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  • 1. Carlsson, C.
    et al.
    Johansson, Carina B.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Holmgren Peterson, K.
    Sul, Y. T.
    Comparisons of bone tissue formation around pure titanium implants using light- and fluorescence microscopically techniques2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ekblad, Alf
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Boström, Björn
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Holm, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Comstedt, Daniel
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forest soil respiration rate and d13C is regulated by recent above ground weather conditions2005In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 143, no 1, p. 136-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil respiration, a key component of the global carbon cycle, is a major source of uncertainty when estimating terrestrial carbon budgets at ecosystem and higher levels. Rates of soil and root respiration are assumed to be dependent on soil temperature and soil moisture yet these factors often barely explain half the seasonal variation in soil respiration. We here found that soil moisture (range 16.5-27.6% of dry weight) and soil temperature (range 8-17.5 degrees C) together explained 55% of the variance (cross-validated explained variance; Q2) in soil respiration rate (range 1.0-3.4 micromol C m(-2) s(-1)) in a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest. We hypothesised that this was due to that the two components of soil respiration, root respiration and decomposition, are governed by different factors. We therefore applied PLS (partial least squares regression) multivariate modelling in which we, together with below ground temperature and soil moisture, used the recent above ground air temperature and air humidity (vapour pressure deficit, VPD) conditions as x-variables. We found that air temperature and VPD data collected 1-4 days before respiration measurements explained 86% of the seasonal variation in the rate of soil respiration. The addition of soil moisture and soil temperature to the PLS-models increased the Q2 to 93%. delta13C analysis of soil respiration supported the hypotheses that there was a fast flux of photosynthates to root respiration and a dependence on recent above ground weather conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that shoot activities the preceding 1-6 days influence, to a large degree, the rate of root and soil respiration. We propose this above ground influence on soil respiration to be proportionally largest in the middle of the growing season and in situations when there is large day-to-day shifts in the above ground weather conditions. During such conditions soil temperature may not exert the major control on root respiration.

  • 3.
    Fürsatz, Marian
    et al.
    Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skog, Mårten
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkopings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sivlér, Petter
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkopings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Palm, Eleonor
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Aronsson, Christopher
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkopings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skallberg, Andreas
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkopings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Department of Physics, Linköping University, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Khalaf, Hazem
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Aili, Daniel
    Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Functionalization of bacterial cellulose wound dressings with the antimicrobial peptide ε-poly-L-Lysine2018In: Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1748-6041, E-ISSN 1748-605X, Vol. 13, article id 025014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound dressings based on bacterial cellulose (BC) can form a soft and conformable protective layer that can stimulate wound healing while preventing bacteria from entering the wound. Bacteria already present in the wound can, however, thrive in the moist environment created by the BC dressing which can aggravate the healing process. Possibilities to render the BC antimicrobial without affecting the beneficial structural and mechanical properties of the material would hence be highly attractive. Here we present methods for functionalization of BC with ε-Poly-L-Lysine (ε-PLL), a non-toxic biopolymer with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Low molecular weight ε-PLL was cross-linked in pristine BC membranes and to carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) functionalized BC using carbodiimide chemistry. The functionalization of BC with ε-PLL inhibited growth of S. epidermidis on the membranes but did not affect the cytocompatibility to cultured human fibroblasts as compared to native BC. The functionalization had no significant effects on the nanofibrous structure and mechanical properties of the BC. The possibility to functionalize BC with ε-PLL is a promising, green and versatile approach to improve the performance of BC in wound care and other biomedical applications.

  • 4. Sul, Y. T.
    et al.
    Jeong, Y.
    Johansson, Carina B.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Albrektsson, T.
    Rate and strength of osseointegration of oxidized and machined turned titanium implants in rabbit bone for 3 and 6 weeks2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Sul, Y. T.
    et al.
    Johansson, Carina B.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Albrektsson, T.
    What surface properties determine significant differences of bone respons to oxidized Mg-incorporated, Ti-unite and Osseotite implants?2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Sul, Young-Taeg
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Biomat Handicap Res, Gothenburg Univ, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Carina B.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Biomat Handicap Res, Gothenburg Univ, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A novel in vivo method for quantifying the interfacial biochemical bond strength of bone implants2010In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, ISSN 1742-5689, E-ISSN 1742-5662, Vol. 7, no 42, p. 81-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantifying the in vivo interfacial biochemical bond strength of bone implants is a biological challenge. We have developed a new and novel in vivo method to identify an interfacial biochemical bond in bone implants and to measure its bonding strength. This method, named biochemical bond measurement (BBM), involves a combination of the implant devices to measure true interfacial bond strength and surface property controls, and thus enables the contributions of mechanical interlocking and biochemical bonding to be distinguished from the measured strength values. We applied the BBM method to a rabbit model, and observed great differences in bone integration between the oxygen (control group) and magnesium (test group) plasma immersion ion-implanted titanium implants (0.046 versus 0.086 MPa, n=10, p=0.005). The biochemical bond in the test implants resulted in superior interfacial behaviour of the implants to bone: (i) close contact to approximately 2 μm thin amorphous interfacial tissue, (ii) pronounced mineralization of the interfacial tissue, (iii) rapid bone healing in contact, and (iv) strong integration to bone. The BBM method can be applied to in vivo experimental models not only to validate the presence of a biochemical bond at the bone–implant interface but also to measure the relative quantity of biochemical bond strength. The present study may provide new avenues for better understanding the role of a biochemical bond involved in the integration of bone implants.

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