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  • 1.
    Aho, Vilma
    et al.
    Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ollila, Hanna M
    Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Stanford University Center for Sleep Sciences, Palo Alto CA, United States.
    Kronholm, Erkki
    Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Population Studies Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku, Finland.
    Bondia-Pons, Isabel
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland; Steno Diabetes Center A/S, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Soininen, Pasi
    Computational Medicine, Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; NMR Metabolomics Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Kangas, Antti J
    Computational Medicine, Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Hilvo, Mika
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland.
    Seppälä, Ilkka
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories, University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Tampere, Finland.
    Kettunen, Johannes
    Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Computational Medicine, Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; NMR Metabolomics Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Oikonen, Mervi
    Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Raitoharju, Emma
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories, University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Tampere, Finland.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland; Steno Diabetes Center A/S, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Kähönen, Mika
    Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    Viikari, Jorma S A
    Department of Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Division of Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Härmä, Mikko
    Brain and Work Research Centre, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Sallinen, Mikael
    Brain and Work Research Centre, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; Agora Center, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Olkkonen, Vesa M
    Minerva Foundation Institute for Medical Research, Helsinki, Finland; Institute of Biomedicine, Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Alenius, Harri
    Unit of Excellence for Immunotoxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jauhiainen, Matti
    Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Paunio, Tiina
    Genomics and Biomarkers Unit, Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories, University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Tampere, Finland.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Orešič, Matej
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland; Steno Diabetes Center A/S, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Raitakari, Olli T
    Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Ala-Korpela, Mika
    Computational Medicine, Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; NMR Metabolomics Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; Computational Medicine, School of Social and Community Medicine, Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja
    Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Prolonged sleep restriction induces changes in pathways involved in cholesterol metabolism and inflammatory responses2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 24828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep loss and insufficient sleep are risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases, but data on how insufficient sleep contributes to these diseases are scarce. These questions were addressed using two approaches: an experimental, partial sleep restriction study (14 cases and 7 control subjects) with objective verification of sleep amount, and two independent epidemiological cohorts (altogether 2739 individuals) with questions of sleep insufficiency. In both approaches, blood transcriptome and serum metabolome were analysed. Sleep loss decreased the expression of genes encoding cholesterol transporters and increased expression in pathways involved in inflammatory responses in both paradigms. Metabolomic analyses revealed lower circulating large HDL in the population cohorts among subjects reporting insufficient sleep, while circulating LDL decreased in the experimental sleep restriction study. These findings suggest that prolonged sleep deprivation modifies inflammatory and cholesterol pathways at the level of gene expression and serum lipoproteins, inducing changes toward potentially higher risk for cardiometabolic diseases.

  • 2.
    Baban, Bayar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. iRiSC – Inflammatory Response and Infection Susceptibility Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Inflammasome activation, colonic cancer and glucose metabolism2016In: Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, ISSN 2405-4577, Vol. 12, article id e37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study the association between inflammasome activation (a potent initiator of inflammation acting via caspase-1 and maturation of interleukin-1β), colonic cancer and glucose metabolism.

    Methods: Five patients with colon cancer and ten matched controls without cancer were measured for insulin sensitivity using the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. For detection of inflammasome activation the caspase-1 activity, determined by detecting FLICA using flow cytometry, was measured in both monocytes and granulocytes at the start of, and at 120 minutes into the clamp. Descriptive and analytical statistics were performed using nonparametric methods by SPSS.

    Results: There was no difference in levels of insulin sensitivity between the two groups (p=0.09). The cancer patients had significantly lower levels of caspase-1 both in monocytes (p<0.05) and granulocytes (p<0.05) compared with the controls. However both patients and controls had significantly higher levels of both mono- and granulocyte caspase-1 activity at 120 minutes into the clamp as compared to at start (p<0.05). Patients showed an overall higher relative increase in caspase-1 during the clamp, however this finding did not reach statistical significance (monocytes; p=0.27, granulocytes; p=0.22).

  • 3.
    Fall, Katja
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Enheten för klinisk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Örebro Universitetssjukhus, Örebro, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Regionalt cancercentrum, Uppsala-Örebro, Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sweden; King´s College, London, UK.
    Sundström, Johan
    Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper, Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala Universitet, Uppsala, Sweden; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden; George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australien.
    Bra prognosstudier kan ge bättre kliniska beslut [Good prognosis studies can provide better clinical decisions]: Validerade risk-/prognosfaktorer hjälper läkaren [Validated risk-/prognosis factors helps the physician].2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 6, p. 279-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Henriksson, Pontus
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Britt
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Gestational weight gain according to Institute of Medicine recommendations in relation to infant size and body composition2015In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 388-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intrauterine life may be a critical period for programming childhood obesity; however, there is insufficient knowledge concerning how gestational weight gain (GWG) affects infant fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM).

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between GWG according to Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations and infant size, FM and FFM. We also investigated if the associations were different for normal-weight and overweight/obese women.

    Methods: This study included 312 healthy Swedish mother-infant pairs. Infant body composition at 1 week of age was assessed using air-displacement plethysmography. Maternal GWG was defined as below, within or above the 2009 IOM recommendations. Multiple regression analyses were used.

    Results: Compared with women whose weight gain was within IOM recommendations, women with weight gain below the recommendations had infants that were shorter (-0.7 cm, P = 0.008) when adjusting for confounders. Normal-weight women exceeding IOM recommendations had infants with higher FM (+58 g, P = 0.008) compared with normal-weight women who gained within the recommendations. No corresponding association was observed for overweight/obese women.

    Conclusions: Inadequate GWG was associated with shorter infants, while excessive GWG was associated with greater infant FM for women who were of normal weight before pregnancy.

  • 5.
    Isaksson, Helena S.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Preanalytical aspects of quantitative TaqMan real-time RT-PCR: applications for TF and VEGF mRNA quantification2006In: Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0009-9120, E-ISSN 1873-2933, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 373-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The present paper focuses on preanalytical aspects of tissue factor (TF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA quantification: the choice of blood collection tubes and defining the time frame allowed before processing the sample. DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood was collected from healthy volunteers in K(3) EDTA tubes, CPT, endotoxin-free EndoTube tubes and in PAXgene tubes. Total RNA concentration was determined by absorbance readings at 260 nm with a GeneQuantII UV spectrophotometer. RNA quantity and quality were also determined by the Lab on a Chip technique (Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer). Real-time RT-PCR assays were performed by the TaqMan technology. RESULTS: The more expensive PAXgene and CPT tubes and the Endo tubes did not give superior results from those obtained in inexpensive routine K(3) EDTA tubes. The PAXgene tubes preserved high molecular mass rRNA better than the other tubes. CONCLUSION: Both the PAXgene system and routine EDTA tubes are suitable for clinical purposes aimed at quantitation of mRNA for TF and VEGF. PAXgene yielded rRNA that was less degraded but had lower mRNA per microg extracted RNA. A time frame up to 24 h until sample processing is acceptable for TF and VEGF mRNA.

  • 6.
    Lindstedt, Katarina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Psychiatric Research Centre.
    Neander, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kjellin, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Sanna Aila
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Being me and being us: adolescents' experiences of treatment for eating disorders2015In: Journal of eating disorders, ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 3, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This qualitative study addresses adolescents' perception of treatment for eating disorders. The importance of involving parents in treatment of young people with eating disorders, especially young people with Anorexia Nervosa, is emphasized in a number of studies. Even so, this form of treatment does not work for everybody, not even within a limited diagnostic group. Previous research has revealed that many young people are not entirely satisfied with their treatment. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the perspectives of adolescents in outpatient treatment, whose treatment often involves family. The aim of the present study was to investigate how young people with experience from adolescent outpatient treatment for eating disorders, involving family-based and individual based interventions, perceive their time in treatment.

    METHODS: This study was conducted using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Fifteen participants were recruited in collaboration with four specialized eating disorder units and interviewed with the purpose to gather narratives.

    RESULTS: The analysis revealed that the adolescents sometimes felt more or less forced into treatment, and strong ambivalent feelings about if and how to participate in treatment permeated the adolescents' narratives. The common factors which emerged in the narratives were assembled under the two major themes: Having to involve family in treatment - in one way or another and Making progress in treatment - a matter of trust.

    CONCLUSIONS: It is of great importance to involve family in treatment in order to understand the problems of the adolescents in their context and be able to take advantage of the resource that parents constitute. However, in certain situations, it is necessary to prioritise individual treatment interventions so that instead of sorting out difficult family situations the therapist focuses on enhancing the young people's resilience, thus enabling them to tackle problematic situations in life.

1 - 6 of 6
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