oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 404
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adams, A.
    et al.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Kalla, R.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Vatn, S.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Bonfiglio, F.
    BioCruces Health Research Institue, Bilbao, Spain.
    Nimmo, E.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Kennedy, N.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Ventham, N.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Vatn, M.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Ricanek, P.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Akershus University, Akershus, Norway.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Söderholm, J.
    Department of Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden;.
    Pierik, M.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Törkvist, L.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gomollon, F.
    University Hospital Clinic Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Gut, I.
    CNAG-CRG Centre for Genomic Regulation, Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Barcelona, Spain.
    Jahnsen, J.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, EpiGen, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Satsangi, J.
    Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Epigenetic alterations at diagnosis predict susceptibility, prognosis and treatment escalation in inflammatory bowel disease - IBD Character2017In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 11, no Suppl. 1, p. S108-S108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ahlman, B.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Metabolic Research Laboratory, St Göran's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, K.
    Metabolic Research Laboratory, St Göran's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leijonmarck, C. E.
    Department of Surgery, St Göran's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedenborg, L.
    Department of Pathology, St Göran's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wernerman, J.
    St Göran's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Short-term starvation alters the free amino acid content of human intestinal mucosa1994In: Clinical Science, ISSN 0143-5221, E-ISSN 1470-8736, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 653-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. The effects of short-term starvation and refeeding on the free amino acid concentrations of the intestinal mucosa were characterized in male subjects (n=6), using endoscopically obtained biopsy specimens from the duodenum and from all four segments of the colon.

    2. The alterations in the amino acid concentrations in response to short-term starvation were overall uniform in both duodenal and colonic mucosa as well as in plasma. Most amino acids decreased, whereas branched-chain amino acids increased.

    3. In the colon, glutamic acid and glutamine decreased during the starvation period, whereas they remained unaltered in the duodenum. This was the major difference in response to short-term starvation between the amino acid concentrations in the intestinal mucosa of the duodenum and colon.

    4. Refeeding for 3 days normalized the amino acid concentrations except for glutamic acid, asparagine and histidine, which remained low in the colon, and threonine, which showed an overshoot in both parts of the intestine. S. The changes in mucosal amino acid concentrations seen in response to starvation and refeeding were uniform in the four segments of the colon. This suggests that sampling from the rectum/sigmoid colon will give representative values for the free amino acid concentrations of the entire large intestine.

  • 3.
    Alaedini, Armin
    et al.
    Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University Medical Center, New York NY, USA; Department of Medicine, Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York NY, USA .
    Lebwohl, Benjamin
    Department of Medicine, Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York NY, USA; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wormser, Gary P.
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla NY, United States.
    Green, Peter H.
    Department of Medicine, Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, Columbia University, New York NY, USA.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Borrelia infection and risk of celiac disease2017In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 15, article id 169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Environmental factors, including infectious agents, are speculated to play a role in the rising prevalence and the geographic distribution of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder. In the USA and Sweden where the regional variation in the frequency of celiac disease has been studied, a similarity with the geographic distribution of Lyme disease, an emerging multisystemic infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes, has been found, thus raising the possibility of a link. We aimed to determine if infection with Borrelia contributes to an increased risk of celiac disease.

    Methods: Biopsy reports from all of Sweden's pathology departments were used to identify 15,769 individuals with celiac disease. Through linkage to the nationwide Patient Register, we compared the rate of earlier occurrence of Lyme disease in the patients with celiac disease to that in 78,331 matched controls. To further assess the temporal relationship between Borrelia infection and celiac disease, we also examined the risk of subsequent Lyme disease in patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease.

    Results: Twenty-five individuals (0.16%) with celiac disease had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease, whereas 79 (0.5%) had a subsequent diagnosis of Lyme disease. A modest association between Lyme disease and celiac disease was seen both before (odds ratio, 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-2.47) and after the diagnosis of celiac disease (hazard ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.40-2.35), with the risk of disease being highest in the first year of follow-up.

    Conclusions: Only a minor fraction of the celiac disease patient population had a prior diagnosis of Lyme disease. The similar association between Lyme disease and celiac disease both before and after the diagnosis of celiac disease is strongly suggestive of surveillance bias as a likely contributor. Taken together, the data indicate that Borrelia infection is not a substantive risk factor in the development of celiac disease.

  • 4.
    Almon, Ricardo
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Engfeldt, Peter
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Tysk, Curt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Prevalence and trends in adult-type hypolactasia in different age cohorts in Central Sweden diagnosed by genotyping for the adult-type hypolactasia-linked LCT -13910C > T mutation2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Adult-type hypolactasia (AtH) can be diagnosed by genotyping in addition to functional tests or intestinal biopsy. The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of AtH by genotyping and to investigate whether AtH prevalence has changed in Sweden during the 20th century. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Schoolchildren (n=690) born in 1983 and 1989, and elderly individuals (n=392) born between 1920 and 1932 were genotyped for AtH using Pyrosequencing technology. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of AtH among children was 14.1%. The majority of children (92%, n=635) were Caucasians with genotype prevalences: CC, 61 (10%); CT, 259 (41%); TT, 307 (49%). The frequency of the mutated allele q was 0.300 in this cohort. The prevalence of AtH estimated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) (q 2), was 9.0% (95% CI: 6.7-11.2%). Eight percent (n=55) of the children were non-Caucasian; genotype prevalences were CC, 36 (66%); CT, 15 (27%); TT, 4 (7%). The prevalence of AtH in these children estimated from HWE was 62.5% (95% CI: 49.7-75.3%). The elderly subjects were all Caucasians. Their genotype prevalences were: CC, 20 (5%); CT, 166 (42%); TT, 206 (53%); the frequency of the mutated allele q was 0.262 and their AtH prevalence estimated from HWE was 6.8% (95% CI: 4.3-9.2%). CONCLUSIONS: The overall prevalence of AtH in children (14%) was higher than previously thought. Among Caucasians, higher figures were seen in children than in the elderly (9% versus 6.8%). The prevalence thus seems to be increasing and this may be due to the immigration of both non-Caucasian and Caucasian groups with a higher prevalence of AtH.

  • 5. Amcoff, K.
    et al.
    Joossens, M.
    Pierik, M. J.
    Jonkers, D.
    Bohr, J.
    Joossens, S
    Romberg-Camp, M.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Wickbom, A.
    Rutgeerts, P. J.
    Tysk, Curt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bodin, L.
    Colombel, J. F.
    Vermeire, S.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Arvets inverkan på serologiska markörer hos tvillingar med IBD2012In: Gastrokuriren, ISSN 1651-0453, Vol. 17, no 26, p. MP-06-MP-06Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Amcoff, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Zhulina, Yaroslava
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lampinen, M.
    Dept Med Sci, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Carlson, M.
    Dept Med Sci, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Prognostic significance of eosinophil granule proteins in inflammatory bowel disease2018In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 12, no Suppl. 1, p. S181-S182Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Amcoff, Karin
    et al.
    Joossens, Marie
    Pierik, Marie J.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Bohr, Johan
    Joossens, Sofie
    Romberg-Camps, Marielle
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Wickbom, Anna K.
    Rutgeerts, Paul J.
    Tysk, Curt
    Bodin, Lennart
    Colombel, Jean-Frederic
    Vermeire, Severine
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Influence of genetics in the expression of serological markers in twins with IBD2012In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 142, no 5, p. S881-S881Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Amcoff, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Joossens, Marie
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven,Belgium; VIB Center for the Biology of Disease, Leuven, Belgium; Microbiology Unit, Faculty of Sciences and Bioengineering Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Brussels, Belgium.
    Pierik, Marie J.
    Gastroenterology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Gastroenterology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Bohr, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Joossens, Sofie
    Gastroenterology, Catholic University of Leuven (KUL), Leuven, Belgium.
    Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle
    Department of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Zuyderland Medical Center, Sittard, Netherlands.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wickbom, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rutgeerts, Paul J.
    Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium.
    Tysk, Curt
    Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colombel, Jean-Frederic
    Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York NY, USA.
    Vermeire, Severine
    Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Concordance in Anti-OmpC and Anti-I2 Indicate the Influence of Genetic Predisposition: Results of a European Study of Twins with Crohn's Disease2016In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 695-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: An adaptive immunological response to microbial antigens has been observed in Crohn's disease (CD). Intriguingly, this serological response precedes the diagnosis in some patients and has also been observed in healthy relatives. We aimed to determine whether genetic factors are implicated in this response in a CD twin cohort.

    Methods: In total, 82 twin pairs (Leuven n = 13, Maastricht n = 8, Örebro n = 61) took part: 81 pairs with CD (concordant monozygotic n = 16, discordant monozygotic n = 22, concordant dizygotic n = 3, discordant dizygotic n = 40) and 1 monozygotic pair with both CD and ulcerative colitis. Serology for Pseudomonas fluorescens-related protein (anti-I2), Escherichia coli outer membrane porin C (anti-OmpC), CBir1flagellin (anti-CBir1) and antibodies to oligomannan (anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody [ASCA]) was determined by standardized enzyme-linked immunoassay.

    Results: All markers were more often present in CD twins than in their healthy twin siblings. Using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), agreements in concentrations of anti-OmpC and anti-I2 were observed in discordant monozygotic but not in discordant dizygotic twin pairs with CD (anti-OmpC, ICC 0.80 and -0.02, respectively) and (anti-I2, ICC 0.56 and 0.05, respectively). In contrast, no agreements were found in anti-CBir, immunoglobulin (Ig) G ASCA and ASCA IgA.

    Conclusions: We show that anti-I2 and anti-CBir1 statuses have specificity for CD and confirm previous reported specificities for anti-OmpC and ASCA. Based on quantitative analyses and observed ICCs, genetics seems to predispose to the anti-OmpC and anti-I2 response but less to ASCA and anti-CBir1 responses.

  • 9.
    Amcoff, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, sweden.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampinen, Maria
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Carlson, Marie
    Department of Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology Research Group, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Clinical implications of assay specific differences in f-calprotectin when monitoring inflammatory bowel disease activity over time2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 344-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: With several faecal calprotectin (FC) assays on the market, it has been difficult to define a uniform threshold for discriminating between remission and active disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to compare the results of different FC-assays in IBD patients, followed over time.

    Material and methods: IBD patients provided faecal samples and reported clinical activity every third month prospectively over a two year period. FC was measured with two ELISA - (Bühlmann and Immunodiagnostik) and one automated fluoroimmunoassay (Phadia).

    Results: In total, 13 patients provided 91 faecal samples. The median (IQR) concentration of FC was higher at active disease than at remission for all assays: Bühlmann 845 (1061-226) μg/g versus 62 (224-39) μg/g, Phadia 369 (975-122) μg/g versus 11 (52-11) μg/g, and Immundiagnostik 135 (302-69) μg/g versus 8 (56-4) μg/g. The Bühlmann assay produced the largest absolute difference but the corresponding relative difference seemed to be more pronounced when analysed by the Phadia - (ratio of means 8.5; 95% CI 3.3-21.9) or the Immundiagnostik assay (ratio of means 7.4; 95% CI 3.1-17.6) than by the Bühlmann assay (ratio of means 5.3; 95% CI 2.7-10.6). Consequently, the specificity for discriminating active disease from remission varied between assays (34-75%) when the cut-off 50 μg/g was used, whereas the differences in sensitivity were less pronounced.

    Conclusions: Cross-comparisons revealed overall poor agreement between the assays as well as differences in the dynamics of FC. These findings suggest that standardisation of the method is needed to implement FC as a disease monitoring tool at large-scale.

  • 10.
    Andersen, Vibeke
    et al.
    Medical Department, Sygehus Sønderjylland Aabenraa, Aabenraa, Denmark; Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Internal Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Vogel, Ulla
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: can we predict risk?2012In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 18, no 31, p. 4091-4094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), may be complicated by colorectal cancer (CRC). In a recent population-based cohort study of 47 347 Danish patients with IBD by Tine Jess and colleagues 268 patients with UC and 70 patients with CD developed CRC during 30 years of observation. The overall risk of CRC among patients with UC and CD was comparable with that of the general population. However, patients diagnosed with UC during childhood or as adolescents, patients with long duration of disease and those with concomitant primary sclerosing cholangitis were at increased risk. In this commentary, we discuss the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis in IBD and current investigations of genetic susceptibility in IBD patients. Further advances will depend on the cooperative work by epidemiologist and molecular geneticists in order to identify genetic polymorphisms involved in IBD-associated CRC. The ultimate goal is to incorporate genotypes and clinical parameters into a predictive model that will refine the prediction of risk for CRC in colonic IBD. The challenge will be to translate these new findings into clinical practice and to determine appropriate preventive strategies in order to avoid CRC in IBD patients. The achieved knowledge may also be relevant for other inflammation-associated cancers.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Kruse, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    D'Amato, M.
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Inflammatory biomarkers in serum discriminate Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from healthy controls2016In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 10, no Suppl. 1, p. S86-S87Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kruse, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Neumann, Gunter
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; BioDonostia Health Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain; IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease are characterized by specific serum protein profiles2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 10, article id e0186142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Genetic and immunological data indicate that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are characterized by specific inflammatory protein profiles. However, the serum proteome of IBD is still to be defined. We aimed to characterize the inflammatory serum protein profiles of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), using the novel proximity extension assay.

    Methods: A panel of 91 inflammatory proteins were quantified in a discovery cohort of CD (n = 54), UC patients (n = 54), and healthy controls (HCs; n = 54). We performed univariate analyses by t-test, with false discovery rate correction. A sparse partial least-squares (sPLS) approach was used to identify additional discriminative proteins. The results were validated in a replication cohort.

    Results: By univariate analysis, 17 proteins were identified with significantly different abundances in CD and HCs, and 12 when comparing UC and HCs. Additionally, 64 and 45 discriminant candidate proteins, respectively, were identified with the multivariate approach. Correspondingly, significant cross-validation error rates of 0.12 and 0.19 were observed in the discovery cohort. Only FGF-19 was identified from univariate comparisons of CD and UC, but 37 additional discriminant candidates were identified using the multivariate approach. The observed cross-validation error rate for CD vs. UC remained significant when restricting the analyses to patients in clinical remission. Using univariate comparisons, 16 of 17 CD-associated proteins and 8 of 12 UC-associated proteins were validated in the replication cohort. The area under the curve for CD and UC was 0.96 and 0.92, respectively, when the sPLS model from the discovery cohort was applied to the replication cohort.

    Conclusions: By using the novel PEA method and a panel of inflammatory proteins, we identified proteins with significantly different quantities in CD patients and UC patients compared to HCs. Our data highlight the potential of the serum IBD proteome as a source for identification of future diagnostic biomarkers.

  • 13.
    Angelison, L.
    et al.
    Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Almer, S.
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, A.
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karling, P.
    Umeå, Sweden.
    Fagerberg, U.
    Västeras, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Thörn, M.
    Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björk, J.
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hindorf, U.
    Lund, Sweden.
    Löfberg, R.
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bajor, A.
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hjortswang, H.
    Linköping, Sweden.
    Hammarlund, P.
    Ängelholm, Sweden.
    Grip, O.
    Malmö, Sweden.
    Torp, J.
    Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Marsal, J.
    Lund, Sweden.
    Hertervig, E.
    Lund, Sweden.
    Long-term outcome of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis: a Swedish multicentre study of 250 patients2017In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 519-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Real-life long-term data on infliximab treatment in ulcerative colitis are limited.

    Aim: To study the long-term efficacy and safety of infliximab in chronic active ulcerative colitis and possible predictors of colectomy and response were also examined.

    Methods: A retrospective multi-centre study of infliximab treatment in 250 patients with chronic active ulcerative colitis with inclusion criteria: age ≥18 years, ambulatory treated, steroid-dependent or intolerant and/or immunomodulator refractory or intolerant.

    Results: Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 123/250 patients (49.2%) at 12 months and in 126/250 patients at a median follow-up of 2.9 years (50.4%). Primary response at 3 months was achieved by 190/250 (76.0%) patients and associated with a high probability of response 168/190 (88.4%) at 12 months and 143/190 (75.3%) at follow-up. Long-term rate of colectomy in primary responders was 6/190 (3.2%) at 12 months and 27/190 (14.2%) at last follow-up. Failure to achieve response at 3 months was associated with a high risk of subsequent colectomy, 29/60 (48.3%) at 12 months and 41/60 (68.3%) at follow-up. Response at 12 months was associated with a low risk of subsequent colectomy, 14/181 (7.7%) compared with non-response 19/34 (55.9%) (P < 0.0001). Non-response at 3 months was an independent predictor of subsequent colectomy (HR = 9.40, 95% CI = 5.10-17.35, P < 0.001). Concomitant azathioprine therapy did not influence outcome in terms of colectomy.

    Conclusions: Long-term efficacy of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis is excellent especially in patients who respond to induction treatment. Conversely, non-response at 3 months predicts a poor outcome, with a high risk of subsequent colectomy.

  • 14.
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Vesterlund, Liselotte
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mazzurana, Luca
    Center for Infectious Medicine, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cordeddu, Lina
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schepis, Danika
    Rheumatology unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Center for Infectious Medicine, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ruhrmann, Sabrina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fabbri, Alessia
    Department of Therapeutic Research and Medicines Evaluation, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy .
    Vukojevic, Vladana
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Percipalle, Piergiorgio
    Biology Program, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salomons, Florian A.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurencikiene, Jurga
    Lipid laboratory, Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Törkvist, Leif
    Gastrocentrum, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; BioDonostia Health Research Institute, San Sebastian and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain .
    Functional Analyses of the Crohn's Disease Risk Gene LACC12016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0168276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Genetic variation in the Laccase (multicopper oxidoreductase) domain-containing 1 (LACC1) gene has been shown to affect the risk of Crohn's disease, leprosy and, more recently, ulcerative colitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. LACC1 function appears to promote fatty-acid oxidation, with concomitant inflammasome activation, reactive oxygen species production, and anti-bacterial responses in macrophages. We sought to contribute to elucidating LACC1 biological function by extensive characterization of its expression in human tissues and cells, and through preliminary analyses of the regulatory mechanisms driving such expression.

    Methods: We implemented Western blot, quantitative real-time PCR, immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry analyses to investigate fatty acid metabolism-immune nexus (FAMIN; the LACC1 encoded protein) expression in subcellular compartments, cell lines and relevant human tissues. Gene-set enrichment analyses were performed to initially investigate modulatory mechanisms of LACC1 expression. A small-interference RNA knockdown in vitro model system was used to study the effect of FAMIN depletion on peroxisome function.

    Results: FAMIN expression was detected in macrophage-differentiated THP-1 cells and several human tissues, being highest in neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells among peripheral blood cells. Subcellular co-localization was exclusively confined to peroxisomes, with some additional positivity for organelle endomembrane structures. LACC1 co-expression signatures were enriched for genes involved in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) signaling pathways, and PPAR ligands downregulated FAMIN expression in in vitro model systems.

    Conclusion: FAMIN is a peroxisome-associated protein with primary role(s) in macrophages and other immune cells, where its metabolic functions may be modulated by PPAR signaling events. However, the precise molecular mechanisms through which FAMIN exerts its biological effects in immune cells remain to be elucidated.

  • 15.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kruse, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sapnara, Maria
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden .
    Hultgren Hörnquist, Elisabeth
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden .
    Elevated fecal peptidase D at onset of colitis in Galphai2-/- mice, a mouse model of IBD.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The identification of novel fecal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is hampered by the complexity of the human fecal proteome. On the other hand, in experimental mouse models there is probably less variation. We investigated the fecal protein content in mice to identify possible biomarkers and pathogenic mechanisms.

    METHODS: Fecal samples were collected at onset of inflammation in Galphai2-/- mice, a well-described spontaneous model of chronic colitis, and from healthy littermates. The fecal proteome was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and quantitative mass spectrometry and results were then validated in a new cohort of mice.

    RESULTS: As a potential top marker of disease, peptidase D was found at a higher ratio in Galphai2-/- mouse feces relative to controls (fold change 27; p = 0.019). Other proteins found to be enriched in Gαi2-/- mice were mainly pancreatic proteases, and proteins from plasma and blood cells. A tendency of increased calprotectin, subunit S100-A8, was also observed (fold change 21; p = 0.058). Proteases are potential activators of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract through their interaction with the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). Accordingly, the level of PAR2 was found to be elevated in both the colon and the pancreas of Galphai2-/- mice at different stages of disease.

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings identify peptidase D, an ubiquitously expressed intracellular peptidase, as a potential novel marker of colitis. The elevated levels of fecal proteases may be involved in the pathogenesis of colitis and contribute to the clinical phenotype, possibly by activation of intestinal PAR2.

  • 16.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kruse, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Sapnara, Maria
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hultgren Hörnquist, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Elevated fecal peptidase D at onset of colitis in Galphai2(-/-) mice, a mouse model of IBD2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The identification of novel fecal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is hampered by the complexity of the human fecal proteome. On the other hand, in experimental mouse models there is probably less variation. We investigated the fecal protein content in mice to identify possible biomarkers and pathogenic mechanisms.

    Methods: Fecal samples were collected at onset of inflammation in Galphai2(-/-) mice, a well-described spontaneous model of chronic colitis, and from healthy littermates. The fecal proteome was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and quantitative mass spectrometry and results were then validated in a new cohort of mice.

    Results: As a potential top marker of disease, peptidase D was found at a higher ratio in Galphai24mouse feces relative to controls (fold change 27; p = 0.019). Other proteins found to be enriched in Gai2(-/-) mice were mainly pancreatic proteases, and proteins from plasma and blood cells. A tendency of increased calprotectin, subunit S100-A8, was also observed (fold change 21; p = 0.058). Proteases are potential activators of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract through their interaction with the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). Accordingly, the level of PAR2 was found to be elevated in both the colon and the pancreas of Galphai24- mice at different stages of disease.

    Conclusions: These findings identify peptidase D, an ubiquitously expressed intracellular peptidase, as a potential novel marker of colitis. The elevated levels of fecal proteases may be involved in the pathogenesis of colitis and contribute to the clinical phenotype, possibly by activation of intestinal PAR2.

  • 17. Bergquist, Annika
    et al.
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bahmanyar, Shahram
    Olsson, Rolf
    Danielsson, Åke
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Prytz, Hanne
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Lööf, Lars
    Sandberg-Gertzén, Hanna
    Almer, Sven
    Askling, Johan
    Ehlin, Anna
    Ekbom, Anders
    Increased risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis in first-degree relatives of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis2008In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 939-943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: The importance of genetic factors for the development of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is incompletely understood. This study assessed the risk of PSC and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) among first-degree relatives of patients with PSC, compared with the first-degree relatives of a cohort without PSC. Methods: Subjects from the national Swedish cohort of PSC patients (n = 678) were matched for date of birth, sex, and region to up to 10 subjects without a diagnosis of PSC (n = 6347). Linkage through general population registers identified first-degree relatives of subjects in both the PSC and comparison cohorts (n = 34,092). Diagnoses among first-degree relatives were identified by using the Inpatient Register. Results: The risk of cholangitis was statistically significantly increased in offspring, siblings, and parents of the PSC patient cohort, compared with relatives of the comparison cohort, with the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, 11.5 (1.6–84.4), 11.1 (3.3–37.8), and 2.3 (0.9–6.1), respectively. The hazard ratios for ulcerative colitis (UC) among first-degree relatives of all PSC patients was 3.3 (2.3–4.9) and for Crohn's disease 1.4 (0.8–2.5). The risk of UC for relatives of PSC patients without IBD was also increased, 7.4 (2.9–18.9). Conclusions: First-degree relatives of patients with PSC run an increased risk of PSC, indicating the importance of genetic factors in the etiology of PSC. First-degree relatives of PSC patients without IBD are also at an increased risk of UC, which might indicate shared genetic susceptibility factors for PSC and UC. 

  • 18. Bergquist, Annika
    et al.
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Lund, Ulrika
    Ekbom, Anders
    Olsson, Rolf
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Prytz, Hanne
    Hultcrantz, Rolf
    Broomé, Ulrika
    Perinatal events and the risk of developing primary sclerosing cholangitis2006In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 12, no 37, p. 6037-6040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate whether perinatal events, intrauterine or postpartum, are associated with the development of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) later in life.

    METHODS: Birth records from 97 patients with adult PSC in Sweden were reviewed. Information on perinatal events including medications and complications during pregnancy, gestation length, birth weight and length were collected. Two control children of the same sex were selected for each subject. Conditional multiple logistic regression was used to assess associations of the perinatal measures with development of PSC.

    RESULTS: No significant associations were found between gestational age, birth length, breastfeeding, and the majority of medical complications including infections or medication during pregnancy for the mothers or postpartum for the children. Vaginal bleeding and peripheral oedema showed associations with PSC, with matched odds ratios of 5.70 (95% CI, 1.13-28.83) and 2.28 (95% CI, 1.04-5.03), respectively.

     

    CONCLUSION: The associations of vaginal bleeding and oedema with subsequent PSC cannot readily be explained, so our findings do not strongly support the hypothesis of a significant role of perinatal events as a risk for the development of PSC later in life.

  • 19.
    Björkqvist, Olle
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Seifert, M.
    Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engstrand, L.
    Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rangel, Ignacio
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Increasing abundance of faecalibacterium prausnitzii is associated with decreased intestinal inflammation in Crohn's disease: A longitudinal study2018In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 12, no Suppl. 1, p. S468-S469Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20. Block, T.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Björck, M.
    Acosta, S.
    Diagnostic accuracy of plasma biomarkers for intestinal ischaemia2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 242-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Intestinal ischaemia is a life‐threatening condition with high mortality, and the lack of accurate and readily available diagnostic methods often results in delay in diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of different plasma biomarkers in diagnosing intestinal ischaemia. Material and methods. Prospective inclusion of patients older than 50 years with acute abdomen admitted to hospital in Karlskrona, Sweden, between 2001 and 2003. Venous blood was sampled prior to any surgery and within 24h from onset of pain. D‐lactate, alpha glutathione S‐transferase, intestinal fatty acid binding protein, creatine kinase B, isoenzymes of lactate dehydrogenase (LD) and alkaline liver phosphatase (ALP) were analysed. D‐dimer was analysed using four different commercially available test kits. Results. In‐hospital mortalities among patients with (n = 10) and without (n = 61) intestinal ischaemia were 40% and 3%, respectively (p = 0.003). D‐dimer was associated with intestinal ischaemia (p = 0.001) independently of which assay was used. No patient presenting with a normal D‐dimer had intestinal ischaemia. D‐dimer >0.9mg/L had a specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of 82%, 60% and 79%, respectively. Total LD, isoenzymes of LD 1–4 and liver isoenzyme of ALP (ALP liver) were significantly higher in patients with intestinal ischaemia, and accuracies for LD 2 (cut‐off 2.3µkat/L) and ALP liver (cut‐off 0.7µkat/L) were 69% and 66%, respectively. Conclusions. D‐dimer may be used as an exclusion test for intestinal ischaemia, but lacks specificity. The other plasma biomarkers studied had insufficient accuracy for this group of patients. Further studies are needed. 

  • 21. Blom, Kristin
    et al.
    Rubin, Jenny
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Intestinal Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Törkvist, Leif
    Rönnblom, Anders
    Sangfelt, Per
    Lördal, Mikael
    Jönsson, Ulla-Britt
    Sjöqvist, Urban
    Håkansson, Lena Douhan
    Venge, Per
    Carlson, Marie
    Eosinophil associated genes in the inflammatory bowel disease 4 region: correlation to inflammatory bowel disease revealed2012In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 18, no 44, p. 6409-6419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To study the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and genetic variations in eosinophil protein X (EPX) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP).

    METHODS: DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid blood of 587 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 592 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 300 healthy subjects. The EPX405 (G > C, rs2013109), ECP434 (G > C, rs2073342) and ECP562 (G > C, rs2233860) gene polymorphisms were analysed, by the 5'-nuclease allelic discrimination assay. For determination of intracellular content of EPX and ECP in granulocytes, 39 blood samples was collected and extracted with a buffer containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The intracellular content of EPX was analysed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The intracellular content of ECP was analysed with the UniCAP(®) system as described by the manufacturer. Statistical tests for calculations of results were χ(2) test, Fisher's exact test, ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls test, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve with Log-rank test for trend, the probability values of P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

    RESULTS: The genotype frequency for males with UC and with an age of disease onset of ≥ 45 years (n = 57) was for ECP434 and ECP562, GG = 37%, GC = 60%, CC = 4% and GG = 51%, GC = 49%, CC = 0% respectively. This was significantly different from the healthy subject's genotype frequencies of ECP434 (GG = 57%, GC = 38%, CC = 5%; P = 0.010) and ECP562 (GG = 68%, GC = 29%,CC = 3%; P = 0.009). The genotype frequencies for females, with an age of disease onset of ≥ 45 years with CD (n = 62), was for the ECP434 and ECP562 genotypes GG = 37%, GC = 52%, CC = 11% and GG = 48%, GC = 47% and CC = 5% respectively. This was also statistically different from healthy controls for both ECP434 (P = 0.010) and ECP562 (P = 0.013). The intracellular protein concentration of EPX and ECP was calculated in μg/10(6) eosinophils and then correlated to the EPX 405 genotypes. The protein content of EPX was highest in the patients with the CC genotype of EPX405 (GG = 4.65, GC = 5.93, and CC = 6.57) and for ECP in the patients with the GG genotype of EPX405 (GG = 2.70, GC = 2.47 and CC = 1.90). ANOVA test demonstrated a difference in intracellular protein content for EPX (P = 0.009) and ECP (P = 0.022). The age of disease onset was linked to haplotypes of the EPX405, ECP434 and ECP562 genotypes. Kaplan Maier curve showed a difference between haplotype distributions for the females with CD (P = 0.003). The highest age of disease onset was seen in females with the EPX405CC, ECP434GC, ECP562CC haplotype (34 years) and the lowest in females with the EPX405GC, ECP434GC, ECP562GG haplotype (21 years). For males with UC there was also a difference between the highest and lowest age of the disease onset (EPX405CC, ECP434CC, ECP562CC, mean 24 years vs EPX405GC, ECP434GC, ECP562GG, mean 34 years, P = 0.0009). The relative risk for UC patients with ECP434 or ECP562-GC/CC genotypes to develop dysplasia/cancer was 2.5 (95%CI: 1.2-5.4, P = 0.01) and 2.5 (95%CI: 1.1-5.4, P = 0.02) respectively, compared to patients carrying the GG-genotypes.

    CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms of EPX and ECP are associated to IBD in an age and gender dependent manner, suggesting an essential role of eosinophils in the pathophysiology of IBD.

  • 22.
    Bodea, Corneliu A.
    et al.
    Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA, USA; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge MA, USA.
    Neale, Benjamin M.
    Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge MA, USA; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge MA, USA.
    Ripke, Stephan
    Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge MA, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite, Campus Mitte, Berlin, Germany.
    International IBD Genetics Consortium, Group author
    Daly, Mark J.
    Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge MA, USA; Analytical and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA; Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge MA, USA.
    Devlin, Bernie
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh PA, USA.
    Roeder, Kathryn
    Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA, USA; Computational Biology Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA, USA.
    A Method to Exploit the Structure of Genetic Ancestry Space to Enhance Case-Control Studies2016In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 98, no 5, p. 857-868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One goal of human genetics is to understand the genetic basis of disease, a challenge for diseases of complex inheritance because risk alleles are few relative to the vast set of benign variants. Risk variants are often sought by association studies in which allele frequencies in case subjects are contrasted with those from population-based samples used as control subjects. In an ideal world we would know population-level allele frequencies, releasing researchers to focus on case subjects. We argue this ideal is possible, at least theoretically, and we outline a path to achieving it in reality. If such a resource were to exist, it would yield ample savings and would facilitate the effective use of data repositories by removing administrative and technical barriers. We call this concept the Universal Control Repository Network (UNICORN), a means to perform association analyses without necessitating direct access to individual-level control data. Our approach to UNICORN uses existing genetic resources and various statistical tools to analyze these data, including hierarchical clustering with spectral analysis of ancestry; and empirical Bayesian analysis along with Gaussian spatial processes to estimate ancestry-specific allele frequencies. We demonstrate our approach using tens of thousands of control subjects from studies of Crohn disease, showing how it controls false positives, provides power similar to that achieved when all control data are directly accessible, and enhances power when control data are limiting or even imperfectly matched ancestrally. These results highlight how UNICORN can enable reliable, powerful, and convenient genetic association analyses without access to the individual-level data.

  • 23. Bodger, K.
    et al.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Dodson, A. R.
    Campbell, F.
    Wilson, S.
    Lee, R.
    Lindberg, E.
    Järnerot, G.
    Tysk, Curt
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Rhodes, J. M.
    Altered colonic glycoprotein expression in unaffected monozygotic twins of inflammatory bowel disease patients2006In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 973-977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous chromatographic analysis of colonic mucins from monozygotic twins with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suggested a genetic mucin alteration in ulcerative colitis (UC). This study explores this further by assessing mucosal expression of the oncofetal carbohydrate antigen TF (galactose beta1, 3 N-acetylgalactosamine alpha-), among the same IBD twins. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Formalin fixed paraffin embedded rectal biopsies were studied from 22 monozygotic twin pairs with IBD. These included eight UC twin pairs and 14 Crohn's disease (CD) twin pairs, with six pairs concordant for disease and 16 unaffected twin siblings. Closely adjacent sections were assessed by peanut lectin histochemistry for TF expression and immunohistochemically for nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) activation with investigators blinded to the diagnosis. RESULTS: Unaffected twins were almost all TF positive (15/16) compared with 5/29 histologically normal controls (p<0.0001). Unaffected UC (7/8) and CD twins (8/8) were similarly TF positive. TF positivity was confined mainly to the superficial epithelium and absent from the stem cell compartment of the lower crypts, suggesting that glycosylation changes are acquired rather than genetically determined. Activated NFkappaB was present in the surface epithelium of mucosal biopsies from 13/14 unaffected IBD twins but in only 6/22 histologically normal controls (p=0.0004). All 22 affected IBD twins were TF positive and 18 were positive for activated NFkappaB. CONCLUSIONS: Altered mucosal glycosylation in unaffected identical twins of IBD patients was confirmed in this study. This occurred in both UC and CD twins. The changes are probably acquired rather than congenital and may reflect "preinflammatory" NFkappaB activation.

  • 24. Bohr, Johan
    et al.
    Löfberg, Robert
    Tysk, Curt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Microscopic colitis: collagenous and lymphocytic colitis2010In: Evidence-based gastroenterology and hepatology / [ed] John McDonald, Andrew Burroughs, Brian Feagan, M. Brian Fennerty, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, 3, p. 257-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bohr, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Nyhlin, N.
    Eriksson, S.
    Tysk, Curt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Mikroskopisk kolit hos äkta makar2008In: Gastrokuriren, Vol. 13, no 30, p. PO-09Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Bohr, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wickbom, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hegedus, Agnes
    Department of Laboratory Medicine/Pathology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hultgren-Hörnquist, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Tysk, Curt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Diagnosis and management of microscopic colitis: Current perspectives2014In: Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology, ISSN 1178-7023, E-ISSN 1178-7023, Vol. 7, p. 273-284Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis, together constituting microscopic colitis, are common causes of chronic diarrhea. They are characterized clinically by chronic nonbloody diarrhea and a macroscopically normal colonic mucosa where characteristic histopathological findings are seen. Previously considered rare, they now have emerged as common disorders that need to be considered in the investigation of the patient with chronic diarrhea. The annual incidence of each disorder is five to ten per 100,000 inhabitants, with a peak incidence in 60- to 70-year-old individuals and a predominance of female patients in collagenous colitis. The etiology and pathophysiology are not well understood, and the current view suggests an uncontrolled mucosal immune reaction to various luminal agents in predisposed individuals. Clinical symptoms comprise chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss, and fecal incontinence that may impair the patient's health-related quality of life. An association is reported with other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, thyroid disorders, diabetes mellitus, and arthritis. The best-documented treatment, both short-term and long-term, is budesonide, which induces clinical remission in up to 80% of patients after 8 weeks' treatment. However, after successful budesonide therapy is ended, recurrence of clinical symptoms is common, and the best possible long-term management deserves further study. The long-term prognosis is good, and the risk of complications, including colonic cancer, is low. We present an update of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of microscopic colitis.

  • 27.
    Borssen, Åsa Danielsson
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Department of Medicine, Section of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Weiland, Ola
    Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Verbaan, Hans
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Gastroenterology Division, Lund University, University Hospital Skane, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Gastroenterology Division, Lund University, University Hospital Skane, Lund, Sweden.
    Werner, Mårten
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Epidemiology and causes of death in a Swedish cohort of patients with autoimmune hepatitis2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 1022-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidemiological studies of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) show varying figures on prevalence and incidence, and data on the long-term prognosis are scarce.

    Objective: To investigate the epidemiology, long-term prognosis and causes of death in a Swedish AIH cohort.

    Material and methods: Data collected from 634 AIH patients were matched to the Cause of Death Registry, and survival analyses were made. Prevalence and incidence were calculated for university hospitals with full coverage of cases and compared to the County of Vasterbotten in Northern Sweden.

    Results: AIH point prevalence was 17.3/100,000 inhabitants in 2009, and the yearly incidence 1990-2009 was 1.2/100,000 inhabitants and year. The time between diagnosis and end of follow-up, liver transplantation or death was in median 11.3 years (range 0-51.5 years). Men were diagnosed earlier (p<.001) and died younger than women (p=.002). No gender differences were found concerning transplant-free, overall survival and liver-related death. Cirrhosis at diagnosis was linked to an inferior survival (p<.001). Liver-related death was the most common cause of death (32.7%). The relative survival started to diverge from the general population 4 years after diagnosis but a distinct decline was not observed until after more than 10 years.

    Conclusions: Long-term survival was reduced in patients with AIH. No gender difference regarding prognosis was seen but men died younger, probably as a result of earlier onset of disease. Cirrhosis at diagnosis was a risk factor for poor prognosis and the overall risk of liver-related death was increased.

  • 28.
    Borssén, Åsa D.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bergquist, Annika
    Department of Medicine, Section of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rorsman, Fredrik
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Weiland, Ola
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Verbaan, Hans
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital Skåne, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Nils
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Emma
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital Skåne, Malmö, Sweden.
    Werner, Marten
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå, Sweden.
    Histological improvement of liver fibrosis in well-treated patients with autoimmune hepatitis: A cohort study2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 34, article id e7708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease that if left untreated may lead to the development of cirrhosis. Previous studies on AIH patients have suggested that fibrosis and even cirrhosis can be reversed by medical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of medical treatment for protection of developing fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    A total of 258 liver biopsies from 101 patients (72 women, 29 men) were analyzed by a single pathologist and classified according to the Ishak grading (inflammation) and staging (fibrosis) system. Liver histology was stratified according to the temporal changes of fibrosis stage (increased, decreased, or stable), and groups were compared.

    Complete or partial response to medical treatment was 94.9%. Reduction of fibrosis stage from the first to the last biopsy was seen in 63 patients (62.4%). We found an association between a reduction in the fibrosis stage and continuous glucocorticoid medication, as well as lowered scores of inflammation at last biopsy. Twenty-one patients had cirrhosis (Ishak stage 6) at least in one of the previous biopsies, but only 5 patients at the last biopsy.

    Histological improvement is common in AIH patients that respond to medical treatment, and a reduction or stabilization of fibrosis stage occurs in about 2/3 of such patients.

  • 29.
    Bron, Peter A.
    et al.
    NIZO Food Research, Ede, The Netherlands; BE-Basic Foundation, The Netherlands, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Kleerebezem, Michiel
    Host Microbe Interactomics Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Brummer, Robert-Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Cani, Patrice D.
    Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, WELBIO – Walloon Excellence in Life Sciences and BIOtechnology, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
    Mercenier, Annick
    Nutrition and Health Research, Nestlé Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    MacDonald, Thomas T.
    Barts and The London school of Medicine and Dentistry, Blizard Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
    Garcia-Ródenas, Clara L
    Nutrition and Health Research, Nestlé Research Center, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Wells, Jerry M.
    Host Microbe Interactomics Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Can probiotics modulate human disease by impacting intestinal barrier function?2017In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 93-107Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intestinal barrier integrity is a prerequisite for homeostasis of mucosal function, which is balanced to maximise absorptive capacity, while maintaining efficient defensive reactions against chemical and microbial challenges. Evidence is mounting that disruption of epithelial barrier integrity is one of the major aetiological factors associated with several gastrointestinal diseases, including infection by pathogens, obesity and diabetes, necrotising enterocolitis, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. The notion that specific probiotic bacterial strains can affect barrier integrity fuelled research in which in vitro cell lines, animal models and clinical trials are used to assess whether probiotics can revert the diseased state back to homeostasis and health. This review catalogues and categorises the lines of evidence available in literature for the role of probiotics in epithelial integrity and, consequently, their beneficial effect for the reduction of gastrointestinal disease symptoms.

  • 30.
    Bruggmann, P.
    et al.
    Arud Ctr Addict Med, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Berg, T.
    Univ Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Ovrehus, A. L. H.
    Dept Infect Dis, Odense Univ Hosp, Odense, Denmark.
    Moreno, C.
    Erasme Univ Hosp, Univ Libre Brussels, Brussels, Belgium.
    Brandao Mello, C. E.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Roudot-Thoraval, F.
    Dept Sante Publ, Hop Henri Mondor, Creteil, France.
    Marinho, R. T.
    Ctr Hosp Lisboa Norte, Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Santa Maria,Lisbon, Portugal.
    Sherman, M.
    Toronto Gen Hosp, Univ Hlth Network, Univ Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
    Ryder, S. D.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, Nottingham, England; Biomed Res Unit, Nottingham, England.
    Sperl, J.
    Dept Hepatogastroenterol, Inst Clin & Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Akarca, U.
    Ege Univ, Izmir, Turkey.
    Balik, I.
    Ankara Univ, Ankara, Turkey.
    Bihl, F.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Osped Cantonale, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
    Bilodeau, M.
    Dept Med, Liver Unit, Univ Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
    Blasco, A. J.
    Adv Tech Hlth Serv Res TAISS, Madrid, Spain.
    Buti, M.
    Biomedical Research Networking Center in Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD), Hosp Valle De Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
    Calinas, F.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Ctr Hosp Lisboa Cent, Hosp Santo Antonio Capuchos, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Calleja, J. L.
    Hosp Puerta Hierro, Madrid, Spain.
    Cheinquer, H.
    Hosp Clin, Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre RS, Brazil.
    Christensen, P. B.
    Dept Infect Dis, Odense Univ Hosp, Odense, Denmark.
    Clausen, M.
    Region Hosp Hovedstaden, Region Hovedstaden, Hillerød, Denmark.
    Coelho, H. S. M.
    Dept Clin Med, Univ Fed Rio de Janeiro, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Cornberg, M.
    Dept Gastroenterol Hepatol & Endocrinol,Hannover Med Sch, Hannover, Germany; German Liver Fdn, Hannover, Germany.
    Cramp, M. E.
    Peninsula Schools Med & Dent, Univ Plymouth, Plymouth, England.
    Dore, G. J.
    Kirby Inst, Univ New S Wales, Sydney NSW, Australia.
    Doss, W.
    Cairo Univ, Cairo, Egypt.
    Duberg, Ann-Sofi
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dept Infect Dis, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    El-Sayed, M. H.
    Ain Shams Univ, Cairo, Egypt.
    Ergor, G.
    Dokuz Eylul Univ, Izmir, Turkey.
    Esmat, G.
    Cairo Univ, Cairo, Egypt.
    Estes, C.
    Ctr Dis Anal CDA, Louisville CO, USA.
    Falconer, K.
    Infect Dis Unit, Dept Med Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Felix, J.
    Exigo Consultores, Alhos Vedros, Portugal.
    Ferraz, M. L. G.
    Div Gastroenterol, Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Ferreira, P. R.
    Div Infect Dis, Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Frankova, S.
    Dept Hepatogastroenterol, Inst Clin & Expt Med, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Garcia-Samaniego, J.
    Biomedical Research Networking Center in Hepatic and Digestive Diseases (CIBEREHD), Hosp Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
    Gerstoft, J.
    Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Giria, J. A.
    Direccao Geral Saude, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Goncales, F. L., Jr.
    Fac Ciencias Med, UNICAMP,Dept Clin Med, Grp Estudo Hepatites,Disciplina Doencas Infeccios, Univ Estadual Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Gower, E.
    Ctr Dis Anal CDA, Louisville CO, USA.
    Gschwantler, M.
    Dept Internal Med 4, Wilhelminenspital Stadt Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Guimaraes Pessoa, M.
    Sch Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Hezode, C.
    Serv Hepatogastroenterol, Hop Henri Mondor, Creteil, France.
    Hofer, H.
    Dept Internal Med 3, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Med Univ Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Husa, P.
    Clin Infect Dis, Univ Hosp Brno, Masaryk Univ, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Idilman, R.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Sch Med, Ankara Univ, Ankara, Turkey.
    Kåberg, M.
    Infect Dis Unit, Dept Med Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kaita, K. D. E.
    Dept Internal Med, Sect Hepatol, Univ Manitoba, Winnipeg MB, Canada; Viral Hepatitis Invest Unit, Hlth Sci Ctr, Winnipeg MB, Canada.
    Kautz, A.
    European Liver Patients Assoc, St Truiden, Belgium.
    Kaymakoglu, S.
    Istanbul Univ, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Krajden, M.
    British Columbia Ctr Dis Control, Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Krarup, H.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Aalborg Univ Hosp, Aalborg, Denmark; Sect Mol Diagnost, Aalborg Univ Hosp, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Laleman, W.
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Katholieke Univ Leuven, Louvain, Belgium.
    Lavanchy, D.
    Lazaro, P.
    Adv Tech Hlth Serv Res TAISS, Madrid, Spain.
    Marotta, P.
    Div Gastroenterol, Univ Western Ontario, London ON, Canada.
    Mauss, S.
    Univ Dusseldorf, Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Mendes Correa, M. C.
    Sch Med, Univ Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Muellhaupt, B.
    Swiss HPB Hepatopancreatobiliary Ctr, Univ Zurich Hosp, Zurich, Switzerland; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Zurich Hosp, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Myers, R. P.
    Liver Unit, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada.
    Negro, F.
    Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Hosp, Geneva, Switzerland; Div Clin Pathol,Univ Hosp, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Nemecek, V.
    Natl Reference Lab Hepatitis, Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Ormeci, N.
    Ankara Univ, Ankara, Turkey.
    Parkes, J.
    Univ Southhampton, Southampton, England.
    Peltekian, K. M.
    Dept Med, Halifax, NS, Canada; Dept Surg, Dalhousie Univ, Halifax, Canada; Serv Hepatol, Queen Elizabeth II Hlth Sci Ctr, Capital Dist Hlth Author, Halifax NS, Canada.
    Ramji, A.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Univ British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Razavi, H.
    Ctr Dis Anal CDA, Louisville CO, USA.
    Reis, N.
    Assembleia Republ, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Roberts, S. K.
    Alfred Hosp, Melbourne Vic, Australia; Monash Univ, Melbourne, Australia.
    Rosenberg, W. M.
    Inst Liver & Digest Hlth, Div Med, University College London (UCL), London, England.
    Sarmento-Castro, R.
    Dept Infect Dis, Ctr Hosp Porto, Oporto, Portugal.
    Sarrazin, C.
    JW Goethe Univ Hosp, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Semela, D.
    Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Cantonal Hosp St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland.
    Shiha, G. E.
    Egyptian Liver Res Inst & Hosp ELRIAH, Dakahliah, Egypt.
    Sievert, W.
    Monash Univ, Melbourne, Australia; Monash Hlth, Melbourne Vic, Australia.
    Starkel, P.
    Clin Univ St Luc, Catholic Univ Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
    Stauber, R. E.
    Dept Internal Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Med Univ Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Thompson, A. J.
    Dept Gastroenterol, St Vincents Hosp, Melbourne Vic, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Vic, Australia.
    Urbanek, P.
    Dept Internal Med, Fac Med 1, Charles Univ Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; Cent Mil Hosp, Prague, Czech Republic.
    van Thiel, I.
    St Truiden, Belgium; Deutsch Leberhilfe eV, European Liver Patients Assoc, Cologne, Germany.
    Van Vlierberghe, H.
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Ghent, Belgium.
    Vandijck, D.
    Ghent Univ Hosp, Ghent, Belgium; Univ Ghent, Ghent, Belgium; Dept Hlth Econ & Patient Safety, Hasselt Univ, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Vogel, W.
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Waked, I.
    Natl Liver Inst, Menoufia, Egypt.
    Wedemeyer, H.
    Dept Gastroenterol Hepatol & Endocrinol, Hannover Med Sch, Hannover, Germany; German Liver Fdn, Hannover, Germany.
    Weis, N.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Wiegand, J.
    Univ Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Yosry, A.
    Cairo Univ, Cairo, Egypt.
    Zekry, A.
    St George Hosp Clin Sch Med, Univ New S Wales, Sydney NSW, Australia; Sch Med Sci, Univ New S Wales, Sydney NSW, Australia.
    Van Damme, P.
    Univ Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Aleman, S.
    Dept Med Huddinge, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol Infect Dis, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hindman, S. J.
    Ctr Dis Anal CDA, Louisville CO, USA.
    Historical epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in selected countries2014In: Journal of Viral Hepatitis, ISSN 1352-0504, E-ISSN 1365-2893, Vol. 21, p. 5-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading indicator for liver disease. New treatment options are becoming available, and there is a need to characterize the epidemiology and disease burden of HCV. Data for prevalence, viremia, genotype, diagnosis and treatment were obtained through literature searches and expert consensus for 16 countries. For some countries, data from centralized registries were used to estimate diagnosis and treatment rates. Data for the number of liver transplants and the proportion attributable to HCV were obtained from centralized databases. Viremic prevalence estimates varied widely between countries, ranging from 0.3% in Austria, England and Germany to 8.5% in Egypt. The largest viremic populations were in Egypt, with 6358000 cases in 2008 and Brazil with 2106000 cases in 2007. The age distribution of cases differed between countries. In most countries, prevalence rates were higher among males, reflecting higher rates of injection drug use. Diagnosis, treatment and transplant levels also differed considerably between countries. Reliable estimates characterizing HCV-infected populations are critical for addressing HCV-related morbidity and mortality. There is a need to quantify the burden of chronic HCV infection at the national level.

  • 31.
    Bruze, Gustaf
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ottosson, Johan
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden.
    Neovius, Martin
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Näslund, Ingmar
    Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Marsk, Richard
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hospital admission after gastric bypass: a nationwide cohort study with up to 6 years follow-up.2017In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, ISSN 1550-7289, E-ISSN 1878-7533, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 962-969, article id S1550-7289(17)30005-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have addressed short-term admission rates after bariatric surgery. However, studies on long-term admission rates are few and population based studies are even scarcer.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess short- and long-term admission rates for gastrointestinal surgery after gastric bypass in Sweden compared with admission rates in the general population.

    SETTING: Swedish healthcare system.

    METHODS: The surgery cohort consisted of adults with body mass index≥35 identified in the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (n = 28,331; mean age 41 years; 76% women; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass performed 2007-2012). For each individual, up to 10 comparators from the general population were matched on birth year, sex, and place of residence (n = 274,513). The primary outcome was inpatient admissions due to gastrointestinal surgery retrieved from the National Patient Register through December 31, 2014. Conditional hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using Cox regression.

    RESULTS: All-cause admission rates were 6.5%, 21.4%, and 65.9% during 30 days, 1 year, and 6 years after surgery, respectively. The corresponding rates for gastrointestinal surgery were 1.8%, 6.8%, and 24.4%. Compared with that of the general population, there was an increased risk of all-cause hospital admission at 1 year (HR 2.6 [2.5-2.6]) and 6 years (HR 2.7 [2.6-2.7]). The risk of hospital admission for any gastrointestinal surgical procedure was greatly increased throughout the study period (HR 8.6 [8.4-8.9]). Female sex, psychiatric disease, and low education were risk factors.

    CONCLUSION: We found a significant risk of admission to hospital over>6 years after gastric bypass surgery.

  • 32.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Andersen, V.
    Dept Med, Viborg Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark; Dept Med, Hosp Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Sch Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Univ Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    D'Inca, R.
    Dept Surg Oncol & Gastroenterol, Azienda Osped Padova, Padua, Italy.
    Magro, F.
    Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Porto, Portugal; Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Porto, Portugal.; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Porto, Portugal.
    Arebi, N.
    Gastroenterol, St Marks Hosp, London, England.
    Kievit, L.
    Dept Med, Herning Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Valpiani, D.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Digest Endoscopy, Morgagni Hosp, Forli, Italy.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece; Gastroenterol Unit, Ioannina, Greece.
    Vegh, Z.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Fumery, M.
    Epimad Registry, Gastroenterol Unit, Amiens Univ & Hosp, Amiens, France.
    Pedersen, N.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Slagelse Hosp, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Belousova, E.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Moscow, Russia.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Isl, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Turcan, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, State Univ Med & Pharm Republ Moldova, Kishinev, Moldova.
    Ellul, P.
    Div Gastroenterol, Mater Hosp, L Imsida, Malta.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Oksanen, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Giannotta, M.
    Dept Gastroenterol, AOU Careggi Reg Referral Ctr Inflammatory Bowel D, Florence, Italy.
    Goldis, A.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Hernandez, V.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Salupere, R.
    Div Gastroenterol & Endocrinol, Tartu Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia.
    Odes, S.
    Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Munkholm, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Immunomodulators reduce the risk of surgery and hospitalisation in Crohn's disease in a prospective European population-based inception cohort: the Epi-IBD cohort2018In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 12, no Suppl. 1, p. S42-S43Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Ellul, P.
    Div Gastroenterol, Mater Dei Hosp, L Imsida, Malta.
    Arebi, N.
    Gastroenterol, St Marks Hosp, London, England.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    D'Inca, R.
    Dept Surg Oncol & Gastroenterol, Azienda Osped Padova, Padua, Italy.
    Andersen, V.
    Med Dept, Viborg Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark; Med Dept, Hosp Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark.
    Belousova, E.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Moscow, Russia.
    Hernandez, V.
    Gastroenterol Dept, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Vegh, Z.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Turcan, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, State Univ Med & Pharm Republ Moldova, Kishinev, Moldova.
    Magro, F.
    Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Porto, Portugal; Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Porto, Portugal; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Porto, Portugal.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ of Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kievit, L.
    Dept Med, Herning Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Goldis, A.
    Clin Gastroenterol, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Dept Hepatol & Gastroenterol, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Oksanen, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Sch Med, Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Univ Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Fumery, M.
    Gastroenterol Unit, Epimad Registry, Amiens Hosp & Univ, Amiens, France.
    Odes, S.
    Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Med Dept, Natl Hosp Faroe Isl, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Valpiani, D.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Digest Endoscopy, Morgagni Hosp, Forli, Italy.
    Pedersen, N.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Slagelse Hosp, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Giannotta, M.
    Reg Referral Ctr Inflammatory Bowel D, Dept Gastroenterol, AOU Careggi Florence, Italy.
    Salupere, R.
    Div Endocrinol & Gastroenterol, Tartu Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Munkholm, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Natural disease course of inflammatory bowel disease unclassified in a prospective European population-based inception cohort-the Epi-IBD cohort2018In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 12, no Suppl. 1, p. S523-S524Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Gerdes, U.
    Ctr Qual, Region Southern Denmark, Middelfart, Denmark; Inst Reg Hlth Res, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Almer, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, University Hospital Linköping, County Council Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Sch Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Univ Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Sebastian, S.
    Hull Royal Infirm, Hull & East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Kingston Upon Hull, England; Hull & York Med Sch, Kingston Upon Hull, England.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Pedersen, N.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Slagelse Hosp, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Salupere, R.
    Div Gastroenterol & Endocrinol, Tartu Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Isl, Torshavn, Denmark; Genet Biobank, Torshavn, Faroe Islands, Danmark.
    Manninen, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece.
    Odes, S.
    Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Andersen, V.
    Dept Med, Viborg Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark; Dept Med, Hosp Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark.
    D'Inca, R.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Turcan, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, State Univ Med & Pharm Republ Moldova, Kishinev, Moldova.
    Magro, F.
    Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Oporto, Portugal; Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Oporto, Portugal.
    Goldis, A.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Vinding, K. Kofod
    Dept Med, Amager Hosp, Amager, Denmark.
    Belousova, E.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Moscow, Russia.
    Ladefoged, K.
    Dept Med, Dronning Ingrids Hosp, Nuuk, Greenland.
    Bailey, Y.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Adelaide & Meath Hosp, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Hernandez, V.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Arebi, N.
    Gastroenterol, St Marks Hosp, London, England.
    Shonova, O.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Nemocnice Ceske Budejovice, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Hoivik, M. L.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Oslo Univ Hosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Moum, B.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Oslo Univ Hosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Munkholm, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Frequency of anaemia and anaemia subtypes in east-west European inception cohort: an ECCO-EpiCom cohort study2016In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 10, no Suppl. 1, p. S453-S454Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark..
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastronterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Hernandez, V.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus..
    Valpiani, D.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Digest Endoscopy, Morgagni Hosp, Forli, Italy.
    Pedersen, N.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Slagelse Hosp, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kievit, L.
    Dept Med, Herning Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Fumery, M.
    Gastroenterol Unit, Epimad Registry, Amiens Univ & Hosp, Amiens, France.
    Salupere, R.
    Div Gastroenterol & Endocrinol, Tartu Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia.
    Arebi, N.
    Gastroenterol, St Marks Hosp, London, England.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Isl, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Giannotta, M.
    Dept Gastroenterol, AOU Careggi, Regional Referral Centre of Inflammatory Bowel, Florence, Italy.
    Oksanen, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece.
    Vegh, Z.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Ellul, P.
    Div Gastroenterol, Mater Dei Hosp, LImsida, Malta.
    Schwartz, D.
    Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Sch Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Hosp Ctr , Univ Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    D'Inca, R.
    Dept Surg Oncol & Gastroenterol, Azienda Osped Padova, Padua, Italy.
    Turcan, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, State Univ Med Pharm, Kishinev, Moldova.
    Magro, F.
    Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Oporto, Portugal; Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Oporto, Portugal.
    Goldis, A.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Lakatos, P. L.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Munkholm, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Change in Crohn's disease behavior in a prospective European population-based inception cohort - the ECCO-EpiCom cohort2017In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 11, no Suppl. 1, p. S452-S453Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Hernandez, V.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Valpiani, D.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Digest Endoscopy, Morgagni Hosp, Forli, Italy.
    Pedersen, N.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Slagelse Hosp, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Prague, Charles Univ Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kievit, L.
    Dept Med, Herning Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Fumery, M.
    Epimad Registry, Gastroenterol Unit, Amiens Univ & Hosp, Amiens, France.
    Salupere, R.
    Div Gastroenterol & Endocrinol, Tartu Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia.
    Arebi, N.
    Gastroenterol, St Marks Hosp, London, England.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark..
    Giannotta, M.
    Inflammatory Bowel D, Dept Gastroenterol, AOU Careggi Regional Referral Centre, Florence, Italy.
    Oksanen, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
    Vegh, Z.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Ellul, P.
    Div Gastroenterol, Mater Dei Hosp, Limsida, Malta.
    Schwartz, D.
    Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Sch Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Univ Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    D'Inca, R.
    Dept Surg Oncol & Gastroenterol, Azienda Osped Padova, Padua, Italy.
    Turcan, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, State Univ Med & Pharm, Kishinev, Moldova..
    Magro, F.
    Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Oporto, Portugal; Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Oporto, Portugal.
    Goldis, A.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Munkholm, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Disease course during the first five years following diagnosis in a prospective European population-based inception cohort - the ECCO-EpiCom cohort2017In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 11, no Suppl. 1, p. S435-S436Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Gastronterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Hernandez, V.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Valpiani, D.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Digest Endoscopy, Morgagni Hosp, Forli, Italy.
    Pedersen, N.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Slagelse Hosp, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kievit, L.
    Dept Med, Herning Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Fumery, M.
    Epimad Registry, Gastroenterol Unit, Amiens Univ & Hosp, Amiens, France.
    Salupere, R.
    Div Gastroenterol & Endocrinol, Tartu Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia.
    Arebi, N.
    Gastroenterol, St Marks Hosp, London, England.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Giannotta, M.
    Dept Gastroenterol, AOU Careggi, Regional Referral Centre of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Florence, Italy.
    Oksanen, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece.
    Vegh, Z.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Ellul, P.
    Div Gastroenterol, Mater Dei Hosp, Limsida, Malta.
    Schwartz, D.
    Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Ben Gurion Univ Negev,Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Sch Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Univ Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    D'Inca, R.
    Dept Surg Oncol & Gastroenterol, Azienda Osped Padova, Padua, Italy.
    Turcan, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, State Univ Med & Pharm Republ Moldova, Kishinev, Moldova.
    Magro, F.
    Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Oporto, Portugal; Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Oporto, Portugal.
    Goldis, A.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Munkholm, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol, North Zealand Univ Hosp, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    The risk of proximal disease extension in patients with limited ulcerative colitis in a prospective European population-based inception cohort - the ECCO-EpiCom cohort2017In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 11, no Suppl. 1, p. S436-S436Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Gastrounit, Medical section, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Center ISCARE, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kievit, L.
    Department of medicine, Herning Central Hospital, Herning, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Salupere, R.
    Division of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Thorshavn, Denmark.
    Manninen, P.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Tsianos, E. V.
    1st Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
    Vegh, Z.
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Odes, S.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    D'Inca, R.
    EpiCom Northern Italy, Florence, Forlì and Padova, Italy.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Turcan, S.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Chisinau, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Moldova, Republic of Moldova.
    Magro, F.
    Institute for molecular and cell biology, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de São João, Porto, Portugal; Institute of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Oporto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
    Goldis, A.
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Hernandez, V.
    Gastroenterology Department, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Arebi, N.
    Gastroenterology, St Mark's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
    Langholz, E.
    Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Munkholm, P.
    Department of gastroenterology, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    EpiCom Northern Italy, Group author
    Unchanged surgery and hospitalization rates in an East-West European inception cohort despite differences in use of biologicals-3-year follow-up of the ECCO-EpiCom cohort2015In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 9, p. S5-S6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Herlev Univ Hosp, Herlev, Denmark.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Thorsgaard, N.
    Dept Med, Herning Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Andersen, V.
    Dept Med, Viborg Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark; Inst Reg Hlth Res, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Dept Med, Hosp Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Tsianos, E. V.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Ioannina, Greece.
    Ladefoged, K.
    Dept Med, Dronning Ingrids Hosp, Nuuk, Greenland.
    Bailey, Y.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Adelaide & Meath Hosp, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
    D'Inca, R.
    UO Gastroenterol, Azienda Osped, Univ Padua, Padua, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr Based Crema & Cremona, Forli, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr Based Crema & Cremona, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Turcan, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Nicolae Testemitanu", Kishinev, Moldova.
    Magro, F.
    Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Oporto, Portugal; Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Oporto, Portugal.
    Goldis, A.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Belousova, E.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Moscow, Russia.
    Hernandez, V.
    Gastroenterol, Complejo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Almer, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Uiveraity Hospital, Cty Council Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden; Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Dept Med 24, Div Gastroenterol, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden .
    Sebastian, S.
    Hull Royal Infirm, Hull & East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Kingston Upon Hull, England; Hull & York Med Sch, Kingston Upon Hull, England.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Odes, S.
    Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Munkholm, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Herlev Univ Hosp, Herlev, Denmark.
    The cost of investigations and medical treatment including biological therapy in a European inception cohort from the biological era: An ECCO-EpiCom study2014In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 8, no Suppl. 1, p. S5-S6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pedersen, N.
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Brinar, M.
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia private practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Centre ISCARE, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Shonova, O.
    Gastroenterology Department, Hospital České Budějovice, České Budějovice, Czech Republic.
    Vind, I.
    Department of Medicine, Amager Hospital, Amager, Denmark.
    Avnstrom, S.
    Department of Medicine, Amager Hospital, Amager, Denmark.
    Thorsgaard, N.
    Department of Medicine, Herning Central Hospital, Herning, Denmark.
    Andersen, V.
    Medical Department, Viborg Regional Hospital, Viborg, Denmark; Medical Department, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Krabbe, S.
    Medical Department, Viborg Regional Hospital, Viborg, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Department of Medicine V (Hepatology and Gastroenterology), Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark.
    Salupere, R.
    Division of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Faroe Islands.
    Olsen, J.
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Faroe Islands.
    Manninen, P.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Collin, P.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Tsianos, E. V.
    1st Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    1st Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
    Ladefoged, K.
    Medical Department, Dronning Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland.
    Lakatos, L.
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Bjornsson, E.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ragnarsson, G.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bailey, Y.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, TCD, Dublin, Ireland.
    Odes, S.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Centre and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Schwartz, D.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Centre and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Martinato, M.
    UO Gastroenterologia, Azienda Ospedaliera—Università di Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Lupinacci, G.
    UO di Medicina e Gastroenterologia, Az Ospedaliera Ospedale di Cremona, Cremona, Italy; UO di Gastroenterologia e Endoscopia Digestiva, Az Ospedaliera Ospedale Maggiore di Crema, Crema, Italy.
    Milla, M.
    Gastroenterology Unit, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    De Padova, A.
    UO Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia Digestiva, Ospedale Morgagni-Pierantoni, Forlì, Italy.
    D'lnca, R.
    UO Gastroenterologia, Azienda Ospedaliera-Università di Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Beltrami, M.
    UO Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia Digestiva, Ospedale Morgagni-Pierantoni, Forlì, Italy.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kiudelis, G.
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Turcan, S.
    Department of Gastroenterology, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
    Tighineanu, O.
    Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Centre of Mother and Child, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
    Mihu, I.
    Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Centre of Mother and Child, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
    Magro, F.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de São João, Porto, Portugal; Institute of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Oporto Medical School, Porto, Portugal; Hospital de Vale de Sousa, Porto, Portugal.
    Barros, L. F.
    Hospital de Vale de Sousa, Porto, Portugal.
    Goldis, A.
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine ‘Victor Babes’, Timisoara, Romania.
    Lazar, D.
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine ‘Victor Babes’, Timisoara, Romania.
    Belousova, E.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russia.
    Nikulina, I.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russia.
    Hernandez, V.
    Gastroenterology Department, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Martinez-Ares, D.
    Gastroenterology Department, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Almer, S.
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Gastroenterology/UHL, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Zhulina, Yaroslava
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arebi, N.
    Sir Alan Park's Physiology Unit, St Mark's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Sebastian, S.
    Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust and Hull and York Medical School, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, UK.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Langholz, E.
    Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Munkholm, P.
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    East-West gradient in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in Europe: the ECCO-EpiCom inception cohort2014In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 588-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe. The reasons for these changes remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an East–West gradient in the incidence of IBD in Europe exists.

    Design: A prospective, uniformly diagnosed, population based inception cohort of IBD patients in 31 centres from 14 Western and eight Eastern European countries covering a total background population of approximately 10.1 million people was created. One-third of the centres had previous experience with inception cohorts. Patients were entered into a low cost, web based epidemiological database, making participation possible regardless of socioeconomic status and prior experience.

    Results: 1515 patients aged 15 years or older were included, of whom 535 (35%) were diagnosed with Crohn’s disease (CD), 813 (54%) with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 167 (11%) with IBD unclassified (IBDU). The overall incidence rate ratios in all Western European centres were 1.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.4) for CD and 2.1 (95% CI 1.8 to 2.6) for UC compared with Eastern European centres. The median crude annual incidence rates per 100 000 in 2010 for CD were 6.5 (range 0–10.7) in Western European centres and 3.1 (range 0.4–11.5) in Eastern European centres, for UC 10.8 (range 2.9–31.5) and 4.1 (range 2.4–10.3), respectively, and for IBDU 1.9 (range 0–39.4) and 0 (range 0–1.2), respectively. In Western Europe, 92% of CD, 78% of UC and 74% of IBDU patients had a colonoscopy performed as the diagnostic procedure compared with 90%, 100% and 96%, respectively, in Eastern Europe. 8% of CD and 1% of UC patients in both regions underwent surgery within the first 3 months of the onset of disease. 7% of CD patients and 3% of UC patients from Western Europe received biological treatment as rescue therapy. Of all European CD patients, 20% received only 5-aminosalicylates as induction therapy.

    Conclusions: An East–West gradient in IBD incidence exists in Europe. Among this inception cohort—including indolent and aggressive cases—international guidelines for diagnosis and initial treatment are not being followed uniformly by physicians.

  • 41.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pedersen, N.
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Sch Med, Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Univ Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Turk, N.
    Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Sch Med, Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Univ Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bortlik, M.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Shonova, O.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Ceske Budejovice, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Vind, I.
    Dept Med, Amager Hosp, Amager, Denmark.
    Avnstrom, S.
    Dept Med, Amager Hosp, Amager, Denmark.
    Thorsgaard, N.
    Dept Med, Herning Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Krabbe, S.
    Dept Med, Viborg Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark.
    Andersen, V.
    Dept Med, Viborg Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark; Organ Ctr, Hosp Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark; Inst Reg Hlth Res, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Dept Med Hepatol & Gastroenterol, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Kjeldsen, J.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Odense Univ Hosp, Odense, Denmark.
    Salupere, R.
    Olsen, J.
    Div Gastroenterol & Endocrinol, Tartu Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia; , Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Manninen, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Collin, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    Div Internal Med, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece.
    Tsianos, E. V.
    Div Internal Med, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece.
    Ladefoged, K.
    Dept Med, Dronning Ingrids Hosp, Nuuk, Greenland.
    Lakatos, L.
    Dept Med, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Ragnarsson, G.
    Sect Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Dept Internal Med, Natl Univ Hosp Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Björnsson, E.
    Sect Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Dept Internal Med, Natl Univ Hosp Reykjavik, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bailey, Y.
    Dept Gastroenterol, TCD, Adelaide & Meath Hosp, Dublin, Ireland.
    O'Morain, C.
    Dept Gastroenterol, TCD, Adelaide & Meath Hosp, Dublin, Ireland.
    Schwartz, D.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Odes, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Giannotta, M.
    Gastroenterol Unit, Careggi Hosp, Florence, Italy.
    Girardin, G.
    UO Gastroenterol, Azienda Osped Univ Padova, Padua, Italy.
    Kiudelis, G.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Turcan, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol, State Univ Med & Pharm Republ Moldova, Kishinev, Moldova.
    Barros, L.
    Hosp de Vale de Sousa, Oporto, Portugal.
    Magro, F.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Oporto, Portugal.
    Lazar, D.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Goldis, A.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Nikulina, I.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Moscow, Russia.
    Belousova, E.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Moscow, Russia.
    Martinez-Ares, D.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Hernandez, V.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Almer, S.
    Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Gastroenterol UHL, Cty Council Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Zhulina, Yaroslava
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Div Gastroenterol, Dept Med.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University Hospital. Div Gastroenterol, Dept Med.
    Arebi, N.
    St Marks Hosp, Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, London, England.
    Tsai, H. H.
    Hull Royal Infirm, Hull & York Med Sch, Hull & East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Kingston Upon Hull, N Humberside, England.
    Sebastian, S.
    Hull Royal Infirm, Hull & York Med Sch, Hull & East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Kingston Upon Hull, N Humberside, England.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    Dept Med, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Munkholm, P.
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Environmental factors in a population-based inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients in Europe: An ECCO-EpiCom study2014In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 607-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of Living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior to diagnosis in Eastern and Western European IBD patients.

    Methods: The EpiCom cohort is a population-based, prospective inception cohort of 1560 unselected IBD patients from 31 European countries covering a background population of 10.1 million. At the time of diagnosis patients were asked to complete an 87-item questionnaire concerning environmental factors.

    Results: A total of 1182 patients (76%) answered the questionnaire, 444 (38%) had Crohn's disease (CD), 627 (53%) ulcerative colitis (UC), and 111 (9%) IBD unclassified. No geographic differences regarding smoking status, caffeine intake, use of oral contraceptives, or number of first-degree relatives with IBD were found. Sugar intake was higher in CD and UC patients from Eastern Europe than in Western Europe while fibre intake was lower (p < 0.01). Daily consumption of fast food as well as appendectomy before the age of 20 was more frequent in Eastern European than in Western European UC patients (p < 0.01). Eastern European CD and UC patients had received more vaccinations and experienced fewer childhood infections than Western European patients (p < 0.01).

    Conclusions: In this European population-based inception cohort of unselected IBD patients, Eastern and Western European patients differed in environmental factors prior to diagnosis. Eastern European patients exhibited higher occurrences of suspected risk factors for IBD included in the Western lifestyle. (C) 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 42.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vegh, Z.
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark; Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Pedersen, N.
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Zagreb Sch Med, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Turk, N.
    Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Zagreb Sch Med, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bortlik, M.
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Shonova, O.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Ceske Budejovice, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Thorsgaard, N.
    Dept Med, Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Krabbe, S.
    Dept Med, Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark.
    Andersen, V.
    Dept Med, Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark; Dept Med, Hosp Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark; Inst Reg Hlth Res, Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Dept Med Hepatol & Gastroenterol 5, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Kjeldsen, J.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Univ Hosp, Odense, Denmark.
    Salupere, R.
    Div Gastroenterol & Endocrinol, Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia.
    Olsen, J.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Isl, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Isl, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Manninen, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Collin, P.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Katsanos, K. H.
    Sch Med, Div Internal Med 1, Univ Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; Sch Med, Div Gastroenterol, Univ Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
    Tsianos, E. V.
    Sch Med, Div Internal Med 1, Univ Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; Sch Med, Div Gastroenterol, Univ Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
    Ladefoged, K.
    Dept Med, Dronning Ingrids Hosp, Nuuk, Greenland.
    Ragnarsson, G.
    Sect Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Dept Internal Med, Natl Univ Hosp, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Björnsson, E.
    Sect Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Dept Internal Med, Natl Univ Hosp, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bailey, Y.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Adelaide & Meath Hosp, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    O'Morain, C.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Adelaide & Meath Hosp, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Schwartz, D.
    Odes, S.
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel .
    Politi, S. P.
    UO Med Interna & Gastroenterol, Azienda Osped Istituti Ospitalieri Cremona, Cremona, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Crema Cremona, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Florence, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Forli, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Padua, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Reggio Emilia, Italy .
    Santini, A.
    Gastroenterol Unit, Careggi Hosp, Florence, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Crema Cremona, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Florence, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Forli, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Padua, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy Ctr, Reggio Emilia, Italy .
    Kiudelis, G.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Inst Digest Res, Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Turcan, S.
    State Univ Med & Pharm Republ Moldova, Dept Gastroenterol, Kishinev, Moldova.
    Magro, F.
    Hosp Sao Joao, Dept Gastroenterol, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Oporto, Portugal; Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Oporto, Portugal.
    Barros, L.
    Hosp Vale Sousa, Oporto, Portugal.
    Lazar, D.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Goldis, A.
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med Victor Babes, Timisoara, Romania.
    Nikulina, I.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Moscow, Russia.
    Belousova, E.
    Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow, Russia.
    Sanroman, L.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Martinez-Ares, D.
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hosp Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Almer, S.
    Dept Med, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden; Dept Gastroenterol UHL, Cty Council Ostergötland, Linköping, Sweden .
    Zhulina, Yaroslava
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Div Gastroenterol, Dept Med, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Div Gastroenterol, Dept Med, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arebi, N.
    St Marks Hosp, Sir Alan Parks Physiol Unit, Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, London, England.
    Houston, Y.
    Hull & East Yorkshire HNS Trust, Dept Gastroenterol, Kingston Upon Hull, N Humberside, England.
    Sebastian, S.
    Hull & East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Hull Royal Infirm, Kingston Upon Hull, England; Hull & York Med Sch, Hull Royal Infirm, Kingston Upon Hull, England.
    Langholz, E.
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lakatos, P. L.
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Munkholm, P.
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Health care and patients' education in a European inflammatory bowel disease inception cohort: an ECCO-EpiCom study2014In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 811-818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: The EpiCom study and inception cohort was initiated in 2010 in 31 centers from 14 Western and 8 Eastern European countries, covering a 10.1 million person background population. Our aim was to investigate whether there is a difference between Eastern and Western Europe in health care and education of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

    Methods: A quality of care (QoC) questionnaire was developed in the EpiCom group consisting of 16 questions covering 5 items: time interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, information, education, empathy and access to health care providers.

    Results: Of 1,515 patients, 947 (217 east/730 west) answered the QoC questionnaire. Only 23% of all patients had knowledge about IBD before diagnosis. In Eastern Europe, significantly more patients searched out information about IBD themselves (77% vs. 68%, p < 0.05), the main source was the Internet (92% vs. 88% p = 0.23). In Western Europe, significantly more patients were educated by nurses (19% vs. 1%, p < 0.05), while in Eastern Europe, gastroenterologists were easier to contact (80% vs. 68%, p < 0.05).

    Conclusion: Health care differed significantly between Eastern and Western Europe in all items, but satisfaction rates were high in both geographic regions. Because of the low awareness and the rising incidence of IBD, general information should be the focus of patient organizations and medical societies. In Western Europe IBD nurses play a very important role in reducing the burden of patient management. (c) 2014 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 43.
    Burisch, J.
    et al.
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Weimers, P.
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Pedersen, N.
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Cukovic-Cavka, S.
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia .
    Vucelic, B.
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia .
    Kaimakliotis, I.
    Nicosia Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Duricova, D.
    IBD Center ISCARE, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bortlik, M.
    IBD Center ISCARE, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Shonová, O.
    Gastroenterology Department, Hospital České Budějovice, České Budějovice, Czech Republic.
    Vind, I.
    Department of Medicine, Amager Hospital, Amager, Denmark .
    Avnstrøm, S.
    Department of Medicine, Amager Hospital, Amager, Denmark .
    Thorsgaard, N.
    Department of Medicine, Herning Central Hospital, Herning, Denmark .
    Krabbe, S.
    Medical Department, Viborg Regional Hospital, Viborg, Denmark .
    Andersen, V.
    Medical Department, Viborg Regional Hospital, Viborg, Denmark ; Medical Department, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark; Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark .
    Dahlerup, J. F.
    Department of Medicine V, Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark .
    Kjeldsen, J.
    Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark .
    Salupere, R.
    Division of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia .
    Olsen, J.
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Nielsen, K. R.
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Manninen, P.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland .
    Collin, P.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland .
    Katsanos, K. H.
    1st Division of Internal Medicine and Division of Gastroenterology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece .
    Tsianos, E. V.
    1st Division of Internal Medicine and Division of Gastroenterology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece .
    Ladefoged, K.
    Medical Department, Dronning Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland .
    Lakatos, L.
    Department of Medicine, Csolnoky F. Province Hospital, Veszprem, Hungary .
    Ragnarsson, G.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Björnsson, E.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Bailey, Y.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland .
    O'Morain, C.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland .
    Schwartz, D.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel ; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Odes, S.
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel ; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Valpiani, D.
    U.O. Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia Digestiva, Ospedale Morgagni - Pierantoni, Forlì, Italy.
    Boni, M. C.
    U.O. Medicina 3 e Gastroenterologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy .
    Jonaitis, L.
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania .
    Kupcinskas, L.
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania .
    Turcan, S.
    Department of Gastroenterology, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Chisinau, Moldova.
    Barros, L.
    Hospital de Vale de Sousa, Porto, Portugal .
    Magro, F.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital São João, Porto, Portugal; Institute of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; IBMC - Institute for Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Lazar, D.
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine 'Victor Babes', Timisoara, Romania .
    Goldis, A.
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine 'Victor Babes', Timisoara, Romania .
    Nikulina, I.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russian Federation .
    Belousova, E.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russian Federation .
    Fernandez, A.
    Gastroenterology Department, POVISA Hospital, Vigo, Spain .
    Sanroman, L.
    Gastroenterology Department, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, Spain .
    Almér, S.
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Department of Gastroenterology/UHL, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Zhulina, Yaroslava
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arebi, N.
    St. Mark's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Diggory, T.
    Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Hull and York Medical School, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, United Kingdom; Hull and York Medical School, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, United Kingdom .
    Sebastian, S.
    Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Hull and York Medical School, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, United Kingdom; Hull and York Medical School, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, United Kingdom .
    Lakatos, P. L.
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary .
    Langholz, E.
    Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Munkholm, P.
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Health-related quality of life improves during one year of medical and surgical treatment in a European population-based inception cohort of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An ECCO-EpiCom study2014In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 1030-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is impaired in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The aim was prospectively to assess and validate the pattern of HRQoL in an unselected, population-based inception cohort of IBD patients from Eastern and Western Europe.

    Methods: The EpiCom inception cohort consists of 1560 IBD patients from 31 European centres covering a background population of approximately 10.1 million. Patients answered the disease specific Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ) and generic Short Form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire at diagnosis and after one year of follow-up.

    Results: In total, 1079 patients were included in this study. Crohn's disease (CD) patients mean SIBDQ scores improved from 45.3 to 55.3 in Eastern Europe and from 44.9 to 53.6 in Western Europe. SIBDQ scores for ulcerative colitis (UC) patients improved from 44.9 to 57.4 and from 48.8 to 55.7, respectively. UC patients needing surgery or biologicals had lower SIBDQ scores before and after compared to the rest, while biological therapy improved SIBDQ scores in CD. CD and UC patients in both regions improved all SF-12 scores. Only Eastern European UC patients achieved SF-12 summary scores equal to or above the normal population.

    Conclusion: Medical and surgical treatment improved HRQoL during the first year of disease. The majority of IBD patients in both Eastern and Western Europe reported a positive perception of disease-specific but not generic HRQoL. Biological therapy improved HRQoL in CD patients, while UC patients in need of surgery or biological therapy experienced lower perceptions of HRQoL than the rest.

  • 44. Burisch, Johan
    et al.
    Cukovic-Cavka, Silvija
    Kaimakliotis, Ioannis
    Shonová, Olga
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Dahlerup, Jens F
    Elkjaer, Margarita
    Langholz, Ebbe
    Pedersen, Natalia
    Salupere, Riina
    Kolho, Kaija-Leena
    Manninen, Pia
    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo
    Shuhaibar, Mary
    Odes, Selwyn
    Martinato, Matteo
    Mihu, Ion
    Magro, Fernando
    Belousova, Elena
    Fernandez, Alberto
    Almer, Sven
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hart, Ailsa
    Munkholm, Pia
    Construction and validation of a web-based epidemiological database for inflammatory bowel diseases in Europe an EpiCom study2011In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 342-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The EpiCom-study investigates a possible East-West-gradient in Europe in the incidence of IBD and the association with environmental factors. A secured web-based database is used to facilitate and centralize data registration.

    AIM: To construct and validate a web-based inception cohort database available in both English and Russian language.

    METHOD: The EpiCom database has been constructed in collaboration with all 34 participating centers. The database was translated into Russian using forward translation, patient questionnaires were translated by simplified forward-backward translation. Data insertion implies fulfillment of international diagnostic criteria, disease activity, medical therapy, quality of life, work productivity and activity impairment, outcome of pregnancy, surgery, cancer and death. Data is secured by the WinLog3 System, developed in cooperation with the Danish Data Protection Agency. Validation of the database has been performed in two consecutive rounds, each followed by corrections in accordance with comments.

    RESULTS: The EpiCom database fulfills the requirements of the participating countries' local data security agencies by being stored at a single location. The database was found overall to be "good" or "very good" by 81% of the participants after the second validation round and the general applicability of the database was evaluated as "good" or "very good" by 77%. In the inclusion period January 1st -December 31st 2010 1336 IBD patients have been included in the database.

    CONCLUSION: A user-friendly, tailor-made and secure web-based inception cohort database has been successfully constructed, facilitating remote data input. The incidence of IBD in 23 European countries can be found at www.epicom-ecco.eu.

  • 45.
    Burisch, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Gastroenterology, Nordsjællands Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Kiudelis, Gediminas
    Institute for Digestive Research, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kupcinskas, Limas
    Institute for Digestive Research, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania; Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kievit, Hendrika Adriana Linda
    Department of Medicine, Herning Central Hospital, Herning, Denmark.
    Andersen, Karina Winther
    Medical Department, Regional Hospital of Viborg, Viborg, Denmark.
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Medical Department, Regional Hospital of Viborg, Viborg, Denmark; Focused research unit for Molecular Diagnostic and Clinical Research (MOK), IRS-Center Sonderjylland, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark.
    Salupere, Riina
    Division of Gastroenterology, Tartu University Hospital, University of Tartyu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Pedersen, Natalia
    Gastroenterology Department, Slagelse Hospital, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Kjeldsen, Jens
    Gastroenterology Department, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    D'Incà, Renata
    Department of Surgical, Oncological and Gastroenterological Sciences, Azienda, University of Padua, Padova, Italy.
    Valpiani, Daniela
    U.O. Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia digestiva, Hospital Morgagni Pierantoni, Forlì, Italy.
    Schwartz, Doron
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Odes, Selwyn
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Olsen, Jóngerð
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Thorshavn, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Kári Rubek
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Thorshavn, Denmark.
    Vegh, Zsuzsanna
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; Division of Gastroenterology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Canada.
    Toca, Alina
    Department of Gastroenterology, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
    Turcan, Svetlana
    Department of Gastroenterology, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
    Katsanos, Konstantinos H.
    Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
    Christodoulou, Dimitrios K
    Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
    Fumery, Mathurin
    Gastroenterology Unit, Epimad Registry, Centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) Amiens Sud, Amiens University Hospital, Amiens, France.
    Gower-Rousseau, Corinne
    Public Health, Epidemiology and Economic Health, Registre Epimad, Lille Hospital, Lille University, Lille, France; Lille Inflammation Research International Center (LIRIC), Lille University, Lille, France.
    Zammit, Stefania Chetcuti
    Division of Gastroenterology, Mater Dei Hospital, Msida, Malta.
    Ellul, Pierre
    Division of Gastroenterology, Mater Dei Hospital, Msida, Malta.
    Eriksson, Carl
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magro, Fernando Jose
    Department of Gastroenterology, Centro Hospitalar de São João EPE, Porto, Portugal; Department of Biomedicine, Institute of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Porto University, Porto, Portugal.
    Duricova, Dana
    IBD Clinical and Research Centre (ISCARE), Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bortlik, Martin
    IBD Clinical and Research Centre (ISCARE), Prague, Czech Republic; Institute of Pharmacology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Fernandez, Alberto
    Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital POVISA, Vigo, Spain.
    Hernández, Vicent
    Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Alvaro Cunqueiro. Instituto Investigación Sanitaria Galicia Sur. EOXI de Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Myers, Sally
    IBD Unit, Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Hull, UK.
    Sebastian, Shaji
    IBD Unit, Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Hull, UK.
    Oksanen, Pia
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Collin, Pekka
    University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Goldis, Adrian
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine 'Victor Babes', Timisoara, Romania.
    Misra, Ravi
    IBD Department, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Arebi, Naila
    IBD Department, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Kaimakliotis, Ioannis P.
    Nicosia private practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Nikuina, Inna
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Belousova, Elena
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Brinar, Marko
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Cukovic-Cavka, Silvija
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Langholz, Ebbe
    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark.
    Munkholm, Pia
    Department of Gastroenterology, Nordsjællands Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Natural disease course of Crohn's disease during the first 5 years after diagnosis in a European population-based inception cohort: an Epi-IBD study2018In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The Epi-IBD cohort is a prospective population-based inception cohort of unselected patients with inflammatory bowel disease from 29 European centres covering a background population of almost 10 million people. The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year outcome and disease course of patients with Crohn's disease (CD).

    DESIGN: Patients were followed up prospectively from the time of diagnosis, including collection of their clinical data, demographics, disease activity, medical therapy, surgery, cancers and deaths. Associations between outcomes and multiple covariates were analysed by Cox regression analysis.

    RESULTS: In total, 488 patients were included in the study. During follow-up, 107 (22%) patients received surgery, while 176 (36%) patients were hospitalised because of CD. A total of 49 (14%) patients diagnosed with non-stricturing, non-penetrating disease progressed to either stricturing and/or penetrating disease. These rates did not differ between patients from Western and Eastern Europe. However, significant geographic differences were noted regarding treatment: more patients in Western Europe received biological therapy (33%) and immunomodulators (66%) than did those in Eastern Europe (14% and 54%, respectively, P<0.01), while more Eastern European patients received 5-aminosalicylates (90% vs 56%, P<0.05). Treatment with immunomodulators reduced the risk of surgery (HR: 0.4, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.6) and hospitalisation (HR: 0.3, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.5).

    CONCLUSION: Despite patients being treated early and frequently with immunomodulators and biological therapy in Western Europe, 5-year outcomes including surgery and phenotype progression in this cohort were comparable across Western and Eastern Europe. Differences in treatment strategies between Western and Eastern European centres did not affect the disease course. Treatment with immunomodulators reduced the risk of surgery and hospitalisation.

  • 46. Burisch, Johan
    et al.
    Pedersen, Natalia
    Cukovic-Cavka, Silvija
    Kaimakliotis, John
    Duricova, Dana.
    Shonova, Olga
    Vind, Ida
    Thorsgaard, Niels
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Dahlerup, Jens F.
    Salupere, Riina
    Nielsen, Kári R.
    Manninen, Pia
    Tsianos, Epameinondas V.
    Ladefoged, Karin
    Bailey, Yvonne
    D'Inca, Renata
    Kupcinskas, Limas
    Turcan, Svetlana
    Magro, Fernando
    Goldis, Adrian
    Belousova, Elena
    Hernandez, Vicent
    Almer, Sven
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Sebastian, Shaji
    Lakatos, Peter L.
    Langholz, Ebbe
    Odes, Selwyn H.
    Munkholm, Pia
    The Cost of Medical Management, Surgery and Clinical Investigations in a European Population-Based Inception Cohort From the Biological Era: An ECCO-Epicom Study2014In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 146, no 5, Supplement 1, p. S203-S203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Burisch, Johan
    et al.
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Natalia
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cukovic-Cavka, Silvja
    Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Turk, Niksa
    Univ Hosp Ctr Zagreb, Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Univ Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kaimakliotis, Ioannis
    Nicosia Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Duricova, Dana
    IBD Ctr ISCARE, Charles Univ Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Shonova, Olga
    Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Ceske Budejovice, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Vind, Ida
    Dept Med, Amager Hosp, Amager, Denmark.
    Avnstrom, Soren
    Dept Med, Amager Hosp, Amager, Denmark.
    Thorsgaard, Niels
    Dept Med, Herning Cent Hosp, Herning, Denmark.
    Krabbe, Susanne
    Dept Med, Viborg Reg Hosp, Viborg, Denmark.
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Medical Department, Viborg Regional Hospital, Viborg, Denmark; Medical Department, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark; Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Jens, Frederik Dahlerup
    Dept Med Hepatol & Gastroenterol 5, Aarhus Univ Hosp, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Kjeldsen, Jens
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Odense Univ Hosp, Odense, Denmark.
    Salupere, Riina
    Div Gastroenterol & Endocrinol, Tartu Univ Hosp, Tartu, Estonia.
    Olsen, Jongero
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Kari Rubek
    Dept Med, Natl Hosp Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Manninen, Pia
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Collin, Pekka
    Dept Gastroenterol & Alimentary Tract Surg, Tampere Univ Hosp, Tampere, Finland.
    Katsanos, Konstantinnos H.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece ; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece.
    Tsianos, Epameinondas V.
    Div Internal Med 1, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece ; Hepatogastroenterol Unit, Univ Hosp, Ioannina, Greece.
    Ladefoged, Karin
    Dept Med, Dronning Ingrids Hosp, Nuuk, Greenland.
    Lakatos, Laszlo
    Dept Med, Csolnoky F Prov Hosp, Veszprem, Hungary.
    Bailey, Yvonne
    Adelaide & Meath Hosp, Dept Gastroenterol, Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    O'Morain, Colm
    Dept Gastroenterol, Adelaide & Meath Hosp, Dublin, Ireland.
    Schwartz, Doron
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Ben Gurion Univ of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel .
    Odes, Selwyn
    Dept Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Soroka Med Ctr, Beer Sheva, Israel; Ben Gurion Univ of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel .
    Martinato, Matteo
    U.O. Gastroenterologia, Azienda Ospedaliera, Università di Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Lombardini, Silvia
    UO Medicina 38 e Gastroenterologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Arcispedale S Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Jonaitis, Laimas
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kupcinskas, Limas
    Department of Gastroenterology, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Chisinau, Moldova.
    Turcan, Svetlana
    Dept Gastroenterol, State Univ Med & Pharm Republ Moldova, Kishinev, Moldova.
    Barros, Louisa
    Dept Med, Hosp Vale de Sousa, Oporto, Portugal.
    Magro, Fernando
    Dept Gastroenterol, Hosp Sao Joao, Oporto, Portugal ; Inst Pharmacol & Therapeut, Oporto Med Sch, Oporto, Portugal ; Inst Mol & Cell Biol, Univ Porto, Oporto, Portugal .
    Lazar, Daniela
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med 'Victor Babes', Timisoara, Romania.
    Goldis, Adrian
    Gastroenterol Clin, Univ Med 'Victor Babes', Timisoara, Romania.
    Nikulina, Inna
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Belousova, Elena
    Dept Gastroenterol, Moscow Reg Res Clin Inst, Moscow, Russia.
    Fernandez, Alberto
    Dept Gastroenterol, POVISA Hosp, Vigo, Spain.
    Hernandez, Vicent
    Dept Gastroenterol, Complexo Hospitalario Univ Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Almer, Sven
    Div Gastroenterol & Hepatol, Karolinska Instutue, Stockholm, Sweden ; Dept Gastroenterol UHL, Cty Council Östergötland,Linköping, Sweden .
    Zhulina, Yaroslava
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Div Gastroenterol, Dept Med, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Div Gastroenterol, Dept Med, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tsai, Her-Hsin
    Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Kingston-Upon-Hull, UK; Hull and York Medical School, Kingston-Upon-Hull, UK; Hull Royal Infirmary, Kingston-Upon-Hull, UK.
    Sebastian, Shaji
    Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Kingston-Upon-Hull, UK; Hull and York Medical School, Kingston-Upon-Hull, UK; Hull Royal Infirmary, Kingston-Upon-Hull, UK.
    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo
    Dept Med 1, Semmelweis Univ, Budapest, Hungary.
    Langholz, Ebbe
    Dept Med Gastroenterol, Gentofte Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Munkholm, Pia
    Med Sect, Ctr Digest Dis, Herlev Univ Hosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    EpiCom Northern Italy Centre Based in Crema and Cremona, Padova and Reggio Emilia, Italy (Lombardini & Martinato, on behalf of ), Group author
    Initial Disease Course and Treatment in an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inception Cohort in Europe: The ECCO-EpiCom Cohort2014In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 36-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:The EpiCom cohort is a prospective, population-based, inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients from 31 European centers covering a background population of 10.1 million. The aim of this study was to assess the 1-year outcome in the EpiCom cohort.

    Methods:Patients were followed-up every third month during the first 12 (3) months, and clinical data, demographics, disease activity, medical therapy, surgery, cancers, and deaths were collected and entered in a Web-based database (www.epicom-ecco.eu).

    Results:In total, 1367 patients were included in the 1-year follow-up. In western Europe, 65 Crohn's disease (CD) (16%), 20 ulcerative colitis (UC) (4%), and 4 IBD unclassified (4%) patients underwent surgery, and in eastern Europe, 12 CD (12%) and 2 UC (1%) patients underwent surgery. Eighty-one CD (20%), 80 UC (14%), and 13 (9%) IBD unclassified patients were hospitalized in western Europe compared with 17 CD (16%) and 12 UC (8%) patients in eastern Europe. The cumulative probability of receiving immunomodulators was 57% for CD in western (median time to treatment 2 months) and 44% (1 month) in eastern Europe, and 21% (5 months) and 5% (6 months) for biological therapy, respectively. For UC patients, the cumulative probability was 22% (4 months) and 15% (3 months) for immunomodulators and 6% (3 months) and 1% (12 months) for biological therapy, respectively in the western and eastern Europe.

    Discussion:In this cohort, immunological therapy was initiated within the first months of disease. Surgery and hospitalization rates did not differ between patients from eastern and western Europe, although more western European patients received biological agents and were comparable to previous population-based inception cohorts.

  • 48.
    Burisch, Johan
    et al.
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Vardi, Hillel
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Pedersen, Natalia
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Brinar, Marko
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Cukovic-Cavka, Silvja
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Center Zagreb, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kaimakliotis, Ioannis
    Private Practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Duricova, Dana
    IBD Center ISCARE, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bortlik, Martin
    IBD Center ISCARE, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Shonová, Olga
    Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Ceske Budejovice, Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic.
    Vind, Ida
    Department of Medicine, Amager Hospital, Amager, Denmark.
    Avnstrøm, Søren
    Department of Medicine, Amager Hospital, Amager, Denmark.
    Thorsgaard, Niels
    Department of Medicine, Herning Central Hospital, Herning, Denmark.
    Krabbe, Susanne
    Medical Department, Viborg Regional Hospital, Viborg, Denmark.
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Medical Department, Viborg Regional Hospital, Viborg, Denmark; Organ Center, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark; Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, Jens F
    Department of Medicine V (Hepatology and Gastroenterology), Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark.
    Kjeldsen, Jens
    Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Salupere, Riina
    Division of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.
    Olsen, Jónger
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Faroe Islands.
    Nielsen, Kári R
    Medical Department, The National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Faroe Islands.
    Manninen, Pia
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Collin, Pekka
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Katsanos, Konstantinnos H
    First Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
    Tsianos, Epameinondas V
    First Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
    Ladefoged, Karin
    Medical Department, Dronning Ingrids Hospital, Nuuk, Greenland.
    Lakatos, Laszlo
    First Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Bailey, Yvonne
    Department of Gastroenterology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, TCD, Dublin, Ireland.
    OʼMorain, Colm
    Department of Gastroenterology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, TCD, Dublin, Ireland.
    Schwartz, Doron
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Lupinacci, Guido
    U.O. di Gastroenterologia e Endoscopia Digestiva, Az.Ospedaliera Ospedale Maggiore di Crema, Crema, Italy; EpiCom Northern Italy centre based in Crema and Cremona, Firenze, Forli, Padova and Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    De Padova, Angelo
    EpiCom Northern Italy centre based in Crema and Cremona, Firenze, Forli, Padova and Reggio Emilia, Italy; U.O. Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia Digestiva, Ospedale Morgagni, Pierantoni, Forli, Italy.
    Jonaitis, Laimas
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kupcinskas, Limas
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Turcan, Svetlana
    Department of Gastroenterology, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
    Barros, Louisa
    Department of Medicine, Hospital de Vale de Sousa, Porto, Portugal.
    Magro, Fernando
    Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de Sao Joao, Porto, Portugal; Institute of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Oporto Medical School, Porto, Portugal; Institute for molecular and cell biology, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Lazar, Daniela
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine "Victor Babes," Timisoara, Romania.
    Goldis, Adrian
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine "Victor Babes," Timisoara, Romania.
    Nikulina, Inna
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russia.
    Belousova, Elena
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russia.
    Fernandez, Alberto
    Gastroenterology Department, POVISA Hospital, Vigo, Spain.
    Pineda, Juan R
    Gastroenterology Department, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Almer, Sven
    GastroCentrum, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tsai, Her-Hsin
    Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust and Hull and York Medical School, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, United Kingdom.
    Sebastian, Shaji
    Hull and East Yorkshire NHS Trust and Hull and York Medical School, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, United Kingdom.
    Friger, Michael
    Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Greenberg, Dan
    Department of Health Systems Management, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel; Guilford Glazer Faculty of Business and Management, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Lakatos, Peter L
    First Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Langholz, Ebbe
    Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Odes, Selwyn
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Munkholm, Pia
    Digestive Disease Centre, Medical Section, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Costs and resource utilization for diagnosis and treatment during the initial year in a European inflammatory bowel disease inception cohort: an ECCO-EpiCom Study2015In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 121-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: No direct comparison of health care cost in patients with inflammatory bowel disease across the European continent exists. The aim of this study was to assess the costs of investigations and treatment for diagnostics and during the first year after diagnosis in Europe.

    METHODS: The EpiCom cohort is a prospective population-based inception cohort of unselected inflammatory bowel disease patients from 31 Western and Eastern European centers. Patients were followed every third month from diagnosis, and clinical data regarding treatment and investigations were collected. Costs were calculated in euros (&OV0556;) using the Danish Health Costs Register.

    RESULTS: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven patients were followed, 710 with ulcerative colitis, 509 with Crohn's disease, and 148 with inflammatory bowel disease unclassified. Total expenditure for the cohort was &OV0556;5,408,174 (investigations: &OV0556;2,042,990 [38%], surgery: &OV0556;1,427,648 [26%], biologicals: &OV0556;781,089 [14%], and standard treatment: &OV0556;1,156,520 [22%)]). Mean crude expenditure per patient in Western Europe (Eastern Europe) with Crohn's disease: investigations &OV0556;1803 (&OV0556;2160) (P = 0.44), surgery &OV0556;11,489 (&OV0556;13,973) (P = 0.14), standard treatment &OV0556;1027 (&OV0556;824) (P = 0.51), and biologicals &OV0556;7376 (&OV0556;8307) (P = 0.31). Mean crude expenditure per patient in Western Europe (Eastern Europe) with ulcerative colitis: investigations &OV0556;1189 (&OV0556;1518) (P < 0.01), surgery &OV0556;18,414 (&OV0556;12,395) (P = 0.18), standard treatment &OV0556;896 (&OV0556;798) (P < 0.05), and biologicals &OV0556;5681 (&OV0556;72) (P = 0.51).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based unselected cohort, costs during the first year of disease were mainly incurred by investigative procedures and surgeries. However, biologicals accounted for >15% of costs. Long-term follow-up of the cohort is needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of biological agents.

  • 49.
    Burisch, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Gastroenterology, North Zealand University Hospital, Frederikssund, Denmark.
    Vegh, Zsuzsanna
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Katsanos, Konstantinnos H
    1st Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
    Christodoulou, Dimitrios K
    1st Division of Internal Medicine and Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.
    Lazar, Daniela
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine ‘Victor Babes’, Timisoara, Romania.
    Goldis, Adrian
    Clinic of Gastroenterology, University of Medicine ‘Victor Babes’, Timisoara, Romania.
    O'Morain, Colm
    Department of Gastroenterology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Fernandez, Alberto
    Department of Gastroenterology. POVISA Hospital, Vigo, Spain.
    Pereira, Santos
    Department of Gastroenterology. Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Galicia Sur, Estrutura Organizativa de Xestión Integrada de Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
    Myers, Sally
    IBD Unit, Hull & East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Hull, UK.
    Sebastian, Shaji
    IBD Unit, Hull & East Yorkshire NHS Trust, Hull, UK.
    Pedersen, Natalia
    Gastroenterology Department, Slagelse Hospital, Slagelse, Denmark.
    Olsen, Jóngerð
    Medical Department, National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Kári Rubek
    Medical Department, National Hospital of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Denmark.
    Schwartz, Doron
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Odes, Selwyn
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Soroka Medical Center, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
    Almer, Sven
    Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Turk, Niksa
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Center Zagreb,Zagreb, Croatia.
    Cukovic-Cavka, Silvja
    Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Center Zagreb,Zagreb, Croatia.
    Nikulina, Inna
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Belousova, Elena
    Department of Gastroenterology, Moscow Regional Research Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Duricova, Dana
    IBD Clinical and Research Centre ISCARE, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Bortlik, Martin
    IBD Clinical and Research Centre ISCARE, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; Institute of Pharmacology, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Shonová, Olga
    Gastroenterology Department, Hospital České Budějovice, České Budějovice, Czech Republic.
    Salupere, Riina
    Division of Gastroenterology, Tartu University Hospital,Tartu, Estonia.
    Barros, Louisa
    Department of Medicine, Hospital de Vale de Sousa, Porto, Portugal.
    Magro, Fernando
    Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital de São João, Porto, Portugal; Institute of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Oporto Medical School, Porto, Portugal; Institute for Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Jonaitis, Laimas
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Kupcinskas, Limas
    Institute for Digestive Research, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Turcan, Svetlana
    Department of Gastroenterology, State University of Medicine and Pharmacy of the Republic of Moldova, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova.
    Kaimakliotis, Ioannis
    Nicosia private practice, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Ladefoged, Karin
    Medical Department, Dronning Ingrids Hospital Greenland, Nuuk, Denmark.
    Kudsk, Karen
    Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Laboratory Center, Hospital of Southern Jutland, Aabenraa, Denmark; Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Vind, Ida
    Gastrounit, Medical Division, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Thorsgaard, Niels
    Department of Medicine, Herning Central Hospital, Herning, Denmark.
    Oksanen, Pia
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Collin, Pekka
    Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Dal Piaz, Giulia
    Dipartimento Medicina Specialistica Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia Digestiva, Ospedale Morgagni-Pierantoni, Forlì, Italy.
    Santini, Alessia
    Gastroenterology Unit, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy.
    Niewiadomski, Ola
    Department of Gastroenterology, St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne VIC, Australia.
    Bell, Sally
    Department of Gastroenterology, St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne VIC, Australia.
    Moum, Bjørn
    Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Arebi, Naila
    St Mark’s Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Kjeldsen, Jens
    Department of Medical Gastroenterology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Carlsen, Katrine
    Department of Pediatrics, Hvidovre University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
    Langholz, Ebbe
    Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Univerisity Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Munkholm, Pia
    1st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik
    Center for Quality, Region of Southern Denmark, Middelfart, Denmark.
    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik
    Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    The EpiCom study group, Group author
    Occurrence of anaemia in the first year of inflammatory bowel disease in a European population-based inception cohort: An ECCO-EpiCom study2017In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 1213-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Anaemia is an important complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anaemia and the practice of anaemia screening during the first year following diagnosis in a European prospective population-based inception cohort.

    Methods: Newly diagnosed IBD patients were included and followed prospectively for one year in 29 European and 1 Australian centre. Clinical data including demographics, medical therapy, surgery and blood samples were collected. Anaemia was defined according to the World Health Organization.

    Results: A total of 1,871 patients (CD: 686, 88%; UC: 1,021, 87%; IBDU 164. 81%) were included in the study. The prevalence of anaemia was higher in CD than in UC patients and overall, 49% of CD and 39% of UC patients had at least one instance of anaemia during the first 12 months after diagnosis. UC patients with more extensive disease and those from Eastern European countries, and CD patients with penetrating disease or colonic disease location, had higher risks of anaemia. CD and UC patients in need of none or only mild anti-inflammatory treatment had a lower risk of anaemia. In a significant proportion of patients, anaemia was not assessed until several months after diagnosis, and in almost half of all cases of anaemia a thorough work-up was not performed.

    Conclusions: Overall, 42% of patients had at least one instance of anaemia during the first year following diagnosis. Most patients were assessed for anaemia regularly; however, a full anaemia work-up was frequently neglected in this community setting.

  • 50. Burisch, Johan
    et al.
    Xia, Bing
    Cukovic-Cavka, Silvija
    Kaimakliotis, John
    Duricova, Dana
    Shonova, Olga
    Vind, Ida
    Pedersen, Natalia
    Langholz, Ebbe
    Thorsgaard, Niels
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Dahlerup, Jens F.
    Salupere, Riina
    Nielsen, Kari R.
    Manninen, Pia
    Tsianos, Epameinondas V.
    Ladefoged, Karin
    Bjornsson, Einar
    Bailey, Yvonne
    Odes, Selwyn H.
    Martinato, Matteo
    Kupcinskas, Limas
    Turcan, Svetlana I.
    Magro, Fernando
    Goldis, Adrian
    Belousova, Elena
    Hernandez, Vicent
    Almer, Sven
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Arebi, Naila
    Sebastian, Shaji
    Lakatos, Peter L.
    Munkholm, Pia S.
    Is there an east-west gradient in the incidence of IBD in Europe?: and further far east in China? First results from the epicom study2012In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 142, no 5, p. S569-S570Article in journal (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 404
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf