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  • 1.
    Adamic, M.
    et al.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Pavlovic, M. D.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Fac Med, Univ Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Rubin, A. Troilius
    Ctr Laser & Vasc Anomalies, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Palmetun-Ekback, M.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Boixeda, P.
    Dept Dermatol, Laser Serv, Ramon & Cajal Hosp, Univ Alcala De Henares, Madrid, Spain.
    Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology2015In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1661-1678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimLasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. MethodsThese guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. ResultsLasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects.

  • 2.
    Ahmed, Areeba
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Koza, Eric
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Shi, Victoria
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Ma, Melissa
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Haq, Misha
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Kottner, Jan
    Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Garg, Amit
    Department of Dermatology, Northwell Health, New York, USA.
    Ingram, John R
    Clinical Reader and Consultant Dermatologist, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Ezzedine, Khaled
    Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France; Epidemiology in Dermatology and Evaluation of Therapeutics (EpiDermE)-EA 7379, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Créteil, France.
    Spuls, Phyllis I
    TBA, Paris, France.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wolkenstein, Pierre
    Department of Dermatology, GHU Henri-Mondor, APHP, UPEC, Créteil, France.
    Fransen, Frederike
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Noe, Megan H
    Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, USA.
    Langbroek, Ginger Beau
    Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bauer, Andrea
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University, Dresden, Germany.
    Thorlacius, Linnea
    Department of Dermatology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Horbach, Sophie E R
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Layton, Alison
    Skin Research Centre, University of York, Heslington Road, York, UK.
    Apfelbacher, Christian
    Institute of Social Medicine and Health Systems Research, Otto Von Guericke University Magdeburg, Leipziger Straße 44, 39120, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Cahn, Brian A
    Department of Dermatology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Pearlman, Ross
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Schlessinger, Daniel I
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Alam, Murad
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Clinical relevance and uptake of core outcome sets in dermatology2024In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 316, no 2, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ahmed, Areeba
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Koza, Eric
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Shi, Victoria
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Ma, Melissa
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Haq, Misha
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Kottner, Jan
    Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Garg, Amit
    Department of Dermatology, Northwell Health, New York, USA.
    Ingram, John R.
    Clinical Reader and Consultant Dermatologist, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Ezzedine, Khaled
    Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France and Epidemiology in Dermatology and Evaluation of Therapeutics (EpiDermE) - EA 7379, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Créteil, France.
    Spuls, Phyllis I
    Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wolkenstein, Pierre
    Department of Dermatology, GHU Henri-Mondor, APHP, UPEC, Créteil, France.
    Fransen, Frederike
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Noe, Megan H.
    Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
    Langbroek, Ginger Beau
    Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bauer, Andrea
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University, Dresden, Germany.
    Thorlacius, Linnea
    Department of Dermatology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Horbach, Sophie E. R.
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Layton, Alison
    Skin Research Centre, University of York, Heslington Road, York, UK.
    Apfelbacher, Christian
    Institute of Social Medicine and Health Systems Research, Otto Von Guericke University Magdeburg, Leipziger Straße 44, 39120, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Cahn, Brian A.
    Department of Dermatology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Pearlman, Ross
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Schlessinger, Daniel I.
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Alam, Murad
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Methodological innovations and stakeholder involvement in core outcome sets for skin diseases: a survey of the C3 working groups2024In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 316, no 4, article id 109Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Alsterholm, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svedbom, Axel
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris D.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holm Sommar, Lena
    Stockholm Hud, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivert, Lina U.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lundeberg, Lena
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venereology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sandström Falk, MariHelen
    Capio Skin, Carlanderska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shayesteh, Alexander
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venereology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Andreas
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Virtanen, Marie
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Dermatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vrang, Sophie
    Patients' organization Atopikerna, The Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bradley, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Emma K.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Establishment and Utility of SwedAD: A Nationwide Swedish Registry for Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Receiving Systemic Pharmacotherapy2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv7312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SwedAD, a Swedish nationwide registry for patients with atopic dermatitis receiving systemic pharmacotherapy, was launched on 1 September 2019. We describe here the establishment of a user-friendly registry to the benefit of patients with atopic dermatitis. By 5 November 2022, 38 clinics had recorded 931 treatment episodes in 850 patients with an approximate national coverage rate of 40%. Characteristics at enrolment included median Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) 10.2 (interquartile range 4.0, 19.4), Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) 18.0 (10.0, 24.0), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 11.0 (5.0, 19.0) and Peak Itch Numerical Rating Scale-11 (NRS-11) 6.0 (3.0, 8.0). At 3 months, median EASI was 3.2 (1.0, 7.3) and POEM, DLQI, and NRS-11 were improved. Regional coverage varied, reflecting the distribution of dermatologists, the ratio of public to private healthcare, and difficulties in recruiting certain clinics. This study highlights the importance of a nationwide registry when managing systemic pharmacotherapy of atopic dermatitis.

  • 5.
    Andernord, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research and Education, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Lund University, Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Christensson, Johanna Bråred
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Glas, Bo
    Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hagvall, Lina
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Lund University, Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Matura, Mihaly
    Department of Dermatology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nyman, Gunnar
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Dept of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Contact allergy to haptens in the Swedish baseline series: Results from the Swedish Patch Test Register (2010 to 2017)2022In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 175-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis has considerable public health impact and causative haptens vary over time.

    OBJECTIVES: To report contact allergy prevalence to allergens in the Swedish baseline series 2010-2017, as registered in the Swedish Patch Test Register.

    METHODS: Results and demographic information for patients tested with the Swedish baseline series in 2010-2017 were analyzed.

    RESULTS: Data for 21 663 individuals (females 69%) were included. Females had significantly more positive patch tests (54% vs 40%). The reaction prevalence rates were highest for nickel sulfate (20.7%), fragrance mix I (7.1%), Myroxylon pereirae (6.9%), potassium dichromate (6.9%), cobalt chloride (6.8%), methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (6.4%), methylisothiazolinone (3.7%), colophonium (3.5%), fragrance mix II (3.2%) and formaldehyde (3.2%). Myroxylon pereirae reaction prevalence increased from 5% in 2010 to 9% in 2017 and that for methyldibromo glutaronitrile from 3.1% to 4.6%. Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone reactions decreased in prevalence after 2014. Nickel reaction prevalence decreased among females aged 10-19 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: Nickel remains the most common sensitizing agent, with reaction prevalence decreasing among females younger than 20 years. The changes in methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone reaction prevalence mirrored those in Europe. The register can reveal changes in contact allergy prevalence over time among patients patch tested in Sweden. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Antelmi, A.
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Metsini, Alexandra
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Regnell, S. E.
    Sanofi AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlberg, M.
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svensson, Å.
    Department of Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, L.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Prevalence of prurigo nodularis in Sweden2024In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Banhart, S.
    et al.
    Fachgebiet‚ Sexuell übertragbare bakterielle Krankheitserreger‘, Abteilung für Infektionskrankheiten, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Jansen, K.
    Fachgebiet‚ HIV/AIDS und andere sexuell oder durch Blut übertragbare Infektionen‘, Abteilung für Infektionsepidemiologie, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Buder, S.
    Konsiliarlabor für Gonokokken, Vivantes Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Tamminga, T.
    Robert Koch Inst, Abt Infekt Krankheiten, Fachgebiet HIV AIDS & Andere Sexuell Oder Durch B, Berlin, Germany..
    Calvignac-Spencer, S.
    Projektgruppe‚ Epidemiologie hochpathogener Erreger‘, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Pilz, T.
    Fachgebiet‚ Sexuell übertragbare bakterielle Krankheitserreger‘, Abteilung für Infektionskrankheiten, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Martini, A.
    Fachgebiet‚ Sexuell übertragbare bakterielle Krankheitserreger‘, Abteilung für Infektionskrankheiten, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Dudareva, S.
    Fachgebiet‚ HIV/AIDS und andere sexuell oder durch Blut übertragbare Infektionen‘, Abteilung für Infektionsepidemiologie, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland; WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and Other STIs, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Schweden.
    Nikisins, S.
    Fachgebiet‚ HIV/AIDS und andere sexuell oder durch Blut übertragbare Infektionen‘, Abteilung für Infektionsepidemiologie, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Dehmel, K.
    Fachgebiet‚ HIV/AIDS und andere sexuell oder durch Blut übertragbare Infektionen‘, Abteilung für Infektionsepidemiologie, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Zuelsdorf, G.
    Fachgebiet‚ HIV/AIDS und andere sexuell oder durch Blut übertragbare Infektionen‘, Abteilung für Infektionsepidemiologie, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Guhl, E.
    Graeber, I
    Konsiliarlabor für Gonokokken, Vivantes Klinikum Neukölln, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Koh, P. K.
    Vivantes Klinikum Neukolln, Konsiliarlabor Gonokokken, Berlin, Germany..
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and Other STIs.
    Bremer, V
    Fachgebiet‚ HIV/AIDS und andere sexuell oder durch Blut übertragbare Infektionen‘, Abteilung für Infektionsepidemiologie, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Heuer, D.
    Fachgebiet‚ Sexuell übertragbare bakterielle Krankheitserreger‘, Abteilung für Infektionskrankheiten, Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Deutschland.
    Identification of a new Association between Genogroup G10557 (G7072) and Cefixime Resistance by means of molecular Typing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates in Germany (2014-2017)2021In: Der Hautarzt, ISSN 0017-8470, E-ISSN 1432-1173, Vol. 72, no Suppl. 1, p. S8-S9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Hintergrund/Fragestellung: Die Behandlung von Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Infektionen ist aufgrund sich neu entwickelnder Antibiotikaresistenzen gefährdet. Folglich sind Surveillance-Programme zur Beschreibung der antimikrobiellen Resistenz (AMR) und molekularen Epidemiologie bei Gonokokken auf nationaler und internationaler Ebene dringend erfor-derlich. In Deutschland wurde hierfür im Jahr 2013 das Gonokokken-Resistenznetzwerk (GORENET) etabliert. Unser Ziel war es, die geneti-sche Diversität von N. gonorrhoeae-Isolaten in Deutschland von 2014 bis 2017 mittels NG-MAST (N. gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing) zu beschreiben.

    Methoden: N. gonorrhoeae-Isolate aus den Jahren 2014–2017 (n=1220; 106 aus 2014, 122 aus 2015, 511 aus 2016 und 481 aus 2017) wurden deutschlandweit eingesandt und mittels AMR-Testung und NG-MAST charakterisiert.

    Ergebnisse: 88,4% aller Isolate stammten von Männern, 11,2% von Frauen. Das mediane Alter lag bei 32 Jahren (Interquartalsabstand; IQA: 25–44 Jahre). Insgesamt wurden 432 verschiedene NG-MAST-Sequenztypen (STs) einschließlich 146 neuer STs detektiert. Daraus resultieren 17 verschiedene Genogruppen, welche 59,2% aller Isolate beinhalten. Genogruppen G1407 und G10557 (G7072) waren signifikant mit Cefixim-Resistenz assoziiert. Dabei sank der Anteil dieser Genogruppen von 2014–2017 von 14,2 auf 6,2% (G1407) bzw. von 6,6 auf 3,1% (G10557 (G7072)),wohingegen der Anteil mehrerer Cefixim-empfindlicher Genogruppen (G11461, von 0,0 auf 5,6%; G17420, von 0,0 auf 5,0%; und G5441, von 0,9 und 4,8%) im gleichen Zeitraum anstieg.

    Schlussfolgerungen: In dieser Arbeit beschreiben wir Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Deutschland als eine genetisch diverse und variable Population und identifizieren eine neue Assoziation zwischen Genogruppe G10557 (G7072) und Cefixim-Resistenz. Diese Ergebnisse unterstreichen die Bedeutung der AMR-Überwachung auf der detaillierten Ebene molekularer Typisierung. Darüber hinaus deuten unsere Daten darauf hin, dass es mit Einführung einer dualen Therapie aus Ceftriaxon und Azithromycin und dem konsekutiv verminderten Einsatz von Cefixim zu einem Rückgang von Cefixim-resistenten Stämmen gekommen ist.

  • 8.
    Beckman, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Public Health Science, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Health Service Research, Management& Policy, University of Florida FL, USA.
    Hagquist, Curt
    Department of Education and Special Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Langan, Sinéad M.
    Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; Health Data Research UK, London, UK.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund; Centre for Clinical Research Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Relationship between Eczema and Self-reported Difficulties Keeping up with School Education: A Cross-sectional Study2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv5268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eczema is a common chronic disease that affects both children and adults, and may have an adverse impact on school performance, as it is characteristically pruritic, and hence may lead to poor concentration and inadequate sleep. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between eczema and self-reported difficulties keeping up with school education. The study was based on cross-sectional questionnaire data collected in schools among all 9th graders (15-16 years old) within a Swedish county. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between having eczema and self-reported difficulties keeping up with school education. A total of 2,620 pupils participated (50.1% female). An increased odds ratio (OR) of selfreported difficulties keeping up with school education was found in adolescents with eczema compared with those without eczema after adjustment for sex and family residence (OR 2.13, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.32-3.44), and with additional adjustment for sleeping problems, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, allergy, rhinitis, asthma, and alcohol consumption (adjusted OR 1.78, CI 1.05-3.00). Eczema may be a relevant risk factor for difficulty keeping up with school education in adolescents. However, studies that can assess temporality, based in different settings with objective reports of both eczema and self-reported difficulties at school, are needed to confirm these findings.

  • 9.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    Fourie, A.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Raepsaet, C.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Damme, N.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Manderlier, B.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    De Meyer, D.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Beele, H.
    Wound Care Centre, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Smet, S.
    Wound Care Centre, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Demarré, L.
    AZ Sint-Elisabeth, Zottegem, Oost-Vlaanderan, Belgium.
    Vossaert, R.
    AZ Sint-Elisabeth, Zottegem, Oost-Vlaanderan, Belgium.
    de Graaf, A.
    Wound Care Support Team, Nursing Centre of Excellence, University Hospitals of Leuven, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, L.
    AZ Maria Middelares, Ghent, Belgium.
    Vandergheynst, N.
    AZ Maria Middelares, Ghent, Belgium.
    Hendrickx, B.
    University Hospital of Brussel (UZB), Department of Plastic Surgery, Brussel, Belgium.
    Hanssens, V.
    University Hospital of Brussel (UZB), Department of Plastic Surgery, Brussel, Belgium.
    Keymeulen, H.
    OLV Ziekenhuis Aalst, Aalst, Oost-Vlaanderan, Belgium.
    Vanderwee, K.
    OLV van Lourdes Ziekenhuis Waregem, Waregem, West-Vlaanderan, Belgium.
    Van De Woestijne, J.
    AZ Groeninge, Kortrijk, West-Vlaanderan, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, S.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Hecke, A.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Savoye, I.
    Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE), Brussels, Belgium.
    Harrison, J.
    Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE), Brussels, Belgium.
    Vrijens, F.
    Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE), Brussels, Belgium.
    Hulstaert, F.
    Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE), Brussels, Belgium.
    Silicone adhesive multilayer foam dressings as adjuvant prophylactic therapy to prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers: a pragmatic non-commercial multicentre randomised open label parallel group medical device trial2021In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 185, no 1, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Silicone adhesive multilayer foam dressings are used as adjuvant therapy to prevent hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (PUs).

    OBJECTIVES: Determine if silicone foam dressings in addition to standard prevention reduce PU incidence category 2 or worse compared to standard prevention alone.

    METHODS: Multicentre, randomised controlled, medical device trial conducted in eight Belgian hospitals. At risk adult patients were centrally randomised (n=1633) to study groups based on a 1:1:1 allocation: experimental group 1 (n=542) and 2 (n=545) - pooled as the treatment group - and the control group (n=546). Experimental groups received PU prevention according to hospital protocol, and a silicone foam dressing on these body sites. The control group received standard of care. The primary endpoint was the incidence of a new PU category 2 or worse at these body sites.

    RESULTS: In the intention-to-treat population (n=1605); 4.0% of patients developed PUs category 2 or worse in the treatment group and 6.3% in the control group (RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.99, P=0.04). Sacral PUs were observed in 2.8% and 4.8% of the patients in the treatment group and the control group, respectively (RR=0.59, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.98, P=0.04). Heel PUs occurred in 1.4% and 1.9% of patients in the treatment and control group respectively (RR=0.76, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.68, P=0.49).

    CONCLUSIONS: Silicone foam dressings reduce the incidence of PUs category 2 or worse in hospitalised at-risk patients when used in addition to standard of care. Results show a decrease for sacrum, but no statistical difference for heel/trochanter areas.

  • 10. Berg, M.
    et al.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Possible gender differences in the quality of life and choice of therapy in acne2011In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 969-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Acne is a very common skin disease that has major impact on the patients' quality of life. Although the disease has been extensively studied we still need more knowledge of factors influencing the decisions for choice of therapy. Objective To evaluate the relationships between clinical severity, patients' self-reported quality of life, treatment choice and the outcome of therapy in a structured out-patient acne clinic. Methods In total 211 consecutive patients (143 females, 68 males) at a structured acne clinic were included. At the first visit a clinical assessment was conducted, therapy was initiated and the patients answered a quality-of-life questionnaire (Dermatology Life Quality Index, DLQI). A follow up was performed after six months, when patients once again answered the DLQI questionnaire and the clinical outcome was assessed by the physician. Results The quality of life was improved after treatment at a group level. At the first visit, the quality of life showed a gender difference (females scoring worse) but did not correlate to the clinical grading nor to the choice of therapy. At six months the DLQI correlated with clinical outcome. Patients with isotretinoin therapy showed a significantly greater improvement in quality of life. There was a tendency to gender difference in the choice of therapy, as in females 32% of the patients were treated with isotretinoin although they were clinically graded as moderate. The corresponding figure for males was 23%. A correlation was found between the initial clinical grading and gender, age and the choice of therapy. Conclusion DLQI can be used to evaluate treatment effects in acne. However, the self-reported quality of life will depend on several factors including age, gender, psychosocial factors and clinical severity.

  • 11.
    Berg, Mats
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; .
    Wiegleb Edström, Desirée
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Flashlamp pulsed dye laser (FPDL) did not cure papulopustular rosacea2004In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine, ISSN 0196-8092, E-ISSN 1096-9101, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 266-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pharmacological treatment has a fairly good effect on the papulopustular lesions in rosacea, but not as good an effect on the erythema and telangiectases. The aim was to treat rosacea patients with both erythematotelangiectatic and papulopustular lesions with flashlamp pulsed dye laser (FPDL) until telangiectases/erythema disappeared, and to evaluate whether the treatment might also be effective on papulopustular lesions.

    STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients were treated on one side of the face with FPDL. The final examination was blinded and performed on the average 10 months after the last treatment.

    RESULTS: Two of the patients had more lesions after treatment, three were unchanged, three had only slightly less, and two had markedly less papulopustular lesions.

    CONCLUSION: Our conclusion from this small sample of patients is that FPDL probably has limited value on papulopustular lesions in rosacea. This indicates that the origin of rosacea may not be only vascular.

  • 12. Berne, Berit
    et al.
    Tammela, Monica
    Färm, Gunilla
    Inerot, Annica
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Can the reporting of adverse skin reactions to cosmetics be improved?: A prospective clinical study using a structured protocol2008In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 223-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The use of cosmetics is rising, and adverse reactions to these products are increasing. In Sweden, the Medical Products Agency (MPA) keeps a voluntary reporting system for such adverse reactions. However, the reporting is sparse, consisting almost only of cases with test-proven allergic contact dermatitis, thus under-reporting the more common irritant reactions.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to try to improve the reporting system.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Dermatologists at 3 dermatology departments used a structured protocol during the clinical investigation of 151 consecutive patients reporting skin reactions to cosmetics. The protocol included symptoms, signs, affected body site, suspected products, and final diagnosis after patch testing. Based on clinical data and patch test results, a causality assessment for each product was made according to a protocol used at the MPA. Results: Allergic contact dermatitis was found in 28% of the patients, and irritant reactions were equally common at 27%.

    CONCLUSIONS: Using this structured protocol, the cases of irritant dermatitis were also reported, and it is recommended that such a protocol is used as a standard to improve the reporting of adverse reactions to skin care products.

  • 13.
    Bignell, C.
    et al.
    City Hospital Campus, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Center for Gonorrhoea and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections, , Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    2012 European guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of gonorrhoea in adults [Europejskie zalecenia diagnostyczne i terapeutyczne w rzeÅŒa̧czce u dorosłych, 2012]2014In: Przegląd Dermatologiczny, ISSN 0033-2526, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 168-178Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Bingefors, Kristina
    et al.
    Farmaci, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Hudkliniken, Skånes universitetssjukhus, Malmö, Sweden.
    Isacson, Dag
    Farmaci, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Self-reported lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis and co-morbidity with asthma and eczema in adulthood: a population-based cross-sectional survey2013In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 438-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atopic dermatitis and its co-morbidity with asthma and allergy is well described in younger age groups. However, population-based studies on adults with atopic dermatitis in childhood are sparse. The aims of this study were to determine: (i) the prevalence of self-reported childhood atopic dermatitis in the population; and (ii) its association with present self-reported hand eczema, eczema, allergy, urticaria and asthma. A questionnaire was sent to a cross-sectional random sample of the Swedish population (n = 7,985), age range 18–84 years (response rate 61.1%). The questionnaire included the question “Have you had childhood eczema?” and questions on 5 other medical problems (hand eczema, other eczema, asthma, urticaria and allergy). Persons reporting eczema in childhood reported increased odds ratios (OR) for hand eczema (4.01), other eczema (3.88), urticaria (2.50), allergy (2.98), and asthma (2.06) as adults. The combination of eczema, allergy and asthma had an OR of 14.10 (95% confidence interval 8.44–23.54). Adults in the age range 18–84 years reporting childhood atopic dermatitis still have high co-morbidity with eczema, asthma, urticaria and allergy.

  • 15.
    Brill, Jason B.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas.
    Cotton, Bryan A.
    Department of Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas.
    Brenner, Megan
    Department of Surgery, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California, USA.
    Duchesne, Juan
    Division Chief Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery Tulane, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
    Ferrada, Paula
    VCU Surgery Trauma, Critical Care and Emergency Surgery, Richmond, Virginia, USA.
    Hörer, Tal M.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Kauvar, David
    Vascular Surgery Service, San Antonio Military Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA.
    Khan, Mansoor
    Academic Department of Military Surgery and Trauma, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, UK.
    Roberts, Derek
    Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Ordonez, Carlos
    Fundación Valle del Lili, Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery. Universidad del Valle, Colombia.
    Perreira, Bruno
    Department of Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
    Priouzram, Artai
    Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kirkpatrick, Andrew
    Regional Trauma Services Foothills Medical Centre; Departments of Surgery, Critical Care Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Candada; Canadian Forces Health Services, Ottawa, Canada.
    The Role of TEG and ROTEM in Damage Control Resuscitation2021In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 56, no 1S, p. 52-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: Trauma induced coagulopathy is associated with very high mortality, and hemorrhage remains the leading preventable cause of death after injury. Directed methods to combat coagulopathy and attain hemostasis are needed. The available literature regarding viscoelastic testing, including thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), was reviewed to provide clinically relevant guidance for emergency resuscitation. These tests predict massive transfusion and developing coagulopathy earlier than conventional coagulation testing, within 15 minutes using rapid testing. They can guide resuscitation after trauma, as well. TEG and ROTEM direct early transfusion of fresh frozen plasma when clinical gestalt has not activated a massive transfusion protocol. Reaction time and clotting time via these tests can also detect clinically significant levels of direct oral anticoagulants. Slowed clot kinetics suggest the need for transfusion of fibrinogen via concentrates or cryoprecipitate. Lowered clot strength can be corrected with platelets and fibrinogen. Finally, viscoelastic tests identify fibrinolysis, a finding associated with significantly increased mortality yet one that no conventional coagulation test can reliably detect. Using these parameters, guided resuscitation begins within minutes of a patient's arrival. A growing body of evidence suggests this approach may improve survival while reducing volumes of blood products transfused.

  • 16.
    Cederlöf, M.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, R.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, C.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Lung and Allergy Unit, Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnusson, P. K. E.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordlind, K.
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Landén, M.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lichtenstein, P.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Intellectual disability and cognitive ability in Darier disease: Swedish nation-wide study2015In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 155-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Darier disease is an autosomal dominant skin disorder caused by mutations in the ATP2A2 gene. Anecdotal reports suggest a relationship between Darier disease and intellectual disabilities, but these reports are based on small clinical samples and limited by absence of control populations.

    Objectives: To examine the risk of intellectual disability and subclinical impairments in cognitive ability in Darier disease.

    Methods: We conducted a matched cohort study based on Swedish Population-, Patient- and Conscript Registers. The risk of being diagnosed with intellectual disability was estimated in 770 individuals with Darier disease, compared with matched comparison individuals without Darier disease. Associations were examined with risk ratios from conditional logistic regressions. In addition, we analysed test-based cognitive ability data (i.e. IQ data) from the Swedish conscript examination, for a subset of patients without diagnosed intellectual disability.

    Results: Individuals with Darier disease had a sixfold increased risk of being diagnosed with intellectual disability (risk ratio 6.2, 95% confidence interval 3.1-12.4). For conscripted individuals with Darier disease but no diagnosed intellectual disability, mean cognitive ability scores were about half a standard deviation lower than for comparison subjects.

    Conclusions: Darier disease is associated with intellectual disability and subclinical impairments in cognitive ability. The Darier-causing mutations merit further attention in molecular genetic research on intellectual disability and cognitive ability.

  • 17.
    David, Fresnais
    et al.
    Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ingberg, Edvin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Infection.
    Elvar, Theodorsson
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Chemistry and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lack of association in acne and salivary testosterone2018In: Journal of controversies in biomedical research, ISSN 2205-5975, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathogenesis of acne vulgaris has only been partially elucidated. Various hormones, especially androgens, are likely to play a role, but results of studies are still inconclusive. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether day to day variation in salivary testosterone correlates with acne in males. Saliva samples were collected for 120 consecutive days from each of the 40 males. Salivary testosterone concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Facial acne lesions were assessed on a daily basis by photography by the participating males. Potential confounders’ (sexual intercourse, masturbation, physical exercise and disease) were also registered every day by the participants. A significant but weak association between salivary testosterone and acne was found (n = 4602, r = 0.031, P = 0.034). Elevated testosterone concentrations were associated with an increase in acne, but when testosterone concentrations were above twice the individual average, acne lesions paradoxically decreased. The current results indicate that daily fluctuations in salivary testosterone levels in males are associated with acne patterns, but the weak correlation suggests that the effect is too small to be of clinical significance. The analysis in the current study was complicated by a large number of days on which the participants had no acne, as well as the seemingly non-monotonic relation between testosterone and acne. This may indicate that the actual relation is stronger than concluded here.

  • 18.
    De Meyer, Dorien
    et al.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Kottner, Jan
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Clinical Research Center for Hair and Skin Science, Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
    Beele, Hilde
    Department of Dermatology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Schmitt, Jochen
    Center for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Lange, Toni
    Center for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Van Hecke, Ann
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Nursing Department, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, Sofie
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department Health Care, VIVES University College, Roeselare, Belgium.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    Delphi Procedure In Core Outcome Set Development: Rating Scale And Consensus Criteria Determined Outcome Selection2019In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 0895-4356, E-ISSN 1878-5921, Vol. 111, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two different rating scales within one Delphi study for defining consensus in core outcome set development and to explore the influence of consensus criteria on the outcome selection.

    STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled parallel group trial with 1:1 allocation within the first Delphi round of the Core Outcome Set in the Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis (CONSIDER) project. Outcomes were rated on a three-point or nine-point Likert scale. Decisions about which outcomes to retain were determined by commonly used consensus criteria (i.e., (combinations of) proportions with restricted ranges, central tendency within a specific range and decrease in variance).

    RESULTS: Fifty-seven participants (group 1=28, group 2=29) rated 58 outcomes. The use of the nine-point scale resulted in almost twice as many outcomes being rated as 'critical' compared to the three-point scale (24 versus 13). Stricter criteria and combining criteria led to less outcomes being identified as 'critical'.

    CONCLUSION: The format of rating scales in Delphi studies for core outcome set development and the definition of the consensus criteria influence outcome selection. The use of the nine-point scale might be recommended to inform the consensus process for a subsequent rating or face-to-face meeting. The three-point scale might be preferred when determining final consensus.

  • 19.
    de Vries, H. J. C.
    et al.
    STI Outpatient Clinic, Infectious Diseases Department, Public Health Service Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity (AI&II), Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    de Barbeyrac, B.
    Mycoplasmal and Chlamydial Infections in Humans, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Mycoplasmal and Chlamydial Infections in Humans, INRA, Bordeaux, France; Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Laboratoire de Bacteriologie, French National Reference Center for Bacterial STIs, Bordeaux, France.
    de Vrieze, N. H. N.
    Department of Dermatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Viset, J. D.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity (AI&II), Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    White, J. A.
    Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Western Health & Social Care Trust, Londonderry, UK.
    Vall-Mayans, M.
    STI Unit Vall d'Hebron-Drassanes, Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections.
    2019 European guideline on the management of lymphogranuloma venereum2019In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1821-1828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New or important issues in this updated version of the 2013 European guideline on the management of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV):

    EPIDEMIOLOGY: Lymphogranuloma venereum continues to be endemic among European men who have sex with men (MSM) since 2003. Lymphogranuloma venereum infections in heterosexuals are extremely rare in Europe, and there is no evidence of transmission of LGV in the European heterosexual population.

    AETIOLOGY AND TRANSMISSION: Chlamydia trachomatis serovars/genovars L2b and L2 are the causative strains in the majority of cases in Europe.

    CLINICAL FEATURES: Among MSM, about 25% of the anorectal LGV infections are asymptomatic. Genital infections among MSM are rare; the ratio of genital vs. anorectal LGV infections is 1 in 15.

    DIAGNOSIS: To diagnose LGV, a sample tested C. trachomatis positive with a commercial nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) platform should be confirmed with an LGV discriminatory NAAT.

    TREATMENT: Doxycycline 100 mg twice a day orally for 21 days is the recommended treatment for LGV. This same treatment is recommended also in asymptomatic patients and contacts of LGV patients. If another regimen is used, a test of cure (TOC) must be performed.

  • 20.
    Deprez, Julie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Kottner, Jan
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Institute of Clinical Nursing Science, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
    Eilegård Wallin, Alexandra
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ohde, Nils
    Institute of Clinical Nursing Science, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
    Bååth, Carina
    Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Faculty of Health, Welfare and Organisation, Østfold University College - Campus Frederikstad, Fredrikstad, Norway.
    Hommel, Ami
    Department of Care Science, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hultin, Lisa
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Upsalla University, Upsalla, Sweden; Upsalla University Hospital, Upsalla, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    What are the prognostic factors for the development of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD): a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e073115Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is irritant contact dermatitis and skin damage associated with prolonged skin contact with urine and/or faeces. Identifying prognostic factors for the development of IAD may improve management, facilitate prevention and inform future research.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This protocol follows the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols. Prospective and retrospective observational studies or clinical trials in which prognostic factors associated with the development of IAD are described are eligible. There are no restrictions on study setting, time, language, participant characteristics or geographical regions. Reviews, editorials, commentaries, methodological articles, letters to the editor, cross-sectional and case-control studies, and case reports are excluded. MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library will be searched from inception until May 2023. Two independent reviewers will independently evaluate studies. The Quality in Prognostic Studies tool will be used to assess the risk of bias, and the Checklist for Critical Appraisal and Data Extraction for Systematic Reviews of Prediction Modelling Studies-Prognostic Factors checklist will be used for data extraction of the included studies. Separate analyses will be conducted for each identified prognostic factor, with adjusted and unadjusted estimated measures analysed separately. Evidence will be summarised with a meta-analysis when possible, and narratively otherwise. The Q and I2 statistics will be calculated in order to quantify heterogeneity. The quality of the evidence obtained will be evaluated according to the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidance.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethical approval is needed since all data is already publicly accessible. The results of this work will be published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

  • 21. Domeika, M.
    et al.
    Litvinenko, I.
    Smirnova, T.
    Gaivaronskaya, O.
    Savicheva, A.
    Sokolovskiy, E.
    Ballard, R. C.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Laboratory diagnostics for non-viral sexually transmitted infections in St. Petersburg, Russia: current situation and hallmarks for improvements2008In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 1094-1100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The numbers and performance characteristics of laboratories providing sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnostic services, as well as the rates of morbidity due to STIs in St. Petersburg, Russia, remain largely unknown.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the range, quality and availability of diagnostic services for several non-viral STIs (Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum and Trichomonas vaginalis) in St. Petersburg during the period September 2005 to June 2006.

    METHODS: Survey data focusing on organization and performance characteristics of STI diagnostic services were assessed using questionnaires, telephone interviews and site visits.

    RESULTS: A total of 118 laboratories providing STI diagnostic services were identified. Of the surveyed laboratories, 54% (64 of 118) diagnosed syphilis, 81% (96 of 118) gonorrhoea, 80% (94 of 118) trichomoniasis and 49% (58 of 118) chlamydial infections. Although most of the laboratories could provide a presumptive diagnosis for syphilis, most of the N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis testing of women did not adhere to international recommendations. Of the laboratories with the capacity to diagnose C. trachomatis infection, 69% still used serological testing (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) to detect antibodies to C. trachomatis.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the diagnostic methods used to establish a laboratory diagnosis, the system of case reporting, the training of laboratory personnel and the level of interlaboratory communication clearly require improvement. This study represents the first step in a process of evaluation of the laboratory support for STI services and the establishment of an interlaboratory network in St. Petersburg.

  • 22.
    Dunk, A M
    et al.
    Tissue Viability Unit, Canberra Hospital, Yamba Drive, Garran, Canberra, ACT, Australia; Synergy: Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre, University of Canberra and ACT Health, Canberra, ACT, Australia; Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Broom, M
    Centenary Hospital for Women and Children, Garran, Canberra, ACT, Australia; Synergy: Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre, University of Canberra and ACT Health, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Kottner, J
    Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Clinical Nursing Science, Germany; Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Schlüer, A B
    Institue of Nursing, ZHAW School of Health Professionals, Winterthur, Switzerland; Spitex Bern, Kinderspitex, Berne, Switzerland.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Is it time to reconsider the terminology for diaper dermatitis?2023In: Journal of tissue viability, ISSN 0965-206X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 169-170Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Health-Related Quality of Life, Depression and Anxiety Correlate with the Degree of Hirsutism2013In: Dermatology, ISSN 1018-8665, E-ISSN 1421-9832, Vol. 227, no 3, p. 278-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hirsutism has a negative impact on women’s quality of life. The relation between quality of life, anxiety, depression and the level of hairiness has not been described.

    Aims: To investigate the correlations between the levels of hairiness, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Methods: 200 patients from Malmö, Örebro and Uppsala, who had been in contact with the clinics for problems with excessive hair growth, were invited to answer a self-administered questionnaire including sociodemographic questions, EQ- 5D index score, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Ferriman- Gallwey scale (F-G); of these, 127 women participated in the study.

    Results: The mean values were: EQ-5D index 0.73 (SD = 0.27), EQ visual analogue scale 61.0 (SD = 22.6), HADSanxiety 9.5 ± 5.3 and HADS-depression 6.5 ± 4.6. The mean DLQI was 11.8 ± 8.4, indicating a very large effect on patients’ lives. All were significantly correlated with the amount of hairiness.  

    Conclusions: Higher levels of hair growth were significantly correlated with a lower level of quality of life and symptoms of both anxiety and depression.

  • 24.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Drug & Therapeut Committee, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Troilius, Agneta
    Laser & Vascular Anomalies, Dermatol Dept, Skåne Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Laser therapy for refractory discoid lupus erythematosus when everything else has failed2013In: Journal of Cosmetic & Laser Therapy, ISSN 1476-4172, E-ISSN 1476-4180, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 260-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is restricted to the skin, mostly the face, often chronic and disfiguring. Standard medical therapies include topical corticosteroids and antimalarials. This is a retrospective long-term follow-up of refractory DLE treated with different lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL). Methods and materials : Sixteen patients with histologically confirmed DLE participated in this study. Two men and fourteen women, aged 28-69 years, mean age 54 years, were treated at the laser units of the Departments of Dermatology at the University Hospital of Orebro from 2001 and at Skane University Hospital in Malmo, Sweden from 1999. Several therapies, including first- and secondline treatments and even cryotherapy, had been used without response. Many patients had marked scarring. Pulsed dye laser (PDL) and IPL were used with low fluencies. Results: Of 16 patients, 14 were improved regarding itching, erythema, scaling, scarring and pain. There was no scarring as a side effect of laser therapy or IPL. Two patients were not satisfied: one because of long healing time, and the other because of post inflammatory hyper pigmentation. Conclusion: IPL and PDL is a safe adjunctive therapy to conventional treatment of DLE. In the effort to prevent severe scarring and disfigurement it should be used as early as possible.

  • 25.
    Ekbäck, Maria [Palmetun]
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Benzein, Eva
    "It is always on my mind": women's experiences of their bodies when living with hirsutism2009In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 358-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many women suffer from excessive hair growth, often in combination with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). It is unclear how hirsutism influences such women's experiences of their bodies. Our aim is to describe and interpret women's experiences of their bodies when living with hirsutism. Interviews were conducted with 10 women with hirsutism. We used a qualitative latent content analysis. Four closely intertwined themes were disclosed: the body was experienced as a yoke, a freak, a disgrace, and as a prison. Hirsutism deeply affects women's experiences of their bodies in a negative way.

  • 26.
    Evenhamre, Karolina
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Correlations Between Disease-specific DLQI and Generic WHOQOL-BREF Quality of Life Instruments in a Clinical Population with Mixed Dermatological Diagnoses: A Pilot Study2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 270-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Fall, Sofia
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Bruze, Magnus
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden .
    Isaksson, Marlene
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden .
    Lidén, Carola
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Matura, Mihaly
    Unit of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Contact allergy trends in Sweden: a retrospective comparison of patch test data from 1992, 2000, and 20092015In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 297-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Contact allergy prevalence rates change over time as a result of variations in allergen exposure. Data from patch test clinics are often used as markers for allergy trends.

    Objectives: The aim of the present retrospective study was to describe trends in rates of sensitization to allergens in the Swedish baseline series.

    Patients/materials/methods: Prevalence rates are described by comparing consecutive patch test data from 1992, 2000 and 2009 in Swedish patch test clinics. In total, 3680 patients were included in 1992, 3825 in 2000, and 3112 in 2009.

    Results: Among test substances with a sensitization rate above 2% in 2009, significant decreases were noted for nickel sulfate, cobalt chloride, colophonium, and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI)/methylisothiazolinone (MI), and a significant increase for p-phenylenediamine, as compared with 1992. Potassium dichromate reactions had increased among younger women, whereas reactions to nickel and cobalt had decreased in this group. Sensitization to chromium, cobalt and fragrance mix I had decreased among older men, and sensitization to nickel had decreased among younger men.

    Conclusions: It is probable that these changes in 1992-2009 reflect both changes in regulations for nickel, lower levels of chromium in cement and of MCI/MI in cosmetics, and increasing use of hair dyes.

  • 28.
    Forslind, B.
    et al.
    Experimental Dermatology Research Group, Dept. of Medical Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Li, H. K.
    Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden.
    Malmqvist, K. G.
    Dept. of Nuclear Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, Lund, Sweden.
    Wiegleb Edström, Desirée
    Experimental Dermatology Research Group, Dept. of Medical Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elemental analysis of hair fibres using PIXE - a population study of sulphur and zinc content1985In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 42, no 1-2, p. 219-222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Forslind, B.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Li, H. K.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Malmqvist, K. G.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wiegleb Edström, Desirée
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elemental content of anagen hairs in a normal Caucasian population studies with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE)1986In: Scanning electron microscopy, ISSN 0586-5581, no Pt 1, p. 237-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elemental content of anagen hair fibers in a Caucasian population of healthy females and males in the age range 10-69 years was performed to constitute a baseline for further studies of pathological conditions. Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analyses were performed on single hair fibers in triplicate from 103 individuals in order to determine sulfur, zinc, calcium, and chlorine content. The hair fibers were all anagen hairs collected from a site little influenced by genetic and hormonal influences 1.5 cm above the right ear of the probands. An area 5-8 mm from the follicle bottom was chosen for the analysis in all cases to minimize effect of hair-do contamination. The average sulfur content was 0.049 g/g and the average zinc content 170 micrograms/g. These results were not significantly influenced by chloroform/ethanol rinsing before analysis. The calcium and chlorine contents were 330 micrograms/g and 0.0033 g/g respectively. The latter data are expected to be more seriously influenced by external factors (e.g., contamination) than sulfur and zinc. No correlation between elemental concentration and sex was found for sulfur and zinc in the present material. PIXE analysis of single hair fibers yields valuable information on the elemental composition of hair fibers and can be rapidly and efficiently performed after simple mounting procedures.

  • 30.
    Frohm Nilsson, M.
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Passian, S.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wiegleb Edström, Desirée
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comparison of two dye lasers in the treatment of port-wine stains2010In: Clincal and Experimental Dermatology, ISSN 0307-6938, E-ISSN 1365-2230, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 126-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Port-wine stains (PWS) are congenital capillary malformations that persist throughout life. Laser therapy is a common treatment for PWS, and pulsed-dye laser is the current treatment of choice.

    AIM: To compare the clinical results on untreated PWS of two dye lasers with different wavelengths and pulse duration: a flashlamp-pumped dye laser (FPDL) and a long-pulse-duration dye laser (LPDL).

    METHODS: In total, 24 patients were treated on 4-6 test areas with both laser types using high-energy and low-energy fluences. An FPDL with 0.45 ms pulse duration tuned to 585 nm was compared with an LPDL with 1.5 or 3.0 ms pulse duration tuned to 595 nm. Twelve weeks later the degree of lightening was evaluated by a blinded assessor. Pain was assessed directly after treatment with both lasers, using a visual analogue scale.

    RESULT: There was no significant difference overall between the two systems in lightening of the lesion or in patient-reported pain.

    CONCLUSION: Both laser systems are equivalent in terms of efficacy and pain.

  • 31.
    Gethin, Georgina
    et al.
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland; Alliance for Research and Innovation in Wounds, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland; School of Nursing & Midwifery, Monash University, Melbourne Victoria, Australia.
    Probst, Sebastian
    School of Nursing & Midwifery, Monash University, Melbourne Victoria, Australia; Geneva School of Health Sciences, HES-SO, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western, Delémont, Switzerland.
    Weller, Carolina
    School of Nursing & Midwifery, Monash University, Melbourne Victoria, Australia.
    Kottner, Jan
    Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. School of Nursing & Midwifery, Monash University, Melbourne Victoria, Australia; Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons, in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland; Research Unit of Plastic Surgery, Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Nurses are research leaders in skin and wound care2020In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 2005-2009Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Assembly declared 2020, the International Year of the Nurse and the Midwife. Recent editorials and commentaries support the leading role of nurses and midwives as frontline caregivers emphasizing the need to invest in the nursing workforce worldwide to meet global health needs. Today nurses are also leaders in research and one example is skin and wound care. In order to reflect on the contribution of nurses as researchers we conducted a systematic review of published articles in five international leading wound care journals in the years 1998, 2008 and 2018. We aimed to determine the type of research publication and percentage of nurses as first, second or senior authors. The place in the authorship was selected as indicative of leadership as it implies responsibility and accountability for the published work. Across the years 1998, 2008 and 2018, 988 articles were published. The overall proportion of nurse-led articles was 29% (n = 286). The total numbers of articles increased over time and so too did the nurse-led contributions. Nurse-led research was strongest in the design categories 'cohort studies' (46%, n = 44), 'systematic reviews' (46%, n = 19), and 'critically appraised literature and evidence-based guidelines' (47%, n = 55).Results of this review indicate that, in addition to the crucial clinical roles, nurses also have a substantial impact on academia and development of the evidence base to guide clinical practice. Our results suggest that nurse led contributions were particularly strong in research summarizing research to guide skin and wound care practice.

  • 32.
    Guy, Rebecca J.
    et al.
    The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Causer, Louise M.
    The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Klausner, Jeffrey D.
    Department of Global Health, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
    Unemo, Magnus
    WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Toskin, Igor
    Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Azzini, Anna M.
    Verona University, Verona, Veneto, Italy.
    Peeling, Rosanna W.
    Department of Clinical Research, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Performance and operational characteristics of point-of-care tests for the diagnosis of urogenital gonococcal infections2017In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, ISSN 1368-4973, E-ISSN 1472-3263, Vol. 93, no Suppl. 4, p. S16-S21Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In 2012, there was an estimated 78 million new cases of gonorrhoea globally. Untreated infection may lead to reproductive and neonatal morbidity and facilitate HIV transmission. Diagnosis and treatment are a priority for control and prevention, yet use of point-of-care tests (POCTs) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) is limited.

    Objectives: To review the performance and operational characteristics of NG POCTs for diagnosis of urogenital gonorrhoea.

    Methods: We compiled and synthesised findings from two separate systematic reviews which included evaluations published until August 2015.

    Results: Six tests were included: five were immunochromatographic tests (ICTs) or optical immunoassay (OIAs) based on antigen detection; with 5-7 steps and results in 25-40 min, and one (GeneXpert CT/NG) was a 'near-patient test' based on nucleic acid amplification technique (NAAT); with three steps, electricity required, and results in 90 min. When compared with laboratory-based NAATs as the reference tests, sensitivities of ICT and OIA-based POCTs ranged from 12.5% to 70% when cervical/vaginal swabs were tested. Specificities ranged from 89% to 99.8%. The near-patient NAAT had sensitivities of >95% and specificities of >99.8% consistently across all specimen types (urine, cervical and vaginal swabs).

    Conclusions: Based on a limited number of evaluations, antigen detection POCTs for NG lacked sufficient sensitivity to be used for screening. A near-patient NAAT has acceptable performance, only involved a few steps, but needs electricity, a temperature-controlled environment and has a 90 min run time. To achieve wider scale up of NG POCTs, we need strong evidence of cost-effectiveness, which should inform guidelines and ultimately increase test development, demand and reduce costs.

  • 33. Hadad, Ronza
    et al.
    Fredlund, Hans
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Evaluation of the new COBAS TaqMan CT test v2.0 and impact on the proportion of new variant Chlamydia trachomatis by the introduction of diagnostics detecting new variant C trachomatis in Örebro county, Sweden2009In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, ISSN 1368-4973, E-ISSN 1472-3263, Vol. 85, p. 190-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (nvCT), discovered in Sweden in 2006, contains a 377-bp cryptic plasmid deletion, which includes the targets for the COBAS Amplicor/TaqMan C trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoea and Abbott m2000rt C trachomatis/N gonorrhoea tests.

    Objectives: To evaluate the new real-time COBAS TaqMan CT test v2.0 (CTM CT v2.0) for C trachomatis diagnostics and to investigate whether the proportion of nvCT was affected by the introduction of genetic diagnostics detecting nvCT (LightMix 480HT) in Örebro county, Sweden.

    Methods: CTM CT v2.0 compared with LightMix 480 HT PCR for the diagnosis of C trachomatis was evaluated. Discrepant samples were analysed using BD ProbeTec ET and Abbott m2000rt RealTime CT II. All previously LightMix and cell culture-positive samples were analysed using an nvCT-specific PCR.

    Results: The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value of CTM CT v2.0 for examined samples (n  =  1058) was 100%, 99.8%, 100% and 98.2%, respectively. Of 11 577 consecutive PCR samples, 9.4% (n  =  1084) were positive and 34.3% (n  =  372) of these were nvCT. Of 2306 consecutive culture samples, 5.0% (n  =  116) were C trachomatis positive and 38.8% (n  =  45) of these were nvCT.

    Conclusions: CTM CT v2.0 is a sensitive and specific method for C trachomatis detection. Studies including larger numbers of symptomatic and asymptomatic patients as well as genital and extragenital samples, and in comparison with other internationally validated and, ideally, US Food and Drug Administration-approved C trachomatis nucleic acid amplification tests are imperative. The proportion of nvCT remains high in Örebro county, Sweden, despite the introduction of genetic diagnostics to detect the mutant. 

  • 34. Hadad, Ronza
    et al.
    Fredlund, Hans
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Impact on the proportion of the new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (nvCT) by introduction of diagnostics detecting nvCT and evaluation of Cobas TaqMan48 CT Test v2.0 for C. trachomatis diagnostics in Örebro county, Sweden2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Hagvall, Lina
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Kristina
    Department of Dermatology, Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Stenberg B., Berndt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology & Venerology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Karlberg, Ann-Therese
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bråred Christensson, Johanna
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Dermatochemistry and Skin Allergy, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Contact allergy to citral and its constituents geranial and neral, coupled with reactions to the prehapten and prohapten geraniol2020In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 31-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Citral is commonly used as a fragrance and flavour material and consists of the aldehydes geranial and neral. Citral is included in fragrance mix (FM) II. Geranial and neral have also been identified in autoxidation of geraniol, a fragrance compound present in FM I.

    Objectives: To study contact allergy to citral, geranial and neral and concomitant reactivity to oxidized geraniol and fragrance markers of the baseline series.

    Patients and Methods: 1476 dermatitis patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis were patch tested using geranial, neral and citral, all 3.5% pet., geraniol 6.0% and oxidized geraniol 11% pet. in addition to the Swedish baseline series.

    Results: Frequencies of positive reactions to citral, geranial and neral were 2.9%, 3.4% and 1.9%, respectively. Together, citral and geranial gave 4.2% positive patch test reactions in consecutive dermatitis patients. In patients with positive reactions to citral or its components, 25‐34% reacted to FM II and 61% reacted to oxidized geraniol.

    Conclusions: Patch testing with citral, its components or oxidized geraniol detects contact allergic reactions not detected using the baseline series. Patch testing with pure geraniol was shown to be of little value. Geranial and neral, although closely chemically related, are concluded to be separate haptens.

  • 36.
    Hagvall, Lina
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Kristina
    Department of Dermatology, Uddevalla Hospital, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology & Venereology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Karlberg, Ann-Therese
    Dermatochemistry, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bråred Christensson, Johanna
    Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Dermatochemistry, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Contact allergy to oxidized geraniol among Swedish dermatitis patients: A multicentre study by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group2018In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 232-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Geraniol is a widely used fragrance terpene, and is included in fragrance mix I. Geraniol is prone to autoxidation, forming the skin sensitizers geranial, neral, and geraniol-7-hydroperoxide. Oxidized geraniol has previously been patch tested in 1 clinic, giving 1% to 4.6% positive reactions in consecutive patients when tested at 2% to 11%.

    AIM: To compare test reactions to pure and oxidized geraniol, to compare 2 different test concentrations of oxidized geraniol and to investigate the pattern of concomitant reactions to fragrance markers of the baseline series in a multicentre setting.

    METHODS: One thousand four hundred and seventy-six consecutive patients referred for patch testing were patch tested with geraniol 6% pet. and oxidized geraniol 6% and 11% pet.

    RESULTS: Pure geraniol 6% pet., oxidized geraniol 6% pet. and oxidized geraniol 11% pet. gave 1%, 3% and 8% positive patch test reactions and 0.7%, 3% and 5% doubtful reactions, respectively. Approximately 50% of the patients with doubtful reactions to oxidized geraniol 6% pet. had positive reactions to oxidized geraniol 11% pet.

    CONCLUSIONS: Oxidized geraniol 11% pet. provides better detection than oxidized geraniol 6% pet. As most patients reacted only to oxidized geraniol, it is important to explore further whether oxidized geraniol should be included in a baseline patch test series.

  • 37.
    Hedberg, Yolanda S.
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Department of Chemistry, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lidén, Carola
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Chromium Dermatitis in a Metal Worker Due to Leather Gloves and Alkaline Coolant2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 104-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hilmarsdóttir, Ingibjörg
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Landspítali – The University Hospital of Iceland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland.
    Arnardóttir, Eva Mjöll
    Department of Microbiology, Landspítali – The University Hospital of Iceland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland.
    Jóhannesdóttir, Elisabet Reykdal
    Department of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Landspítali – The University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Golparian, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other Sexually Transmitted Infections, Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Chlamydia trachomatis in Iceland: Prevalence, Clinico-epidemiological Features and Comparison of Cobas 480 CT/NG and Aptima Combo 2 (CT/NG) for Diagnosis2021In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 101, article id adv00393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of, and risk factors for, Chlamydia trachomatis in attendees recruited prospectively from October 2018 to January 2019 at the only sexually transmitted infections clinic in Iceland (in Reykjavik), and to evaluate the cobas 4800 CT/NG Test and Aptima Combo 2 Assay for C. trachomatis detection in male urine and female vaginal swabs. Prevalence of C. trachomatis was 15.8% among 487 women and 13.6% among 491 men (no Neisseria gonorrhoeae positive patients were found). C. trachomatis detection was independently and positively associated with being tested for contact tracing, 18?24 years of age, and reporting ? 6 sexual partners within 12 months. Reporting sex with nonresidents of Iceland was associated with a lower risk of C. trachomatis infection. Both assays had a high sensitivity in detection of C. trachomatis (Aptima Combo 2: 100%; cobas 4800 CT/NG: 95.1%) and high specificity (100% and 99.6%, respectively). The high local prevalence of C. trachomatis and increased acquisition risk following sex with residents are of public health concern.

  • 39.
    Hirschberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Medical Biosciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ekman, Bertil
    Department of Endocrinology in Linköping, and Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wahlberg, Jeanette
    Department of Endocrinology in Linköping, and Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Landberg, Eva
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, and Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Altered immunoglobulin G glycosylation in patients with isolated hyperprolactinaemia2021In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 2, article id e0247805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prolactin is a peptide hormone produced in the anterior pituitary, which increase in several physiological and pathological situations. It is unclear if hyperprolactinaemia may affect glycosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG). Twenty-five patients with hyperprolactinemia and 22 healthy control subjects were included in the study. The groups had similar age and gender distribution. A panel of hormonal and haematological analyses, creatinine, glucose, liver enzymes and immunoglobulins were measured by routine clinical methods. IgG was purified from serum by Protein G Sepharose. Sialic acid was released from IgG by use of neuraminidase followed by quantification on high performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. Tryptic glycopeptides of IgG was analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Hormone and immunoglobulin levels were similar in the two groups, except for IgA and prolactin. Significantly higher IgG1 and IgG2/3 galactosylation was found in the patient group with hyperprolactinaemia compared to controls. (A significant correlation between prolactin and IgG2/3 galactosylation (Rs 0.61, p<0.001) was found for samples with prolactin values below 2000 mIU/L. The relative amount of sialylated and bisecting glycans on IgG did not differ between patients and controls. The four macroprolactinaemic patients showed decreased relative amount of bisecting IgG2/3 glycans. Hyperprolactinaemia was found to be associated with increased galactosylation of IgG1and IgG2/3. This may have impact on IgG interactions with Fc-receptors, complement and lectins, and consequently lead to an altered immune response. 

  • 40.
    Hjelmevoll, Stig Ove
    et al.
    Departments of Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Olsen, Merethe Elise
    Departments of Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Sollid, Johanna U. Ericson
    Department of Microbiology and Virology, Institute of Medical Biology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Haaheim, Hakon
    Departments of Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Melby, Kjetil K.
    Department of Microbiology, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Moi, Harald
    Olafiaklinikken, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University Hospital. WHO Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and other STIs, National Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sverige; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skogen, Vegard
    Departments of Infectious Diseases, Medical Clinic, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Appropriate Time for Test-of-Cure when Diagnosing Gonorrhoea with a Nucleic Acid Amplification Test2012In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Culture is commonly regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. However, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have rapidly replaced culture for diagnostics in many settings. The aim of the present study was to investigate the appropriate time for test-of-cure (TOC) when NAATs are used for diagnosis of gonorrhoea. In total, 30 patients (28 men and 2 women) provided urethral, cervical, rectal or pharyngeal specimens for TOC. All included patients, except one who did not return for second TOC before day 19, tested negative within 2 weeks after treatment with cefixime 400 mg x 1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that 68% of the culture-positive strains were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Thus, the recommended empirical treatment with ciprofloxacin in Norway should be changed immediately. TOC can be performed 2 weeks after treatment when NAATs are used for diagnosis of gonorrhoea.

  • 41.
    Horner, P.
    et al.
    Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Evaluation of Interventions, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Donders, G.
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium.
    Cusini, M.
    Department of Dermatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Policlinico, Milano, Italy.
    Gomberg, M.
    Moscow Scientific and Practical Center of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, Moscow, Russia.
    Jensen, J. S.
    Infection Preparedness, Research Unit for Reproductive Tract Microbiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Gonorrhoea and Other STIs, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology.
    Should we be testing for urogenital Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum and U. urealyticum in men and women?: a Position Statement from the European STI Guidelines Editorial Board2018In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1845-1851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At present, we have no evidence that we are doing more good than harm detecting and subsequently treating Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum colonisations/infections. Consequently, routine testing and treatment of asymptomatic or symptomatic men and women for M. hominis, U. urealyticum, and U. parvum is not recommended. Asymptomatic carriage of these bacteria is common and the majority of individuals do not develop disease. Although U. urealyticum has been associated with urethritis in men, it is probably not causal unless a high load is present (likely carriage in 40-80% of detected cases). The extensive testing, detection and subsequent antimicrobial treatment of these bacteria performed in some settings may result in selection of antimicrobial resistance, in these bacteria, "true" STI agents, as well as in the general microbiota, and substantial economic cost for society and individuals, particularly women. The commercialisation of many particularly multiplex PCR assays detecting traditional non-viral STIs together with M. hominis, U. parvum and/or U. urealyticum have worsened this situation. Thus, routine screening of asymptomatic men and women or routine testing of symptomatic individuals for M. hominis, U. urealyticum, and U. parvum is not recommended. If testing of men with symptomatic urethritis is undertaken, traditional STI urethritis agents such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, M. genitalium and, in settings where relevant, Trichomonas vaginalis should be excluded prior to U. urealyticum testing and quantitative species-specific molecular diagnostic tests should be used. Only men with high U. urealyticum load should be considered for treatment, however, appropriate evidence for effective treatment regimens is lacking. In symptomatic women, bacterial vaginosis (BV) should always be tested for and treated if detected.

  • 42.
    Howells, Laura
    et al.
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Chalmers, Joanne R.
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Gran, Sonia
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Ahmed, Amina
    Patient representative, Nottingham, UK.
    Apfelbacher, Christian
    Medical Sociology, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Regensburg; Institute of Social Medicine and Health Economics, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Burton, Tim
    Patient representative, Nottingham, UK.
    Howie, Lynita
    Patient representative, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lawton, Sandra
    Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust, Rotherham, UK.
    Ridd, Matthew J.
    Population Health Science, University of Bristol, UK.
    Rogers, Natasha K.
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    Sears, Alison V.
    St John’s Institute of Dermatology and Peter Gorer Department of Immunobiology, School of Immunology and Microbial Sciences, King’s College London, London, UK.
    Spuls, Phyllis I.
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public health and Epidemiology, Immunity and Infections, the Netherlands.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Clinical Research, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Thomas, Kim S.
    Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
    RECAP OF ATOPIC ECZEMA (RECAP): ASSESSING ECZEMA CONTROL FROM THE PATIENT AND PARENT PERSPECTIVE2021In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 101, no Suppl. 221, p. 29-29, article id PE4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative recommend long-term control of eczema is measured in all clinical trials over 3 months in duration, but prior to this work, no instrument had been identified as suitable for inclusion in the core outcome set.

    Objective: To develop a ques-tionnaire to capture ‘eczema control’ from a patient/caregiver’s perspective.

    Methods: A mixed-methods approach was used to develop and refine a conceptual framework, generate, refine and select items and initial testing of the items. Questionnaire con-tent was generated and refined via a focus group, expert panel meetings, cognitive interviews and an online survey with people with eczema/caregivers. Impact analysis and multivariable li-near regression were used for item selection. The distribution of scores and construct validity were assessed.

    Results: Fourteen expert panel members (including patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals and methodologists) co-produced the instrument; with input from people with eczema/caregivers via a focus group (n = 6), cognitive interviews (n = 13) and an online survey (n = 330). Recap of atopic eczema (RECAP) is a seven-item questionnaire with a self-reported and caregiver-reported version. Initial testing suggested no floor or ceiling effects and good construct validity. Positive correlation with the Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) was confirmed (r(258)=0.83, p < 0.001).

    Conclusions: RECAP is appropriate and feasible for measuring eczema control in clinical trials. Testing of measurement properties and translation to other languages is ongoing. RECAP has been recommended for inclusion in the HOME core outcome set for clinical trials and the HOME clinical practice set.

  • 43.
    Hörfelt, C.
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Funk, J.
    Dr. Funk's Hudklinikk, Moss, Norway.
    Frohm-Nilsson, M.
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wiegleb Edström, Desirée
    Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wennberg, A.-M.
    Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Topical methyl aminolaevulinate photodynamic therapy for treatment of facial acne vulgaris: results of a randomized, controlled study2006In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 155, no 3, p. 608-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for alternative treatments for moderate to severe acne vulgaris. Preliminary experience suggests that topical methyl aminolaevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) may have potential.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of MAL-PDT for treatment of moderate inflammatory facial acne.

    PATIENTS/METHODS: Thirty patients aged 15-28 years with moderate to severe acne were included in a blinded, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled multicentre study. Each side of each patient's face was randomly assigned to treatment with MAL (160 mg g1) or placebo cream, applied for 3 h prior to illumination. A second treatment was given 2 weeks later. On each occasion, patients assessed the intensity of pain using a 10-cm visual analogue scale. Inflammatory and noninflammatory acne lesions were counted at baseline and 4 and 10 weeks after the last PDT treatment. The investigator assessed the global severity of acne at baseline (seven patients had severe acne on at least one side of the face) and each study visit using a six-point rating scale. Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis, including all 30 patients.

    RESULTS: There was a statistically significant greater reduction in the total inflammatory lesion count with MAL-PDT compared with placebo PDT at week 12; median reduction 54% [95% confidence interval (CI) 35-64%] vs. 20% (95% CI 8-50%), P = 0.0006. MAL-PDT was associated with more pain than placebo PDT, although intensity varied across centres and was reduced with repeated treatment. Local adverse events were consistent with this treatment modality.

    CONCLUSIONS: MAL-PDT is effective in the treatment of moderate to severe inflammatory facial acne. Further studies are warranted to optimize this promising procedure.

  • 44.
    Isaksson, Marlene
    et al.
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Brared-Christensson, Johanna
    Dept Dermatol, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Malin
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Matura, Mihaly
    Inst Environm Med, Dept Dermatol, Unit Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Dermatol, Ctr Occupat & Environm Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Halvor
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ryberg, Kristina
    Dept Dermatol, Uddevalla Cent Hosp, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Dept Dermatol, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Patch Testing with Formaldehyde 2.0% in Parallel with 1.0% by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group2014In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 408-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a multicentre study consecutively patch-tested dermatitis patients were tested simultaneously with 1.0% and 2.0% (w/v) formaldehyde in aqua applied with a micro-pipette (15 mu l) to the filter paper disc in Finn Chambers (0.30 mg/cm(2) and 0.60 mg/cm(2), respectively). A total of 2,122 dermatitis patients were patch-tested. In all, 77 (3.6%) patients reacted positively to formaldehyde; 37 reacted only to 2.0%, 35 reacted to both concentrations and 5 patients reacted only to 1.0%. Significantly more patients were thus diagnosed with contact allergy to formaldehyde with 2.0% compared to 1.0% (p<0.001) without causing more irritant reactions. The detected number of isolated allergic reactions to the 2 formaldehyde-releasers in the Swedish baseline series and not to formaldehyde itself raises the question whether quaternium-15 1.0% and diazolidinyl urea 2.0% should be present in the Swedish baseline series.

  • 45.
    Isaksson, Marlene
    et al.
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Inerot, Annica
    Dept Dermatol, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Liden, Carola
    Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Unit Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Stockholm Cty Council,Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Matura, Mihaly
    Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Unit Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Halvor
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Multicentre patch testing with fragrance mix II and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group2014In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 187-189Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Jamil, Wasim N.
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Erikssohn, Ingalill
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    How well is the outcome of patch testing remembered by the patients?: A 10-year follow-up of testing with the Swedish baseline series at the Department of Dermatology in Örebro, Sweden2012In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 215-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patch testing is beneficial for patients with contact dermatitis. However, it is not known how well the outcome of patch testing is remembered after a prolonged period.

    Objectives: To study how well patients remember the outcome of their tests after 1-10 years. Patients/materials/methods. In 2010, a questionnaire was sent to all patients tested with the Swedish baseline series in 2009, 2005, and 2000.

    Results: The response rate was 53.3% (252/473), and 96% (241/252) of patients reported that they had been submitted for allergy testing. Among those with positive patch test results, 79% (111/141) remembered a positive result and 29% (41/141) reported the correct name of the allergen. We found a wide variation (0-80%) in how well the patients remembered positive test results for different allergens. The ability to recall allergens had no relationship with the localization or extension of eczema lesions, but was negatively correlated with the number of diagnosed allergies, the number of years after patch testing, and being male.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that improved information for patients following patch testing is required, in order to improve the prognosis of contact dermatitis.

  • 47.
    Jamil, Wasim N.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effects of time and recall of patch test results on quality of life (QoL) after testing: Cross-sectional study analyzing QoL in hand eczema patients 1, 5 and 10 years after patch testing2017In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 88-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patch testing can improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    Objectives: To study the impact on HRQoL of elapsed time after patch testing (1-10 years), and how the outcome of testing and patients' recall affects HRQoL.

    Patients/materials/methods: The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire was sent to all patients (aged 18-65 years) who were patch tested for suspected contact allergy in 2009, 2005 and 2000 at the Department of Dermatology in Örebro.

    Results: The response rate was 51% (n = 256). The DLQI score was significantly lower at 10 years after patch testing (mean DLQI = 5.5) than at 1 year (mean DLQI = 7.7). Work was the most impaired aspect. A binary logistic model showed that only time (10 years after testing) was associated with no effect, a light effect or a moderate effect (DLQI < 10) on HRQoL. No such association was seen for patients with negative or positive test results concerning full recall, partial recall or no recall of diagnosed allergens.

    Conclusions: Although there was an improvement in HRQoL over time, the work aspect remained a major problem. The improvement was not affected by the outcome of testing and patients' recall of test results.

  • 48.
    Jamil, Wasim
    et al.
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology.
    Incidence Rate of Hand Eczema in Different Occupations: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis2022In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 102, article id adv00681Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand eczema is a chronic disease that results in economic and psychosocial burdens. The aim of this study was to systematically review and assess the magnitude of the association between exposure related to occupations and the incidence rate of hand eczema. A systematic search in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases, from inception to September 2017, of full-text observational studies reporting incident cases of hand eczema during employment, and a supplementary search in PubMed to September 2020, were conducted. Among 2,417 screened abstracts, 15 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Incidence rates were reported per 100 person-years. Based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, 9 studies were good quality, 2 fair quality, and 4 poor quality. Hairdressers had a high incidence of hand eczema of 21.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.3-27.4), as did nurses, 16.9 (95% CI 11.2-22.7), and metal workers, 12.4 (95% CI 3.5-21.3). Hairdressers were predominantly women, and metal worker were predominantly men. Office occupations had an incidence rate of hand eczema of 4.9 (95% CI 1.2-9.6). The high risk of hand eczema for hairdressers, nurses, and metal workers, should be considered by healthcare policymakers. Even occupations with low irritant profile, such as office workers, were at risk of developing hand eczema, and more occupations should be investigated regarding the related risk of developing hand eczema.

  • 49.
    Jamil, Wasim
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, and Faculty of Medicine, Section of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Occupational Dermatology &Medical Science Lunds university Malmö, Sweden.
    Berg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Medical Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Department of Dermatology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Can Dermatology Life Quality Index be used as a Prognostic Tool for Predicting Need of Health Care in Eczema Patients? A Pilot Study2022In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 102, article id adv00673Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Johansen, Jeanne D.
    et al.
    Dept Dermatoallergol, Natl Allergy Res Ctr, Gentofte Hosp, Univ Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina
    Occupat Med, Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Agner, Tove
    Dept Dermatol, Bispebjerg Hosp, Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersen, Klaus E.
    Odense Univ Hosp, Univ Southern Denmark, Dept Dermatol, Odense, Denmark; Allergy Ctr, Odense Univ Hosp, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Bircher, Andreas
    Dept Dermatol, Allergy Unit, Univ Basel Hosp, Basel, Switzerland; Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden.
    Cannavo, Alicia
    Hosp Municipal Vicente Lopez Prof Bernard Houssay, Buenos Aires DF, Argentina.
    Gimenez-Arnau, Ana
    Dept Dermatol, Hosp Mar, Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Goncalo, Margarida
    Dept Dermatol, Univ Hosp, Coimbra, Portugal; Fac Med, Univ Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Goossens, An
    Dept Dermatol, Contact Allergy Unit, Univ Hosp KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    John, Swen M.
    Dept Dermatol, Environm Med, Hlth Theory,Univ Osnabruck, Osnabruck, Germany.
    Liden, Carola
    Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mahler, Vera
    Dept Dermatol, Allergy Unit, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
    Matura, Mihly
    Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Unit Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Stockholms Läns Sjukvårdsområde (SLSO), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rustemeyer, Thomas
    Dept Dermatol, Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Serup, Jorgen
    Dept Dermatol, Bispebjerg Hosp, Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Spiewak, Radoslaw
    Dept Expt Dermatol & Cosmetol, Coll Med, Jagiellonian Univ, Krakow, Poland.
    Thyssen, Jacob P.
    Dept Dermatoallergol, Natl Allergy Res Ctr, Gentofte Hosp, Univ Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
    Vigan, Martine
    Dept Dermatol, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) Besancon, Besancon, France.
    White, Ian R.
    St Johns Inst Dermatol, Dept Cutaneous Allergy, St Thomas Hosp, London, England.
    Wilkinson, Mark
    Spire Hosp, Leeds, England.
    Uter, Wolfgang
    Dept Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    European Society of Contact Dermatitis guideline for diagnostic patch testing: recommendations on best practice2015In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 195-221Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present guideline summarizes all aspects of patch testing for the diagnosis of contact allergy in patients suspected of suffering, or having been suffering, from allergic contact dermatitis or other delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and mucosal conditions. Sections with brief descriptions and discussions of different pertinent topics are followed by a highlighted short practical recommendation. Topics comprise, after an introduction with important definitions, materials, technique, modifications of epicutaneous testing, individual factors influencing the patch test outcome or necessitating special considerations, children, patients with occupational contact dermatitis and drug eruptions as special groups, patch testing of materials brought in by the patient, adverse effects of patch testing, and the final evaluation and patient counselling based on this judgement. Finally, short reference is made to aspects of (continuing) medical education and to electronic collection of data for epidemiological surveillance.

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