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  • 1.
    Aahlin, Eirik K
    et al.
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    von Meyenfeldt, Maarten
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands; NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Dejong, Cornelius Hc
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands; NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fearon, Kenneth C
    Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK .
    Lobo, Dileep N
    Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, National Institute for Health Research, Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK .
    Demartines, Nicolas
    Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Revhaug, Arthur
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    Wigmore, Stephen J
    Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK .
    Lassen, Kristoffer
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    Functional recovery is considered the most important target: a survey of dedicated professionals2014In: Perioperative medicine, ISSN 2047-0525, Vol. 3, article id 3:5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to survey the relative importance of postoperative recovery targets and perioperative care items, as perceived by a large group of international dedicated professionals.

    Methods: A questionnaire with eight postoperative recovery targets and 13 perioperative care items was mailed to participants of the first international Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) congress and to authors of papers with a clear relevance to ERAS in abdominal surgery. The responders were divided into categories according to profession and region.

    Results: The recovery targets 'To be completely free of nausea', 'To be independently mobile' and 'To be able to eat and drink as soon as possible' received the highest score irrespective of the responder's profession or region of origin. Equally, the care items 'Optimizing fluid balance', 'Preoperative counselling' and 'Promoting early and scheduled mobilisation' received the highest score across all groups.

    Conclusions: Functional recovery, as in tolerance of food without nausea and regained mobility, was considered the most important target of recovery. There was a consistent uniformity in the way international dedicated professionals scored the relative importance of recovery targets and care items. The relative rating of the perioperative care items was not dependent on the strength of evidence supporting the items.

  • 2.
    Aam, Stina
    et al.
    Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Clinic of Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Gynnild, Mari Nordbø
    Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Stroke Unit, Clinic of Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Munthe-Kaas, Ragnhild
    Department of Medicine, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Bærum Hospital, Drammen, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Saltvedt, Ingvild
    Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Clinic of Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Lydersen, Stian
    Department of Mental Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Knapskog, Anne-Brita
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Ihle-Hansen, Hege
    Department of Medicine, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Bærum Hospital, Drammen, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Ellekjær, Hanne
    Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Stroke Unit, Clinic of Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Eldholm, Rannveig Sakshaug
    Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Clinic of Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
    Fure, Brynjar
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    The Impact of Vascular Risk Factors on Post-stroke Cognitive Impairment: The Nor-COAST Study2021In: Frontiers in Neurology, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 12, article id 678794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) is common, but evidence on the impact of vascular risk factors is lacking. We explored the association between pre-stroke vascular risk factors and PSCI and studied the course of PSCI.

    Materials and Methods: Vascular risk factors were collected at baseline in stroke survivors (n = 635). Cognitive assessments of attention, executive function, memory, language, and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) were performed at 3 and/or 18 months post-stroke. Stroke severity was assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). PSCI was measured with global z; MoCA z-score; and z-score of the four assessed cognitive domains. Mixed-effect linear regression was applied with global z, MoCA z-score, and z-scores of the cognitive domains as dependent variables. Independent variables were the vascular risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, coronary heart disease, previous stroke), time, and the interaction between these. The analyses were adjusted for age, education, and sex. There were between 5 and 25% missing data for the variables for PSCI.

    Results: Mean age was 71.6 years (SD 11.7); 42% were females; and the mean NIHSS score at admittance was 3.8 (SD 4.8). Regardless of vascular risk factors, global z, MoCA, and all the assessed cognitive domains were impaired at 3 and 18 months, with MoCA being the most severely impaired. Atrial fibrillation (AF) was associated with poorer language at 18 months and coronary heart disease (CHD) with poorer MoCA at 18 months (LR =12.80, p = 0.002, and LR = 8.32, p = 0.004, respectively). Previous stroke was associated with poorer global z and attention at 3 and 18 months (LR = 15.46, p < 0.001, and LR = 16.20, p < 0.001). In patients without AF, attention improved from 3 to 18 months, and in patients without CHD, executive function improved from 3 to 18 months (LR = 10.42, p < 0.001, and LR = 9.33, p = 0.009, respectively).

    Discussion: Our findings indicate that a focal stroke lesion might be related to pathophysiological processes leading to global cognitive impairment. The poorer prognosis of PSCI in patients with vascular risk factors emphasizes the need for further research on complex vascular risk factor interventions to prevent PSCI.

  • 3.
    Aass, Lisbeth Kjelsrud
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Schröder, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    Moen, Øyfrid Larsen
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (MH), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Gjøvik, Norway.
    It's Not a Race, It's a Marathon!: Families Living with a Young Adult Suffering from Mental Illness2021In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore families' perceptions of everyday life when living with a young adult suffering from mental illness. Findings include: 1) Families balance between letting go and enabling the young adult to become independent while remaining close to help him/her complete education, work and have a social life. 2) Young adults try to deal with symptoms of mental illness by themselves and not be a burden, although longing for family members to understand them and the situation. 3) Healthcare professionals still hold back information although young adults have consented to giving family members insight.

  • 4.
    Abad-Gurumeta, A.
    et al.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Hosp Univ la Paz, Madrid, Spain.
    Ripolles-Melchor, J.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Casans-Frances, R.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Hosp Clin Univ Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Espinosa, A.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Martinez-Hurtado, E.
    Dept Anaesthesia, Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Fernandez-Perez, C.
    Dept Consultant Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Ramirez, J. M.
    Dept Colorectal Surg, Univ Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Lopez-Timoneda, F.
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Dept Anaesthesia, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Calvo-Vecino, J. M.
    Hosp Univ Infanta Leonor, Dept Anaesthesia, Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    A systematic review of sugammadex vs neostigmine for reversal of neuromuscular blockade2015In: Anaesthesia, ISSN 0003-2409, E-ISSN 1365-2044, Vol. 70, no 12, p. 1441-1452Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reviewed systematically sugammadex vs neostigmine for reversing neuromuscular blockade. We included 17 randomised controlled trials with 1553 participants. Sugammadex reduced all signs of residual postoperative paralysis, relative risk (95% CI) 0.46 (0.29-0.71), p=0.0004 and minor respiratory events, relative risk (95% CI) 0.51 (0.32-0.80), p=0.0034. There was no difference in critical respiratory events, relative risk (95% CI) 0.13 (0.02-1.06), p=0.06. Sugammadex reduced drug-related side-effects, relative risk (95% CI) 0.72 (0.54-0.95), p=0.02. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative nausea or the rate of postoperative vomiting, relative risk (95% CI) 0.94 (0.79-1.13), p=0.53, and 0.87 (0.65-1.17), p=0.36 respectively.

  • 5.
    Abawi, Akram
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Samano, Ninos
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Five-Year Follow-Up After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Concomitant Coronary Artery Disease: A Single-Center Experience2023In: Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery, ISSN 0102-7638, E-ISSN 1678-9741, Vol. 39, no 1, article id e20220461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus on the impact of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Therefore, the objective of this study was, in a single-center setting, to evaluate the five-year outcome of transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with or without coronary artery disease.

    METHODS: All transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients between 2009 and 2019 were included and grouped according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease. The primary endpoint, five-year all-cause mortality, was evaluated using Cox regression adjusted for age, sex, procedure years, and comorbidities. Comorbidities interacting with coronary artery disease were evaluated with interaction tests. In-hospital complications was the secondary endpoint.

    RESULTS: In total, 176 patients had aortic stenosis and concomitant coronary artery disease, while 170 patients had aortic stenosis only. Mean follow-up was 2.2±1.6 years. There was no difference in the adjusted five-year all-cause mortality between transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with and without coronary artery disease (hazard ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.70, P=0.99). In coronary artery disease patients, impaired renal function, peripheral arterial disease, or ejection fraction < 50% showed a significant interaction effect with higher five-year all-cause mortality. No significant differences in complications between the groups were found.

    CONCLUSION: Five-year mortality did not differ between transcatheter aortic valve implantation patients with or without coronary artery disease. However, in patients with coronary artery disease and impaired renal function, peripheral arterial disease, or ejection fraction < 50%, we found significantly higher five-year all-cause mortality.

  • 6.
    Abdalla, Mohammed A.
    et al.
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), The University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Shah, Najeeb
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), The University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Deshmukh, Harshal
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), The University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Sahebkar, Amirhossein
    Biotechnology Research Centre, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad, Iran; Mashhad University of Medical Sciences I Applied Biomedical Research Centre, Mashhad, Iran; The University of Western Australia I School of Medicine, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
    Östlundh, Linda
    United Arab Emirate University I College of Medicine and Health Sciences, The National Medical Library, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Rifai, Rami H.
    United Arab Emirate University I College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Atkin, Stephen L.
    RCSI Medical University of Bahrain I School of Postgraduate Studies and Research, Bahrain, Kingdom of Bahrain.
    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), The University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Effect of pharmacological interventions on lipid profiles and C-reactive protein in polycystic ovary syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 443-459Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition affecting women of reproductive age. It is associated with dyslipidaemia and elevated plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), which increase the risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

    Objective: To review the existing evidence on the effects of different pharmacological interventions on lipid profiles and CRP of women with PCOS.

    Data Sources: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science in April 2020 and updated the results in March 2021.

    Study Selection: The study included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and follows the 2020 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).

    Data Extraction: Two independent researchers extracted data and assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Covidence systematic review software were used for blinded screening and study selection.

    Data Synthesis: In 29 RCTs, there were significant reductions in triglycerides with atorvastatin versus placebo [mean difference (MD): -0.21 mmol/L; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.39, -0.03, I-2 = 0%, moderate grade evidence]. Significant reductions were seen for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with metformin versus placebo [standardized mean difference (SMD): -0.41; 95% CI: -0.85, 0.02, I-2 = 59%, low grade evidence]. Significant reductions were also seen for total cholesterol with saxagliptin versus metformin (MD: -0.15 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.23, -0.08, I-2 = 0%, very low grade evidence). Significant reductions in C-reactive protein (CRP) were seen for atorvastatin versus placebo (MD: -1.51 mmol/L; 95% CI: -3.26 to 0.24, I-2 = 75%, very low-grade evidence).

    Conclusion: There were significant reductions in the lipid parameters when metformin, atorvastatin, saxagliptin, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone were compared with placebo or other agents. There was also a significant reduction of CRP with atorvastatin.

  • 7.
    Abdalla, Mohammed A.
    et al.
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Shah, Najeeb
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Deshmukh, Harshal
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Sahebkar, Amirhossein
    Biotechnology Research Center, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Applied Biomedical Research Center, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Östlundh, Linda
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, The National Medical Library, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Rifai, Rami H.
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Institute of Public Health, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Atkin, Stephen L.
    School of Postgraduate Studies and Research, RCSI Medical University of Bahrain, Busaiteen, Kingdom of Bahrain.
    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Impact of pharmacological interventions on anthropometric indices in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials2022In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 758-780Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition affecting women of reproductive age and is associated with increased body weight.

    Objective: To review the literature on the effect of different pharmacological interventions on the anthropometric indices in women with PCOS.

    Data sources: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane library, and the Web of Science in April 2020 with an update in PubMed in March 2021.

    Study selection: The study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA)2020.

    Data extraction: Reviewers extracted data and assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.

    Results: 80 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. Metformin vs placebo showed significant reduction in the mean body weight (MD: -3.13 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -5.33 to -0.93, I-2 = 5%) and the mean body mass index (BMI) (MD: -0.75 kg/m(2); 95% CI: -1.15 to -0.36, I-2 = 0%). There was a significant reduction in the mean BMI with orlistat versus placebo (MD: -1.33 kg/m(2); 95% CI: -2.16 to -0.66, I-2 = 0.0%), acarbose versus metformin (MD: -1.26 kg/m(2); 95% CI: -2.13 to -0.38, I-2 = 0%), and metformin versus pioglitazone (MD: -0.91 kg/m(2); 95% CI: -1.62 to -0.19, I-2 = 0%). A significant increase in the mean BMI was also observed in pioglitazone versus placebo (MD: + 2.59 kg/m(2); 95% CI: 1.78-3.38, I-2 = 0%) and in rosiglitazone versus metformin (MD: + 0.80 kg/m(2); 95% CI: 0.32-1.27, I-2 = 3%). There was a significant reduction in the mean waist circumference (WC) with metformin versus placebo (MD: -1.21 cm; 95% CI: -3.71 to 1.29, I-2 = 0%) while a significant increase in the mean WC with pioglitazone versus placebo (MD: + 5.45 cm; 95% CI: 2.18-8.71, I-2 = 0%).

    Conclusion: Pharmacological interventions including metformin, sitagliptin, pioglitazone, rosiglitazone orlistat, and acarbose have significant effects on the anthropometric indices in women with PCOS.

  • 8.
    Abdalla, Mohammed A.
    et al.
    Department of Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), The University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Shah, Najeeb
    Department of Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), The University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Deshmukh, Harshal
    Department of Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), The University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Sahebkar, Amirhossein
    Biotechnology Research Centre, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Applied Biomedical Research Centre, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
    Östlundh, Linda
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, The National Medical Library, United Arab Emirate University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Rifai, Rami H.
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Institute of Public Health, United Arab Emirate University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Atkin, Stephen L.
    School of Postgraduate Studies and Research, RCSI Medical University of Bahrain, Busaiteen, Kingdom of Bahrain.
    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat
    Department of Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), The University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Impact of pharmacological interventions on insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials2022In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 371-394Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine condition affecting women of reproductive age. It is characterized by insulin resistance and is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The objective was to review the literature on the effect of different pharmacological interventions on insulin resistance in women with PCOS.

    Design: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane library and the Web of Science in April 2020 and updated in March 2021. The study follows the 2020 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-ana. Reviwers extracted data and assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.

    Results: In 58 randomized controlled trials there were significant reductions in the fasting blood glucose (FBG) with metformin versus placebo (standardized mean difference [SMD]: -0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.40, -0.06; I-2 = 0%, low-grade evidence), and acarbose versus metformin (mean difference [MD]: -10.50 mg/dl; 95% CI: -15.76, -5.24; I-2 = 0%, low-grade evidence). Significant reductions in fasting insulin (FI) with pioglitazone versus placebo (SMD: -0.55; 95% CI: -1.03, -0.07; I-2 = 37%; p = .02, very-low-grade evidence). A significant reduction in homoeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was seen with exenatide versus metformin (MD: -0.34; 95% CI: -0.65, -0.03; I-2 = 0%, low-grade evidence). No effect on homoeostatic model assessment of beta cells (HOMA-B) was observed.

    Conclusions: Pharmacological interventions, including metformin, acarbose, pioglitazone and exenatide have significant effects on FBG, FI, HOMA-IR but not on HOMA-B.

  • 9.
    Abdalla, Mohammed Altigani
    et al.
    Allam Diabetes Centre, Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Shah, Najeeb
    Allam Diabetes Centre, Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Deshmukh, Harshal
    Allam Diabetes Centre, Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Sahebkar, Amirhossein
    Biotechnology Research Center, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Applied Biomedical Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; School of Medicine, The University of Western Australia, Perth WA, Australia.
    Östlundh, Linda
    National Medical Library, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Rifai, Rami H.
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Atkin, Stephen L.
    School of Postgraduate Studies and Research, RCSI Medical University of Bahrain, Busaiteen, Kingdom of Bahrain.
    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Allam Diabetes Centre Hull Royal Infirmary Anlaby Road HU3 2JZ, Hull, UK.
    Impact of metformin on the clinical and metabolic parameters of women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials2022In: Therapeutic Advances in Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 2042-0188, Vol. 13, article id 20420188221127142Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the commonest endocrine disorders affecting women of reproductive age, and metformin is a widely used medication in managing this condition.

    Aim: To review the available literature comprehensively on the therapeutic impact of metformin on the clinical and metabolic parameters of women with PCOS.

    Data source: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane Library and the Web of Science and selected sources for grey literature from their inception to April 2020. An updated search in PubMed was performed in June 2022.

    Data synthesis: Two reviewers selected eligible studies and extracted data, and the review is reported following the 2020 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).

    Results: In 24 eligible randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving 564 participants who received metformin therapy, metformin was associated with significant reduction in body weight by 3.13 kg (95% CI: -5.33, -0.93), body mass index (BMI) by 0.82 kg/m(2) (95% CI: -1.22, -0.41), fasting blood glucose [standardised mean difference (SMD): -0.23; 95% CI: -0.40, -0.06], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (SMD: -0.41; 95% CI: -0.85, 0.03), total testosterone (SMD: -0.33; 95% CI: -0.49, -0.17), androstenedione (SMD: -0.45; 95% CI: -0.70, -0.20), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) (SMD: -0.58; 95% CI: -1.16, 0.00) and increase the likelihood of clinical pregnancy rate [odds ratio (OR): 3.00; 95% CI: 1.95, 4.59] compared with placebo.

    Conclusion: In women with PCOS, metformin use has shown a positive impact in reducing body weight, BMI, total testosterone, androstenedione, 17-OHP, LDL-C, fasting blood glucose and increasing the likelihood of pregnancy in women with PCOS.

  • 10.
    Abdalla, Mohammed Altigani
    et al.
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Allam Diabetes Centre, The University of Hull, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), Hull, UK.
    Shah, Najeeb
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Allam Diabetes Centre, The University of Hull, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), Hull, UK.
    Deshmukh, Harshal
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Allam Diabetes Centre, The University of Hull, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), Hull, UK.
    Sahebkar, Amirhossein
    Biotechnology Research Centre, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Applied Biomedical Research Centre, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; School of Medicine, the University of Western Australia, Perth WA, Australia .
    Östlundh, Linda
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, the National Medical Library, United Arab Emirates University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Rifai, Rami H.
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Institute of Public Health, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Atkin, Stephen L.
    School of Postgraduate Studies and Research, RCSI Medical University of Bahrain, Busaiteen, Kingdom of Bahrain.
    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Allam Diabetes Centre, The University of Hull, Hull York Medical School (HYMS), Hull, UK.
    Impact of pharmacological interventions on biochemical hyperandrogenemia in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials2022In: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, ISSN 0932-0067, E-ISSN 1432-0711Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine disease that affects women of reproductive age and is characterised by biochemical and clinical androgen excess.

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of pharmacological interventions used to decrease androgen hormones in women with PCOS.

    Data source: We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane library and the Web of Science from inception up to March 2021. Data synthesis Two reviewers selected eligible studies and extracted data, and the review is reported according to the 2020 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).

    Results: Of the 814 randomised clinical trials (RCTs) located in the search, 92 met the eligibility criteria. There were significant reductions in total testosterone level with metformin versus (vs) placebo (SMD: - 0.33; 95% CI - 0.49 to - 0.17, p < 0.0001, moderate grade evidence) and dexamethasone vs placebo (MD:-0.86 nmol/L; 95% CI - 1.34 to - 0.39, p = 0.0004, very low-grade evidence). Significant reductions in the free testosterone with sitagliptin vs placebo (SMD: - 0.47; 95% CI - 0.97 to 0.04, p = 0.07, very low-grade evidence), in dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) with flutamide vs finasteride (MD: - 0.37 mu g/dL; 95% CI - 0.05 to - 0.58, p = 0.02, very low-grade evidence), a significant reduction in androstenedione (A4) with rosiglitazone vs placebo (SMD: - 1.67; 95% CI - 2.27 to - 1.06; 59 participants, p < 0.00001, very low-grade evidence), and a significant increase in sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) with oral contraceptive pill (OCP) (35 mu g Ethinyl Estradiol (EE)/2 mg cyproterone acetate (CPA)) vs placebo (MD: 103.30 nmol/L; 95% CI 55.54-151.05, p < 0.0001, very low-grade evidence) were observed.

    Conclusion: Metformin, OCP, dexamethasone, flutamide, and rosiglitazone use were associated with a significant reduction in biochemical hyperandrogenemia in women with PCOS, though their individual use may be limited due to their side effects.

    PROSPERO registration No CRD42020178783.

  • 11.
    Abdeldaim, Guma M. K.
    et al.
    Section of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Clinical Mycobacteriology, National Center for Diseases Control, Benghazi, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.
    Strålin, Kristoffer
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olcén, Per
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Jonas
    Section of Clinical Virology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mölling, Paula
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Herrmann, Björn
    Section of Clinical Bacteriology, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Quantitative fucK gene polymerase chain reaction on sputum and nasopharyngeal secretions to detect Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia2013In: Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease, ISSN 0732-8893, E-ISSN 1879-0070, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 141-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the fucK gene was developed for specific detection of Haemophilus influenzae. The method was tested on sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) from 78 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). With a reference standard of sputum culture and/or serology against the patient's own nasopharyngeal isolate, H. influenzae etiology was detected in 20 patients. Compared with the reference standard, fucK PCR (using the detection limit 10(5) DNA copies/mL) on sputum and NPA showed a sensitivity of 95.0% (19/20) in both cases, and specificities of 87.9% (51/58) and 89.5% (52/58), respectively. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sputum fucK PCR was found to be significantly superior to sputum P6 PCR for detection of H. influenzae CAP. NPA fucK PCR was positive in 3 of 54 adult controls without respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, quantitative fucK real-time PCR provides a sensitive and specific identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions.

  • 12.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ellabban, Mohamed A.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pros and Cons of Early and Late Skin Grafting in Children with Burns: Evaluation of Common Concepts2022In: European Burn Journal, E-ISSN 2673-1991, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background: There is no consensus regarding the timing of surgery in children with smaller burn size, specifically in deep dermal burns. Delayed surgery has risks in terms of infection and delayed wound healing. Early surgery also risks the removal of potentially viable tissue. Our aim was to investigate the effect of the timing of surgical intervention on the size of the area operated on and the time to wound healing. Methods: A retrospective analysis for all children (<18 years) with burn size <20% body surface area (BSA%) during 2009–2020 who were operated on with a split-thickness skin graft. The patients were grouped by the timing of the first skin graft operation: early = operated on within 14 days of injury; delayed = operated on more than two weeks after injury. Results: A total of 84 patients were included in the study, 43 who had an early operation and 41 who had a delayed operation. There were no differences between the groups regarding burn size, or whether the burns were superficial or deep. The mean duration of healing time was seven days longer in the group with delayed operation (p = 0.001). The area operated on was somewhat larger (not significantly so) in the group who had early operation. Nine children had two skin graft operations, eight in the early group and one in the delayed group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The patients who were operated on early had the advantage of a shorter healing time, but there was a higher rate of complementary operations and a tendency towards a larger burn excision.

  • 13.
    Abduljabbar, Zahra Athab
    et al.
    Specialist Dental Clinic, Folktandvården Sörmland AB, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svensson, Krister G
    Swedish Armed Forces HQ, Surgeon General's Department, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hjalmarsson, Lars
    Specialist Dental Clinic, Folktandvården Sörmland AB, Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden; Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Franke Stenport, Victoria
    Department of Prosthodontics/Dental Materials Science, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Alf
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Dental Research Department.
    Chewing side preference and laterality in patients treated with unilateral posterior implant-supported fixed partial prostheses2022In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 49, no 11, p. 1080-1086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is not clear to what extent chewing is improved by unilateral oral rehabilitation with implant-supported fixed partial prostheses (ISFPPs).

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate whether patients treated with unilateral ISFPPs in the maxilla use their prostheses during mastication to the same extent as they used their contralateral natural teeth. A further aim was to investigate whether there is a correlation between preferred chewing side and laterality.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Chewing side preference was assessed in 15 participants treated with unilateral ISFPPs in the maxilla. The first, second, third, fifth, and tenth chewing cycles were assessed, and the test was repeated ten times. All participants also answered a questionnaire about their chewing side preference.

    RESULTS: Most of the participants presented bilateral chewing, but two (13%) chewed only on the ISFPP. There was no statistically significant association between the objectively assessed chewing side and dental status (natural teeth or ISFPPs) during any of the recorded chewing cycles (p >.1). There were statistically significant correlations between both the subjectively reported usually preferred chewing side and the subjective chewing side preference during the test, and the objectively assessed chewing side for the first three chewing cycles (p <.01). No correlation was found between handedness and the objectively assessed chewing side.

    CONCLUSION: In the present study, most participants chewed bilaterally, and chewing was performed both on the ISFPP and on the natural teeth. No correlation was found between the preferred chewing side, objectively or subjectively determined, and laterality.

  • 14.
    Abdulkadir, Suhaila
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Gadolinium vid MR-undersökning av MS-patienter: En litteraturstudie2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 15.
    Abdulla, Suzanne
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Stråldos och bildkvalitet vid konventionell frontalbild av ländryggen med och utan kompression2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 16.
    Abdullahi Ossoble, Rage
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Use of and patient satisfaction with removable partial dentures and the impact on oral health related quality of life; a cross-sectional survey study2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Removable partial dentures (PRD) are among the treatment options available for partially edentulous patients. The usage of RPD and patient satisfaction with the prosthesis relates to Oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL).

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RPDs, satisfaction with the prostheses as well as OHRQoL in patients provided with a RPD in general practice. A further aim was to identify possible factors related to RPD usage, patient satisfaction and OHRQoL.

    Material and method: A cross-sectional survey study, utilizing a questionnaire regarding patient satisfaction with different aspects of the participants RPD, the Swedish version of OHIP-14 questionnaire and the usage of the prosthesis.

    Results: A majority of respondents, (83.6%) reported that they used their prosthesis daily or often. The overall satisfaction rate among respondents was 83.0% with 39.3% stating that they were highly satisfied with the prosthesis and the mean OHIP- 14 score was 8.5, SD 10.2. The chewing ability was reported to be improved by 58.9% but impairment in chewing was reported by 26.8%. Pain from supporting teeth and soft tissue, sociodemographic factors and dissatisfaction with pre-treatment information and personal treatment were associated with not using the RPD.

    Conclusions: In the present study, treatment with RPD was in most patients associated with improvement in chewing and appearance. Insufficient pretreatment information, perception of treatment and pain from supporting tissue was associated with reduced use of and satisfaction with the RPD.

  • 17.
    AbdulWahab, Atqah
    et al.
    Department of Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; Weill Cornell Medicine‑Qatar, Doha, Qatar.
    Zahraldin, Khalid
    Department of Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Sid Ahmed, Mazen
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Microbiology Division, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Abu Jarir, Sulieman
    Departments of Internal Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Muneer, Mohammed
    Plastic Surgery, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Mohamed, Shehab F.
    Departments of Internal Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Hamid, Jemal M.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Microbiology Division, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Hassan, Abubaker A. I.
    Departments of Internal Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    Ibrahim, Emad Bashir
    Weill Cornell Medicine‑Qatar, Doha, Qatar; Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Microbiology Division, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.
    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled antibiotics2017In: Lung India, ISSN 0970-2113, E-ISSN 0974-598X, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 527-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA) is an important and growing issue in the care of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and a major cause of morbidity and mortality.

    Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the frequency of MDR-PA recovered from the lower respiratory samples of pediatric and adult CF patients, and its antibiotic resistance pattern to commonly used antimicrobial agents including beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones.

    Materials and Methods: The lower respiratory isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from inpatients and outpatients CF clinics from a tertiary care teaching hospital for the period from October 2014 to September 2015. The identification and antimicrobial susceptibility for all the isolates were performed by using the BD Phoenix (TM) and E-test in compliance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines.

    Results: A total of 61 P. aeruginosa samples were isolated from thirty CF patients from twenty families. Twelve sputum samples were positive for MDR-PA (seven nonmucoid and five mucoid isolates) from five CF patients (five families) with moderate-to-very severe lung disease given MDR-PA frequency of 19.7%. The median age of the study group was 20 (range 10-30) years. Three CF patients were on chronic inhaled tobramycin and two on nebulized colistin. The antimicrobial patterns of isolates MDR-PA showed the highest rate of resistance toward each gentamycin, amikacin, and cefepime (100%), followed by 91.7% to ciprofloxacin, 75% to tobramycin, 58.3% to meropenem, and 50% to piperacillin-tazobactam. None of the isolates were resistant to colistin during the study period.

    Conclusion: The study results emphasize that the emergence of a significant problem in the clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in CF patients that dictate appropriate attention to the antibiotic management after proper surveillance.

  • 18.
    Abdurahman, Samir
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine F68, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barqasho, Babilonia
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nowak, Piotr
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cuong, Do Duy
    Infectious Diseases Department, Bach Mai Hospital, Hanoi, Viet Nam .
    Amogné, Wondwossen
    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University, Addis Abeba, Ethiopia .
    Larsson, Mattias
    Division of Global Health (IHCAR), Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Oxford University Clinical Research Unit (OUCRU), Hanoi, Viet Nam .
    Lindquist, Lars
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Marrone, Gaetano
    Division of Global Health (IHCAR), Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sönnerborg, Anders
    Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine F68, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pattern of microbial translocation in patients living with HIV-1 from Vietnam, Ethiopia and Sweden2014In: Journal of the International AIDS Society, E-ISSN 1758-2652, Vol. 17, p. 18841-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The role of microbial translocation (MT) in HIV patients living with HIV from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is not fully known. The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the patterns of MT in patients from Vietnam, Ethiopia and Sweden.

    METHODS: Cross-sectional samples were obtained from treatment-naïve patients living with HIV-1 and healthy controls from Vietnam (n=83; n=46), Ethiopia (n=9492; n=50) and Sweden (n=51; n=19). Longitudinal samples were obtained from a subset of the Vietnamese (n=24) in whom antiretroviral therapy (ART) and tuberculostatics were given. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS), sCD14 and anti-flagellin IgG were determined by the endpoint chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    RESULTS: All three biomarkers were significantly increased in patients living with HIV-1 from all countries as compared to controls. No differences were found between males and females. Vietnamese and Ethiopian patients had significantly higher levels of anti-flagellin IgG and LPS, as compared to Swedes. ART reduced these levels for the Vietnamese. Vietnamese patients given tuberculostatics at initiation of ART had significantly lower levels of anti-flagellin IgG and higher sCD14. The biomarkers were lower in Vietnamese who did not develop opportunistic infection.

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher MT is common in patients living with HIV compared to healthy individuals, and in patients from LMICs compared to patients from a high-income country. Treatment with tuberculostatics decreased MT while higher levels of MT are associated with a poorer clinical outcome.

  • 19.
    Abedi, Mohammad R.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Transfusion Medicine.
    Doverud, Ann-Charlotte
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Section for Transfusion Medicine, Örebro University Hospital. Örebro, Sweden.
    Preparation and Pathogen Inactivation of Double Dose Buffy Coat Platelet Products using the INTERCEPT Blood System2012In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, E-ISSN 1940-087X, no 70, article id UNSP e4414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood centers are faced with many challenges including maximizing production yield from the blood product donations they receive as well as ensuring the highest possible level of safety for transfusion patients, including protection from transfusion transmitted diseases. This must be accomplished in a fiscally responsible manner which minimizes operating expenses including consumables, equipment, waste, and personnel costs, among others.

    Several methods are available to produce platelet concentrates for transfusion. One of the most common is the buffy coat method in which a single therapeutic platelet unit (>= 2.0 x10(11) platelets per unit or per local regulations) is prepared by pooling the buffy coat layer from up to six whole blood donations. A procedure for producing "double dose" whole blood derived platelets has only recently been developed.

    Presented here is a novel method for preparing double dose whole blood derived platelet concentrates from pools of 7 buffy coats and subsequently treating the double dose units with the INTERCEPT Blood System for pathogen inactivation. INTERCEPT was developed to inactivate viruses, bacteria, parasites, and contaminating donor white cells which may be present in donated blood. Pairing INTERCEPT with the double dose buffy coat method by utilizing the INTERCEPT Processing Set with Dual Storage Containers (the "DS set"), allows blood centers to treat each of their double dose units in a single pathogen inactivation processing set, thereby maximizing patient safety while minimizing costs. The double dose buffy coat method requires fewer buffy coats and reduces the use of consumables by up to 50% (e.g. pooling sets, filter sets, platelet additive solution, and sterile connection wafers) compared to preparation and treatment of single dose buffy coat platelet units. Other cost savings include less waste, less equipment maintenance, lower power requirements, reduced personnel time, and lower collection cost compared to the apheresis technique.

  • 20.
    Abrahamsson, T. R.
    et al.
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, H. E.
    Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, A. F.
    Sch Biotechnol, Div Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, Royal Inst Technol (KTH ), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Engstrand, L.
    Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Div Gene Technol, Sci Life Lab, KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, M. C.
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden; Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Clin Immunol, Unit Autoimmun & Immune Regulat, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age2014In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 842-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age. Objective To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema. Methods The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1week, 1month and 12months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830). Results Children developing asthma (n=8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1week (P=0.04) and 1month (P=0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n=13), eczema (n=12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n=14) at 7years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood.

  • 21.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    Sch Biotechnol, Sci Life Lab, KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Sch Biotechnol, Sci Life Lab, KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.; Unit Autoimmun & Immune Regulat, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Clin Immunol, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gut microbiota diversity and atopic disease: Does breast-feeding play a role? Reply2013In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 248-249Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control, Solna, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Unit of Autoimmunity and Immune Regulation, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Low diversity of the gut microbiota in infants with atopic eczema2012In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 129, no 2, p. 434-440.e2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is debated whether a low total diversity of the gut microbiota in early childhood is more important than an altered prevalence of particular bacterial species for the increasing incidence of allergic disease. The advent of powerful, cultivation-free molecular methods makes it possible to characterize the total microbiome down to the genus level in large cohorts.

    Objective: We sought to assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to atopic eczema development.

    Methods: Microbial diversity and composition were analyzed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454-pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month, and 12 months of age in 20 infants with IgE-associated eczema and 20 infants without any allergic manifestation until 2 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

    Results: Infants with IgE-associated eczema had a lower diversity of the total microbiota at 1 month (P = .004) and a lower diversity of the bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes and the genus Bacteroides at 1 month (P = .02 and P = .01) and the phylum Proteobacteria at 12 months of age (P = .02). The microbiota was less uniform at 1 month than at 12 months of age, with a high interindividual variability. At 12 months, when the microbiota had stabilized, Proteobacteria, comprising gram-negative organisms, were more abundant in infants without allergic manifestation (Empirical Analysis of Digital Gene Expression in R [edgeR] test: P = .008, q = 0.02).

    Conclusion: Low intestinal microbial diversity during the first month of life was associated with subsequent atopic eczema.

  • 23. Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Ted
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Oldaeus, Göran
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    No effect of probiotics on respiratory allergies: a seven-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial in infancy2013In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 556-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Supplementation with the probioticLactobacillus reuteri reduced the incidence of IgE-associated allergic disease in infancy. This treatment might therefore also reduce the risk of asthma and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in school age.

    Objective: To evaluate whether perinatal and infant supplementation withL.reuteri reduced the prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age and to explore whether this supplementation was associated with any long-term side effects.

    Methods: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with oral supplementation withL.reuteriATCC 55730 (1x10(8)CFU) during the last month of gestation and through the first year of life comprising 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 184 completed a 7-yr follow-up. The primary outcomes at 7yr of age were allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity (ClinicalTrials.govID NCT01285830).

    Results: The prevalence of asthma (15% in the probiotic vs. 16% in placebo group), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (27% vs. 20%), eczema (21% vs. 19%) and skin prick test reactivity (29% vs. 26%) was similar in the probiotic and placebo group. Growth indices and gastrointestinal symptoms were similar in the two groups. No severe adverse events were reported.

    Conclusion: The effect ofL.reuteri on sensitization andIgE-associated eczema in infancy did not lead to a lower prevalence of respiratory allergic disease in school age. Thus, the effect ofL.reuteri on the immune system seems to be transient. Administration ofL.reuteri during the last weeks of gestation and in infancy was not associated with any long-term side effects.

  • 24.
    Abreu, Miguel Henriques
    et al.
    Department of Medical Oncology, Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (IPO-Porto), Porto, Portugal; Porto Comprehensive Cancer Center Raquel Seruca (PCCC), Porto, Portugal.
    Lillsunde-Larsson, Gabriella
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bartosch, Carla
    Porto Comprehensive Cancer Center Raquel Seruca (PCCC), Porto, Portugal; Department of Pathology, Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (IPO-Porto), Porto, Portugal; Cancer Biology & Epigenetics Group, Research Center of Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (CI-IPO-Porto)/Health Research Network (RISE@CI-IPO-Porto), Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (IPO-Porto), Porto, Portugal.
    Ricardo, Sara
    Differentiation and Cancer Group, Institute for Research and Innovation in Health (i3S) of the University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 1H-TOXRUN - One Health Toxicology Research Unit, University Institute of Health Sciences (IUCS), CESPU, CRL, Gandra, Portugal; Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine from University of Porto (FMUP), Porto, Portugal.
    Editorial: New molecular approaches to improve gynecological cancer management2023In: Frontiers in Oncology, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 13, article id 1235035Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Abu Ishkheidem, Imadeddin
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg.
    Breimer, Martin
    Popovic, Zoran
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg.
    Nygren, Åsa
    Parkhagen, Madeleine
    Andersson Grönlund, Marita
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg.
    Health economic effects of DOIT, a new IT-system for diabetic retinopathy primary screening and secondary follow-up2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Abuhasanein, Suleiman
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Chaves, Vanessa
    Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Mohsen, Ali Moustafa
    Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Al-Haddad, Jasmine
    Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Sunila, Merete
    Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Ströck, Viveka
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Jerlström, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Urology.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Institution of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Swärd, Jesper
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Henrik
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Diagnostic value of repeated comprehensive investigation with CT urography and cystoscopy for recurrent macroscopic haematuria2024In: BJUI Compass, E-ISSN 2688-4526, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 253-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To perform a descriptive analysis of a series of patients with recurrent macroscopic haematuria after a primary standard evaluation including computed tomography urography (CTU) and cystoscopy negative for urinary bladder cancer (UBC) and upper tract urothelial cancer (UTUC) and to identify potential factors associated with occurrence of recurrent macroscopic haematuria.

    Methods: All patients older than 50 years who underwent urological investigation for macroscopic haematuria with both cystoscopy and CTU 2015-2017 were retrospectively reviewed. A descriptive analysis of the primary and later investigations for recurrent macroscopic haematuria was performed. To investigate the association between explanatory variables and the occurrence of recurrent macroscopic haematuria, a Poisson regression analysis was performed.

    Results: A total of 1395 eligible individuals with primary standard investigation negative for UBC and UTUC were included. During a median follow-up of 6.2 (IQR 5.3-7) years, 248 (18%) patients had recurrent macroscopic haematuria, of whom six patients were diagnosed with UBC, two with prostate cancer, one with renal cell carcinoma and one had a suspected UTUC at the repeated investigation. Within 3 years, 148 patients (11%) experienced recurrent macroscopic haematuria, of whom two patients were diagnosed with low-grade UBC (TaG1-2), one with T2G3 UBC and one with low-risk prostate cancer. The presence of an indwelling catheter, use of antithrombotic medication, pathological findings at CTU or cystoscopy or history of pelvic radiotherapy were all statistically significant independent predictors for increased risk for recurrent macroscopic haematuria.

    Conclusion: In the case of recurrent macroscopic haematuria within 3 years of primary standard evaluation for urinary tract cancer, there was a low risk of later urological malignancies in patients initially negative for UBC and UTUC. Therefore, waiting 3 years before conducting another complete investigation in cases of recurrent macroscopic haematuria might be appropriate.

  • 27.
    Abuhasanein, Suleiman
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of surgery, Urology section, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jerlström, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Urology.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden and Institution of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ströck, Viveka
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Henrik
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Do not throw out the baby with the bath water2022In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 235-236Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Abuhasanein, Suleiman
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Urology Section, NU Hospital Group, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Jahnson, Staffan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Urology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Truls
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jerlström, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Urology.
    Liedberg, Fredrik
    Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Institution of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sherif, Amir
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ströck, Viveka
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kjölhede, Henrik
    Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Standardized care pathways for patients with suspected urinary bladder cancer: the Swedish experience2022In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare time intervals to diagnosis and treatment, tumor characteristics, and management in patients with primary urinary bladder cancer, diagnosed before and after the implementation of a standardized care pathway (SCP) in Sweden.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer was studied before (2011-2015) and after (2016-2019) SCP. Data about time from referral to transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT), patients and tumor characteristics, and management were analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed for cT1 and cT2-4 tumors.

    RESULTS: Out of 26,795 patients, median time to TURBT decreased from 37 to 27 days after the implementation of SCP. While the proportion of cT2-T4 tumors decreased slightly (22-21%, p < 0.001), this change was not stable over time and the proportions cN + and cM1 remained unchanged. In the subgroups with cT1 and cT2-4 tumors, the median time to TURBT decreased and the proportions of patients discussed at a multidisciplinary team conference (MDTC) increased after SCP. In neither of these subgroups was a change in the proportions of cN + and cM1 observed, while treatment according to guidelines increased after SCP in the cT1 group.

    CONCLUSION: After the implementation of SCP, time from referral to TURBT decreased and the proportion of patients discussed at MDTC increased, although not at the levels recommended by guidelines. Thus, our findings point to the need for measures to increase adherence to SCP recommendations and to guidelines.

  • 29.
    Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Vascular Center, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Block, Tomas
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björnsson, Steinarr
    Vascular Center, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Resch, Timothy
    Vascular Center, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Björck, Martin
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Clinical Chemistry, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Diagnostic pitfalls at admission in patients with acute superior mesenteric artery occlusion2012In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0736-4679, E-ISSN 1090-1280, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 635-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acute superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion leads to acute intestinal ischemia and is associated with high mortality. Early diagnosis is often missed, and confounding factors leading to diagnostic delays need to be highlighted.

    OBJECTIVES: To identify potential diagnostic laboratory pitfalls at admission in patients with acute SMA occlusion.

    METHODS: Fifty-five patients with acute SMA occlusion were identified from the in-hospital register during a 4-year period, 2005-2009.

    RESULTS: The median age was 76 years; 78% were women. The occlusion was embolic in 53% and thrombotic in 47% of patients. At admission, troponin I was above the clinical decision level (> 0.06 μg/L) for acute ischemic myocardial injury in 9/19 (47%) patients with embolic occlusion. Elevated pancreas amylase and normal plasma lactate were found in 12/45 and 13/27, respectively. A troponin I (TnI) above the clinical decision level was associated with a high frequency of referrals from the general surgeon to a specialist in internal medicine (p = 0.011) or a cardiologist (p = 0.024). The diagnosis was established after computed tomography angiography in 98% of the patients. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 33%. Attempting intestinal revascularization (n = 43; p < 0.001), with a 95% frequency rate of completion control of the vascular procedure, was associated with a higher survival rate, whereas referral to the cardiologist was associated with a higher mortality rate (p = 0.018).

    CONCLUSION: Elevated TnI was common in acute SMA occlusion, and referral to the cardiologist was found to be associated with adverse outcome. Elevated pancreas amylase and normal plasma lactate values are also potential pitfalls at admission in patients with acute SMA occlusion.

  • 30.
    Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Vascular Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Current status on plasma biomarkers for acute mesenteric ischemia2012In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 355-361Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia is difficult. The aim of this review is to provide current status on the search for an accurate plasma biomarker for acute mesenteric ischemia. A search using the medical subject heading terms marker and mesenteric ischemia or intestinal ischemia or superior mesenteric artery occlusion or mesenteric venous thrombosis in the Medline and Embase databases from 1980 to 2011. Studies without a control group or a control group consisted of healthy individuals (human studies), or studies on intestinal reperfusion were excluded. Twenty animal and twelve human studies were identified. In human studies, the studied series of patients had a control group that had a need of laparotomy (n = 2), suspected acute mesenteric ischemia (n = 7), acute abdomen (n = 2) or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (n = 1). D: -dimer has been found to be the most consistent highly sensitive early marker, but specificity was low. The follow-up study on α-glutathione S-transferase yielded inferior sensitivity and accuracy than the preliminary study, clearly questioning the value of this marker. Intestinal fatty acid binding globulin (I-FABP) and D: -lactate are both interesting markers, but the results were conflicting. Different cut-off levels have been used in the studies on I-FABP. The encouraging preliminary result of cobalt-albumin and urinary FABP as an accurate marker needs to be addressed in other study populations. The early clinical and laboratory diagnosis of intestinal ischemia remains a challenge. None of the proposed plasma-derived tests for acute mesenteric ischemia has as yet entered routine clinical practice. The proposed biomarkers need to be evaluated in a prospective clinical research project in patients with acute abdomen.

  • 31.
    Adamic, M.
    et al.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Pavlovic, M. D.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Fac Med, Univ Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Rubin, A. Troilius
    Ctr Laser & Vasc Anomalies, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Palmetun-Ekback, M.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Boixeda, P.
    Dept Dermatol, Laser Serv, Ramon & Cajal Hosp, Univ Alcala De Henares, Madrid, Spain.
    Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology2015In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1661-1678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimLasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. MethodsThese guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. ResultsLasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects.

  • 32.
    Adams, A.
    et al.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Kalla, R.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Vatn, S.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Bonfiglio, F.
    BioCruces Health Research Institue, Bilbao, Spain.
    Nimmo, E.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Kennedy, N.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Ventham, N.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Vatn, M.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Ricanek, P.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Akershus University, Akershus, Norway.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Söderholm, J.
    Department of Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden;.
    Pierik, M.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Törkvist, L.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gomollon, F.
    University Hospital Clinic Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Gut, I.
    CNAG-CRG Centre for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Barcelona, Spain.
    Jahnsen, J.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Satsangi, J.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Epigenetic alterations at diagnosis predict susceptibility, prognosis and treatment escalation in inflammatory bowel disease - IBD Character2017In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 11, no Suppl. 1, p. S108-S108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Adeteg, Sandra
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bergman, Eva-Lena
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Att vara ung vuxen med reumatisk sjukdom och leva med kronisk smärta och trötthet: En kvalitativ intervjustudie2009Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien var att fånga in hur trötthet och smärta påverkar vardagen för unga vuxna med reumatisk sjukdom.

    Metoden är kvalitativ och för datainsamlingen gjordes semistrukturerade intervjuer. Materialet transkriberades transkriberades i sin helt och när det var klart påbörjades analysering av det som framkommit. I analysen sökte vi efter meningsbärande enheter och försökte ordna dem i kategorier och underkategorier.

    Resultatet visar att sjukdomen har en stor påverkan på våra informanters liv, men att de också har bra strategier för att kunna leva med sjukdomen. Det visar också på att även om strategierna är bra och de vet hur de ska hantera sjukdomen så stöter de på hinder, till exempel har skolgången blivit negativt påverkad för de flesta av informanterna. Något som visat sig vara extra viktigt har varit vännerna och det sociala nätverket. Alla informanter har på ett eller annat sätt verkligen understrykt betydelsen av vänner som är förstående och som på det sättet hjälper till att hitta det positiva med livet.

    Slutsatsen som kan dras utifrån detta arbete är att vara ung och ha en reumatisk sjukdom är något som påverkar hela livet. Vi har sett på informanterna i studien att trots detta flyter livet på och de lyckas i de flesta fall att få balans mellan aktivitet och vila. Just denna balans är mycket viktig.

     

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  • 34.
    Adlitzer, Helena
    et al.
    Regionalt cancercentrum Stockholm Gotland, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; Region Gotland, Visby, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Östersunds sjukhus, Östersund, Sverige; Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sverige.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Fridegren, Inger
    Nacka Närsjukhus, Nacka, Sverige.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Palliativt kompetenscentrum Östergötland, Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping, Sverige; Linköpings Universitet,Linköping, Sverige.
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    Palliativt utvecklingscentrum, Lunds universitet, Lund, sverige; Region Skåne, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    Palliativt kompetenscentrum i Östergötland, Vrinnevisjukhuset, Norrköping, Sverige.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg, Sverige; Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    FoU Centrum, Skaraborgs sjukhus, Skövde, Sverige.
    Löfdahl, Elisabet
    Palliativa sektionen Stockholms Universitet, Stockholm, Sverige; Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet, Östersund, Sverige.
    Molander, Ulla
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Persson, Hans
    Danderyds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène
    Skånes Universitetssjukhus (SUS), Lund, Sverige.
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Lunds universitet, Lund, Sverige; Region Skåne, Kristianstad, Sverige.
    Schaufelberger, Maria
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Seiger Cronfalk, Berit
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, stockholm, Sverige; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Silk, Gerd
    Kvalitets- och utvecklingsenheten, Region Gotland, Visby, Sverige.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet Stockholm, Sverige; Stockholms Sjukhem, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitetssjukhus, Linköping, Sverige.
    Tavemark, Sofia
    Örebro kommun, Örebro, Sverige.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet Högskola, Stockholm, Sverige; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,Sverige.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sverige.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Palliativ vård i livets slutskede: Nationellt vårdprogram2016Report (Other academic)
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    Palliativ vård i livets slutskede: Nationellt vårdprogram
  • 35. Adolfsson, Annsofie
    Miscarriage: women’s experience and its cumulative incidence2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many women experience miscarriage every year. Every fourth woman who has given birth reports that she has previous experience of miscarriage. In a study of all women in the Swedish Medical Birth Register 1983-2003, we found that the number of cases of self reported miscarriage had increased in Sweden during this 21 year period. This increase can be explained by the introduction of sensitive pregnancy tests around 1990, as well as an increase in the mean age of the mothers, by approximately 3 years, during the observation period. The risk of miscarriage is 13% with the first child. With subsequent pregnancies, the risk of miscarriage is 8%, 6% and 4% with the second, third and fourth child, respectively.

    Thirteen of these women who had suffered a recent miscarriage were interviewed four months later, and their feelings of guilt and emptiness were explored. Their experience was that they wanted their questions to be answered, and that they wanted others to treat them as the mothers to be that they felt themselves to be. They also experienced the need for time to grieve their loss.

    Measurement of grief by means of the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS) is used in research but has also been proposed for clinical use. We have translated this psychological instrument to Swedish, back-translated and tested it in a small pilot study. In a randomized controlled study, women with early miscarriage were allocated, either to a structured visit (study group) or a regular visit (control group) to a midwife. The structured visit was conducted according to the Swanson caring theory. We could conclude that the structured visit had no significant effect on grief compared to the regular visit, as measured using the PGS. However, women with the sub-diagnosis missed abortion have significantly more grief four months after early miscarriage, regardless of visit type.

    We also performed a content analysis of the tape-recorded structured follow-up visit. The code-key used was Bonanno and Kaltman’s general grief categorization. Women’s expression of grief after miscarriage was found to be very similar to the grief experienced following the death of a relative. Furthermore, the grief was found to be independent of number of children, women’s age, or earlier experience of miscarriage.

    Conclusions: Every fourth woman who gives birth reports that she has also experienced early miscarriage. The experience of these women is that they have suffered a substantial loss and their reaction is grief similar to that experienced following the death of a relative.

    List of papers
    1. Cumulative incidence of previous spontaneous abortion in Sweden in 1983-2003: a register study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cumulative incidence of previous spontaneous abortion in Sweden in 1983-2003: a register study
    2006 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 741-747Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study is to find out how common miscarriages are among women who have delivered a child. METHODS: The numbers of deliveries and miscarriages were extracted from the Swedish Medical Birth Register between 1983 and 2003. Linear regression was performed in order to investigate whether the increasing mean age of mothers or differences in pregnancy identification methods could explain the increased frequency of miscarriage. RESULTS: The reported number of miscarriages increased each year during the 21-year period, with a marked increase between 1991 and 1993 and only a slight increase during the final 10 years. For primiparous women, the frequency of reported miscarriages per delivery increased from 8.6% in 1983 to 13.9% in 2003. The corresponding figures for 2-parous women showed an increase from 14.5% to 21.3% respectively. Women aged 30-34 years had an odds ratio of 1.43 (95% CI 1.40-1.45) to suffer spontaneous abortion compared to the age group 25-29 years. Linear regression showed that an increase in mean age at delivery could only partly explain the increase in the frequency of reported miscarriages. A possible explanation could be differences in methods of identifying early pregnancy. CONCLUSION: Of all women who deliver a child, nearly 20% have experienced previous miscarriage. The increased mean age of women could only explain a small portion of the seen increase in miscarriage. The marked increase from 1991 to 1993 is interesting. Possible reasons for the increase are discussed.

    Keywords
    Abortion, Spontaneous/*epidemiology
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27333 (URN)10.1080/00016340600627022 (DOI)000238188100017 ()16752269 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33745700356 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2013-02-05 Created: 2013-02-05 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Guilt and emptiness: women's experiences of miscarriage
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guilt and emptiness: women's experiences of miscarriage
    2004 (English)In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Women who lose an early pregnancy are shocked when they are first given the information that they have miscarried. Later they feel guilt and emptiness. Heideggerian interpretive phenomenology has been used with 13 women from southwest Sweden to uncover their lived experience of miscarriage. Women plan their future with a child during early pregnancy. When miscarriage occurs it is not a gore, an embryo, or a fetus they lose, it is their child. They feel that they are the cause of the miscarriage through something they have done, eaten, or thought. They feel abandonment and they grieve for their profound loss; they are actually in bereavement.

    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-25616 (URN)10.1080/07399330490444821 (DOI)15354621 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-3042592129 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2012-08-30 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    3. Translation of the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale into Swedish
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translation of the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale into Swedish
    2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 269-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Women's emotions and grief after miscarriage are influenced not only by the context in which the miscarriage occurred but also by their past experience, the circumstances around the miscarriage and their future prospects. Their emotions therefore express a specific form of grief. Normally the time needed to work through the loss varies. A number of different scales, measuring women's emotions and grief after miscarriage have been published. One instrument that measures the specific grief, such as the grief after miscarriage is the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS) that was designed to measure grief after perinatal loss and has good reliability and validity.

    AIMS: The purpose of this study was to translate the PGS into Swedish and to use the translation in a small pilot study.

    MATERIAL AND METHOD: The original short version of the PGS was first translated from English into Swedish and then back-translated into English, using different translators. During translation and back-translation, not only the linguistic and grammatical aspects were considered but also cultural differences. The Likert 5-point and a 10-point scale were tested in a pilot study where 12 volunteers anonymously answered the PGS twice. The intra-personal correlations were compared and analysed with weighted kappa-coefficient.

    FINDINGS: In all, five different versions were tested before the final Swedish version was established. The weighted kappa-coefficient for the volunteers was 0.58, which is regarded as representing good reproducibility.

    CONCLUSION: The PGS was translated successfully into Swedish and could be used in a Swedish population. As this work is rather time-consuming we therefore wish to publish the Swedish version so that it may be used by other researchers.

    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-25613 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2006.00404.x (DOI)000239865900005 ()16922980 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33747620299 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2012-08-30 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    4. Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: a randomized study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: a randomized study
    2006 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women's grief after miscarriage is substantial and important. Women who experience early miscarriage do not constitute a homogenous group. The aim of this study is to measure whether a structured follow-up visit to a midwife (group 1) at 21-28 days after early miscarriage could reduce the women's grief, measured using the perinatal grief scale Swedish short version (PGS) after a further 3 months (i.e. 4 months after the miscarriage), compared to a regular follow-up visit to a midwife (group 2).

    Methods: We performed an open randomized study of women who experienced early miscarriage (n = 88). The midwife's attitude in group 1 came from Swanson science theory of midwifery. In group 2, the women were offered only the ordinary type of consultation at a regular visit. A questionnaire with the PGS was used in both groups. Four months after the miscarriage, a second questionnaire with the same perinatal grief scale was sent by post.

    Results: There was a 30% greater reduction in grief in group 1 than that in group 2, when comparing the first and second measurements (not significant). The biggest differences were in the subscales active grief and difficulty in coping. Women with the subdiagnosis missed abortions had, as a group, significantly higher PGS scores at both visits, especially in active grief and difficulty in coping, regardless of the type of follow-up visit.

    Conclusions: A structured follow-up visit did not, in comparison with a regular follow-up visit, imply any significant reduction in grief as measured using the PGS scale. However, the subgroup missed abortion had more extensive grief than the other women with miscarriage. Structured follow-up visits are not imperative for all women with early miscarriage.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oslo, Norway: Taylor & Francis, 2006
    Keywords
    Early miscarriage, grief, midwife, support, treatment
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-25614 (URN)10.1080/00016340500539376 (DOI)000236110500012 ()16553182 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33645461138 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2012-08-30 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    5. Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women's experience after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno's taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women's experience after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno's taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale
    2010 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Grief is a normal phenomenon but showing great variation depending on cultural and personal features. Bonanno and Kaltman have nonetheless proposed five aspects of normal grief. The aim of this study was to investigate if women with miscarriage experience normal grief.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Content analyses of 25 transcribed conversations with women 4 weeks after their early miscarriages were classified depending on the meaning-bearing units according to Bonanno and Kaltman's categories. In the factor analyses, these categories were compared with the Perinatal Grief Scale and women's age, number of children and number of miscarriages, and gestational weeks.

    RESULTS: Women with miscarriage fulfill the criteria for having normal grief according to Bonanno and Kaltman. All of the 25 women had meaning-bearing units that were classified as cognitive disorganization, dysphoria, and health deficits, whereas disrupted social and occupational functioning and positive aspects of bereavement were represented in 22 of 25 women. From the factor analysis, there are no differences in the expression of the intensity of the grief, irrespective of whether or not the women were primiparous, younger, or had suffered a first miscarriage.

    CONCLUSION: Women's experience of grief after miscarriage is similar to general grief after death. After her loss, the woman must have the possibility of expressing and working through her grief before she can finish her pregnancy emotionally. The care-giver must facilitate this process and accept that the intensity of the grief is not dependent on the woman's age, or her number of earlier miscarriages.

    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-25610 (URN)10.3109/03009731003739851 (DOI)000281013000008 ()20636255 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77954841916 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Per-Göran Larsson is also affiliated toDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Skaraborgs sjukhus, Kärnsjukhuset Skövde, Skövde, SwedenandDivision of Women and Child Health, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden

    Available from: 2012-08-30 Created: 2012-08-30 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 36.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. The Centre for Women’s, Family and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud & Vestfold University, Kongsberg, Norway.
    Arbhede, Emelie
    Department Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Marklund, Elisabeth
    Women’s Clinic, Highland Distric County Hospital, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    Institutes of Health and Care Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Miscarriage: Evidence Based Information for the Web and Its Development Procedure2015In: Advances in Sexual Medicine, ISSN 2164-5191, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 89-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this paper is to describe the process of developing web information on miscarriage based on scientific evidence, for women and couples in Sweden experiencing miscarriage. Method: A participatory design was used which included researchers, professional  xperts and users. A participatory design was used involving researchers, professional experts and users. The information was developed in six stages: 1) identifying the needs of information; 2) identifying and constructing the main areas of information and its paths; 3) identifying and inviting experts for revision; 4) developing the text; 5) reviewing the text; 6) design and structuring for adaption to website. Results: The text of information developed gradually based on the seven steps. The final text comprised three parts: 1) what is miscarriage; 2) experiences of miscarriage; 3) processing and lanning for new pregnancy. Conclusion: Using participatory design was time and resource consuming, however it was functional for producing appropriate information for the target group. The developed evidence based facts text is assumed to be a complement to the information that is provided by the health care system.

  • 37.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital, Skövde, Sweden; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital, Skövde, Sweden; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: a randomized study2006In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women's grief after miscarriage is substantial and important. Women who experience early miscarriage do not constitute a homogenous group. The aim of this study is to measure whether a structured follow-up visit to a midwife (group 1) at 21-28 days after early miscarriage could reduce the women's grief, measured using the perinatal grief scale Swedish short version (PGS) after a further 3 months (i.e. 4 months after the miscarriage), compared to a regular follow-up visit to a midwife (group 2).

    Methods: We performed an open randomized study of women who experienced early miscarriage (n = 88). The midwife's attitude in group 1 came from Swanson science theory of midwifery. In group 2, the women were offered only the ordinary type of consultation at a regular visit. A questionnaire with the PGS was used in both groups. Four months after the miscarriage, a second questionnaire with the same perinatal grief scale was sent by post.

    Results: There was a 30% greater reduction in grief in group 1 than that in group 2, when comparing the first and second measurements (not significant). The biggest differences were in the subscales active grief and difficulty in coping. Women with the subdiagnosis missed abortions had, as a group, significantly higher PGS scores at both visits, especially in active grief and difficulty in coping, regardless of the type of follow-up visit.

    Conclusions: A structured follow-up visit did not, in comparison with a regular follow-up visit, imply any significant reduction in grief as measured using the PGS scale. However, the subgroup missed abortion had more extensive grief than the other women with miscarriage. Structured follow-up visits are not imperative for all women with early miscarriage.

  • 38.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Skaraborgssjukhus Skövde, Sweden.
    Effekten av strukturerat återbesök till barnmorska för kvinnor med tidiga missfall: en randomiserad studie2004In: , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Skaraborgs sjukhus, Skövde, Sweden.
    The effect of structured second visit to midwifes in women with early miscarriage: a randomized study2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Skaraborgs sjukhus Skövde, Sweden.
    The effect of structured second visit to midwifes in women with early miscarriage: a randomized study2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hogström, Lars
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Johansson, Marianne
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Janson, Per Olof
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berg, Marie
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Francis, Jynfiaf
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sogn, Jan
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Hellström, Anna-Lena
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Livskvalitet bland par i Sverige efter adoption, efter IVF och efter spontan befruktning och förlossning2011In: Svenska barnmorskeförbundet 300 år. Stockholm Abstrakt bok, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women's experience after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno's taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale2010In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Grief is a normal phenomenon but showing great variation depending on cultural and personal features. Bonanno and Kaltman have nonetheless proposed five aspects of normal grief. The aim of this study was to investigate if women with miscarriage experience normal grief.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Content analyses of 25 transcribed conversations with women 4 weeks after their early miscarriages were classified depending on the meaning-bearing units according to Bonanno and Kaltman's categories. In the factor analyses, these categories were compared with the Perinatal Grief Scale and women's age, number of children and number of miscarriages, and gestational weeks.

    RESULTS: Women with miscarriage fulfill the criteria for having normal grief according to Bonanno and Kaltman. All of the 25 women had meaning-bearing units that were classified as cognitive disorganization, dysphoria, and health deficits, whereas disrupted social and occupational functioning and positive aspects of bereavement were represented in 22 of 25 women. From the factor analysis, there are no differences in the expression of the intensity of the grief, irrespective of whether or not the women were primiparous, younger, or had suffered a first miscarriage.

    CONCLUSION: Women's experience of grief after miscarriage is similar to general grief after death. After her loss, the woman must have the possibility of expressing and working through her grief before she can finish her pregnancy emotionally. The care-giver must facilitate this process and accept that the intensity of the grief is not dependent on the woman's age, or her number of earlier miscarriages.

  • 43.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Skaraborgs sjukhus, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kvinnors sorg efter missfall kan minska med ändrade vårdrutiner2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Skaraborgssjukhus Skövde, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Hälsohögskolan i Jönköping, Sweden.
    Missfall: kvinnans upplevelser2004In: , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Tullander-Tjörnstrand, Karin
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden; School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Decreased need for emergency services after changing management for suspected miscarriage2011In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 8, p. 921-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the effect of a changed routine to identify women with a nonviable pregnancy, in order to utilize health care resources more efficiently during office hours rather than relying on emergency care services. From hospital register data about where and when women with miscarriages were treated, there was a significant trend during a nine-year period for miscarriages to be more rarely diagnosed (p-value<0.001) in the emergency ward after office hours. The proportion of miscarriages that were diagnosed and handled at the emergency ward decreased from 31% in 2001 to 17% in 2009. Furthermore, the number of women showing up with bleeding at the emergency ward, but who also had a normal viable pregnancy, declined during the same period (p-value<0.01). Women with suspected miscarriage benefit from structured information and standardized management and can effectively be scheduled for day-time assessment including ultrasound with a concomitant reduced need for emergency services.

  • 46. Adolfsson, Emma
    Preserving female fertility2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47. Adolfsson, Emma
    What does poor embryo development mean, and how does it influence subsequent cycles?2018In: Practical problems in assisted conception / [ed] Ying Cheong; Togas Tulandi; Tin-Chui Li, Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 169-173Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Adolfsson, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Andershed, Anna Nowosad
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Morphology vs morphokinetics: a retrospective comparison of inter-observer and intra-observer agreement between embryologists on blastocysts with known implantation outcome2018In: Jornal Brasileiro de Reproducao Assistida, ISSN 1517-5693, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Our primary aim was to compare the morphology and morphokinetics on inter- and intra-observer agreement for blastocyst with known implantation outcome. Our secondary aim was to validate the morphokinetic parameters' ability to predict pregnancy using a previous published selection algorithm, and to compare this to standard morphology assessments.

    METHODS: Two embryologists made independent blinded annotations on two occasions using time-lapse images and morphology evaluations using the Gardner Schoolcraft criteria of 99 blastocysts with known implantation outcome. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was calculated and compared using the two methods. The embryos were grouped based on their morphological score, and on their morphokinetic class using a previous published selection algorithm. The implantation rates for each group was calculated and compared.

    RESULTS: There was moderate agreement for morphology, with agreement on the same embryo score in 55 of 99 cases. The highest agreement rate was found for expansion grade, followed by trophectoderm and inner cell mass. Correlation with pregnancy was inconclusive. For morphokinetics, almost perfect agreement was found for early and late embryo development events, and strong agreement for day-2 and day-3 events. When applying the selection algorithm, the embryo distributions were uneven, and correlation to pregnancy was inconclusive.

    CONCLUSIONS: Time-lapse annotation is consistent and accurate, but our external validation of a previously published selection algorithm was unsuccessful.

  • 49.
    Adolfsson, Emma
    et al.
    University Hospital of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nowosad Andershed, Anna
    University Hospital of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Improved accuracy of embryo scoring using morphokinetic compared with strict morphology2015In: Human reproduction: Abstracts of the 31st Annual Meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology / [ed] J.L.H. Evers; E. Somigliana; R. Sharpe, 2015, p. i333-i333Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Adolfsson, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Qvick, Alvida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gréen, Henrik
    Division of Drug Research, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kling, Daniel
    Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Department of Clinical Genetics and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Centre for Rare Diseases in South East Region of Sweden, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Jon
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Department of Clinical Genetics and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Green, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Technical in-depth comparison of two massive parallel DNA-sequencing methods for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from victims of sudden cardiac death2021In: Forensic Science International: Genetics, ISSN 1872-4973, E-ISSN 1878-0326, Vol. 53, article id 102522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a tragic and traumatic event. SCD is often associated with hereditary genetic disease and in such cases, sequencing of stored formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue is often crucial in trying to find a causal genetic variant. This study was designed to compare two massive parallel sequencing assays for differences in sensitivity and precision regarding variants related to SCD in FFPE material. From eight cases of SCD where DNA from blood had been sequenced using HaloPlex, corresponding FFPE samples were collected six years later. DNA from FFPE samples were amplified using HaloPlex HS, sequenced on MiSeq, representing the first method, as well as amplified using modified Twist and sequenced on NextSeq, representing the second method. Molecular barcodes were included to distinguish artefacts from true variants. In both approaches, read coverage, uniformity and variant detection were compared using genomic DNA isolated from blood and corresponding FFPE tissue, respectively. In terms of coverage uniformity, Twist performed better than HaloPlex HS for FFPE samples. Despite higher overall coverage, amplicon-based HaloPlex technologies, both for blood and FFPE tissue, suffered from design and/or performance issues resulting in genes lacking complete coverage. Although Twist had considerably lower overall mean coverage, high uniformity resulted in equal or higher fraction of genes covered at ≥ 20X. By comparing variants found in the matched samples in a pre-defined cardiodiagnostic gene panel, HaloPlex HS for FFPE material resulted in high sensitivity, 98.0% (range 96.6-100%), and high precision, 99.9% (range 99.5-100%) for moderately fragmented samples, but suffered from reduced sensitivity (range 74.2-91.1%) in more severely fragmented samples due to lack of coverage. Twist had high sensitivity, 97.8% (range 96.8-98.7%) and high precision, 99.9% (range 99.3-100%) in all analyzed samples, including the severely fragmented samples.

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