (R 5.1 ± 0.5 vs B 7.1 ± 0.5 seconds; P = .001) both decreased during remifentanil administration. Distal latency (R 5.2 ± 0.4 vs B 7.5 ± 0.2 seconds; P < .001) and distal esophageal distension-contraction latency (R 3.5 ± 0.1 vs B 4.7 ± 0.2 seconds; P < .001) were both reduced. Intrabolus pressures were increased in both the proximal (R 5.3 ± 0.9 vs B 2.6 ± 1.3 mm Hg; P = .01) and distal esophagus (R 8.6 ± 1.7 vs B 3.1 ± 0.8 mm Hg; P = .001). There was no evidence of increased esophageal bolus residue.

    CONCLUSIONS AND INFERENCES: Remifentanil-induced effects were different for proximal and distal esophagus, with a reduced time for trans-sphincteric bolus flow at the EGJ, suggestive of central and peripheral μ-opioid agonism. There were no functional consequences in healthy subjects.

  • 5.
    De Meyer, Dorien
    et al.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Gabriel, Sabrina
    Clinical Research Center for Hair and Skin Science, Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
    Kottner, Jan
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Clinical Research Center for Hair and Skin Science, Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany.
    Van Damme, Nele
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Den Bussche, Karen
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, Sofie
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department Health Care, VIVES University College, Roeselare, Belgium.
    Van Hecke, Ann
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Nursing Department, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    Outcome measurement instruments for erythema associated with incontinence-associated dermatitis: systematic review2019Inngår i: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To: (1) examine which outcome measurement instruments for erythema associated with incontinence-associated dermatitis with supporting evidence about measurement properties are available; (2) evaluate the methodological quality of the studies and the quality of the measurement properties; and (3) identify eligible instruments to measure erythema in incontinence-associated dermatitis research.

    DESIGN: Systematic review.

    DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and CENTRAL were systematically searched until July 2018 (update December 2018). Additional input was gathered from 151 incontinence-associated dermatitis experts. Cited and citing references of included studies were screened.

    REVIEW METHODS: The COSMIN Risk of Bias checklist was applied to evaluate the methodological quality of the studies. Reported measurement properties were rated against criteria for good measurement properties.

    RESULTS: Fourteen studies, describing 10 measurement instruments, were included. In five instruments, erythema was captured as a separate concept, two studies provided empirical evidence about the measurement properties. The most studied measurement properties were reliability (9 studies), measurement error (4 studies) and criterion validity (4 studies). In one study, internal consistency was examined.

    CONCLUSION: No instrument measuring exclusively erythema associated with incontinence-associated dermatitis exists. There is no single composite incontinence-associated dermatitis measurement instrument that outperforms others. Development or adaption of an instrument to measure erythema associated with incontinence-associated dermatitis is one option to solve this challenge.

    IMPACT: The evidence about measurement properties of instruments measuring erythema associated with incontinence-associated dermatitis has not been summarized to date. The lack of an instrument should trigger activities to measure this domain accurately in future clinical trials.

  • 6.
    Eriksson Crommert, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Unsgaard-Tøndel, Monica
    Departments of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health and Social Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Vasseljen, Ottar
    Departments of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Can Sonography Be Used to Estimate Deep Abdominal Muscle Activation in Different Static Arm Positions While Standing?2017Inngår i: Journal of ultrasound in medicine, ISSN 0278-4297, E-ISSN 1550-9613, Vol. 36, nr 1, s. 129-139Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether sonography is a reliable tool for measuring deep abdominal muscle activation in different static arm positions while standing.

    Methods: Sonographic recordings were made of the transversus abdominis and obliquus internus abdominis in 4 different static arm positions that varied with regard to the postural demand and loading direction posed on the trunk. Ten nonconsecutive repetitions of each arm position were performed, and thickness measurements were made at 2 locations within each muscle. Reliability was analyzed by the generalizability theory; comparisons regarding thickness measurements were made by repeated-measures analyses of variance; and fascial sliding was analyzed by a 1-sample t test.

    Results: Averaged over all repetitions, arm positions, and the 2 measurement locations, the thickness measurements were highly reliable for both the obliquus internus abdominis and transversus abdominis. The transversus abdominis was thicker with shoulders flexed than with shoulders extended or arms above the head (P < .021) and with arms alongside the body compared with shoulders extended (P < .005). There was no thickness difference between arm positions for the obliquus internus abdominis (P = .059).

    Conclusions: The results indicate that sonographic recordings of the obliquus internus abdominis and transversus abdominis in different static arm positions while standing provide reliable measurements of muscle thickness. However, in light of previously reported electromyographic data, the results raise some concerns regarding the validity of using thickness measurements as proxies for muscle activation in positions that may induce passive muscle deformation.

  • 7.
    Feng, X. M.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olsson, J.
    Centre for Human Studies of Foodstuffs, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Swanberg, M.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rönnow, D.
    Department of Electronics, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Image analysis for monitoring the barley tempeh fermentation process2007Inngår i: Journal of Applied Microbiology, ISSN 1364-5072, E-ISSN 1365-2672, Vol. 103, nr 4, s. 1113-1121Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To develop a fast, accurate, objective and nondestructive method for monitoring barley tempeh fermentation.

    Methods and Results: Barley tempeh is a food made from pearled barley grains fermented with Rhizopus oligosporus. Rhizopus oligosporus growth is important for tempeh quality, but quantifying its growth is difficult and laborious. A system was developed for analysing digital images of fermentation stages using two image processing methods. The first employed statistical measures sensitive to image colour and surface structure, and these statistical measures were highly correlated (r = 0.92, n = 75, P < 0.001) with ergosterol content of tempeh fermented with R. oligosporus and lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In the second method, an image-processing algorithm optimized to changes in images of final tempeh products was developed to measure number of visible barley grains. A threshold of 5 visible grains per Petri dish indicated complete tempeh fermentation. When images of tempeh cakes fermented with different inoculation levels of R. oligosporus were analysed the results from the two image processing methods were in good agreement.

    Conclusion: Image processing proved suitable for monitoring barley tempeh fermentation. The method avoids sampling, is nonintrusive, and only requires a digital camera with good resolution and image analysis software.

    Significance and Impact of the Study: The system provides a rapid visualization of tempeh product maturation and qualities during fermentation. Automated online monitoring of tempeh fermentation by coupling automated image acquisition with image processing software could be further developed for process control.

  • 8.
    Gatzounis, Rena
    et al.
    Research Group Experimental Health Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands; Research Group Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Crombez, Geert
    Department of Experimental-Clinical & Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Schrooten, Martien G. S.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Research Group Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Belgium.
    S. Vlaeyen, Johan W.
    Research Group Experimental Health Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, The Netherlands; Research Group Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, University of Leuven, Belgium.
    A break from pain!: Interruption management in the context of pain2019Inngår i: Pain management, ISSN 1758-1869, Vol. 9, nr 1, s. 81-91Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Activity interruptions, namely temporary suspensions of an ongoing task with the intention to resume it later, are common in pain. First, pain is a threat signal that urges us to interrupt ongoing activities in order to manage the pain and its cause. Second, activity interruptions are used in chronic pain management. However, activity interruptions by pain may carry costs for activity performance. These costs have recently started to be systematically investigated. We review the evidence on the consequences of activity interruptions by pain for the performance of the interrupted activity. Further, inspired by literature on interruptions from other research fields, we suggest ways to improve interruption management in the field of pain, and provide a future research agenda.

  • 9.
    Geijer, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Centre for Assessment of Medical Technology in Örebro, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Udumyan, Ruzan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lohse, Georg
    Centre for Assessment of Medical Technology in Örebro, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Örebro Rehab Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsagård, Ylva
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Centre for Assessment of Medical Technology in Örebro, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Temperature measurements with a temporal scanner: systematic review and meta-analysis2016Inngår i: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, nr 3, artikkel-id e009509Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Systematic review and meta-analysis on the diagnostic accuracy of temporal artery thermometers (TAT).

    Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. The index test consisted of temperature measurement with TAT. The reference test consisted of an estimation of core temperature.

    Participants: Clinical patients as well as healthy participants, with or without fever.

    Interventions: Literature search in PubMed, Embase, Cinahl and Web of Science. Three reviewers selected articles for full-text reading after which a further selection was made. Risk of bias was assessed with QUADAS-2. Pooled difference and limits of agreement (LoA) were estimated with an inverse variance weighted approach. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated using hierarchical models. Quality of evidence was assessed according to the GRADE system.

    Primary and secondary outcome measures: The primary outcome was measurement accuracy expressed as mean difference ±95% LoA. A secondary outcome was sensitivity and specificity to detect fever. If tympanic thermometers were assessed in the same population as TAT, these results were recorded as well.

    Results: 37 articles comprising 5026 participants were selected. Pooled difference was -0.19°C (95% LoA -1.16 to 0.77°C), with moderate quality of evidence. Pooled sensitivity was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.81) with a specificity of 0.94 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.97). The subgroup analysis revealed a trend towards underestimation of the temperature for febrile patients. There was a large heterogeneity among included studies with wide LoA which reduced the quality of evidence.

    Conclusions: TAT is not sufficiently accurate to replace one of the reference methods such as rectal, bladder or more invasive temperature measurement methods. The results are, however, similar to those with tympanic thermometers, both in our meta-analysis and when compared with others. Thus, it seems that TAT could replace tympanic thermometers with the caveat that both methods are inaccurate.

    Trial registration number: CRD42014008832.

  • 10.
    Jendeberg, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Thunberg, Per
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Medical Physics.
    Lidén, Mats
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Radiology.
    Differentiation of distal ureteral stones and pelvic phleboliths using a convolutional neural network2020Inngår i: Urolithiasis, ISSN 2194-7236Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives were to develop and validate a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) using local features for differentiating distal ureteral stones from pelvic phleboliths, compare the CNN method with a semi-quantitative method and with radiologists' assessments and to evaluate whether the assessment of a calcification and its local surroundings is sufficient for discriminating ureteral stones from pelvic phleboliths in non-contrast-enhanced CT (NECT). We retrospectively included 341 consecutive patients with acute renal colic and a ureteral stone on NECT showing either a distal ureteral stone, a phlebolith or both. A 2.5-dimensional CNN (2.5D-CNN) model was used, where perpendicular axial, coronal and sagittal images through each calcification were used as input data for the CNN. The CNN was trained on 384 calcifications, and evaluated on an unseen dataset of 50 stones and 50 phleboliths. The CNN was compared to the assessment by seven radiologists who reviewed a local 5 × 5 × 5 cm image stack surrounding each calcification, and to a semi-quantitative method using cut-off values based on the attenuation and volume of the calcifications. The CNN differentiated stones and phleboliths with a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 94%, 90% and 92% and an AUC of 0.95. This was similar to a majority vote accuracy of 93% and significantly higher (p = 0.03) than the mean radiologist accuracy of 86%. The semi-quantitative method accuracy was 49%. In conclusion, the CNN differentiated ureteral stones from phleboliths with higher accuracy than the mean of seven radiologists' assessments using local features. However, more than local features are needed to reach optimal discrimination.

  • 11.
    Khodadad, Davood
    et al.
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
    Ahmadian, Alireza
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
    Ay, Mohammadreza
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
    Esfahani, Armaghan Fard
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
    Banaem, Hossein Yousefi
    Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
    Zaidi, Habib
    Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland.
    B-spline based free form deformation thoracic non-rigid registration of CT and PET images2011Inngår i: International Conference on Graphic and Image Processing (ICGIP 2011) / [ed] Yi Xie & Yanjun Zheng, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2011, Vol. 8285, artikkel-id 82851KKonferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate attenuation correction of emission data is mandatory for quantitative analysis of PET images. One of the main concerns in CT-based attenuation correction(CTAC) of PET data in multimodality PET/CT imaging is misalignment between PET and CT images. The aim of this study, is to proposed a hybrid method which is simple, fast and accurate, for registration of PET and CT data which affected from respiratory motion in order to improve the quality of CTAC. The algorithm is composed of three methods: First, using B-spline Free Form Deformation to describe both images and deformation field. Then applying a pre-filtering on both PET and CT images before segmentation of structures in order to reduce the respiratory related attenuation correction artifacts of PET emission data. In this approach, B-spline using FFD provide more accurate adaptive transformation to align the images, and structure constraints obtained from prefiltering applied to guide the algorithm to be more fast and accurate. Also it helps to reduce the radiation dose in PET/CT by avoiding repetition of CT imaging. These advances increase the potential of the method for routine clinical application.

  • 12.
    Khodadad, Davood
    et al.
    Experimental Mechanics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Ahmadian, Alireza
    Institute for Advanced Medical Technologies (IAMT), Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.
    Banaem, Hossein Yousefi
    Department of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.
    Ay, Mohammad Reza
    Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran .
    Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan
    Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran .
    CT and PET Image Registration: Application to Thorax Area2013Inngår i: Journal of Image and Graphics, ISSN 2301-3699, Vol. 1, nr 4, s. 171-175Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate attenuation correction of emission data is mandatory for quantitative analysis of PET images. One of the main concerns in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) of PET data in multimodality PET/CT imaging is misalignment occurred due to respiratory artifact between PET and CT images. In this paper a combined method which is simple and fast is proposed for registration of PET and CT data to correct the effect of this artifact. The algorithm is composed of two step: First step is meant to reduce the noise by applying an adaptive gradient anistropic diffusion filter then using Iterative closest point (ICP) registration method in order to obtain initial estimation to ensure fast and accurate convergence of the algorithm. At the second step, the respiratory related artifact of PET images is greatly reduced by employing Free Form Deformation algorithm based on B-spline which provides more accurate adaptive transformation to align the images.

  • 13.
    Khodadad, Davood
    et al.
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nordebo, Sven
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Müller, Beat
    Swisstom AG, Landquart, Switzerland.
    Waldmann, Andreas
    Swisstom AG, Landquart, Switzerland.
    Yerworth, Rebecca
    Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Becher, Tobias
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Centre Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Frerichs, Inez
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Centre Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Sophocleous, Louiza
    KIOS Research Centre, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Van Kaam, Anton
    Department of Neonatology, Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Neonatologu, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Miedema, Martijn
    Department of Neonatology, Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Seifnaraghi, N
    Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University, Hendon campus, The Burroughs, London, United Kingdom.
    Bayford, R
    Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University, Hendon campus, The Burroughs, London, United Kingdom.
    Optimized breath detection algorithm in electrical impedance tomography2018Inngår i: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 39, nr 9, artikkel-id 094001Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This paper defines a method for optimizing the breath delineation algorithms used in electrical impedance tomography (EIT). In lung EIT the identification of the breath phases is central for generating tidal impedance variation images, subsequent data analysis and clinical evaluation. The optimisation of these algorithms is particularly important in neonatal care since the existing breath detectors developed for adults may give insufficient reliability in neonates due to their very irregular breathing pattern.

    Approach: Our approach is generic in the sense that it relies on the definition of a gold standard and the associated definition of detector sensitivity and specificity, an optimisation criterion and a set of detector parameters to be investigated. The gold standard has been defined by 11 clinicians with previous experience with EIT and the performance of our approach is described and validated using a neonatal EIT dataset acquired within the EU-funded CRADL project.

    Main results: Three different algorithms are proposed that improve the breath detector performance by adding conditions on (1) maximum tidal breath rate obtained from zero-crossings of the EIT breathing signal, (2) minimum tidal impedance amplitude and (3) minimum tidal breath rate obtained from time-frequency analysis. As a baseline a zero-crossing algorithm has been used with some default parameters based on the Swisstom EIT device.

    Significance: Based on the gold standard, the most crucial parameters of the proposed algorithms are optimised by using a simple exhaustive search and a weighted metric defined in connection with the receiver operating characterics. This provides a practical way to achieve any desirable trade-off between the sensitivity and the specificity of the detectors.

  • 14.
    Khodadad, Davood
    et al.
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nordebo, Sven
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Seifnaraghi, Nima
    Faculty of science and technology, Middlesex University, Hendon campus, The Burroughs, London, United Kingdom.
    Waldmann, Andreas D.
    Swisstom AG, Landquart, Switzerland.
    Müller, Beat
    Swisstom AG, Landquart, Switzerland.
    Bayford, Richard
    Faculty of science and technology, Middlesex University, Hendon campus, The Burroughs, London, United Kingdom.
    Breath detection using short-time Fourier transform analysis in electrical impedance tomography2017Inngår i: 2017 XXXIInd General Assembly and Scientific Symposium of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI GASS), IEEE, 2017, s. 1-3Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Spectral analysis based on short-time Fourier transform (STFT) using Kaiser window is proposed to examine the frequency components of neonates EIT data. In this way, a simultaneous spatial-time-frequency analysis is achieved.

  • 15.
    Khodadad, Davood
    et al.
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nordebo, Sven
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Seifnaraghi, Nima
    Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, The Burroughs, London, United Kingdom.
    Yerworth, Rebecca
    Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Waldmann, Andreas D.
    Swisstom AG, Landquart, Switzerland.
    Müller, Beat
    Swisstom AG, Landquart, Switzerland.
    Frerichs, Inéz
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Centre Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    van Kaam, Anton
    Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Miedema, Martijn
    Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bayford, Richard
    Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, The Burroughs, London, United Kingdom.
    The Value of Phase Angle in Electrical Impedance Tomography Breath Detection2018Inngår i: 2018 Progress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS-Toyama), Electromagnetics Academy , 2018, s. 1040-1043Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to report our investigation demonstrating that the phase angle information of complex impedance could be a simple indicator of a breath cycle in chest Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The study used clinical neonatal EIT data. The results show that measurement of the phase angle from complex EIT data can be used as a complementary information for improving the conventional breath detection algorithms.

  • 16.
    Larsson, Matz
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. The Cardiology-Lung Clinic, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tool-use-associated sound in the evolution of language2015Inngår i: Animal Cognition, ISSN 1435-9448, E-ISSN 1435-9456, Vol. 18, nr 5, s. 993-1005Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Proponents of the motor theory of language evolution have primarily focused on the visual domain and communication through observation of movements. In the present paper, it is hypothesized that the production and perception of sound, particularly of incidental sound of locomotion (ISOL) and tool-use sound (TUS), also contributed. Human bipedalism resulted in rhythmic and more predictable ISOL. It has been proposed that this stimulated the evolution of musical abilities, auditory working memory, and abilities to produce complex vocalizations and to mimic natural sounds. Since the human brain proficiently extracts information about objects and events from the sounds they produce, TUS, and mimicry of TUS, might have achieved an iconic function. The prevalence of sound symbolism in many extant languages supports this idea. Self-produced TUS activates multimodal brain processing (motor neurons, hearing, proprioception, touch, vision), and TUS stimulates primate audiovisual mirror neurons, which is likely to stimulate the development of association chains. Tool use and auditory gestures involve motor processing of the forelimbs, which is associated with the evolution of vertebrate vocal communication. The production, perception, and mimicry of TUS may have resulted in a limited number of vocalizations or protowords that were associated with tool use. A new way to communicate about tools, especially when out of sight, would have had selective advantage. A gradual change in acoustic properties and/or meaning could have resulted in arbitrariness and an expanded repertoire of words. Humans have been increasingly exposed to TUS over millions of years, coinciding with the period during which spoken language evolved. ISOL and tool-use-related sound are worth further exploration.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Matz
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Cardiology-Lung Clinic, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ekström, Seth Reino
    Audiological Research Center, Ahlsén's Research Institute, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Audiological Research Center, Ahlsén's Research Institute, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effects of sounds of locomotion on speech perception2015Inngår i: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 17, nr 77, s. 227-232Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Human locomotion typically creates noise, a possible consequence of which is the masking of sound signals originating in the surroundings. When walking side by side, people often subconsciously synchronize their steps. The neurophysiological and evolutionary background of this behavior is unclear. The present study investigated the potential of sound created by walking to mask perception of speech and compared the masking produced by walking in step with that produced by unsynchronized walking. The masking sound (footsteps on gravel) and the target sound (speech) were presented through the same speaker to 15 normal-hearing subjects. The original recorded walking sound was modified to mimic the sound of two individuals walking in pace or walking out of synchrony. The participants were instructed to adjust the sound level of the target sound until they could just comprehend the speech signal ("just follow conversation" or JFC level) when presented simultaneously with synchronized or unsynchronized walking sound at 40 dBA, 50 dBA, 60 dBA, or 70 dBA. Synchronized walking sounds produced slightly less masking of speech than did unsynchronized sound. The median JFC threshold in the synchronized condition was 38.5 dBA, while the corresponding value for the unsynchronized condition was 41.2 dBA. Combined results at all sound pressure levels showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for synchronized footsteps; the median difference was 2.7 dB and the mean difference was 1.2 dB [P < 0.001, repeated-measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA)]. The difference was significant for masker levels of 50 dBA and 60 dBA, but not for 40 dBA or 70 dBA. This study provides evidence that synchronized walking may reduce the masking potential of footsteps.

  • 18.
    Lendaro, Eva
    et al.
    Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics.
    Burger, Helena
    University Rehabilitation Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    van der Sluis, Corry K
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    McGuire, Brian E.
    School of Psychology & Centre for Pain Research, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Pilch, Monika
    School of Psychology & Centre for Pain Research, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
    Bunketorp-Käll, Lina
    Centre for Advanced Reconstruction of Extremities, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kulbacka-Ortiz, Katarzyna
    Centre for Advanced Reconstruction of Extremities, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rignér, Ingrid
    Gåskolan/Ortopedteknik, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stockselius, Anita
    Rehabcenter Sfären, Bräcke Diakoni, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Widehammar, Cathrine
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Hill, Wendy
    Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.
    Geers, Sybille
    Fysische Geneeskunde en Revalidatie, University Hospital Gent, Gent, Belgium.
    Ortiz-Catalan, Max
    Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden; Integrum AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Phantom motor execution as a treatment for phantom limb pain: protocol of an international, double-blind, randomised controlled clinical trial2018Inngår i: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, nr 7, artikkel-id e021039Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a chronic condition that can greatly diminish quality of life. Control over the phantom limb and exercise of such control have been hypothesised to reverse maladaptive brain changes correlated to PLP. Preliminary investigations have shown that decoding motor volition using myoelectric pattern recognition, while providing real-time feedback via virtual and augmented reality (VR-AR), facilitates phantom motor execution (PME) and reduces PLP. Here we present the study protocol for an international (seven countries), multicentre (nine clinics), double-blind, randomised controlled clinical trial to assess the effectiveness of PME in alleviating PLP.

    Methods and analysis: Sixty-seven subjects suffering from PLP in upper or lower limbs are randomly assigned to PME or phantom motor imagery (PMI) interventions. Subjects allocated to either treatment receive 15 interventions and are exposed to the same VR-AR environments using the same device. The only difference between interventions is whether phantom movements are actually performed (PME) or just imagined (PMI). Complete evaluations are conducted at baseline and at intervention completion, as well as 1, 3 and 6 months later using an intention-to-treat (ITT) approach. Changes in PLP measured using the Pain Rating Index between the first and last session are the primary measure of efficacy. Secondary outcomes include: frequency, duration, quality of pain, intrusion of pain in activities of daily living and sleep, disability associated to pain, pain self-efficacy, frequency of depressed mood, presence of catastrophising thinking, health-related quality of life and clinically significant change as patient’s own impression. Follow-up interviews are conducted up to 6 months after the treatment.

    Ethics and dissemination: The study is performed in agreement with the Declaration of Helsinki and under approval by the governing ethical committees of each participating clinic. The results will be published according to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials guidelines in a peer-reviewed journal.

    Trial registration number: NCT03112928; Pre-results.

  • 19.
    Lidén, Mats
    Region Örebro län. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    A new method for predicting uric acid composition in urinary stones using routine single-energy CT2018Inngår i: Urolithiasis, ISSN 2194-7228, Vol. 46, nr 4, s. 325-332Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Urinary stones composed of uric acid can be treated medically. Prediction of uric acid stone type is, therefore, desirable when a urinary stone is diagnosed with unenhanced CT. The purpose of the present study was to describe single-energy thin slice quantitative CT parameters of urinary stones correlated to chemical stone type and to develop a method to distinguish pure uric acid stones (UA) from other stones (non-UA/Mix). Unenhanced thin slice single-energy CT images of 126 urinary stones (117 patients) with known chemical stone type were retrospectively included in the study. Among the included stones, 22 were UA and 104 were non-UA/Mix. The included CT images and Laplacian filtered images of the stones were quantitatively analyzed using operator-independent methods. A post hoc classification method for pure UA stones was created using a combination of cutoff values for the peak attenuation and peak point Laplacian. The stone types differed in most quantitative image characteristics including mean attenuation (p < 0.001), peak attenuation (p < 0.001), and peak point Laplacian (p < 0.001). The sensitivity for the post hoc-developed peak attenuation-peak point Laplacian method for classifying pure UA stones was 95% [21/22, 95% CI (77-100%)] and the specificity was 99% [103/104, 95% CI (95-100%)]. In conclusion, quantitative image analysis of thin slice routine single-energy CT images is promising for predicting pure UA content in urinary stones, with results comparable to double energy methods.

  • 20.
    Lindner, Helen Y
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Buer, Nina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Dept. of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Compensatory Movement in Upper Limb Prosthesis Users during Activity Performance2019Inngår i: ISPO 17th World Congress:  Basics to Bionics: Abstract Book, ISPO , 2019, s. -512Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Low dexterity of conventional two-function (open, close) myoelectric hand prostheses with limited wrist movement often leads to compensatory shoulder and elbow movements, e.g. excess shoulder abduction and elbow flexion. Compensatory movements may lead to musculoskeletal pain [1] and it is thus important to identify prosthesis users with compensatory movements and to develop preventive treatments for musculoskeletal pain.

    AIM: The study aim was to measure and compare compensatory movements during activity performance among upper limb prosthesis users with different levels of myoelectric control.

    METHOD: Twenty-seven users of conventional myoelectric hand prosthesis performed the Assessment of Capacity for Myoelectric Control (ACMC) at the Örebro Limb Deficiency and Arm Prosthesis Centre. The performances were recorded and analyzed with Dartfish motion capture video analysis software. The software was used to track and measure the maximum angles for shoulder abduction and elbow flexion at the non-prosthetic and prosthetic sides during the activity performance. Two independent raters used Dartfish to analyze 10 videos and Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) was used to calculate inter-rater reliability. The ability to control a myoelectric prosthetic hand was assessed by the ACMC.

    RESULTS: The within-individual differences for shoulder abduction ranged from 2° to 52° and for elbow flexion from 1° to 66°. When compared between prosthetic and non-prosthetic side, larger differences in shoulder abduction and elbow flexion were found among the users with ACMC ≤ 0 than users with ACMC > 0 (Fig.1a). When comparing the within-individual side differences between prosthesis users with ACMC ≤0 and users with ACMC >0, a significant angle difference was found in the elbows (p=0.03) but not in the shoulders (p=0.34) (Fig.1b). Inter-rater reliability between the two independent raters was excellent (ICC 0.91).

    DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Compensatory elbow movements during activity performance are higher in upper limb prosthesis users with low level of myoelectric control. Prevention for musculoskeletal pain should consist of both training for improved prosthetic control and improved prosthetic use in activity performance. Measurement of compensatory movements can help to identify amputees with frequent compensatory movements. Future studies are needed to investigate the effect of ability to control myoelectric prosthesis on musculoskeletal pain.

    REFERENCES [1] Jones LE, Davidson JH. Prosthet Orthot Int 1999; 23(1):55-8.

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This study was supported financially by the Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation.

  • 21.
    Lindner, Helen Y
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Hill, Wendy
    Institute of Biomedical Engineering, UNB, Fredericton, Canada.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Health Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Dept. of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Cognitive load and compensatory movement in learning to use a multi-function hand2019Inngår i: ISPO 17th World Congress: Basics to Bionics: Abstract Book, ISPO , 2019, s. 52-52Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Recent technology provides increased dexterity in multi-function hands with the potential to reduce compensatory body movements. However, it is challenging to learn how to operate a hand that has up to 36 grips. While the cognitive load required to use these hands is unknown, it is clear that if the cognitive load is too high, the user may stop using the multi-functional hand or may not take full advantage of its advanced features.

    AIM: The aim of this project was to compare cognitive load and compensatory movement in using a multi-function hand versus a conventional myo hand.

    METHOD: An experienced prosthesis user was assessed using his conventional myo hand and an unfamiliar iLimb Ultra hand, with two-site control and the same wrist for both prostheses. He was trained to use power grip, lateral grip and pinch grip and then completed the SHAP test while wearing the Tobii Pro 2 eye-tracking glasses. Pupil diameter (normal range: 2-4mm during normal light) was used to indicate the amount of cognitive load.[1] The number of eye fixations on the prosthesis indicate the need of visual feedback during operation. Dartfish motion capture was used to track the maximum angles for shoulder abduction and elbow flexion.

    RESULTS: Larger pupils were found in the use of Ilimb ultra (2.6-5.6mm) than in the use of conventional myo hand (2.4-3.5mm) during the SHAP abstract light tests. The pupils dilated most often during changing grips, e.g. switching to pinch grip for the tripod task (from 2.7 to 5.6mm). After training of using power grip and pinch grip repeatedly, the maximum pupil diameter decreased from 5.6 to 3.3mm. The number of eye fixations on the I-limb ultra (295 fixations) were also higher than on the conventional myo-hand (139 fixations). Smaller shoulder abduction and elbow flexion were observed in the use of I-limb ultra (16.6°, 36.1°) than in the use of conventional myo hand (57°, 52.7°).

    DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Although it is cognitively demanding to learn to use a multi-function hand, it is possible to decrease this demand with adequate prosthetic training. Our results suggest that using a multi-function hand enables reduction of body compensatory movement, however at the cost of a higher cognitive load. Further research with more prosthesis users and other multi-function hands is needed to confirm the study findings.

    REFERENCES [1] van der Wel P, van Steenbergen H. Psychon Bull Rev 2018; 25(6):2005-15.

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: This project was supported financially by Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation, Promobilia Foundation and Örebro University.

  • 22.
    Nygren, Heli
    et al.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Castillo, Sandra
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based lipidomics for studies of body fluids and tissues2011Inngår i: Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029, Vol. 708, s. 247-257Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, analytical methodologies for the global profiling of lipids in serum and tissue samples are reported. The sample preparation is based on a modified Folch extraction, and the analysis is carried out with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). For further identification, MS(n) mass spectrometry is carried out utilizing an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry as the detector. Such a system affords determination of accurate masses and is thus a highly useful tool for lipid identification. The repeatability of the analysis proved to be good, with relative standard errors for spiked samples being between 4.51 and 10.44%. The throughput of the methodology described here is over 100 samples a day.

  • 23.
    Pettersson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Hedvall, Per-Olof
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Alienating design – the oppressive face of an inaccessible societyManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 24.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Sensing the Environment: a Perceptual and Psychosocial Analysis of Events in the Surroundings from a Handicap Perspective. Medicinteknikdagarna Örebro2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 25.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Sensing the Environment: a Perceptual and Psychosocial Analysis of Events in the Surroundings from a Handicap Perspective. Missisauga2003Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 26.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Sensing the Environment: a Perceptual and Psychosocial Analysis of Events in the Surroundings from a Handicap Perspective. Perth2007Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 27.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Borg, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    Philipson, Lennart
    Stranneby, Dag
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Auditive identification of signal-processed environmental sounds: monitoring the environment2008Inngår i: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, nr 12, s. 724-736Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the present study was to compare six transposing signal-processing algorithms based on different principles (Fourier-based and modulation based), and to choose the algorithm that best enables identification of environmental sounds, i.e. improves the ability to monitor events in the surroundings. Ten children (12-15 years) and 10 adults (21-33 years) with normal hearing listened to 45 representative environmental (events) sounds processed using the six algorithms, and identified them in three different listening experiments involving an increasing degree of experience. The sounds were selected based on their importance for normal hearing and deaf-blind subjects. Results showed that the algorithm based on transposition of 1/3 octaves (fixed frequencies) with large bandwidth was better (p<0.015) than algorithms based on modulation. There was also a significant effect of experience (p<0.001). Adults were significantly (p<0.05) better than children for two algorithms. No clear gender difference was observed. It is concluded that the algorithm based on transposition with large bandwidth and fixed frequencies is the most promising for development of hearing aids to monitor environmental sounds.

  • 28.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Stenström, Ingeborg
    Monitor, a vibrotactile aid for environmental perception: a field evaluation by four people with severe hearing and vision impairment2013Inngår i: Scientific World Journal, ISSN 1537-744X, E-ISSN 1537-744X, nr Article ID 206734, s. 1-11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Monitor is a portable vibrotactile aid to improve the ability of people with severe hearing impairment or deafblindness to detect, identify, and recognize the direction of sound-producing events. It transforms and adapts sounds to the frequency sensitivity range of the skin. The aid was evaluated in the field. Four females (44-54 years) with Usher Syndrome I (three with tunnel vision and one with only light perception) tested the aid at home and in traffic in three different field studies: without Monitor, with Monitor with an omnidirectional microphone, and with Monitor with a directional microphone. The tests were video-documented, and the two field studies with Monitor were initiated after five weeks of training. The detection scores with omnidirectional and directional microphones were 100% for three participants and above 57% for one, both in their home and traffic environments. In the home environment the identification scores with the omnidirectional microphone were 70%-97% and 58%-95% with the directional microphone. The corresponding values in traffic were 29%-100% and 65%-100%, respectively. Their direction perception was improved to some extent by both microphones. Monitor improved the ability of people with deafblindness to detect, identify, and recognize the direction of events producing sounds.

  • 29.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Stranneby, Dag
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Akner-Koler, Cheryl
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design in Sweden (Konstfack), Stockholm,Sweden .
    Borg, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Monitor: a vibrotactile aid to improve environmental perception of persons with severe hearing impairment/deafblindness2012Inngår i: TeMA Hörsel, 2012, 2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 30.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Audiologiskt forskningscentrum i Örebro, Region Örebro Län, Örebro.
    Stranneby, Dag
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik. Audiologiskt forskningscentrum i Örebro, Region Örebro Län, Örebro.
    Borg, Erik
    Audiologiskt forskningscentrum i Örebro, Region Örebro Län, Örebro.
    Hudens multivibratoriska diskriminationsförmåga för kommunikation med Braille2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Stranneby, Dag
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Borg, Erik
    Audiologiskt forskningscentrum i Örebro, Region Örebro Län, Örebro.
    Ready-Ride, Ready-Move and VibroBraille Three Tactile Aids to Improve the Mobility of Persons with Deafness, Blindness or Deafblindness2018Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 32.
    Reed, Sean
    et al.
    Centre for Risk and Reliability Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Alkit Communications AB, Mölndal, Sweden; Uppsala DataBase Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Estimating the availability of hydraulic drive systems operating under different functional profiles through simulation2015Inngår i: Safety and Reliability, ISSN 0961-7353, Vol. 35, nr 2, s. 4-19Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydraulic drive systems are widely used in a variety of industrial applications where high torque and low speed rotational power are required. The advantages include maximum torque from zero speed, continuously variable speed within wide limits, high reliability and insensitivity to shock loads. A drive system consists of a hydraulic circuit, electric motors, hydraulic pumps, hydraulic motors and auxiliary components. The stress on the components, and hence wear and failure rate, varies with the torque and speed output by the drive. The reliability of a hydraulic drive system of a particular design can therefore vary significantly between installations operating in applications with different functional requirements. Predicting the availability of a drive system in a particular application is useful for several purposes such as optimising the system design and estimating support costs. This paper describes a simulation model, developed to estimate the availability of a hydraulic drive system in a given functional profile, consisting of output torque and speed time phase requirements. It outputs statistics on system availability and component failure rates. As an example, the simulation model is used to compare these statistics for a drive design operating under two distinct operational profiles.

  • 33.
    Seifnaraghi, Nima
    et al.
    Department of Science and Technology, Middlesex University, London, UK.
    Tizzard, Andrew
    Department of Science and Technology, Middlesex University, London, UK.
    de Gelidi, Serena
    Department of Science and Technology, Middlesex University, London, UK.
    Khodadad, Davood
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Nordebo, Sven
    Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Van Kaam, Anton
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Frerichs, Inez
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Centre Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
    Waldmann, Andreas
    Swisstom AG company, Landquart, Switzerland.
    Sorantin, Erich
    Department of Radiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Tschauner, Sebastian
    Department of Radiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Demosthenous, Andreas
    Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, UCL, London, UK.
    Christofides, Stelios
    Department of Medical Physics, Nicosia Generel Hospital, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Bayford, Richard
    Department of Science and Technology, Middlesex University, London, UK.
    Estimation of thorax shape for forward modelling in lungs EIT2017Inngår i: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Biomedical Applications of Electrical Impedance Tomography / [ed] Alistair Boyle, Ryan Halter, Ethan Murphy & Andy Adler, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA: Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth , 2017, s. 58-58Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The thorax models for pre-term babies are developed based on the CT scans from new-borns and their effect on image reconstruction is evaluated in comparison with other available models.

  • 34.
    Stranneby, Dag
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Akner-Koler, Cheryl
    Örebro universitet, Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan. University College of Arts, Crafts and Design in Sweden (Konstfack), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borg, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Ready-Ride: a positioning and communication system to increase the autonomy of riders with visual impairment/deafblindness2012Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 35.
    Stranneby, Dag
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Montgomery Cederheim, A.
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    RantanenPeterson, M.
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Akner-Koler, Cheryl
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Borg, Erik
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ready-Ride Increase the Autonomy of Riders with Deafblindness2011Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 36.
    Thomas, Ilias
    et al.
    School of Technology and Business Studies, Computer Engineering, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Westin, Jerker
    School of Technology and Business Studies, Computer Engineering, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Alam, Moudud
    School of Technology and Business Studies, Computer Engineering, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Filip
    Department of Pharmacology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Senek, Marina
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet. School of Technology and Business Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    A treatment–response index from wearable sensors for quantifying Parkinson's disease motor states2018Inngår i: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 22, nr 5, s. 1341-1349, artikkel-id 8119948Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this study was to develop an algorithm that automatically quantifies motor states (off,on,dyskinesia) in Parkinson's disease (PD), based on accelerometry during a hand pronation-supination test. Clinician's ratings using the Treatment Response Scale (TRS), ranging from -3 (very Off) to 0 (On) to +3 (very dyskinetic), was used as target. For that purpose, 19 participants with advanced PD and 22 healthy persons were recruited in a single center open label clinical trial in Uppsala, Sweden. The trial consisted of single levodopa dose experiments for the people with PD (PwP), where participants were asked to perform standardized wrist rotation tests, using each hand, before and at pre-specified time points after the dose. The participants used wrist sensors containing a 3D accelerometer and gyroscope. Features to quantify the level, variation and asymmetry of the sensor signals, three-level Discrete Wavelet Transform features and approximate entropy measures were extracted from the sensors data. At the time of the tests, the PwP were video recorded. Three movement disorder specialists rated the participants’ state on the TRS scale. A Treatment Response Index from Sensors (TRIS) was constructed to quantify the motor states based on the wrist rotation tests. Different machine learning algorithms were evaluated to map the features derived from the sensor data to the ratings provided by the three specialists. Results from cross validation, both in 10-fold and a leave-one-individual out setting, showed good predictive power of a support vector machine model and high correlation to the TRS scale. Values at the end tails of the TRS scale were under and over predicted due to the lack of observations at those values but the model managed to accurately capture the dose - effect profiles of the patients. In addition, the TRIS had good test-retest reliability on the baseline levels of the PD participants (Intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.83) and reasonable sensitivity to levodopa treatment (0.33 for the TRIS). For a series of test occasions the proposed algorithms provided dose - effect time profiles for participants with PD, which could be useful during therapy individualization of people suffering from advanced PD.

  • 37.
    Yousefi, Hossein
    et al.
    Research Centre for Biomedical Technology and Robotics, RCBTR, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran.
    Ahmadian, Alireza
    Research Centre for Biomedical Technology and Robotics, RCBTR, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran.
    Khodadad, Davood
    Experimental Mechanics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden; Exceptional Talents Development Centre,Tehran, Iran .
    Saberi, Hooshangh
    Brain and Spinal Injuries Repair Research Centre, Department of Neurosurgery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran.
    Daneshmehr, Alireza
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran .
    An optimised linear mechanical model for estimating brain shift caused by meningioma tumours2013Inngår i: International Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering, ISSN 2376-7227, Vol. 1, nr 1, s. 1-9Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimation of brain deformation plays an important role in computer-aided therapy and image-guided neurosurgery systems. Tumour growth can cause brain deformation and change stress distribution in the brain. Biomechanical models exist that use a finite element method to estimate brain shift caused by tumour growth. Such models can be categorised as linear and non-linear models, both of which assume finite deformation of the brain after tumour growth. Linear models are easy to implement and fast enough to for applications such as IGS where the time is a great of concern. However their accuracy highly dependent on the parameters of the models in this paper, we proposed an optimisation approach to improve a naive linear model to achieve more precise estimation of brain displacements caused by tumour growth. The optimisation process has improved the accuracy of the model by adapting the brain model parameters according to different tomour sizes.We used patient-based tetrahedron finite element mesh with proper material properties for brain tissue and appropriate boundary conditions in the tumour region. Anatomical landmarks were determined by an expert and were divided into two different sets for evaluation and optimisation. Tetrahedral finite element meshes were used and the model parameters were optimised by minimising the mean square distance between the predicted locations of the anatomical landmarks derived from Brain Atlas images and their actual locations on the tumour images. Our results demonstrate great improvement in the accuracy of an optimised linear mechanical model that achieved an accuracy rate of approximately 92%.

  • 38.
    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein
    et al.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Advance Medical Technology, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan Iran.
    Kermani, Saeed
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Advance Medical Technology, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan Iran.
    Sarrafzadeh, Omid
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Advance Medical Technology, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan Iran.
    Khodadad, Davood
    Experimental Mechanics, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    An improved spatial FCM algorithm for cardiac image segmentation2013Inngår i: 2013 13th Iranian Conference on Fuzzy Systems (IFSC), IEEE, 2013, s. 1-4Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Image segmentation is one of challenging field in medical image processing. Segmentation of cardiac wall is one of challenging work and it is very important step in evaluation of heart functionality by existing methods. For cardiac image analysis, Fuzzy C- Means (FCM) algorithm proved to be superior over the other clustering approaches in segmentation field. However, the nave FCM algorithm is sensitive to noise because of not considering the spatial information in the image. In this paper an improved FCM algorithm is formulated by incorporating the spatial domain neighborhood information into the membership function for clustering (ISFCM). In this paper we applied improved Fuzzy c-Means with spatial information for left ventricular wall segmentation. Obtained results showed that the proposed method can segment cardiac wall automatically with acceptable accuracy. The comparison of proposed method with nave FCM proved that ISFCM can segment with more accuracy than nave FCM.

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