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  • 1.
    Acosta, Stefan
    et al.
    Vascular Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Current status on plasma biomarkers for acute mesenteric ischemia2012In: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis, ISSN 0929-5305, E-ISSN 1573-742X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 355-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia is difficult. The aim of this review is to provide current status on the search for an accurate plasma biomarker for acute mesenteric ischemia. A search using the medical subject heading terms marker and mesenteric ischemia or intestinal ischemia or superior mesenteric artery occlusion or mesenteric venous thrombosis in the Medline and Embase databases from 1980 to 2011. Studies without a control group or a control group consisted of healthy individuals (human studies), or studies on intestinal reperfusion were excluded. Twenty animal and twelve human studies were identified. In human studies, the studied series of patients had a control group that had a need of laparotomy (n = 2), suspected acute mesenteric ischemia (n = 7), acute abdomen (n = 2) or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (n = 1). D: -dimer has been found to be the most consistent highly sensitive early marker, but specificity was low. The follow-up study on α-glutathione S-transferase yielded inferior sensitivity and accuracy than the preliminary study, clearly questioning the value of this marker. Intestinal fatty acid binding globulin (I-FABP) and D: -lactate are both interesting markers, but the results were conflicting. Different cut-off levels have been used in the studies on I-FABP. The encouraging preliminary result of cobalt-albumin and urinary FABP as an accurate marker needs to be addressed in other study populations. The early clinical and laboratory diagnosis of intestinal ischemia remains a challenge. None of the proposed plasma-derived tests for acute mesenteric ischemia has as yet entered routine clinical practice. The proposed biomarkers need to be evaluated in a prospective clinical research project in patients with acute abdomen.

  • 2.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    eComment. Postoperative atrial fibrillation: a robust human model of atrial fibrillation genesis?2013In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 614-615Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Exploration of Theoretical Ganglionated Plexi Ablation Technique in Atrial Fibrillation Surgery COMMENTARY2014In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 98, no 5, p. 1604-1605Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg.
    Postoperative atrial fibrillation and stroke-is it time to act?2014In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 69-70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Thoraxkliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro, Sweden.
    Albåge, Anders
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jidéus, Lena
    Akademiska universitetssjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berglin, Eva
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kirurgisk behandling av förmaksflimmer i samband med hjärtkirurgi [Surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in connection with cardiac surgery]: konsensusrapport från Sveriges arytmiansvariga hjärtkirurger [ Consensus report from Swedish cardiac surgeons responsible for arrhythmia]2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 5, p. 214-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Förmaksflimmer är vanligt och förekommer hos 6–10 procent av de patienter som ska genomgå kranskärlsoperation eller klaffkirurgi. Kirurgisk ablation av förmaksflimmer i samband med kranskärlsoperation eller klaffkirurgi bör erbjudas alla symtomatiska och utvalda asymtomatiska patienter. Cox-maze III (labyrintoperation) är den metod som gett bäst resultat vad avser frihet från förmaksflimmer 1 år efter ingreppet.

    Under senare år har flera nya metoder utvecklats för att åstadkomma elektriskt isolerande lesioner i hjärtats förmak. Dessa är tekniskt enklare och mindre invasiva. De är dock behäftade med sämre resultat än den ursprungliga Cox-maze III-operationen. Arytmiansvariga kirurger på landets samtliga hjärtkirurgiska kliniker har nått samstämmighet om hur förmaksflimmer bör behandlas i samband med annan hjärtkirurgi. Denna konsensus, vilken presenteras här, betonar vikten av att vid kirurgisk ablation följa lesionsmönstret i Cox-maze III och helst behandla både höger och vänster förmak för bästa långtidsresultat

  • 6.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation have a doubled cardiovascular mortality2009In: Scandinavian cardiovascular journal : SCJ, ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 330-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of postoperative AF on late mortality and cause of death in CABG patients.

    DESIGN: All CABG patients without preoperative AF surgically treated between January 1, 1997 and June 30, 2000 were included (N = 1419). Altogether, 419 patients (29.5%) developed postoperative AF. After a median follow-up of 8.0 years, survival data were obtained, causes of death were compared and Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to determine predictors of late mortality.

    RESULTS: The total mortality was 140 deaths/419 patients (33.4%) in postoperative AF patients and 191 deaths/1 000 patients (19.1%) in patients without AF. Death due to cerebral ischemia (2.6% vs. 0.5%), myocardial infarction (7.4% vs. 3.0%), sudden death (2.6% vs. 0.9%), and heart failure (6.7% vs. 2.7%) was more common among postoperative AF patients. Postoperative AF was an age-independent risk indicator for late mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.56 (95% confidence interval 1.23-1.98).

    CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative AF is an age-independent risk factor for late mortality in CABG patients, explained by an increased risk of cardiovascular death.

  • 7.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Dept Cardiol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Birger
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Positioning of the ablation catheter in total endoscopic ablation2014In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 125-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Minimally invasive ablation of atrial fibrillation is an option in patients not suitable for or refractory to catheter ablation. Total endoscopic ablation can be performed via a monolateral approach, whereby a left atrial box lesion is created. If the ablation is introduced from the right side, the positioning of the ablation catheter on the partly hidden left pulmonary veins is of vital importance. Using thoracoscopy in combination with multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography, the anatomical position of the ablation catheter can be established. Our experience in over 60 procedures has confirmed this to be a safe technique of total endoscopic ablation.

  • 8.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Englund, Anders
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass surgery carries an eightfold risk of future atrial fibrillation and a doubled cardiovascular mortality2010In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1353-1359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This article presents a study of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) and its long-term effects on mortality and heart rhythm.

    METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 571 patients with no history of AF who underwent primary aortocoronary bypass surgery from 1999 to 2000. Postoperative AF occurred in 165/571 patients (28.9%). After a median follow-up of 6 years, questionnaires were obtained from 91.6% of surviving patients and an electrocardiogram (ECG) from 88.6% of all patients. Data from hospitalisations due to arrhythmia or stroke during follow-up were analysed. The causes of death were obtained for deceased patients.

    RESULTS: In postoperative AF patients, 25.4% had atrial fibrillation at follow-up compared with 3.6% of patients with no AF at surgery (p<0.001). An episode of postoperative AF was the strongest independent risk factor for development of late AF, with an adjusted risk ratio of 8.31 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.20-16.43). Mortality was 29.7% (49 deaths/165 patients) in the AF group and 14.8% (60 deaths/406 patients) in the non-AF group (p<0.001). Death due to cerebral ischaemia was more common in the postoperative AF group (4.2% vs 0.2%, p<0.001), as was death due to myocardial infarction (6.7% vs 3.0%, p=0.041). Postoperative AF was an age-independent risk factor for late mortality, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.57 (95% CI 1.05-2.34).

    CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative AF patients have an eightfold increased risk of developing AF in the future, and a doubled long-term cardiovascular mortality.

  • 9.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandin, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Souza, Domingos S. R.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Annular abscess leading to free wall rupture2014In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. E39-E39Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ahmadi, Zainab
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bornefalk-Hermansson, Anna
    Department of Statistics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekström, Magnus
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Respiratory Medicine & Allergology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Long-Term Oxygen Therapy 24 vs 15 h/day and Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 9, article id e0163293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) ≥ 15 h/day improves survival in hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). LTOT 24 h/day is often recommended but may pose an unnecessary burden with no clear survival benefit compared with LTOT 15 h/day. The aim was to test the hypothesis that LTOT 24 h/day decreases all-cause, respiratory, and cardiovascular mortality compared to LTOT 15 h/day in hypoxemic COPD. This was a prospective, observational, population-based study of COPD patients starting LTOT between October 1, 2005 and June 30, 2009 in Sweden. Overall and cause-specific mortality was analyzed using Cox and Fine-Gray regression, controlling for age, sex, prescribed oxygen dose, PaO2 (air), PaCO2 (air), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), WHO performance status, body mass index, comorbidity, and oral glucocorticoids. A total of 2,249 included patients were included with a median follow-up of 1.1 years (interquartile range, 0.6-2.1). 1,129 (50%) patients died and no patient was lost to follow-up. Higher LTOT duration analyzed as a continuous variable was not associated with any change in mortality rate (hazard ratio [HR] 1.00; (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.02) per 1 h/day increase above 15 h/day. LTOT exactly 24 h/day was prescribed in 539 (24%) patients and LTOT 15-16 h/day in 1,231 (55%) patients. Mortality was similar between the groups for all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular mortality. In hypoxemic COPD, LTOT 24 h/day was not associated with a survival benefit compared with treatment 15-16 h/day. A design for a registry-based randomized trial (R-RCT) is proposed.

  • 11.
    Ahmed, K.
    et al.
    School of Health and Medical Science, Clinical Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Association between objectively measured physical activity and sub-clinical atherosclerosis in young adults2010In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 31, no Suppl 1, p. 388-388Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Alibegovic, A.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pretreatment with glucose infusion prevents fatal outcome after hemorrhage in food deprived rats1993In: Circulatory Shock, ISSN 0092-6213, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-four hour food deprivation increases mortality after experimental hemorrhage. Survival after hemorrhage is closely related to the capacity of the animal to develop hyperglycemia. In this study, 24 hr food deprived rats were given a 3-hr infusion of either 0.3 ml/100 g b.wt./h 30% glucose iv (n = 10) or the same volume of 0.9% NaCl (n = 10) prior to 60 min of standardized hemorrhage. Glucose infusion resulted in a transient hyperglycemia, and 600% greater hepatic glycogen content compared to saline (P < 0.001). During hemorrhage, glucose-treated rats developed substantial hyperglycemia while glucose levels fell in saline treated (P < 0.001). Concomitant developments in hematocrits indicated improved plasma refill in glucose treated animals (P < 0.01). While saline treated rats developed irreversible shock and died within 3 hr of bleeding, glucose treated rats had a MAP of 52 ± 2 (mean ± SEM) mm Hg by the end of hemorrhage (P < 0.01). All glucose-treated rats recovered and survived the seven-day observation period. It is concluded that glucose infusion leading to hepatic glycogen repletion alters outcome after experimental hemorrhage in food deprived animals. These experimental results may be of clinical relevance, since elective surgery is generally performed after overnight fasting, which substantially reduces the hepatic glycogen reserve.

  • 13.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Atrial fibrillation: inflammatory and pharmacological studies2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    List of papers
    1. Source of inflammatory markers in patients with atrial fibrillation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Source of inflammatory markers in patients with atrial fibrillation
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 10, p. 848-853Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Elevated levels of C-reactive protein and other inflammatory markers have been reported in some patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Whether this finding is related to AF per se or to other conditions remains unclear. In addition, the source of inflammatory markers is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to assess the extent and the source of inflammation in patients with AF and no other concomitant heart or inflammatory conditions.

    Methods and results The study group consisted of 29 patients referred for radiofrequency catheter ablation: 10 patients with paroxysmal AF, 8 patients with permanent AF, and 10 control patients with Wolf-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and no evidence of AF (mean age 54±11 vs. 57±13 vs. 43±16). No patient had structural heart diseases or inflammatory conditions. High-sensitive C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were assessed in blood samples from the femoral vein, right atrium, coronary sinus, and the left and right upper pulmonary veins. All samples were collected before ablation. Compared with controls and patients with paroxysmal AF, patients with permanent AF had higher plasma levels of IL-8 in the samples from the femoral vein, right atrium, and coronary sinus, but not in the samples from the pulmonary veins (median values in the femoral vein: 2.58 vs. 2.97 vs. 4.66 pg/mL, P = 0.003; right atrium: 2.30 vs. 3.06 vs. 3.93 pg/mL, P = 0.013; coronary sinus: 2.85 vs. 3.15 vs. 4.07, P = 0.016). A high-degree correlation existed between the IL-8 levels in these samples (correlation coefficient between 0.929 and 0.976, P< 0.05). No differences in the C-reactive protein and IL-6 levels were noted between the three groups of patients.

    Conclusion The normal levels of C-reactive protein and IL-6, alongwith the elevated levels of IL-8 in patients with permanent AF but not in those with paroxysmal AF, suggest a link between a low-grade inflammatory reaction and long-lasting AF. The elevated IL-8 levels in the peripheral blood, right atrium, and coronary sinus but not in the pulmonary veins suggest a possible source of inflammation in the systemic circulation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford University Press, 2008
    Keywords
    Atrial fibrillation, Inflammation, Catheter ablation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-22941 (URN)10.1093/europace/eun111 (DOI)
    Available from: 2012-05-23 Created: 2012-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Atorvastatin and persistent atrial fibrillation following cardioversion: a randomized placebo-controlled multicentre study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atorvastatin and persistent atrial fibrillation following cardioversion: a randomized placebo-controlled multicentre study
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 827-833Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect of atorvastatin in achieving stable sinus rhythm (SR) 30 days after electrical cardioversion (CV) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: The study included 234 patients. The patients were randomized to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg daily (n = 118) or placebo (n = 116) in a prospective, double-blinded fashion. Treatment was initiated 14 days before CV and was continued 30 days after CV. The two groups were well-balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. Mean age was 65 +/- 10 years, 76% of the patients were male and 4% had ischaemic heart disease. Study medication was well-tolerated in all patients but one. Before primary endpoint 12 patients were excluded. In the atorvastatin group 99 patients (89%) converted to SR at electrical CV compared with 95 (86%) in the placebo group (P = 0.42). An intention-to-treat analysis with the available data, by randomization group, showed that 57 (51%) in the atorvastatin group and 47 (42%) in the placebo group were in SR 30 days after CV (OR 1.44, 95%CI 0.85-2.44, P = 0.18). CONCLUSION: Atorvastatin was not statistically superior to placebo with regards to maintaining SR 30 days after CV in patients with persistent AF.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, 2009
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11644 (URN)10.1093/eurheartj/ehp006 (DOI)19202157 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-08-27 Created: 2010-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. The safety of flecainide treatment of atrial fibrillation: long-term incidence of sudden cardiac death and proarrhythmic events
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The safety of flecainide treatment of atrial fibrillation: long-term incidence of sudden cardiac death and proarrhythmic events
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    2011 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 270, no 3, p. 281-290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:To assess the safety of long-term treatment with flecainide in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly with regard to sudden cardiac death (SCD) andproarrhythmic events.

    Design: Retrospective,observational cohort study.Setting.Single-centre study at Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.

    Setting: Single-centre study at Orebro University Hospital, Sweden.

    Subjects: A total of 112 patients with paroxysmal (51%) or persistent (49%) AF (mean age 60 ± 11 years) were included after identifying all patients with AF who initiated oral flecainide treatment (mean dose 203 ± 43 mg per day) between 1998 and 2006. Standard exclusion⁄inclusion criteria for flecainide were used,andflecainidetreatmentwasusually combined withanatrioventricular-blocking agent (89%).

    Main outcome measure: Death was classified as sudden or nonsudden according to standard definitions. Proarrhythmia was defined as cardiac syncope or lifethreatening arrhythmia.

    Results: Eight deaths were reported during a mean follow- up of 3.4 ± .4 years. Compared to the general population, the standardized mortality ratios were 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68–3.09) for allcause mortality and 4.16 (95% CI 1.53–9.06) for death from cardiovascular disease. Three deaths were classified as SCDs. Proarrhythmic events occurred in six patients (two each with wide QRS tachycardia, 1 : 1 conducted atrial flutter and syncope during exercise).

    Conclusion: We found an increased incidence of SCD or proarrhythmic events in this real-world study of flecainide used for the treatment of AF. The findings suggest that further investigation into the safety of flecainide for the treatment of patients with AF is warranted.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2011
    Keywords
    atrial fibrillation, flecainide, proarrhythmia, safety, sudden cardiac death
    National Category
    General Practice
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-22942 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02395.x (DOI)000293793600011 ()21635583 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-80051576394 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Boehringer-Ingelheim  

    Sanofi-Aventis  

    Astra Zeneca  

    Bristol-Myers Squibb 

    Available from: 2012-05-23 Created: 2012-05-23 Last updated: 2018-09-11Bibliographically approved
    4. Safety of flecainide for atrial fibrillation: the Swedish atrial fibrillation cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Safety of flecainide for atrial fibrillation: the Swedish atrial fibrillation cohort study
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Little is known about the safety of flecainide in atrial fibrillation (AF). Whether current flecainide treatment practice in Sweden is associated with increased mortality compared to treatment with beta-blockers alone was investigated in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF).

    Methods and Results A total of 182,678 patients diagnosed with AF between 1 July 2005 and 31 December 2008 were identified through the Swedish National Hospital Discharge Register. These data were matched to data from the Prescribed Drug Register and information about death from the Total Population Register. The primary outcome was all cause mortality at the end of the study period, 1 Feb 2010. Flecainide was prescribed to 5381 patients (2.9%), and 64,918 patients (45.7%) received beta-blockers only. During follow-up, 2.8% and 30.8% of these patients died, respectively. After coarsened and exact matching, 2,178 patients (1.2% of total) on flecainide and beta-blockers had more similar baseline characteristics to 27,313 patients (15.3% of total) on beta-blockers only. In the main analysis, flecainide exposure was not associated with increased mortality (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.21-0.36,P<0.001). In the matched flecainide population, 205 (9.4%) patients had underlying structural heart disease. Sixteen (28.6%) of the flecainide-exposed patients who died had structural heart disease. The patients who only received flecainide (n=264) had higher mortality rate than the patients who received flecainide and beta-blockers (6.8 versus 2.6%,P<0.001).

    Conclusions Flecainide is not associated with increased mortality in patients with AF compared to beta-blockers alone. Patients who die after receiving flecainide often have structural heart disease.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-22943 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-05-23 Created: 2012-05-23 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 14.
    Almroth, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Höglund, Niklas
    Boman, Kurt
    Englund, Anders
    Jensen, Steen
    Kjellman, Björn
    Tornvall, Per
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Atorvastatin and persistent atrial fibrillation following cardioversion: a randomized placebo-controlled multicentre study2009In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 827-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect of atorvastatin in achieving stable sinus rhythm (SR) 30 days after electrical cardioversion (CV) in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: The study included 234 patients. The patients were randomized to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg daily (n = 118) or placebo (n = 116) in a prospective, double-blinded fashion. Treatment was initiated 14 days before CV and was continued 30 days after CV. The two groups were well-balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. Mean age was 65 +/- 10 years, 76% of the patients were male and 4% had ischaemic heart disease. Study medication was well-tolerated in all patients but one. Before primary endpoint 12 patients were excluded. In the atorvastatin group 99 patients (89%) converted to SR at electrical CV compared with 95 (86%) in the placebo group (P = 0.42). An intention-to-treat analysis with the available data, by randomization group, showed that 57 (51%) in the atorvastatin group and 47 (42%) in the placebo group were in SR 30 days after CV (OR 1.44, 95%CI 0.85-2.44, P = 0.18). CONCLUSION: Atorvastatin was not statistically superior to placebo with regards to maintaining SR 30 days after CV in patients with persistent AF.

  • 15.
    Alström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Risk factors for re-exploration due to bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study aimed to investigate relevant clinical risk factors for re-exploration due to bleeding after primary coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, and to evaluate the influence of antiplatelet and antifibrinolytic drugs.

    Design: Three retrospective analyses were performed on patients who underwent CABG: (1) Logistic regression was used to identify clinical risk factors for re-exploration (n = 3000). (2) A case-control study (n = 228) was used to obtain information on exposure of antithrombotic and hemostatic therapy. (3) Based on exposure to antiplatelet and antifibrinolytic therapy, and odds ratios (ORs) in multivariate logistic models, the proportion of re-explorations attributed to these drugs was calculated.

    Results: A receiver operating characteristic curve was created for clinical risk factors. The C-index was 0.64, indicating limited ability to predict re-exploration for bleeding. Clopidogrel was the only drug influencing the risk of re-exploration (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.7-5.9). The harmful effect of clopidogrel was confirmed in multivariate model (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.2-9.9), and aprotinin had a protective effect of the same magnitude (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.6).

    Conclusions: Clopidogrel is an essential risk factor for re-exploration due to bleeding, and attributable to at least one-quarter of surveyed cases. Aside from pharmaceuticals, there are no strong clinical risk factors.

  • 16.
    Andell, Pontus
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Sofia
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Mohammad, Moman A.
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Götberg, Matthias
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    James, Stefan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jensen, Jens
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Unit of Medicine, Capio St Görans Sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Angeras, Oskar
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; University and Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; University and Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, Jonas
    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Koul, Sasha
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance Is Associated With Better Outcome in Patients Undergoing Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Stenting Compared With Angiography Guidance Alone2017In: Circulation. Cardiovascular Interventions, ISSN 1941-7640, E-ISSN 1941-7632, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e004813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Small observational studies have indicated better outcome with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance when performing unprotected left main coronary artery (LMCA) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), but the overall picture remains inconclusive and warrants further investigation. We studied the impact of IVUS guidance on outcome in patients undergoing unprotected LMCA PCI in a Swedish nationwide observational study.

    Methods and Results: Patients who underwent unprotected LMCA PCI between 2005 and 2014 because of stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome were included from the nationwide SCAAR (Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry). Of 2468 patients, IVUS guidance was used in 621 (25.2%). The IVUS group was younger (median age, 70 versus 75 years) and had fewer comorbidities but more complex lesions. IVUS was associated with larger stent diameters (median, 4 mm versus 3.5 mm). After adjusting for potential confounders, IVUS was associated with significantly lower occurrence of the primary composite end point of all-cause mortality, restenosis, or definite stent thrombosis (hazard ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.84) and all-cause mortality alone (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.82). In 340 propensity score-matched pairs, IVUS was also associated with significantly lower occurrence of the primary end point (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.80).

    Conclusions: IVUS was associated with an independent and significant outcome benefit when performing unprotected LMCA PCI. Potential mediators of this benefit include larger and more appropriately sized stents, perhaps translating into lower risk of subsequent stent thrombosis. Although residual confounding cannot be ruled out, our findings indicate a possible hazard when performing unprotected LMCA PCI without IVUS guidance.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Tommy
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Atrial fibrillation and cause of death, sex differences in mortality, and anticoagulation treatment in low-risk patients2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia but information on cause of death in patients with AF is sparse, and whether individuals at low risk of cerebral infarction (CVL) should receive antico-agulant medication is controversial. Studies of sex differences with respect to mortality risk have shown conflicting results.

    Methods: Data were obtained from Swedish National Registers. In Study I, there were 272 186 AF patients and matched controls and in Studies II and III, 9519 AF patients and no other diagnosis and matched controls. Study IV compared treatment with warfarin to no treatment in 48 433 patients with AF. Hazard ratio (HR) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals and outcome rates as number per 1000 person-years.

    Results: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) was the most common underlying cause of death and was present in 40.2% of AF patients at a HR of 1.7 (1.4-2.1). CVL/stroke was a cause of death in 13.1%, HR 2.7 (1.8-4.0). Among underlying and contributing causes of death, the most common diagnoses were IHD in 43.5%, HR 1.7 (1.4-2.0) and heart failure in 33.1%, HR 2.9 (2.2-3.7). The HRs for mortality in females with AF in age categories ≤65, 65-74, and 75-85 were 2.15, 1.72, and 1.44, and for males 1.76, 1.36, and 1.24. The rates of mortality in females with AF in age categories 55-64, 65-74, and 75-85 were 6.2, 20.7, and 57.3, and for males 8.5, 27.3, and 64.5. In patients 65-74 years, females with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2, and males with a score of 1 receiving warfarin treatment showed a significantly reduced risk of cerebral infarc-tion/stroke, HR 0.46 (0.25-0.83) for females and for males, HR 0.39 (0.21-0.73).

    Conclusions: Most common causes of death in AF patients were CVL/stroke, heart failure, and IHD. HR of mortality in patients with AF was higher in females than in males but absolute risk was higher in males with AF compared to females with AF. Anticoagulant therapy was benefi-cial in patients ≥65 years, regardless of the CHA2DS2-VASc score.

    List of papers
    1. All-cause mortality in 272 186 patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation 1995-2008: a Swedish nationwide long-term case-control study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>All-cause mortality in 272 186 patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation 1995-2008: a Swedish nationwide long-term case-control study
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 14, p. 1061-1067Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To evaluate long-term all-cause risk of mortality in women and men hospitalized for the first time with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with matched controls. Methods and results A total of 272 186 patients (44% women) <= 85 years at the time of hospitalization with incidental AF 1995-2008 and 544 344 matched controls free of in-hospital diagnosis of AF were identified. Patients were followed via record linkage of the Swedish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry. Using Cox regression models, the long-term relative all-cause mortality risk, adjusted for concomitant diseases, in women vs. controls was 2.15, 1.72, and 1.44 (P < 0.001) in the age categories <= 65, 65-74, and 75-85 years, respectively. The corresponding figures for men were 1.76, 1.36, and 1.24 (P < 0.001). Among concomitant diseases, neoplasm, chronic renal failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease contributed most to the increased all-cause mortality vs. controls. In patients with AF as the primary diagnosis, the relative risk of mortality was 1.63, 1.46, and 1.28 (P < 0.001) in women and 1.45, 1.17, and 1.10 (P < 0.001) in men. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation was an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality in patients with incident AF. The concomitant diseases that contributed most were found outside the thromboembolic risk scores. The highest relative risk of mortality was seen in women and in the youngest patients compared with controls, and the differences between genders in each age category were statistically significant.

    Keywords
    Atrial fibrillation, Mortality, Gender, Age, Long term
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38709 (URN)10.1093/eurheartj/ehs469 (DOI)000317424300014 ()23321349 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84876218799 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies ar:

    AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden

    Örebro Heart Foundation Research and

    Committee of Örebro University Hospital

    Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-11-18 Last updated: 2018-07-23Bibliographically approved
    2. Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: A nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: A nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies of patients with "lone" and "idiopathic" atrial fibrillation (AF) have provided conflicting evidence concerning the development, management and prognosis of this condition.

    Methods: In this nation-wide, retrospective, cohort study, we studied patients diagnosed with incidental AF recorded in national Swedish registries between 1995 and 2008. Controls were matched for age, sex and calendar year of the diagnosis of AF in patients. All subjects were free of any in-hospital diagnosis from 1987 and until patients were diagnosed with AF and also free of any diagnosis within one year from the time of inclusion. Follow-up continued until 2009. We identified 9519 patients (31% women) and 12,468 matched controls.

    Results: Relative risks (RR) versus controls for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in women were 19.6, 4.4, 3.4 and 2.5 in the age categories <55, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-85, years respectively. Corresponding figures for men were 3.4, 2.5, 1.7 and 1.9. RR for heart failure were 6.6, 6.6, 6.3 and 3.8 in women and 7.8, 4.6, 4.9 and 2.9 in men. All RR were statistically significant with p < 0.01. RR for myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality were statistically significantly increased only in the two oldest age categories in women and 65-74 years in men.

    Conclusions: Patients with AF and no co-morbidities at inclusion had at least a doubled risk of stroke or TIA and a tripled risk of heart failure, through all age categories, as compared to controls. Women were at higher RR of stroke or TIA than men. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-SA license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Atrial fibrillation, Cardiovascular morbidity, Mortality, Cohort, Nationwide
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56310 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.09.092 (DOI)000343895000046 ()25499348 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    AstraZeneca RD Mölndal

    Örebro Heart Foundation

    Research Committee of Örebro University Hospital OLL 2012-265231

    Available from: 2017-03-14 Created: 2017-03-14 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
    3. Patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: causes of death during long-term follow-up compared to matched controls
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: causes of death during long-term follow-up compared to matched controls
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 40, no 11, p. 1076-1082Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the long-term, cause-specific mortality risk in patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF).

    METHODS: From a nation-wide registry of patients hospitalized with incident AF between 1995 and 2008 we identified 9 519 patients with a first diagnosed AF and no comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis. They were matched with 12 468 controls. The follow-up continued until December 2008. Causes of death were classified according to the ICD-10 codes.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 11.1% of patients with AF and 8.3% of controls died. Cardiovascular diseases were the most common causes of death and the only diagnoses which showed significantly higher relative risk in patients with AF than controls (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.3), and the relative risk was significantly higher in women than in men. Stroke was a more common cause among patients with AF, 13.1% versus 9.7% (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.0), while cerebral hemorrhage was more common among controls, 4.7% versus 10.2% (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5). The time from AF diagnosis to death was 6.0 ± 3.1 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: In patients with incident AF and no known comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis, only cardiovascular diseases were more often causes of death as compared to controls. Women carried a significantly higher relative risk than men.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2017
    Keywords
    atrial fibrillation, cause of death, idiopathic, morbidity, mortality
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61704 (URN)10.1002/clc.22776 (DOI)000417744800020 ()28841233 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028540727 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    AstraZeneca
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Örebro Heart Foundation 

    Research Committee of Örebro University Hospital, Sweden 

    Available from: 2017-11-13 Created: 2017-11-13 Last updated: 2018-09-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Patients with atrial fibrillation and outcomes of cerebral infarction in those with treatment of warfarin versus no warfarin with references to CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score, age and sex: A Swedish nationwide observational study with 48 433 patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with atrial fibrillation and outcomes of cerebral infarction in those with treatment of warfarin versus no warfarin with references to CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score, age and sex: A Swedish nationwide observational study with 48 433 patients
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e0176846Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: There is controversy in the guidelines as to whether patients with atrial fibrillation and a low risk of stroke should be treated with anticoagulation, especially those with a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 1 point.

    Methods: In a retrospective, nationwide cohort study, we used the Swedish National Patient Registry, the National Prescribed Drugs Registry, the Swedish Registry of Education and the Population and Housing Census Registry. 48 433 patients were identified between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2008 with incident atrial fibrillation who were divided in age categories, sex and a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 0, 1, 2 and >= 3 and they were included in a time-varying analysis of warfarin treatment versus no treatment. The primary end-point was cerebral infarction and stroke, and patients were followed until 31 December 2009.

    Results: Patients with 1 point from the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score showed the following adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with a 95% confidence interval: men 65-74 years 0.46 (0.25-0.83), men < 65 years 1.11 (0.56-2.23) and women < 65 years 2.13 (0.94-4.82), where HR < 1 indicates protection with warfarin. In patients < 65 years and 2 points, HR in men was 0.35 (0.18-0.69) and in women 1.84 (0.86-3.94) while, in women with at least 3 points, HR was 0.31 (0.16-0.59). In patients 65-74 years and 2 points, HR in men was 0.37 (0.23-0.59) and in women 0.39 ( 0.21-0.73). Categories including age >= 65 years or >= 3 points showed a statistically significant protection from warfarin.

    Conclusions: Our results support that treatment with anticoagulation may be considered in all patients with an incident atrial fibrillation diagnosis and an age of 65 years and older, i.e. also when the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score is 1.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Public Library of Science, 2017
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57914 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0176846 (DOI)000400648500084 ()28472091 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85019090489 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Research Committee of Örebro University  0LL 2012-265231 

    AstraZeneca RD Mölndal  

    Örebro Heart Foundation 

    Available from: 2017-06-08 Created: 2017-06-08 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
  • 18.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Dept Cardiology, Örebro Univ Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Dept. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Örebro Univ Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Dept. Laboratory Medicine, Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden; The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University Hospital.
    All-cause mortality in 272 186 patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation 1995-2008: a Swedish nationwide long-term case-control study2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 14, p. 1061-1067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To evaluate long-term all-cause risk of mortality in women and men hospitalized for the first time with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with matched controls. Methods and results A total of 272 186 patients (44% women) <= 85 years at the time of hospitalization with incidental AF 1995-2008 and 544 344 matched controls free of in-hospital diagnosis of AF were identified. Patients were followed via record linkage of the Swedish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry. Using Cox regression models, the long-term relative all-cause mortality risk, adjusted for concomitant diseases, in women vs. controls was 2.15, 1.72, and 1.44 (P < 0.001) in the age categories <= 65, 65-74, and 75-85 years, respectively. The corresponding figures for men were 1.76, 1.36, and 1.24 (P < 0.001). Among concomitant diseases, neoplasm, chronic renal failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease contributed most to the increased all-cause mortality vs. controls. In patients with AF as the primary diagnosis, the relative risk of mortality was 1.63, 1.46, and 1.28 (P < 0.001) in women and 1.45, 1.17, and 1.10 (P < 0.001) in men. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation was an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality in patients with incident AF. The concomitant diseases that contributed most were found outside the thromboembolic risk scores. The highest relative risk of mortality was seen in women and in the youngest patients compared with controls, and the differences between genders in each age category were statistically significant.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Dept Cardiol, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clin Epidemiol & Biostat Unit, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Dept Med Sci, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden; AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: A nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies of patients with "lone" and "idiopathic" atrial fibrillation (AF) have provided conflicting evidence concerning the development, management and prognosis of this condition.

    Methods: In this nation-wide, retrospective, cohort study, we studied patients diagnosed with incidental AF recorded in national Swedish registries between 1995 and 2008. Controls were matched for age, sex and calendar year of the diagnosis of AF in patients. All subjects were free of any in-hospital diagnosis from 1987 and until patients were diagnosed with AF and also free of any diagnosis within one year from the time of inclusion. Follow-up continued until 2009. We identified 9519 patients (31% women) and 12,468 matched controls.

    Results: Relative risks (RR) versus controls for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in women were 19.6, 4.4, 3.4 and 2.5 in the age categories <55, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-85, years respectively. Corresponding figures for men were 3.4, 2.5, 1.7 and 1.9. RR for heart failure were 6.6, 6.6, 6.3 and 3.8 in women and 7.8, 4.6, 4.9 and 2.9 in men. All RR were statistically significant with p < 0.01. RR for myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality were statistically significantly increased only in the two oldest age categories in women and 65-74 years in men.

    Conclusions: Patients with AF and no co-morbidities at inclusion had at least a doubled risk of stroke or TIA and a tripled risk of heart failure, through all age categories, as compared to controls. Women were at higher RR of stroke or TIA than men. (C) 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-SA license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

  • 20.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patients with atrial fibrillation and outcomes of cerebral infarction in those with treatment of warfarin versus no warfarin with references to CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score, age and sex: A Swedish nationwide observational study with 48 433 patients2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e0176846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: There is controversy in the guidelines as to whether patients with atrial fibrillation and a low risk of stroke should be treated with anticoagulation, especially those with a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 1 point.

    Methods: In a retrospective, nationwide cohort study, we used the Swedish National Patient Registry, the National Prescribed Drugs Registry, the Swedish Registry of Education and the Population and Housing Census Registry. 48 433 patients were identified between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2008 with incident atrial fibrillation who were divided in age categories, sex and a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 0, 1, 2 and >= 3 and they were included in a time-varying analysis of warfarin treatment versus no treatment. The primary end-point was cerebral infarction and stroke, and patients were followed until 31 December 2009.

    Results: Patients with 1 point from the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score showed the following adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with a 95% confidence interval: men 65-74 years 0.46 (0.25-0.83), men < 65 years 1.11 (0.56-2.23) and women < 65 years 2.13 (0.94-4.82), where HR < 1 indicates protection with warfarin. In patients < 65 years and 2 points, HR in men was 0.35 (0.18-0.69) and in women 1.84 (0.86-3.94) while, in women with at least 3 points, HR was 0.31 (0.16-0.59). In patients 65-74 years and 2 points, HR in men was 0.37 (0.23-0.59) and in women 0.39 ( 0.21-0.73). Categories including age >= 65 years or >= 3 points showed a statistically significant protection from warfarin.

    Conclusions: Our results support that treatment with anticoagulation may be considered in all patients with an incident atrial fibrillation diagnosis and an age of 65 years and older, i.e. also when the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score is 1.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Magnuson, Anders
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Frøbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala and AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poçi, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: causes of death during long-term follow-up compared to matched controls2017In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 40, no 11, p. 1076-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the long-term, cause-specific mortality risk in patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF).

    METHODS: From a nation-wide registry of patients hospitalized with incident AF between 1995 and 2008 we identified 9 519 patients with a first diagnosed AF and no comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis. They were matched with 12 468 controls. The follow-up continued until December 2008. Causes of death were classified according to the ICD-10 codes.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 11.1% of patients with AF and 8.3% of controls died. Cardiovascular diseases were the most common causes of death and the only diagnoses which showed significantly higher relative risk in patients with AF than controls (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.3), and the relative risk was significantly higher in women than in men. Stroke was a more common cause among patients with AF, 13.1% versus 9.7% (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.0), while cerebral hemorrhage was more common among controls, 4.7% versus 10.2% (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5). The time from AF diagnosis to death was 6.0 ± 3.1 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: In patients with incident AF and no known comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis, only cardiovascular diseases were more often causes of death as compared to controls. Women carried a significantly higher relative risk than men.

  • 22.
    Angerås, Oskar
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Haraldsson, Inger
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Redfors, Björn
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology.
    Petursson, Petur
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Albertsson, Per
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ioanes, Dan
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Odenstedt, Jacob
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Hans
    Department of Cardiology, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Witt, Nils
    Department of Cardiology, South Hospital Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rück, Andreas
    Department of Cardiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Millgård, Jonas
    Department of Cardiology, Sunderby Hospital, Sunderbyn, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Persson, Jonas
    Department of Cardiology, Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söderbom, Måns
    Department of Economics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wedel, Hans
    Health Metrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erlinge, David
    Department of Cardiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    James, Stefan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ramunddal, Truls
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Omerovic, Elmir
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Impact of Thrombus Aspiration on Mortality, Stent Thrombosis, and Stroke in Patients With ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report From the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e007680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Thrombus aspiration is still being used in a substantial number of patients despite 2 large randomized clinical trials showing no favorable effect of routine thrombus aspiration during primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with STsegment- elevation myocardial infarction. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of thrombus aspiration on mortality, stent thrombosis, and stroke using all available data from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR).

    Methods and Results: We identified 42 829 consecutive patients registered in SCAAR between January 2005 and September 2014 who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Thrombus aspiration was used in 25% of the procedures. We used instrumental variable analysis with administrative healthcare region as the treatmentpreference instrumental variable to evaluate the effect of thrombus aspiration on mortality, stent thrombosis, and stroke. Thrombus aspiration was not associated with mortality at 30 days (risk reduction: -1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], -5.4 to 3.0; P=0.57) and 1 year (risk reduction: -2.4; 95% CI, -7.6 to 3.0; P=0.37). Thrombus aspiration was associated with a lower risk of stent thrombosis both at 30 days (risk reduction: -2.7; 95% CI, -4.1 to -1.4; P<0.001) and 1 year (risk reduction: -3.5; 95% CI, -5.3 to -1.7; P<0.001). In-hospital stroke and neurologic complications did not differ between groups (risk reduction: 0.1; 95% CI, -0.8 to 1.1; P=0.76).

    Conclusions: Mortality was not different between the groups. Thrombus aspiration was associated with decreased risk of stent thrombosis. Our study provides important evidence for the external validity of previous randomized studies regarding mortality.

  • 23.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Neurology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Farahmand, Bahman
    Epi-consultants (Formerly Karolinska Institute), Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Terént, Andreas
    Department of Medical Sciences,Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åsberg, Signild
    Department of Medical Sciences, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    To Treat or Not to Treat: Anticoagulants as Secondary Preventives to the Oldest Old With Atrial Fibrillation.2017In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1617-1623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Anticoagulant treatment is effective for preventing recurrent ischemic strokes in patients who have atrial fibrillation. This benefit is paid by a small increase of hemorrhages. Anticoagulant-related hemorrhages seem to increase with age, but there are few studies showing whether the benefits of treatment persist in old age.

    METHODS: For this observational study, 4 different registers were used, among them Riksstroke, the Swedish Stroke Register. Patients who have had a recent ischemic stroke, were 80 to 100 years of age, and had atrial fibrillation, were included from 2006 through 2013. The patients were stratified into 3 age groups: 80 to 84, 85 to 89, and ≥90 years of age. Information on stroke severity, risk factors, drugs, and comorbidities was gathered from the registers. The patients were followed with respect to ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, other hemorrhages, or death.

    RESULTS: Of all 23 356 patients with atrial fibrillation, 6361 (27%) used anticoagulants after an ischemic stroke. Anticoagulant treatment was associated with less recurrent ischemic stroke in all age groups. Hemorrhages increased most in the ≥90-year age group, but this did not offset the overall beneficial effect of the anticoagulant. Apart from age, no other cardiovascular risk factor or comorbidity was identified that influenced the risk of anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage. Drugs other than anticoagulants did not influence the incidence of major hemorrhage.

    CONCLUSIONS: Given the patient characteristics in this study, there is room for more patients to be treated with anticoagulants, without hemorrhages to prevail. In nonagenarians, hemorrhages increased somewhat more, but this did not affect the overall outcome in this age stratum.

  • 24.
    Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Neurology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Háls Berglund, Maria
    Riksstroke, Medicincentrum, University Hospital of Norrland, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Chemistry, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Long-Term Risk of Stroke after Transient Ischemic Attack2017In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 43, no 1-2, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the absence of active management, the stroke risk after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) may be high. Almost 10 years ago, the results of the EXPRESS and SOS-TIA studies called for a more rapid management of TIA patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the other stroke risks in the longer term, after the implementation of a more active approach to TIA. We also wanted to assess the predictive value of the ABCD2 score in this context.

    Methods: Riksstroke is the national stroke registry in Sweden. Data from Riksstroke's TIA module, and the national cause-of-death register, for the years 2011 and 2012 were used in this study. Stroke occurrence was monitored via Riksstroke. Cox's regression was used for risk evaluation. The predictive value of the ABCD2 score was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve.

    Results: A total of 15,068 TIA episodes occurred in 14,102 patients. The follow-up time varied between 0 and 819 days, with an average of 417 days. The mortality for all TIA patients during the follow-up time was 7.1%. Of the unique patients, 545 had one or more strokes (3.9%), corresponding to 34 events per 1,000 person years. Significant risk factors for stroke were: age, previous TIA, atrial fibrillation (AF), oral anticoagulant (OAC) treatment, hypertension treatment, and the ABCD2 items speech impairment, unilateral weakness, and diabetes mellitus. The ABCD2 score correlated with a subsequent stroke, but its predictive value was low.

    Conclusion: The risk of stroke is low after the acute phase of a TIA, probably lower than in previous studies. This may be due to better secondary prevention in recent years. Several risk factors predict stroke, notably hypertensive treatment, which may be inadequate; and AF, where OACs may be under-used. It is difficult to identify the role of the ABCD2 score in clinical practice.

  • 25.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Steinke, Elaine
    School of Nursing, Wichita State University, Wichita, USA.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Decreased sexual function in partners after patients’ first-time myocardial infarction2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 521-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A myocardial infarction event affects not only patients but also partners, although how it affects the partners’ sexual function is not studied.

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to describe and compare how partners experienced their sexual function one year before with one year after first-time myocardial infarction of their partner.

    Methods: A longitudinal and comparative design was used. Self-reported data on Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire was collected retrospectively at two occasions from 123 partners (87 women and 36 men), measuring the year prior to the first-time myocardial infarction and the year after. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.

    Results: The total score for Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire showed a significant decrease over time. In all four subscales a decrease was found, which were statistically significant in three out of the four subscales (sexual desire, 19.39 vs 18.61; p<0.001, orgasm, 14.11 vs 13.64; p=0.027 and satisfaction, 12.61 vs 12.31; p=0.042). Twenty-six partners reported that their intercourse frequencies decreased over time, while six partners reported an increased intercourse frequency.

    Conclusions: Partners’ sexual function decreased after patients’ first-time myocardial infarction. It is important for health personnel to offer information and discussion about sexual function and concerns with both patients and partners after a first-time myocardial infarction.

  • 26.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnéaus University, Växjö, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönkoping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The male partners' experiences of the intimate relationships after a first myocardial infarction2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 108-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stress in the intimate relationship is found to worsen the prognosis in women suffering from myocardial infarction (MI). Little is known about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship.

    Aim: This study aimed to explore and describe the experience of men's intimate relationships in connection to and after their female partner's first MI.

    Methods: An explorative and qualitative design was used. Interviews were conducted with 16 men having a partner who the year before had suffered a first MI. The data were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three themes emerged: masculine image challenged; life takes another direction; and life remains unchanged. The men were forced to deal with an altered image of themselves as men, and as sexual beings. They were hesitant to approach their spouse in the same way as before the MI because they viewed her to be more fragile. The event also caused them to consider their own lifestyle, changing towards healthier dietary and exercise habits.

    Conclusions: After their spouse's MI, men experienced a challenge to their masculine image. They viewed their spouse as being more fragile, which led the men to be gentler in sexual intimacy and more hesitant to invite sexual activity. This knowledge about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship could be helpful for health personnel in hospitals and primary care when they interact with couples where the woman suffers from cardiac disease or other chronic disorders. (C) 2010 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Arinell, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blanc, Stéphane
    Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien-De'partement d'Ecologie, Physiologie, Ethologie Unite' Mixte de Recherche 7178. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite' de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Effect of prolonged standardized bed rest on cystatin C and other markers of cardiovascular risk2011In: BMC Physiology, ISSN 1472-6793, E-ISSN 1472-6793, Vol. 11, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sedentary lifestyle is associated with coronary artery disease but even shorter periods of physical inactivity may increase cardiovascular risk. Cystatin C is independently associated with cardiovascular disease and our objective was to investigate the relation between this novel biomarker and standardized bed rest. Research of immobilization physiology in humans is challenging because good biological models are in short supply. From the Women International Space simulation for Exploration study (WISE) we studied markers of atherosclerosis and kidney function, including cystatin C, in a standardized bed rest study on healthy volunteers. Fifteen healthy female volunteers participated in a 20-day ambulatory control period followed by 60 days of bed rest in head-down tilt position (-6°) 24 h a day, finalized by 20 days of recovery. The subjects were randomized into two groups during bed rest: a control group (n = 8) that remained physically inactive and an exercise group (n = 7) that participated in both supine resistance and aerobic exercise training.

    RESULTS: Compared to baseline values there was a statistically significant increase in cystatin C in both groups after bed rest (P < 0.001). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), calculated by both cystatin C and Cockcroft-Gault equation, decreased after bed rest while there were no differences in creatinine or creatine kinase levels. CRP did not change during bed rest in the exercise group, but there was an increase of CRP in the control group during recovery compared to both the baseline and the bed rest periods. The apo-B/apo-Ai ratio increased during bed rest and decreased again in the recovery period. Subjects experienced a small but statistically significant reduction in weight during bed rest and compared to baseline weights remained lower at day 8 of recovery.

    CONCLUSION: During and following prolonged standardized bed rest the concentrations of several clinically relevant cardiovascular risk markers change.

  • 28.
    Arinell, Karin
    et al.
    Dept Cardiol, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiol.
    Blanc, Stephane
    Dept Ecol Physiol & Ethol, Dept Ecol, Inst Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Strasbourg, France.
    Larsson, Anders
    Dept Clin Chem, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiol.
    Downregulation of platelet activation markers during long-term immobilization2013In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 369-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immobilization and sedentary lifestyle are risk factors for venous thromboembolism and cardiovascular disease, yet little is known about platelet function during long-term physical inactivity. Our aim was to investigate platelet activation markers and their coupling to standardized immobilization: platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and P-selectin. We studied 15 healthy females participating in the Women International Space simulation for Exploration study. Following a 20-day ambulatory control period, the subjects underwent 60 days of bed rest in head-down tilt position (-6 degrees) 24 hours a day, finalized by 20 days of recovery. The subjects were randomized into two groups during bed rest: a control group (n = 8) that remained physically inactive and an exercise group (n = 7) that participated in both supine resistance and aerobic exercise training. Blood samples for the analysis of platelet activation markers were collected at baseline (5 days before bed rest), after 44 days of bed rest and 8 days into the recovery period. Compared to baseline, the levels of P-selectin and PDGF-BB decreased after bed rest (by 55%, p = 0.01 and 73%, p < 0.03, respectively) and remained decreased in the recovery period (by 76%, p < 0.001 and 78%, p < 0.02, respectively, compared to baseline). Platelet count (baseline value for the exercise group 260 000/mu l +/- 34 000 and baseline value for the control group 210 000/mu l +/- 30 000) did not change during the bed rest study (two-way repeated measurements ANOVA, p = ns). There were no statistical differences between the physically inactive and the exercise group. During long-term immobilization, a known risk factor for thrombosis, the levels of P-selectin and PDGF-BB decreased. Our findings indicate downregulation of platelet activation during immobilization.

  • 29.
    Axelsson, Birger
    et al.
    Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Häggmark, Sören
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Heart Centre and Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svenmarker, Staffan
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Heart Centre and Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Johansson, Göran
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Gupta, Anil
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tydén, Hans
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wouters, Patrick
    Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Haney, Michael
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Effects of Combined Milrinone and Levosimendan Treatment on Systolic and Diastolic Function During Postischemic Myocardial Dysfunction in a Porcine Model2016In: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 1074-2484, E-ISSN 1940-4034, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 495-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is not known whether there are positive or negative interactions on ventricular function when a calcium-sensitizing inotrope is added to a phosphodiesterase inhibitor in the clinical setting of acute left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We hypothesized that when levosimendan is added to milrinone treatment, there will be synergetic inotropic and lusitropic effects. This was tested in an anesthetized porcine postischemic global LV injury model, where ventricular pressures and volumes (conductance volumetry) were measured. A global ischemic injury was induced by repetitive left main stem coronary artery occlusions. Load-independent indices of LV function were assessed before and after ventricular injury, after milrinone treatment, and finally after addition of levosimendan to the milrinone treatment. Nonparametric, within-group comparisons were made. The protocol was completed in 12 pigs, 7 of which received the inotrope treatment and 5 of which served as controls. Milrinone led to positive lusitropic effects seen by improvement in tau after myocardial stunning. The addition of levosimendan to milrinone further increased lusitropic state. The latter effect could however not be attributed solely to levosimendan, since lusitropic state also improved spontaneously in time-matched controls at the same rate during the corresponding period. When levosimendan was added to milrinone infusion, there was no increase in systolic function (preload recruitable stroke work) compared to milrinone treatment alone. We conclude that in this model of postischemic LV dysfunction, there appears to be no clear improvement in systolic or diastolic function after addition of levosimendan to established milrinone treatment but also no negative effects of levosimendan in this context.

  • 30.
    Bachoo, P.
    et al.
    Dept Vasc Surg, Aberdeen Royal Infirm, Aberdeen, UK.
    Verhoeven, E. L. G.
    Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Nuernberg Clin, Nurnberg, Germany.
    Larzon, Thomas
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Early outcome of endovascular aneurysm repair in challenging aortic neck morphology based on experience from the GREAT C3 registry2013In: Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery, ISSN 0021-9509, E-ISSN 1827-191X, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 573-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The aim of this paper was to evaluate early outcome of the GORE (R) EXCLUDER (R) AAA Endoprosthesis featuring C3 Delivery System in subjects with aortic neck anatomy outside IFU. Methods. Individual patient data prospectively collected over a 2 year period from the Global Registry for Endovascular Aortic Treatment (GREAT). For each subject a minimum data set was collected containing demographic, pre/intra- and postoperative variables. Main outcome measures were successful exclusion of the AAA and occurrence of any major endoleak at 1 month. In this study, outside IFU was defined as aortic neck length less than 15 mm and/or aortic neck angle greater than 60 degrees. Results. A total of 400 subjects, (86.6% male, mean age 73.9 years). Primary pathology was AAA in 94.2% with 98.2% undergoing EVAR as a primary procedure. Sixty-eight subjects underwent EVAR outside IFU (neck length <15 nun N.=32, neck angle >60 degrees N.=47 and neck length <15 nun and angle >60 degrees N.=11). The graft was successfully deployed within 5 nun of its intended location in 63 (94%) cases utilising a total of 33 repositioning episodes. Eight aortic cuffs were used, 5 to treat a type 1 endoleak. At 30 days we recorded 2 type 2 endoleaks both successfully treated and 1 type 1b also successfully treated. There were 2 deaths, one in each group. Conclusion. GORE (R) EXCLUDER (R) AAA Endoprosthesis featuring C3 Delivery System allows re-positioning to be performed safely in cases outside IFU. Repositioning is an effective operative manoeuvre and facilitates EVAR in challenging anatomy. Longer follow-up is required to evaluate the durability of these results at 30 days.

  • 31.
    Ban, Lu
    et al.
    Division of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; Division of Rheumatology, Orthopaedics and Dermatology, Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Sprigg, Nikola
    Stroke, Division of Neuroscience, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Abdul Sultan, Alyshah
    Division of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute for Primary Care & Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom.
    Nelson-Piercy, Catherine
    Women's Health Academic Centre, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Bath, Philip M
    Women's Health Academic Centre, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Stephansson, Olof
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tata, Laila J
    Division of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Incidence of First Stroke in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Women of Childbearing Age: A Population-Based Cohort Study From England2017In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 6, no 4, article id e004601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant women may have an increased risk of stroke compared with nonpregnant women of similar age, but the magnitude and the timing of such risk are unclear. We examined the risk of a first stroke event in women of childbearing age and compared the risk during pregnancy and in the early postpartum period with the background risk outside these periods.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We conducted an open cohort study of 2 046 048 women aged 15 to 49 years between April 1, 1997, and March 31, 2014, using linked primary (Clinical Practice Research Datalink) and secondary (Hospital Episode Statistics) care records in England. Risk of first stroke was assessed by calculating the incidence rate of stroke in antepartum, peripartum (2 days before until 1 day after delivery), and early (first 6 weeks) and late (second 6 weeks) postpartum periods compared with nonpregnant time using a Poisson regression model with adjustment for maternal age, socioeconomic group, and calendar time. A total of 2511 women had a first stroke. The incidence rate of stroke was 25.0 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 24.0-26.0) in nonpregnant time. The rate was lower antepartum (10.7 per 100 000 person-years, 95% CI 7.6-15.1) but 9-fold higher peripartum (161.1 per 100 000 person-years, 95% CI 80.6-322.1) and 3-fold higher early postpartum (47.1 per 100 000 person-years, 95% CI 31.3-70.9). Rates of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke both increased peripartum and early postpartum.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although the absolute risk of first stroke is low in women of childbearing age, healthcare professionals should be aware of a considerable increase in relative risk during the peripartum and early postpartum periods.

  • 32.
    Bergh, Cecilia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Fall, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Udumyan, Ruzan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Sjöqvist, Hugo
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Severe infections and subsequent delayed cardiovascular disease2017In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 24, no 18, p. 1958-1966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Severe infections in adulthood are associated with subsequent short-term cardiovascular disease. Whether hospital admission for sepsis or pneumonia is associated with persistent increased risk (over a year after infection) is less well established.

    Design: The design of this study was as a register-based cohort study.

    Methods: Some 236,739 men born between 1952-1956 were followed from conscription assessments in adolescence to 2010. All-cause cardiovascular disease ( n = 46,754), including coronary heart disease ( n = 10,279) and stroke ( n = 3438), was identified through national registers 1970-2010 (at ages 18-58 years).

    Results: Sepsis or pneumonia in adulthood (resulting in hospital admission) are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the years following infection. The risk is highest during the first year after the infection, with an adjusted hazard ratio (and 95% confidence intervals) of 6.33 (5.65-7.09) and a notably increased risk persisted with hazard ratios of 2.47 (2.04-3.00) for the second and 2.12 (1.71-2.62) for the third year after infection. The risk attenuated with time, but remained raised for at least five years after infection; 1.87 (1.47-2.38). The results are adjusted for characteristics in childhood, cardiovascular risk factors and medical history in adolescence. Similar statistically significant associations were found for coronary heart disease and stroke.

    Conclusions: Raised risks of cardiovascular disease following hospital admission for sepsis or pneumonia were increased for more than five years after the infection, but with the highest magnitude during the first three years following infection, suggesting a period of vulnerability when health professionals and patients should be aware of the heightened risk for cardiovascular disease.

  • 33.
    Bergh, Cecilia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Udumyan, Ruzan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Appelros, Peter
    Department of Neurology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fall, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Determinants in adolescence of stroke-related hospital stay duration in men: a national cohort study2016In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 2416-2418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Physical and psychological characteristics in adolescence are associated with subsequent stroke risk. Our aim is to investigate their relevance to length of hospital stay and risk of second stroke.

    Methods: Swedish men born between 1952 and 1956 (n=237 879) were followed from 1987 to 2010 using information from population-based national registers. Stress resilience, body mass index, cognitive function, physical fitness, and blood pressure were measured at compulsory military conscription examinations in late adolescence. Joint Cox proportional hazards models estimated the associations of these characteristics with long compared with short duration of stroke-related hospital stay and with second stroke compared with first.

    Results: Some 3000 men were diagnosed with nonfatal stroke between ages 31 and 58 years. Low stress resilience, underweight, and higher systolic blood pressure (per 1-mm Hg increase) during adolescence were associated with longer hospital stay (compared with shorter) in ischemic stroke, with adjusted relative hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 1.46 (1.08-1.89), 1.41 (1.04-1.91), and 1.01 (1.00-1.02), respectively. Elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressures during adolescence were associated with longer hospital stay in men with intracerebral hemorrhage: 1.01 (1.00-1.03) and 1.02 (1.00-1.04), respectively. Among both stroke types, obesity in adolescence conferred an increased risk of second stroke: 2.06 (1.21-3.45).

    Conclusions: Some characteristics relevant to length of stroke-related hospital stay and risk of second stroke are already present in adolescence. Early lifestyle influences are of importance not only to stroke risk by middle age but also to recurrence and use of healthcare resources among stroke survivors.

  • 34.
    Bergh, Cecilia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Udumyan, Ruzan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fall, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom .
    Stress resilience and physical fitness in adolescence and risk of coronary heart disease in middle age2015In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 101, no 8, p. 623-629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Psychosocial stress is a suggested risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship of stress resilience in adolescence with subsequent CHD risk is underinvestigated, so our objective was to assess this and investigate the possible mediating role of physical fitness.

    METHODS: In this register-based study, 237 980 men born between 1952 and 1956 were followed from 1987 to 2010 using information from Swedish registers. Stress resilience was measured at a compulsory military conscription examination using a semistructured interview with a psychologist. Some 10 581 diagnoses of CHD were identified. Cox regression estimated the association of stress resilience with CHD, with adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors.

    RESULTS: Low-stress resilience was associated with increased CHD risk. The association remained after adjustment for physical fitness and other potential confounding and mediating factors, with adjusted HRs (and 95% CIs) of 1.17 (1.10 to 1.25), with some evidence of mediation by physical fitness. CHD incidence rates per 1000 person-years (and 95% CIs) for low-stress, medium-stress and high-stress resilience were 2.61 (2.52 to 2.70), 1.97 (1.92 to 2.03) and 1.59 (1.53 to 1.67) respectively. Higher physical fitness was inversely associated with CHD risk; however, this was attenuated by low-stress resilience, shown by interaction testing (p<0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Low-stress resilience in adolescence was associated with increased risk of CHD in middle age and may diminish the benefit of physical fitness. This represents new evidence of the role of stress resilience in determining risk of CHD and its interrelationship with physical fitness.

  • 35.
    Bergh, Cecilia
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Udumyan, Ruzan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Fall, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Pre-stroke characteristics and stroke severity after first stroke in middle-aged men2015In: Nordic Stroke 2015: 18th Nordic Congress of Cerebrovascular Diseases, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Berghammer, Malin
    et al.
    Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Örebro University Hospital. Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekman, Inger
    Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Ctr Person Ctr Care, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Peter
    Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Self-reported health status (EQ-5D) in adults with congenital heart disease2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 165, no 3, p. 537-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Today, more patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) reach adulthood. There are conflicting findings concerning the relationship between quality of life (QoL) or health state for adults with CHD and the complexity of their CHD. The aim of the study was, firstly, to compare the reported health status and health perception of adult patients with CHD and, secondly, to investigate what variables influenced the patients' health status and health perception. Methods: Data from 1435 patients completing the EQ-5D questionnaire, which includes reported health status and health perception, were analyzed. Results: Valid EQ-5D data were reported by 1274 patients, showing overall results indicating a good health status. Problems were most frequently reported in the dimension "pain/discomfort" (31.9%) and "anxiety/depression" (29.8%). Higher occurrence of problems were reported by patients with complex disease i.e. single ventricle (p<0.001) and by female patients (p<0.0001). Symptomatic patients reported a lower health status (p<0.0001) and a lower perceived health on EQ-VAS (p<0.0001). Of the asymptomatic patients, 20.5% nevertheless reported problems in "pain/discomfort" and 22.2% in the "anxiety/depression" dimension. Conclusion: The health status of adults with CHD is influenced by symptoms, NYHA-classification, age and gender. Adults with CHD report a lower occurrence of problems in comparison to previously published results from a general population, but the importance of actively asking about the patient's experience is demonstrated by the high degree of asymptomatic patients reporting problems on EQ-5D. (c) 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Bergström, Ida
    et al.
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Lundberg, Anna K
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Simon
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Annexin A1 in blood mononuclear cells from patients with coronary artery disease: Its association with inflammatory status and glucocorticoid sensitivity.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a key player in resolution of inflammation and a mediator of glucocorticoid actions. In atherosclerotic tissue, increased expression of AnxA1 has been associated with protective plaque-stabilizing effects. Here, we investigated the expression of AnxA1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood was collected from 57 patients with stable CAD (SCAD) and 41 healthy controls. We also included a minor group (n = 10) with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). AnxA1 mRNA was measured in PBMCs. Expression of AnxA1 protein (total and surface-bound) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) were detected in PBMC subsets by flow cytometry. Also, salivary cortisol, interleukin(IL)-6 and IL-10 in plasma, and LPS-induced cytokine secretion from PBMCs, with or without dexamethasone, were assessed. AnxA1 mRNA was found to be slightly increased in PBMCs from SCAD patients compared with controls. However, protein expression of AnxA1 or GRs in PBMC subsets did not differ between SCAD patients and controls, despite SCAD patients showing a more proinflammatory cytokine profile ex vivo. Only surface expression of AnxA1 on monocytes correlated with dexamethasone-mediated suppression of cytokines. In ACS patients, a marked activation of AnxA1 was seen involving both gene expression and translocation of protein to cell surface probably reflecting a rapid glucocorticoid action modulating the acute inflammatory response in ACS. To conclude, surface expression of AnxA1 on monocytes may reflect the degree of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Speculatively, "normal" surface expression of AnxA1 indicates that anti-inflammatory capacity is impaired in SCAD patients.

  • 38.
    Bilos, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pirouzram, Artai
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Toivola, Asko
    Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Vidlund, Mårten
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cha, Soon Ok
    Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hörer, Tal
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    EndoVascular and Hybrid Trauma Management (EVTM) for Blunt Innominate Artery Injury with Ongoing Extravasation2017In: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, ISSN 0174-1551, E-ISSN 1432-086X, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 130-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innominate artery (IA) traumatic injuries are rare but life-threatening, with high mortality and morbidity. Open surgical repair is the treatment of choice but is technically demanding. We describe a case of blunt trauma to the IA with ongoing bleeding, treated successfully by combined (hybrid) endovascular and open surgery. The case demonstrates the immediate usage of modern endovascular and surgical tools as part of endovascular and hybrid trauma management.

  • 39.
    Björkenheim, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Brandes, Axel
    Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Andersson, Tommy
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wandt, Birger
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Henriette Sloth
    Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Predictors of hospitalization for heart failure and of all-cause mortality after atrioventricular nodal ablation and right ventricular pacing for atrial fibrillation2014In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 1772-1778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Atrioventricular junction ablation (AVJA) is a highly effective treatment in patients with therapy refractory atrial fibrillation (AF) but renders the patient pacemaker dependent. We aimed to analyse the long-term incidence of hospitalization for heart failure (HF) and all-cause mortality in patients who underwent AVJA because of AF and to determine predictors for HF and mortality.

    Methods and results: We retrospectively enrolled 162 consecutive patients, mean age 67 +/- 9 years, 48% women, who underwent AVJA because of symptomatic AF refractory to pharmacological treatment (n = 117) or unsuccessful repeated pulmonary vein isolation (n = 45). Hospitalization for HF occurred in 32 (20%) patients and 35 (22%) patients died, representing a cumulative incidence for hospitalization for HF and mortality over the first 2 years after AVJA of 9.1 and 5.2%, respectively. Hospitalization for HF occurred to the same extent in patients who failed pharmacological treatment as in patients with repeated pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), although the mortality was slightly higher in the former group. QRS prolongation >= 120 ms and left atrial diameter were independent predictors of hospitalization for HF, while hypertension and previous HF were independent predictors of death.

    Conclusion: The long-term hospitalization rate for HF and all-cause mortality was low, which implies that long-term ventricular pacing was not harmful in this patient population, including patients with unsuccessful repeated PVI.

  • 40.
    Björkenheim, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Brandes, Axel
    Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Chemnitz, Alexander
    Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poçi, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rhythm Control and its Relation to Symptoms During the First Two Years After Radiofrequency Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation2016In: Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology, ISSN 0147-8389, E-ISSN 1540-8159, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 914-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate rhythm control up to two years after AF ablation and its relation to reported symptoms.

    Background: The implantable loop recorder (ILR) continuously records the ECG, has an automatic AF detection algorithm and a possibility for patients to activate an ECG recording during symptoms.

    Methods: Fifty-seven patients (mean age 57±9 years, 60% male, 88% paroxysmal AF) underwent AF ablation following ILR implantation. Device data were downloaded at the ablation and three, six, 12, 18 and 24 months after ablation.

    Results: Fifty-four patients completed the two-year follow-up. Thirteen (24%) patients had no AF episodes detected by ILR during follow-up. Ten of 41 patients (24%) with AF recurrence were only detected by ILR and AF recurrences were detected earlier by ILR (P<0.001). The median AF burden in patients with AF recurrence was 5.7% (IQR 0.4-14.4) and was even lower in patients with AF only detected by ILR (P = 0.001). Forty-eight % of the patients indicated symptoms via the patient activator but 33% of those recordings were not due to AF. Early AF recurrence (within 3 months) was highly associated with later AF recurrence (P<0.001). AF burden >0.5% and longest >6h before the ablation were independent predictors of AF recurrence during intermittent but not continuous monitoring.

    Conclusions: After AF ablation, the AF burden was low throughout the 24 months follow-up. Nevertheless, symptoms were commonly indicated but one third of patient activated recordings did not show AF. Continuous monitoring was superior to intermittent follow-up in detecting AF episodes and assessing the AF burden.

    Clinical trial registration: URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00697359.

  • 41.
    Björkenheim, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Brandes, Axel
    Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Chemnitz, Alexander
    Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poçi, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patient-Reported Outcomes in Relation to Continuously Monitored Rhythm Before and During 2 Years After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Using a Disease-Specific and a Generic Instrument2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 5, article id e008362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation improves patient-reported outcomes, irrespective of mode of intermittent rhythm monitoring. We evaluated the use of an AF-specific and a generic patient-reported outcomes instrument during continuous rhythm monitoring 2 years after AF ablation.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-four patients completed the generic 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey and the AF-specific AF6 questionnaires before and 6, 12, and 24 months after AF ablation. All patients underwent continuous ECG monitoring via an implantable loop recorder. The generic patient-reported outcomes scores were compared with those of a Swedish age- and sex-matched population. After ablation, both summary scores reached normative levels at 24 months, while role-physical and vitality remained lower than norms. Responders to ablation (AF burden <0.5%) reached the norms in all individual 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey domains, while nonresponders (AF burden >0.5%) reached norms only in social functioning and mental component summary. All AF6 items and the sum score showed moderate to large improvement in both responders and nonresponders, although responders showed significantly greater improvement in all items except item 1 from before to 24 months after ablation. Higher AF burden was independently associated with poorer physical component summary and AF6 sum score.

    CONCLUSIONS: The AF-specific AF6 questionnaire was more sensitive to changes related to AF burden than the generic 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Patients improved as documented by both instruments, but a higher AF burden after ablation was associated with poorer AF-specific patient-reported outcomes and poorer generic physical but not mental health. Our results support the use of an AF-specific instrument, alone or in combination with a generic instrument, to assess the effect of ablation.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00697359.

  • 42.
    Björkenheim, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Brandes, Axel
    Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Chemnitz, Alexander
    Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Svedberg, Lena
    Department of Cardiology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poçi, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Assessment of Atrial Fibrillation–Specific Symptoms Before and 2 Years After Atrial Fibrillation Ablation: Do Patients and Physicians Differ in Their Perception of Symptom Relief?2017In: JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology, ISSN 2405-500X, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 1168-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate patient-reported and physician-assessed atrial fibrillation (AF)–related symptoms after AF ablation.

    Background: Success of AF ablation is usually defined as freedom from AF, although symptom relief is often patients’ desire.

    Methods: Symptom relief was assessed as perceived by patients using the short, validated, AF-specific symptom questionnaire AF6 and as classified by physicians using the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) classification at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after AF ablation. Recurrence of arrhythmia was documented by continuous electrocardiographic monitoring.

    Results: In total, 54 patients completed the 24-month follow-up. All 6 items on the AF6, AF6 sum score, and EHRA class improved significantly over time. The greatest improvement was seen during the first 6 months after ablation, but AF6 scores showed continued improvement up to 12 months, in contrast to EHRA class. There was a low correlation between AF6 score and EHRA class, but the predictive ability was low. Both AF6 scores and EHRA class were significantly correlated with AF burden at all times after ablation. A change of >9 points in AF6 sum score corresponded to a meaningful reduction in symptom severity.

    Conclusion: Patient-reported and physician-assessed outcomes were both useful in assessing symptom relief after AF ablation, although patient-reported outcomes were more sensitive tools. There was also a discrepancy between patient-reported and physician-assessed outcomes after ablation. Freedom from AF and a low AF burden most often resulted in a reduction of symptoms, but symptom relief also occurred despite little effect on the arrhythmia.

  • 43.
    Boknäs, N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Faxälv, L.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ramström, Sofia
    LLinköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindahl, T.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Thrombin generation in plasma measured with a commercial reagent for the detection of microparticle-derived tissue factor is heavily influenced by contact activation2013In: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 1538-7933, E-ISSN 1538-7836, Vol. 11, no S1, p. 401-402Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Bondia-Pons, Isabel
    et al.
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland; Department of Food Science and Physiology, Research Building, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
    Pöhö, Päivi
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Bozzetto, Lutgarda
    Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Vetrani, Claudia
    Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Patti, Lidia
    Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Aura, Anna-Marja
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Annuzzi, Giovanni
    Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland; Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Rivellese, Angela Albarosa
    Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland; Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Isoenergetic diets differing in their n-3 fatty acid and polyphenol content reflect different plasma and HDL-fraction lipidomic profiles in subjects at high cardiovascular risk2014In: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, ISSN 1613-4125, E-ISSN 1613-4133, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 1873-1882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SCOPE: Dysregulation of lipid homeostasis is related to multiple major healthcare problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of n-3 fatty acid (FA) and polyphenol rich diets on plasma and HDL fraction lipidomic profiles in subjects at high cardiovascular risk.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Ultra performance LC coupled to quadrupole TOF/MS mass spectrometry global lipidomic profiling was applied to plasma and HDL fraction from an 8 wk randomized intervention with four isoenergetic diets, differing in their natural n-3 FA and polyphenols content, in 78 subjects with a high BMI, abdominal obesity, and at least one other feature of the metabolic syndrome. Dependency network analysis showed a different pattern of associations between lipidomics, dietary, and clinical variables after the dietary interventions. The most remarkable associations between variables were observed after the diet high in n-3 FA and polyphenols, as the inverse association between gallic acid intake and LDL cholesterol levels, which was indirectly associated with a HDL cluster exclusively comprised lysophospholipids.

    CONCLUSION: This is the first human randomized controlled trial showing direct and indirect associations with lipid molecular species and clinical variables of interest in the evaluation of the metabolic syndrome after diets naturally rich in polyphenols.

  • 45.
    Breimer, Lars H.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry Unit, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Where Are We Now With Bilirubin as a Marker of Vascular Risk?2014In: Angiology, ISSN 0003-3197, E-ISSN 1940-1574, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 177-179Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Brink, Magnus
    et al.
    Infektionskliniken, Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Cronqvist, Jonas
    Infektionskliniken, Skånes universitetssjukhus, Malmö, Sverige.
    Fagerberg, Anneli
    Anestesi och intensivvård, Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Akutkliniken, Universitetssjukhuset Örebro, Örebro, Sverige.
    Lindgren, Pär
    Anestesi och intensivvård, Växjö ­centrallasarett, Växjö, Sverige.
    Lipcsey, Miklos
    Anestesi och intensivvård, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sverige.
    Okas, Mantas
    Akutmedicinkliniken, ­Capio S:t Görans sjukhus AB, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Petersson, Johan
    Funktion perioperativ medicin och intensiv­vård, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset Solna, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Nu gäller Sepsis-3 för definitioner och diagnostiska kriterier [New definition of and diagnostic criteria for sepsis: Swedish use of Sepsis-3]2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115, no 15, p. 660-667, article id E3W9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Brunkwall, J.
    et al.
    Dept Vasc & Endovasc Surg, Univ Clin, Univ Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Kasprzak, P.
    Dept Surg, Sect Vasc Surg, Klinikum Nurnberg,Dept Vasc Surg, Univ Regensburg, Nurnberg, Germany.
    Verhoeven, E.
    Dept Cardiovasc Surg, Antonius Hosp, Nieuwegein, Netherlands.
    Heijmen, R.
    Dept Vasc Surg, St Guys Hosp, London, England.
    Taylor, P.
    Dept Vasc Surg, St Guys Hosp, London, England.
    ADSORB Trialists, Group author
    Endovascular Repair of Acute Uncomplicated Aortic Type B Dissection Promotes Aortic Remodelling: 1 Year Results of the ADSORB Trial2014In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Uncomplicated acute type B aortic dissection (AD) treated conservatively has a 10% 30-day mortality and up to 25% need intervention within 4 years. In complicated AD, stent grafts have been encouraging. The aim of the present prospective randomised trial was to compare best medical treatment (BMT) with BMT and Gore TAG stent graft in patients with uncomplicated AD. The primary endpoint was a combination of incomplete/no false lumen thrombosis, aortic dilatation, or aortic rupture at 1 year.

    Methods: The AD history had to be less than 14 days, and exclusion criteria were rupture, impending rupture, malperfusion. Of the 61 patients randomised, 80% were DeBakey type IIIB.

    Results: Thirty-one patients were randomised to the BMT group and 30 to the BMT+TAG group. Mean age was 63 years for both groups. The left subclavian artery was completely covered in 47% and in part in 17% of the cases. During the first 30 days, no deaths occurred in either group, but there were three crossovers from the BMT to the BMT TAG group, all due to progression of disease within 1 week. There were two withdrawals from the BMT+TAG group. At the 1-year follow up there had been another two failures in the BMT group: one malperfusion and one aneurysm formation (p = .056 for all). One death occurred in the BMT TAG group. For the overall endpoint BMT+TAG was significantly different from BMT only (p < .001). Incomplete false lumen thrombosis, was found in 13 (43%) of the TAG+BMT group and 30 (97%) of the BMT group (p < .001). The false lumen reduced in size in the BMT+TAG group (p < .001) whereas in the BMT group it increased. The true lumen increased in the BMT TAG (p < .001) whereas in the BMT group it remained unchanged. The overall transverse diameter was the same at the beginning and after 1 year in the BMT group (42.1 mm), but in the BMT+TAG it decreased (38.8 mm; p = .062).

    Conclusions: Uncomplicated AD can be safely treated with the Gore TAG device. Remodelling with thrombosis of the false lumen and reduction of its diameter is induced by the stent graft, but long term results are needed. (C) 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery.

  • 48.
    Calais, Fredrik
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Coronary artery disease and prognosis in relation to cardiovascular risk factors, interventional techniques and systemic atherosclerosis2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To evaluate the prognosis associated with location and severity of coronary and systemic atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to risk factors and interventional techniques.

    Methods: The thesis comprised six longitudinal studies based on three patient cohorts: The Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry, the Västmanland Myocardial Infarction Survey, and the Thrombus Aspiration in ST-Elevation myocardial infarction in Scandinavia study, to evaluate clinical outcome relative to coronary lesion location and severity, extracoronary artery disease (ECAD), intervention techniques, and leisuretime physical inactivity (LTPI).

    Results: Stent placement in the proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD) was more often associated with restenosis than was stenting in the other coronary arteries. The use of drug-eluting stents in the LAD was associated with a lower risk of restenosis and death compared to baremetal stents. Thrombus aspiration in in the LAD during acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI) did not improve clinical outcome, irrespective of adjunct intervention technique. Clinical, but not subclinical, ECAD was associated with poor prognosis in patients with MI. Longitudinal extent of CAD at the time of MI was a predictor of ECAD, and coexistence of extensive CAD and ECAD was associated with particularly poor prognosis following MI. Self-reported LTPI was associated with MI and all-cause mortality independent of ECAD.

    Conclusions: Drug-eluting stents, but not thrombus aspiration, improved prognosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in the proximal LAD. Self- reported LTPI, clinical ECAD, and systemic atherosclerosis defined groups with poor prognosis after MI.

    List of papers
    1. Proximal coronary artery intervention: Stent thrombosis, restenosis and death
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proximal coronary artery intervention: Stent thrombosis, restenosis and death
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    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 170, no 2, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of lesions in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) may confer a worse prognosis compared with the proximal right coronary artery (RCA) and left circumflex coronary artery (LCX). Methods: From May 2005, to May 2011 we identified all PCIs for proximal, one-vessel coronary artery disease in the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR). We evaluated restenosis, stent thrombosis (ST) and mortality in the LAD as compared to the RCA and LCX according to stent type, bare metal (BMS) or drug-eluting stents (DES). Results: 7840 single vessel proximal PCI procedures were identified. Mean follow-up time was 792 days. No differences in restenosis or ST were seen between the LAD and the RCA. The frequency of restenosis and ST was higher in the proximal LAD compared to the proximal LCX (restenosis: hazard ratio (HR) 2.28, confidence interval (CI) 1.56-3.34 p < 0.001; ST: HR 2.32, CI 1.11-4.85 p = 0.024). We found no difference in mortality related to coronary artery. In the proximal LAD, DES implantation was associated with a lower restenosis rate (HR 0.39, CI 0.27-0.55 < 0.001) and mortality (HR 0.58, CI 0.41-0.82 p = 0.002) compared with BMS. In the proximal RCA and LCX, DES use was not associated with lower frequency of clinical restenosis or mortality. Conclusions: Following proximal coronary artery intervention restenosis was more frequent in the LAD than in the LCX. Solely in the proximal LAD we found DES use to be associated with a lower risk of restenosis and death weighted against BMS. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Keywords
    Angioplasty, Coronary artery disease, Drug-eluting stents
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56452 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcard.2013.10.060 (DOI)000327889200032 ()24211065 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-03-16 Created: 2017-03-16 Last updated: 2018-05-28Bibliographically approved
    2. Leisure-time physical inactivity and risk of myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality: A case-control study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leisure-time physical inactivity and risk of myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality: A case-control study
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 177, no 2, p. 599-600Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Exercise, Cardiovascular diseases, Myocardial infarction, Peripheral artery disease
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56360 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.08.137 (DOI)000345232200087 ()25223818 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84913582534 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-03-15 Created: 2017-03-15 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
    3. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction, Thrombus Aspiration, and Different Invasive Strategies: A TASTE Trial Substudy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction, Thrombus Aspiration, and Different Invasive Strategies: A TASTE Trial Substudy
    2015 (English)In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 4, no 6, article id e001755Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The clinical effect of thrombus aspiration in ST-elevation myocardial infarction may depend on the type of aspiration catheter and stenting technique.

    Methods and Results: The multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label trial Thrombus Aspiration in ST-Elevation myocardial infarction in Scandinavia (TASTE) did not demonstrate a clinical benefit of thrombus aspiration compared to percutaneous coronary intervention alone. We assessed the effect of type of aspiration device, stent type, direct stenting, and postdilatation on outcomes at 1 year. There was no difference in all-cause mortality, between the 3 most frequently used aspiration catheters (Eliminate [Terumo] 5.4%, Export [Medtronic] 5.0%, Pronto [Vascular Solutions] 4.5%) in patients randomized to thrombus aspiration. There was no difference in mortality between directly stented patients randomized to thrombus aspiration compared to patients randomized to percutaneous coronary intervention only (risk ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.67, P=0.73). Similarly, there was no difference in mortality between the 2 randomized groups for patients receiving drug-eluting stents (risk ratio 0.89, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.26, P=0.50) or for those treated with postdilation (risk ratio 0.72, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.07, P=0.11). Furthermore, there was no difference in rehospitalization for myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis between the randomized arms in any of the subgroups.

    Conclusions: In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction randomized to thrombus aspiration, the type of aspiration catheter did not affect outcome. Stent type, direct stenting, or postdilation did not affect outcome irrespective of treatment with thrombus aspiration and percutaneous coronary intervention or percutaneous coronary intervention alone.

    Keywords
    angioplasty, myocardial infarction, stenting, thrombus aspiration
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45542 (URN)10.1161/JAHA.114.001755 (DOI)000357025100014 ()26077585 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20100178 B0010401
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions

    Terumo Medical Corporation

    Medtronic Solution

    Svenska Hjartförbundet

    Vascular Solution

    Available from: 2015-08-12 Created: 2015-08-12 Last updated: 2018-07-01Bibliographically approved
    4. Thrombus aspiration in patients with large anterior myocardial infarction: A Thrombus Aspiration in ST-Elevation myocardial infarction in Scandinavia trial substudy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thrombus aspiration in patients with large anterior myocardial infarction: A Thrombus Aspiration in ST-Elevation myocardial infarction in Scandinavia trial substudy
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    2016 (English)In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 172, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The TASTE trial did not demonstrate clinical benefit of thrombus aspiration (TA). High-risk patients might benefit from TA.

    Methods: The TASTE trial was a multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label trial obtaining end points from national registries. Patients (n = 7,244) with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomly assigned 1: 1 to TA and PCI or to PCI alone. We assessed the 1-year clinical effect of TA in a subgroup with potentially large anterior STEMI: mid or proximal left anterior descending coronary artery infarct lesion, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 0 to 2 flow, and symptom onset to PCI time = 5 hours. In this substudy, patient eligibility criteria corresponded to that of the INFUSE-AMI study.

    Results: In total, 1,826 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. All-cause mortality at 1 year of patients randomized to TA did not differ from those randomized to PCI only (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05, 95% CI 0.74-1.49, P = .77). Rates of rehospitalization for myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stent thrombosis did not differ between groups (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.51-1.46, P = .59; HR 1.10 95% CI 0.77-1.58, P = .58; and HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.30-1.86, P = .53, respectively). This was also the case for the combined end point of all-cause mortality and rehospitalization for myocardial infarction, heart failure, or stent thrombosis (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.79-1.26, P = .99).

    Conclusion: In patients with STEMI and large area of myocardium at risk, TA did not affect outcome within 1 year.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2016
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Research subject
    Cardiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48941 (URN)10.1016/j.ahj.2015.11.012 (DOI)000369603800016 ()26856224 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Medtronic

    Vascular solutions

    Terumo

    Biosensors 

    Biotronik

    Available from: 2016-03-07 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
    5. Prognostic impact of subclinical or manifest extracoronary artery diseases after acute myocardial infarction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prognostic impact of subclinical or manifest extracoronary artery diseases after acute myocardial infarction
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 263, p. 53-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), clinically overt extracoronary artery diseases (ECADs), including claudication or previous strokes, are associated with poor outcomes. Subclinical ECADs detected by screening are common among such patients. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic impact of subclinical versus symptomatic ECADs in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

    Methods: In a prospective observational study, 654 consecutive patients diagnosed with AMI underwent ankle brachial index (ABI) measurements and ultrasonographic screening of the carotid arteries and abdominal aorta. Clinical ECADs were defined as prior strokes, claudication, or extracoronary artery intervention. Subclinical ECADs were defined as the absence of a clinical ECAD in combination with an ABI <= 0.9 or >1.4, carotid artery stenosis, or an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Results: At baseline, subclinical and clinical ECADs were prevalent in 21.6% and 14.4% of the patients, respectively. Patients with ECADs received evidence-based medication more often at admission but similar medications at discharge compared with patients without ECADs. During a median follow-up of 5.2 years, 166 patients experienced endpoints of hospitalization for AMI, heart failure, stroke, or cardiovascular death. With ECAD-free cases as reference and after adjustment for risk factors, a clinical ECAD (hazard ratio [HR] 2.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34-3.27, p = 0.001), but not a subclinical ECAD (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.89-2.05, p = 0.164), was significantly associated with worse outcomes.

    Conclusions: Despite receiving similar evidence-based medication at discharge, patients with clinical ECAD, but not patients with a subclinical ECAD, had worse long-term prognosis than patients without an ECAD after AMI. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    Keywords
    Extracoronary artery disease, Myocardial infarction, Prognosis
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-60724 (URN)10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2017.05.027 (DOI)000407634000884 ()28599258 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020304353 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Sparbanksstiftelsen Nya  552  693  0932  2297 

    County of Västmanland  

    Swedish Medical Association

    Available from: 2017-09-11 Created: 2017-09-11 Last updated: 2018-08-06Bibliographically approved
    6. Incremental prognostic value of coronary and systemic atherosclerosis aftermyocardial infarction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incremental prognostic value of coronary and systemic atherosclerosis aftermyocardial infarction
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    General Practice Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-65425 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-03-02Bibliographically approved
  • 49.
    Calais, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson Östman, Maja
    Örebro University, Faculty of Health, Department of Cardiology, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Pär
    Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University and Department of Clinical Physiology, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Incremental prognostic value of coronary and systemic atherosclerosis aftermyocardial infarctionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Calais, Fredrik
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Pär O.
    Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Clinical Physiology, Västmanland Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Wachtell, Kristian
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Leisure-time physical inactivity and risk of myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality: A case-control study2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 177, no 2, p. 599-600Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 304
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