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  • 1.
    Ahnström, Johan
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden; Länsstyrelsen i Uppsala län, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Jan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berg, Åke
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Lars
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Boonstra, Wijnand J.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Uppsala, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Johanna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Farmers' Interest in Nature and Its Relation to Biodiversity in Arable Fields2013In: International Journal of Ecology, ISSN 1687-9708, E-ISSN 1687-9716, 617352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiversity declines in farmland have been attributed to intensification of farming at the field level and loss of heterogeneity at the landscape level. However, farmers are not solely optimizing production; their actions are also influenced by social factors, tradition and interest in nature, which indirectly influence biodiversity but rarely are incorporated in studies of farmland biodiversity. We used social science methods to quantify farmers’ interest in nature on 16 farms with winter wheat fields in central Sweden, and combined this with biodiversity inventories of five organism groups (weeds, carabid beetles, bumblebees, solitary bees, and birds) and estimates of landscape composition andmanagement intensity at the field level.Agricultural intensity,measured as crop density, and farmers’ interest in nature explained variation in biodiversity, measured as the proportion of the regional species richness found on single fields. Interest in nature seemed to incorporate many actions taken by farmers and appeared to be influenced by both physical factors, for example, the surrounding landscape, and social factors, for example, social motivations.This study indicates that conservation of biodiversity in farmland, and design of new agri-environmental subsidy systems, would profit from taking farmers’ interest in nature and its relation to agricultural practices into account.

  • 2.
    Alsterlund, Rolf
    et al.
    Infektionskliniken, Centralsjukhuset, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Edén, Tony
    Kliniska bakteriologiska laboratoriet.
    De Jong, Birgitta
    Epidemiologiska enheten, Smittskyddsenheten.
    Lyxell, Gabriella
    Miljölaboratoriet i Umeå AB, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Per Olof
    Länsveterinär, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Ransjö, Ulrika
    Enheten för sjukhushygien, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Solna, Sweden.
    Yersinia enterocolitica på Bjärehalvön: Risker med kylda matvaror1995In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 47, no 6, 257-260 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Alsterlund, Rolf
    et al.
    Landstinget, Kristianstads län, Sweden.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karp, Gabriella
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Edén, Tony
    Klinisk bakteriologiska laboratoriet, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    De Jong, Birgitta
    Vattensektionen, Smittskyddsinstitutet, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Per Olof
    Länsstyrelsen, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Ransjö, Ulrika
    Avdelningen för Klinisk mikrobiologi, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Yersinia enterocolitica-utbrott på Bjärehalvön visar på risker med kylda matvaror1995In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 92, no 12, 1213-1214 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    På sensommaren 1988 hade man i Skåne ett stort lokalt utbrott med 61 fall av infektioner med Yersinia enterocolitica. DEn kliniska bilden var avsevärt mildare än som brukar rapporteras, med diarré, magsmärtor och feber som dominerande symtom, och endast två fall av svårare komplikationer. Den sannolika smittkällan var mjölk från ett litet mejeri där hygienen inte var den bästa, Utbrottet visar på en av många risker med distribution av industriellt framställda kylda livsmedel.

  • 4.
    Alsén-Eklöf, Eva
    et al.
    Livstecknet.
    Danielsson Tham (intervjuobjekt), Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sveriges professor i livsmedelshygien: Välj risknivå med öka kunskap!1990Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Urinary incontinence: prevalence, treatment seeking behaviour, experiences, and perceptions among persons with and without urinary leakage2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis is to describe urinary incontinence (UI) from a population perspective and to describe experiences and perceptions of UI from an individual perspective. This includes assessing the prevalence of urinary incontinence as well as describing treatment seeking and experiences of living with UI. A secondary aim was to describe the perception of UI among cultures other than the Swedish mainstream, exemplified in this case by Syrian women living in Sweden. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used, including questionnaires and interviews.

    Studies I and II were quantitative studies based on a population-based study. Together with a postal survey on general health and living conditions “Life & Health”, a questionnaire on urinary incontinence was sent out to 15 360 randomly-selected residents aged 18-79 in Orebro County, Sweden. In Study I, UI was found to affect 19%. The majority of the respondents experienced minor problems, and only 18% of those reporting UI wanted treatment. However, there was also a group who reported severe problems, but despite this 42% of them did not want treatment. Study II investigated why people with UI refrain from seeking care and treatment. It was found that the desire for treatment was regulated by the frequency of UI, being restricted from participating in various activities, the degree of inconvenience, and the type of UI.

    Studies III and IV were both qualitative interview studies, describing older women’s experiences of living with UI (Study III) and Syrian women’s perceptions of UI (Study IV). There were similarities between the results of these two studies; the women described UI as a normal and expected problem, and they knew that the district nurse could prescribe incontinence protections and that treatments existed. In both studies, the women expressed difficulties in making contact with the health care service, while the women who did not speak Swedish (Study IV) also had difficulties due to different communication problems.

    In conclusion, it is important that health care resources are optimized to identify and meet the needs of those who experience major problems with UI, and that there is awareness of the communication difficulties that can be present in meeting with people who speak other languages. However it is also important not to medicalize those who experience minor problems and who have the desire to manage on their own.

    List of papers
    1. Urinary incontinence: prevalence, impact on daily living and desire for treatment : a population-based study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urinary incontinence: prevalence, impact on daily living and desire for treatment : a population-based study
    2004 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, Vol. 38, no 2, 125-130 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To investigate the prevalence of urinary incontinence in a representative population in Sweden, and to assess to what extent the condition affects daily life and to what degree those afflicted desire treatment.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS:

    In a population-based study, a postal questionnaire comprising 12 questions on urinary incontinence was sent to a representative sample of 15 360 randomly selected residents (aged 18-79 years) of Orebro County, Sweden. This was a supplement to a comprehensive survey of public health and general living conditions.

    RESULTS:

    The response rate was 64.5%. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 19% when defined as "any leakage" and 7% when defined as "at least once a week". Women were more afflicted than men, and the proportion of people with urinary incontinence increased markedly with increasing age. Most considered their problems to be minor, having little impact on daily life, which was reflected by the fact that only 18% of those with urinary incontinence desired treatment. About 17% of those with urinary incontinence reported severe problems that interfered with daily life. Of respondents with severe problems, 42% did not want treatment.

    CONCLUSION:

    According to this population-based study, urinary incontinence is not a major problem for most people in the community. Although a considerable proportion of the population report urinary incontinence, the majority experience minor problems and only 18% desire treatment. For a limited group of people, urinary incontinence is a severe problem. It is important that healthcare resources are optimized to identify and meet the needs of those who are most afflicted.

    Keyword
    impact on daily life, population‐based study, prevalence, urinary incontinence Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00365590310022608
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3043 (URN)10.1080/00365590310022608 (DOI)10.1080/00365590310022608 ()15204395 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-1942422250 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2009-01-12 Created: 2009-01-12 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Urinary incontinence - why refraining from treatment?: a population based study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urinary incontinence - why refraining from treatment?: a population based study
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 39, no 4, 301-307 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate why persons with urinary incontinence (UI) refrain from seeking care and treatment.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A population-based study was undertaken in which a public health survey and a specific UI questionnaire were sent to 15 360 randomly selected residents (age 18-79 years) of Orebro County, Sweden. For all persons reporting UI, the expressed wish for treatment or no treatment was analyzed in relation to relevant variables from both inquiry forms using binary logistic regression analysis.

    RESULTS: The response rate was 64.5%. UI was reported by 2194 persons, 1724 of whom comprised the study population. A statistically significant association was found between the degree of UI and a desire for treatment. Persons who did not experience daily leakage and those who did not perceive the leakage as troublesome or having an affect on their daily life mostly stated that they did not desire treatment. Socioeconomic or other health-related factors were not associated with desiring or not desiring treatment for UI.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that it is the perceived severity of UI that determines whether afflicted persons desire treatment or not. Other factors, relating to seeking healthcare in general, were not found to be of importance. Interventions to identify those in need of treatment for UI should primarily be directed towards those with severe symptoms.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Taylor & Francis, 2005
    Keyword
    : Healthcare-seeking behavior, population-based study, urinary incontinence
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Urology and Nephrology Nursing
    Research subject
    Medicine; Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4540 (URN)10.1080/00365590510031129 (DOI)000231453100007 ()16118105 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-27144476977 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Part of thesis: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2713

    Available from: 2008-04-14 Created: 2008-04-14 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Accepting and adjusting: Older women´s experiences of living with urinary incontinence
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accepting and adjusting: Older women´s experiences of living with urinary incontinence
    2008 (English)In: Urologic Nursing, ISSN 1053-816X, Vol. 28, no 2, 115-121 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In-depth interviews were performed with 11 Swedish women who contacted a district nurse to obtain sanitary protection. Three key constituents (themes) emerged: "learning to live with it despite difficulties," "other illnesses are more important," and "reluctance to seek care." The essence of the phenomenon of living with urinary incontinence (Ul) was expressed as "a situation to accept and adjust to."

    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3045 (URN)- ()18488587 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-45849087670 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Part of thesis: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2713

    Funding agency:Orebro CountyCouncil's Research Fund

    Available from: 2009-01-12 Created: 2009-01-12 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Perceptions of urinary incontinence among syrian Christian women living in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of urinary incontinence among syrian Christian women living in Sweden
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 20, no 3, 296-303 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe the perception of urinary incontinence (UI) among Syrian women living in Sweden. DESIGN: A qualitative, descriptive design with focus group discussions (FGDs) was used and analyzed with content analysis. Fourteen Syrian women were interviewed in three FGDs. FINDINGS: Three categories emerged, "Thoughts on UI," "Managing UI," and "Communication With the Health Care System." Among the interviewees, UI was a common, and expected, problem, which could be managed. However, some expressed shame and embarrassment. Some talked about communication problems with health care. DISCUSSION: and Implications for Practice: The health care system should be adjusted to the women's needs, with awareness of the communication difficulties, which could result in misunderstanding and neglected treatments.

    Keyword
    urinary incontinence, ethnic group, interpreter, focus group discussion, psychosocial factors
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7355 (URN)10.1177/1043659609334850 (DOI)000267504000005 ()19372538 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-67650503250 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2009-06-22 Created: 2009-06-22 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 6.
    Andersson, Katri
    et al.
    Institutionen för livsmedelshygien, Kungliga Veterinärhögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Danielsson Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Barn smittar hund1977In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 29, no 24, 977-977 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Children with cancer: focusing on their fear and on how their fear is handled2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Various fears in children with cancer have previously been identified as a result of studying e.g. symptom experiences, distress and uncertainty within this population. Studies of the meaning the children give to their fear, as well as the handling of their fear seem to be sparse, however. Also, fear has not been an exclusive focus in previous studies. Professionals in clinical practice have pointed to the need for such research, which has prompted the present research work. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore twofold; firstly, the aim was to elucidate fear in children and adolescents with cancer in order to gain an understanding from the perspective of adolescents and parents. Secondly, it was to elucidate parents’ and professionals’ handling of the fear. This in order to gain a deeper understanding of what performances and manners the children and adolescents can face when being fearful. A qualitative descriptive design was adopted in the five included studies. The methods used in the data analysis were phenomenological hermeneutical method (studies I–III) and qualitative content analysis (studies IV–V).

    In study I six adolescent girls, aged 14–16 years, with experiences of various cancer diagnoses, but now declared fit, were interviewed. The results reveal that they experience their fear as embodied, which in the comprehensive understanding of the results was interpreted as a threat to their personal self, their whole existence. Their fear was seen as a holistic intertwined experience, including fear related to the physical body and to the social self. Also, existential fear was described. Their described experience was interpreted as suffering.

    Studies II and III share the same data. Fifteen parents of children at various ages with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed in focus groups about their experience of their child’s fear. In study II the result reveals how the parents experienced and understood their child’s fear. The fear was described as a multidimensional phenomenon, which was not always easy to identify. It was contrasted to feelings of unease and to absence of fear. In the comprehensive understanding the fear was interpreted as a suffering, as that was regarded to be what was the common meaning in the narratives. The suffering was interpreted as an ethical demand to the parents to take action. In study III the parents described their actions, i.e. they described how they dealt with the fear. Their actions were described as acting in the best interests of the child, which included striving to make the child feel secure and experience wellbeing, up to a certain point. However, after this point the parents used their parental authority to maintain the child’s physical health rather than trying to prevent or relieve the child’s fear. In the comprehensive understanding the parents’ handling of their child’s fear was interpreted as revealing mercy and as being synonymous with meeting the ethical demand put on them.

    In study IV ten experienced nurses and physicians were individually interviewed about how they handled fear in children with cancer. The result reveals that the existential issues were dealt with within the relationship with the child, on a sliding scale between closeness and distance, and that the fear related to medical procedures occurred on a continuum between support and lack of support. The various actions involved, and the manner in which these actions were performed, was described.

    In the observational study (study V) eleven parents and their children as well as eleven health professionals participated. They were observed at children’s routine visits at the outpatient clinic. The aim was to study the interactions related to fear. The result reveals that when children were fearful they expressed this both verbally and non-verbally. The parents’ and professionals’ actions and interactions in these situations were found to be characterized by recognition of the fear or lack of attention to the fear.

    The findings can contribute to a broadened knowledge on fear in children and adolescents with cancer. Awareness and understanding of the meaning adolescents give to their fear, and furthermore, of the parents’ experience and understanding of their child’s fear can provide tools for interacting with these groups. The findings on how fear is dealt with by the ones children have claimed as important sources for support, can give insights into what the child may face when being fearful. These insights can form the basis for individual, as well as collegial, reflections on what is done when children face fear, how fear is handled on an everyday basis and why it is handled in this way. Such reflections could lead to an ethical awareness of handling fear in children with cancer.

    List of papers
    1. Embodied suffering: experiences of fear in adolescent girls with cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodied suffering: experiences of fear in adolescent girls with cancer
    2008 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 12, no 2, 129-143 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, fear in adolescents with cancer has been sparsely described from an emic perspective. The aim of this study was to illuminate fear in adolescents with personal experience of cancer. The participants were six adolescent girls between the age of 14 and 16 years who were no longer under active treatment for cancer but still went for regular check-ups. Open interviews were conducted. Data were analysed according to the phenomenological hermeneutic method. In the result one main theme was identified: `an embodied fear — a threat to the personal self'. This theme was built up by three separate but intertwined themes: `experiencing fear related to the physical body', `experiencing existential fear' and `experiencing fear related to the social self'. In the comprehensive understanding the fear was interpreted from youth cultural aspects as well as a holistic perspective. The importance of professionals taking the whole person and their situation into account when meeting the fear is underlined.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Sage, 2008
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Surgery Cancer and Oncology
    Research subject
    Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5377 (URN)10.1177/1367493508088550 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-06 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Children's fear as experienced by the parents of children with cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's fear as experienced by the parents of children with cancer
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 22, no 3, 233-244 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    It is known that children with cancer experience and express fear, but little is found in the literature about how the parents experience their child's fear. This study aimed to highlight the parents' lived experience and understanding of their child's fear. Focus group interviews with 15 parents were performed. Data were analyzed through a phenomenological hermeneutic method. Fear in children with cancer is described by the parents as a multidimensional phenomenon, which is somehow difficult to identify. It appears in contrast to the absence of fear. The comprehensive understanding of the results reveals that the parents experience their children's fear as both a suffering and an ethical demand for the parents to answer.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2007
    Keyword
    Cancer, barn, rädsla, upplevelse
    National Category
    Pediatrics Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Nursing Medical and Health Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3979 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn2007.03.003 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-08-31 Created: 2007-08-31 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Parental handling of fear in children with cancer: caring in the best interests of the child
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental handling of fear in children with cancer: caring in the best interests of the child
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2837 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-05-04 Created: 2007-05-04 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. How physicians and nurses handle fear in children with cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How physicians and nurses handle fear in children with cancer
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 22, no 1, 71-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on fear in children with cancer has often focused on interventions to alleviate fear related to medical procedures and less on how to meet the challenges related to existential fear. This study aimed to describe how experienced nurses and physicians handle fear in children with cancer. Ten nurses and physicians with more than 10 years of experience in child oncology from a university hospital in Sweden were interviewed, and a qualitative content analysis was performed on the data. Nurses' and physicians' handling of fear encompasses commitment and closeness and yet also a distancing from fear and its expressions

    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Medical and Health Sciences Pediatrics
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2838 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2006.05.010 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-05-04 Created: 2007-05-04 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    5. Fear in children with cancer: observations at an outpatient visit
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fear in children with cancer: observations at an outpatient visit
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 12, no 3, 191-208 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe interactions within the family and between them and professionals on a routine visit at a paediatric oncology outpatient clinic where the visiting child was likely to be fearful. Observations were performed. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The behaviours most frequently observed as expressing fear were being quiet, withdrawn or providing detailed descriptions of experiences. Within the theme `Recognition of the fear', an attentive attitude to the fear was traced; fear was confirmed and cooperation was seen. Although many efforts were made to meet the fear, this was not always successful. Within the theme `Lack of attention to the fear', the fear was not in focus due to parental worries and concerns about the child's health, and organizational disturbances. The results can serve as a basis for collegial reflections of how to handle fear in children with cancer.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Sage, 2008
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5375 (URN)10.1177/1367493508092519 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-06 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 8.
    Arnebrant, Kriatina
    et al.
    Department of Microbial Ecology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Changes in atp content during and after chloroform fumigation1990In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 22, no 6, 875-877 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Beck-Friis, Johan
    et al.
    Svensk Veterinärtidning.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise (intervjuobjekt)
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Euphoria ut på arbetsmarknaden2005In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 57, no 2, 25-26 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Beck-Friis, Johan
    et al.
    Svensk Veterinärtidning.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise (intervjuobjekt)
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    ISOPOL XV – internationellt listeriasymposium i Uppsala2004Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Beck-Friis, Johan
    et al.
    Sveriges veterinärförbund.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise (intervjuobjekt)
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Salmonella: en smitta att ta på allvar2004In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 56, no 10, 33-34 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Behrens, Thomas
    et al.
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Ruhr Univ Bochum, Inst Prevent & Occupat Med German Social Accid In, Bochum, Germany..
    Lynge, Elsebeth
    Univ Copenhagen, Inst Publ Hlth, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Cree, Ian
    UCL, Inst Ophthalmol, London, England..
    Lutz, Jean-Michel
    Univ Zurich, NICER, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Univ Lund Hosp, Dept Oncol, S-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Guenel, Pascal
    INSERM, CESP Ctr Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, U1018, Villejuif, France.;Univ Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France..
    Merletti, Franco
    Univ Turin, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Piemonte, Italy.;CPO, Piemonte, Italy..
    Morales-Suarez-Varela, Maria
    Univ Valencia, Dept Prevent Med, Unit Publ Hlth & Environm Care, Valencia, Spain.;CIBER Act Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Res Grp CIBER CB06 02 0045, Valencia, Spain.;Ctr Publ Hlth Res CSISP, Valencia, Spain..
    Afonso, Noemia
    Inst Portugues Oncol Francisco Gentil, Med Oncol Serv, Oporto, Portugal..
    Stengrevics, Aivars
    Latvia Canc Registry, Riga, Latvia..
    Fevotte, Joelle
    Umrestte UCB Lyon 1 InVS Inrets, F-69373 Lyon, France..
    Sabroe, Svend
    Univ Aarhus, Dept Epidemiol, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Llopis-Gonzalez, Agustin
    Univ Valencia, Dept Prevent Med, Unit Publ Hlth & Environm Care, Valencia, Spain.;CIBER Act Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Res Grp CIBER CB06 02 0045, Valencia, Spain..
    Gorini, Giuseppe
    ISPO Canc Prevent & Res Inst, Environm & Occupat Epidemiol Unit, Florence, Italy..
    Hardell, Lennart
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Oncology.
    Stang, Andreas
    Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Clin Epidemiol, Halle, Germany.;Univ Duisburg Essen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Essen, Germany..
    Ahrens, Wolfgang
    Bremen Inst Prevent Res & Social Med, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Univ Duisburg Essen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Essen, Germany..
    Pesticide exposure in farming and forestry and the risk of uveal melanoma2012In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 23, no 1, 141-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since pesticides are disputed risk factors for uveal melanoma, we studied the association between occupational pesticide exposure and uveal melanoma risk in a case-control study from nine European countries.

    Incident cases of uveal melanoma and population as well as hospital controls were included and frequency-matched by country, 5-year age groups and sex. Self-reported exposure was quantified with respect to duration of exposure and pesticide application method. We calculated the exposure intensity level based on application method and use of personal protective equipment. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression analyses and adjusted for several potential confounders.

    293 case and 3,198 control subjects were interviewed. We did not identify positive associations with activities in farming or forestry, pesticide application or pesticide mixing. No consistent positive associations were seen with exposure intensity level scores either. The only statistically significantly raised association in this study was for exposure to chemical fertilizers in forestry (OR = 8.93; 95% CI 1.73-42.13), but this observation was based on only six exposed subjects. Results did not change when we restricted analyses to morphologically verified cases and excluded proxy interviews as well as cancer controls. We did not observe effect modification by sex or eye color.

    Risk estimates for pesticide exposures and occupational activities in agriculture and forestry were not increased and did not indicate a hormonal mechanism due to these exposures.

  • 13.
    Belfrage, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björklund, Johanna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Salomonsson, Lennart
    Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effects of farm size and on-farm landscape heterogeneity on biodiversity-case study of twelve farms in a swedish landscape2015In: Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, ISSN 2168-3565, E-ISSN 2168-3573, Vol. 39, no 2, 170-188 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study in Sweden, six small (<50 ha) and six large farms (>135 ha) participated. The aims of the study were to a) measure differences between small and large farms regarding on-farm landscape heterogeneity, and b) evaluate relations between on-farm landscape heterogeneity and biodiversity, measured as numbers of breeding bird species, bird territories, butterflies, bumblebees, and herbaceous plant species. Sample area of the same size, placed on each farm, was used for the biodiversity assessments and on-farm landscape heterogeneity studies. On-farm landscape heterogeneity was classified with the Shannon-Wiener diversity index. Linear regression was applied to analyze relationships between on-farm landscape heterogeneity and biodiversity indicators. Multivariate regression was used to analyze relations between single bird species and specific on-farm habitats. Small farms had significantly higher on-farm landscape heterogeneity than large farms. Strong positive relations between on-farm landscape heterogeneity and number of breeding birds, butterflies, and herbaceous plant species were found. Total on-farm landscape heterogeneity seems to be more important for bird diversity than do specific landscape elements. The study indicates that, to increase biodiversity, farm size should be taken into consideration.

  • 14.
    Bergqvist, Åsa
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Smittspridning av campylobacter inom fjäderfäslakteri1986In: XV Nordiska veterinärkongressen – 15th Nordic Veterinary Congress, Stockholm 28/7–1/8 1986: Proceedings / [ed] Hans Kindahl, Ingemar Jämte, Stockholm: Sveriges Veterinärförbund , 1986, 355-358 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Berndtson, E.
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Emanuelson, U.
    Swedish Association for Livestock Breeding and Production, Eskilstuna, Sweden .
    Engvall, A.
    Department of Epizootiology, National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A 1-year epidemiological study of campylobacters in 18 Swedish chicken farms1996In: Preventive Veterinary Medicine, ISSN 0167-5877, E-ISSN 1873-1716, Vol. 26, no 3-4, 167-185 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Broiler chickens are often intestinal carriers of Campylobacter. During processing, Campylobacter may be spread over the carcass. Thus, undercooked chicken meat, or other foods contaminated by raw chicken can act as a source of infection to humans. This study was conducted to identify risk factors for chicken flocks being colonized with Campylobacter. Eighteen chicken farms with altogether 62 chicken compartments were studied for 1 year with visits during each growing period and sampling of chicken caecal contents at slaughter. Four to six subsequent flocks were raised in each compartment during the study. A detailed questionnaire was used to record farm parameters such as building materials, feed and water equipment, hygiene and management routines. Campylobacter prevalence varied between farms, between growing periods within the farms and also during the year, with lowest prevalence during the spring. Campylobacters were isolated from 27% out of 287 flocks. Only two farms were negative at all samplings. Often the flock following a positive flock in a compartment was negative, indicating that normal cleaning and disinfecting routines are sufficient for eliminating the bacteria from the house. Usually only one serotype was found in each positive flock. Campylobacter occurrence increased with the age of the chickens at slaughter, and also with flock size.

    Univariable chi-square tests were done of the association between possible risk factors and Campylobacter prevalence. Factors associated with higher Campylobacter prevalence in flocks were lack of or diffuse hygiene barriers, increasing flock size, increasing age at slaughter, short vs. long empty periods, wet litter beds, other poultry nearby or staff handling other poultry, flocks divided before slaughter, staff loading to slaughter at several farms and occurrence of mice. Under Swedish conditions, water does not seem to be a source of infection for chickens. Origin and handling of day-old chickens, feed additives, houses and litter were not associated with higher Campylobacter prevalence.

  • 16.
    Berndtson, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Blomgren, Gunny
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Incidence of campylobacter on a broiler farm1987In: The IVth International Workshop on Campylobacter Infections, Department of Clinical Bacteriology, University Göteborg, June 16–18, 1987, Göteborg, Sweden: Programme and Abstracts, 1987, Abstract no. 17- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Berndtson, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Engvall, Anders
    Department of Epizootiology, National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Experimental colonization of mice with Campylobacter jejuni1994In: Veterinary Microbiology, ISSN 0378-1135, E-ISSN 1873-2542, Vol. 41, no 1-2, 183-188 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of one human and two chicken strains of Campylobacter jejuni to colonise and survive in three different strains of laboratory mice (NMRI, CBA and C57-Black) was studied. Mice were inoculated orally with Campylobacter jejuni and faeces samples were cultured at regular intervals during the following months. The length of colonisation of mice differed between mouse strains but also between Campylobacter strains. The mouse strain C57-Black was not colonised with C. jejuni to the same degree as the other mouse strains. It is concluded that mice can become colonised for prolonged periods and that they may act as reservoirs of Campylobacter for other species.

  • 18.
    Beuchat, L. R.
    et al.
    Center for Food Safety and Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, USA.
    Frändberg, E.
    Biology Division, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Deak, T.
    Center for Food Safety and Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, USA; Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Szent Istvan University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Alzamora, S. M.
    Pabellon de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Chen, J.
    Center for Food Safety and Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, USA.
    Guerrero, S.
    Pabellon de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    López-Malo, A.
    Departmento de Ingenieria Quimica y Alimentos, Universidad de la Americas-Puebla, Sta. Catarina Martir, Puebla, Mexico.
    Ohlsson, I.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olsen, M.
    Biology Division, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Peinado, J. M.
    Departmento de Microbiologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Completense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    de Siloniz, M. I.
    Departmento de Microbiologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad Completense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Tornai-Lehoczki, J.
    National Collection of Agricultural and Industrial Microorganisms, Szent Istvan University, Budapest, Hungary.
    Performance of mycological media in enumerating desiccated food spoilage yeasts: an interlaboratory study2001In: International Journal of Food Microbiology, ISSN 0168-1605, E-ISSN 1879-3460, Vol. 70, no 1-2, 89-96 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dichloran 18% glycerol agar (DG18) was originally formulated to enumerate nonfastidious xerophilic moulds in foods containing rapidly growing Eurotium species. Some laboratories are now using DG18 as a general purpose medium for enumerating yeasts and moulds, although its performance in recovering yeasts from dry foods has not been evaluated. An interlaboratory study compared DG18 with dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar (DRBC), plate count agar supplemented with chloramphenicol (PCAC), tryptone glucose yeast extract chloramphenicol agar (TGYC), acidified potato dextrose agar (APDA), and orange serum agar (OSA) for their suitability to enumerate 14 species of lyophilized yeasts. The coefficient of variation for among-laboratories repeatability within yeast was 1.39% and reproducibility of counts among laboratories was 7.1%. The order of performance of media for recovering yeasts was TGYC > PCAC = OSA > APDA > DRBC > DG18. A second study was done to determine the combined effects of storage time and temperature on viability of yeasts and suitability of media for recovery. Higher viability was retained at - 18 degreesC than at 5 degreesC or 25 degreesC for up to 42 weeks, although the difference in mean counts of yeasts stored at - 18 degreesC and 25 degreesC was only 0.78 log(10) cfu/ml of rehydrated suspension. TGYC was equal to PCAC and superior to the other four media in recovering yeasts stored at - 18 degreesC, 5 degreesC, or 25 degreesC for up to 42 weeks. Results from both the interlaboratory study and the storage study support the use of TGYC for enumerating desiccated yeasts. DG18 is not recommended as a general purpose medium for recovering yeasts from a desiccated condition.

  • 19.
    Björklund, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Eksvärd, Karin
    Inspire and action research ab.
    Schaffer, Christina
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm,. Sverige.
    Assessing ecosystem services in perennial intercropping systems: participatory action research in Swedish modern agrofores2014In: Farming systems facing global challenges: Capacities and strategies / [ed] Schobert, H., Riecher, M.-C., Fischer, H. Aenis, T. & Knierim, 2014, 112-113 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is on how to assess ecosystem services in complex agroforestry systems using a case of edible forest gardens. Benefits of doing these assessments in a participatory learning and action research (PLAR) context are elaborated, as well as difficulties and questions that this has raised. The PLAR group comprised farmers on 13 smallholdings, researchers and a facilitator, which through collaboration and participatory methods have developed a general design of a forest garden, 60 m2 in size and established it on all 13 participating farms. Important values of the work are that ecosystem services are related to specific local contexts and that methodology for multi-criteria assessments of the generation of ecosystem services on a farm scale are being developed. Farmers engaged in formulating research questions, development of field trial designs, sampling and analysis of results improves the relevance and quality of the research as well as advance the adoption of new knowledge.

  • 20.
    Björklund, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Johansson, Börje
    Hulta Norrgård, Linköping, Sweden.
    Assessing multifunctionality in relation to resource use: a holistic approach to measure efficiency, developed by participatory research2012In: Methods and procedures for building sustainable farming systems / [ed] Marta-Costa, A. A. & Soares da Silva, E. L. D. G, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2012, 161-173 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s intensive agriculture needs to be transformed into sustainable production of food, and this process requires good tools that can assess whether an action is leading towards this in the long term. A critical issue is what optimal yield comprises in terms of other functions of agriculture, as higher yields might lead to e.g. a reduction in biodiversity or soil carbon. In this study, emergy analysis and footprinting were combined to assess and illustrate the total resource use caused by a farming activity (milk production) and to identify the renewable fraction of this resource use. The total efficiency was defined as a function of the resource use and the multifunctionality of production. The classification of ecosystem services in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) was used as the basis for ranking multifunctionality. The results were expressed in the form of ecosystem bundles for the four MA categories (provisioning, supporting, regulating and cultural functions). Three scenarios with different degrees of input intensity and milk production were constructed and compared with the current production mode. The ratio of local renewable resource use to total resource use differed greatly between the different production strategies, being 1:3 for a self-sufficient organic farm and 1:14 for a conventional farm with maximum milk yield. Milk production was five-fold higher on the conventional farm, while generation of ecosystem services increased with increasing self-sufficiency under the local conditions prevailing in the study. Ecosystem services in all categories except provisioning were ranked higher when self-sufficiency increased.

  • 21.
    Bonde, Torben A.
    et al.
    Department of Water in Environment and Society, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rosswall, Thomas
    Department of Water in Environment and Society, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Microbial biomass as a fraction of potentially mineralizable nitrogen in soils from long-term field experiments1988In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 20, no 4, 447-452 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aerobic long-term incubations (40-wk) were employed to measure the potentially mineralizable nitrogen (N0) in five 30-yr old cropping systems. The cropping systems consisted of: (1) bare fallow; (2) cropping with no additions; (3) cropping with 80 kg N ha-1 y-1 as Ca(NO3)2; (4) cropping with 80 kg N ha-1 yr-1 as Ca(NO3)2 plus 1800kg C ha-1 yr-1 as straw; and (5) cropping with 80 kg N ha-1 yr-1 plus 1800 kg C ha-1 yr-1 as farmyard manure. The amounts of N mineralized during the 40-wk incubations were between 93 and 168 μg g-1 (302-543 kg N ha-1 down to 25cm depth) with the lowest value for the fallow and the highest for the farmyard manure treatment. Microbial biomass-C and -N were measured on four occasions during the incubations. The biomass-C showed a rapid decrease to week 4 (to 36% of the initial mass), a slower decrease to week 9 (to 23% of initial mass) and a very slow decline to the final determination at the end of the incubation (to 8% of initial mass). The biomass-N displayed a similar pattern. Two related models were employed to describe the kinetics of N-mineralization during incubation: (1) a two-component first-order; and (2) a simplified special case of the two-component model. In all cases except the straw-amended soil, the simplified two-component model offered the best description of the curves of accumulated mineral-N. The available fraction, Na, of soil organic-N had mineralization rate constants similar to those for mineralization of microbial biomass.

  • 22.
    Boström, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Comstedt, Daniel
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Ekblad, Alf
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Can isotopic fractionation during respiration explain the 13C-enriched sporocarps of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi?2008In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 177, no 4, 1012-1019 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • The mechanism behind the 13C enrichment of fungi relative to plant materials is unclear and constrains the use of stable isotopes in studies of the carbon cycle in soils.

    • Here, we examined whether isotopic fractionation during respiration contributes to this pattern by comparing δ13C signatures of respired CO2, sporocarps and their associated plant materials, from 16 species of ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic fungi collected in a Norway spruce forest.

    • The isotopic composition of respired CO2 and sporocarps was positively correlated. The differences in δ13C between CO2 and sporocarps were generally small, < ±1‰ in nine out of 16 species, and the average shift for all investigated species was 0.04‰. However, when fungal groups were analysed separately, three out of six species of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes respired 13C-enriched CO2 (up to 1.6‰), whereas three out of five species of polypores respired 13C-depleted CO2 (up to 1.7‰; P < 0.05). The CO2 and sporocarps were always 13C-enriched compared with wood, litter or roots.

    • Loss of 13C-depleted CO2 may have enriched some species in 13C. However, that the CO2 was consistently 13C-enriched compared with plant materials implies that other processes must be found to explain the consistent 13C-enrichment of fungal biomass compared with plant materials.

  • 23.
    Boysen, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björneholm, Stina
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effect of the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala on interactions between Penicillium roqueforti, Penicillium carneum, and Penicillium paneum in moist grain under restricted air supply2000In: Postharvest biology and technology, ISSN 0925-5214, E-ISSN 1873-2356, Vol. 19, no 2, 173-179 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penicillium roqueforti was recently reclassified into the three species P. roqueforti, Penicillium carneum, and Penicillium paneum based on differences in ribosomal DNA sequences and secondary metabolites, e.g. mycotoxins. This is the first report on interaction between these closely related mould species under stress conditions. The yeast Pichia anomala (J121) inhibits growth of P. roqueforti in grain stored in malfunctioning airtight storage systems. The ability of P. anomala to inhibit all three species of the P. roqueforti group was examined in separate experiments as well as the competition between the three mould species when co-cultured with or without the yeast in non-sterile wheat grain (a(w) 0.95) under restricted air supply. Mould growth was analysed by dilution plating after 14 days and the individual colonies identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting. When co-culturing the P. roqueforti group in wheat without P. anomala all three species were able to grow to the same extent. Also, when co-culturing all species of the P. roqueforti group together with P. anomala, the growth response of the three species was very similar. Al yeast levels of 10(4) CFU g(-1),grain a pronounced inhibition was observed and at 10(5) CFU g(-1) grain a fungicidal effect was detected, indicating a potentiated effect of P. anomala when co-culturing the three mould species.

  • 24.
    Bratt, Anna
    et al.
    Borås Tidning .
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise (intervjuobjekt)
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Skafferiet – det är rena städskåpet2015In: Borås tidning Del 3 – Bostad söndag 18 januari 2015, ISSN 1103-9132, no Söndag 18 januari, 8-9 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Bruce, Åke
    et al.
    Statens livsmedelsverk.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Det var inte bättre förr: ett akademiföretal2015In: Mot ett modernt livsmedelssystem: livsmedelshygien och livsmedelskontroll i Sverige och Norden 1850–1950 / [ed] Per Eriksson, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och lantbruksakademien , 2015, 7-12 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Bruce, Åke
    et al.
    Statens livsmedelsverk.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Vad kontrollerades under perioden 1850–1950 och vilka hjälpmedel i form av lagar, kunskap och teknik fanns att tillgå?2015In: Mot ett modernt livsmedelssystem: livsmedelshygien och livsmedelskontroll i Sverige och Norden 1850–1950 / [ed] Per Eriksson, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och lantbruksakademien , 2015, 19-33 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Båth, Klara
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Uppsala Biocenter, Uppsala, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Food and Biotechnology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Persson, Karin Neil
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Uppsala Biocenter, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Uppsala Biocenter, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Leong, Su-lin L.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Uppsala Biocenter, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Microbiota of an unpasteurised cellar-stored goat cheese from northern Sweden2012In: Agricultural and Food Science, ISSN 1459-6067, E-ISSN 1795-1895, Vol. 21, no 2, 197-203 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study reports on lactic acid bacteria (LAB), yeasts and moulds isolated from three artisanal Swedish cellar-stored goat cheeses aged for 1, 3 and 5 months. Starter culture LAB dominated in the younger cheeses, and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, common in raw goats' milk, had persisted from the unpasteurised milk into all the cheeses. Non-starter LAB dominated in the 5 month cheese, in particular, Lactobacillus sakei, a meat-associated LAB not previously isolated from cheese. Debaryomyces hansenii, and Penicillium and Mucor species were dominant among the yeasts and moulds, respectively. The cheese rind was not formed primarily from Penicillium species as in traditional cheeses such as Camembert - rather, mycelium from Mucor mucedo contributed to rind formation. Mould species known to produce sterigmatocystin, aflatoxins or ochratoxin A in cheese were not isolated in this study; growth of mycotoxigenic Aspergilli may have been inhibited by the cool conditions in the earth-cellar (4-6 degrees C).

  • 28.
    Börjesson, T.
    et al.
    Swedish Farmers Supply & Marketing Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eklöv, T.
    Laboratory of Applied Physics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, A.
    Swedish Farmers Supply & Marketing Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundgren, H.
    Laboratory of Applied Physics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Electronic nose for odor classification of grains1996In: Cereal Chemistry, ISSN 0009-0352, E-ISSN 1943-3638, Vol. 73, no 4, 457-461 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An electronic nose was used to classify grain samples based on their smell and to predict the degree of moldy/musty odor. A total of 235 samples of wheat, barley and oats, which had been odor classified by at least two grain inspectors, were used. Headspace samples from heated grain were pumped through chambers containing metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) sensors, SnO2 semiconductors and an infrared detector monitoring CO2. The sensor signals were evaluated with a pattern-recognition software program based on artificial neural networks. The samples were divided into either the four classes moldy/musty, acid/sour, burnt, or normal or the two classes good and bad according to the inspectors descriptions. They were also assigned a score describing their intensity of moldy/musty odor. The electronic nose correctly classified approximate to 75% of the samples when using the four-class system and approximate to 90% when using the two-class system. These values exceeded the corresponding percentages of agreement between two grain inspectors classifying the grain.

  • 29.
    Börjesson, T.
    et al.
    Grain Department, Lidköping, Sweden.
    Stenberg, B.
    Precision Agriculture, Department of Soil Science, SLU, Skara, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Near-infrared spectroscopy for estimation of ergosterol content in barley: A comparison between reflectance and transmittance techniques2007In: Cereal Chemistry, ISSN 0009-0352, E-ISSN 1943-3638, Vol. 84, no 3, 231-236 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fungal-specific lipid ergosterol correlates with fungal biomass and often also with the degree of mycotoxin contamination of cereals. We compared the ability of a near-infrared reflectance (NIR) instrument with a broad wavelength range (400-2500 nm) and a near-infrared transmittance (NIT) instrument with a narrower wavelength range (850-1050 nm) to predict the ergosterol content of naturally infected barley samples. The two instruments were equally good at predicting ergosterol content in Swedish samples (r(2) = 0.81 and 0.83 for NIT and NIR, respectively). The NIT instrument was then used for samples from three countries (Sweden, Ireland, UK). This model had about the same root mean-squared error (approximate to 5 mg of ergosterol/kg, db, of grain) as the dataset with only Swedish samples, although the r(2) value was lower (0.58). The investigation has shown that it is possible to predict ergosterol content in whole barley samples using NIR or NIT instrumentation, and acceptable models can be obtained using different barley cultivars and samples from different countries and harvest years. This should make it possible to routinely predict the fungal biomass at grain terminals.

  • 30.
    Börjesson, T.
    et al.
    SIK - Swedish Institute for Food Research, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stöllman, U.
    SIK - Swedish Institute for Food Research, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adsorption of volatile fungal metabolites to wheat grains and subsequent desorption1994In: Cereal Chemistry, ISSN 0009-0352, E-ISSN 1943-3638, Vol. 71, no 1, 16-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adsorption of the volatile fungal metabolites 2-methylfuran, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 1-octen-3-ol to wheat grains, and their subsequent desorption, were investigated. Adsorption was performed both dynamically and statically. In the dynamic system, volatile compounds in a N2 flow were led through 400 g of wheat in a glass column. In the static system, 400 g of wheat was stored in an airtight glass vessel containing the volatile compounds in the atmosphere. Three desorption procedures were compared: an N2 flow at 20-degrees-C, an N2 flow at 50-degrees-C, and extraction with supercritical CO2. 3-Methyl-1-butanol and 1-octen-3-ol were efficiently adsorbed and could also readily be desorbed to considerably higher extents at 50-degrees-C than at 20-degrees-C. The supercritical CO2 extraction was more efficient than N2 desorption in extracting volatile compounds, but because of the smaller sample sizes (1 g), the amounts extracted per gram of grain were lower than the amounts extracted with N2 desorption at 50-degrees-C. The adsorbed amount of each volatile compound was calculated as the difference between content in the N2 stream before passage through the wheat and its content after passage. Desorption by means of a N2 stream led to the recovery of about 5% of 2-methylfuran, 35% of 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 100% of 1-octen-3-ol.

  • 31.
    Börjesson, Thomas S.
    et al.
    SIK -the Swedish Institute for Food Research, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stöllman, Ulla M.
    SIK -the Swedish Institute for Food Research, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Off-odorous compounds produced by molds on oatmeal agar: Identification and relation to other growth characteristics1993In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 41, no 11, 2104-2111 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten Penicillium and Aspergillus species, four with a strong musty off-odor and six reference fungi without any characteristic odor, were cultivated on oatmeal agar for 5 days in cultivation vessels provided with an inlet and an outlet for air. Samples of volatile metabolites were collected on a porous polymer adsorbent attached to the outlet from day 2 through day 5 after inoculation. Adsorbed compounds were desorbed thermally and analyzed with GC/MS and a combined GC and sensory analysis, the GC sniff technique. Multivariate analysis of GC/MS and fungal odor data revealed strong associations between 6 of 65 volatile compounds and musty off-odor. The GC sniff technique showed that five of these, dimethyl disulfide, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-methylisoborneol, and two C11H18 compounds, had prominent off-odors. In addition, geosmin, 1-methoxy-3-methylbenzene, and methylphenol were produced in large amounts by some off-odorous fungi and contributed to their unpleasant odor. 3-Methylfuran, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol were much more commonly produced than the off-odorous compounds. Both odorous and other volatile metabolites could be detected after 2 days of fungal growth. The production of odorous metabolites was enhanced at the time of sporulation.

  • 32.
    Böttiger, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Genetic variation in the folate receptor-alpha and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genes as determinants of plasma homocysteine concentrations2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Elevated total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and neurocognitive disease such as dementia. The B vitamins folate and B12 are the main de terminants of tHcy. tHcy concentration can also be affected by mutations in genes coding for receptors, enzymes and transporters important in the metabolism of Hcy. This thesis focuses on mutations in the genes for folate receptor-alpha and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and the effect they have on tHcy concentrations.

    Six novel mutations in the gene for folate receptor-alpha were described in Paper I. Taken together they exist in a population with a prevalence of approximately 1% and thus are not unusual. There may be an association of –69dupA and –18C>T to tHcy but for the 25-bp deletion, –856C>T, –921T>C and –1043G>A there is probably no association to tHcy. Mutation screening was continued and four additional mutations, 1314G>A, 1816delC, 1841G>A and 1928C>T, were described in Paper II. The prevalences for the heterozygotes were between 0.5% and 13% in an elderly population. There was no significant difference in prevalence between the elderly subjects and patients with dementia. The 1816(–)-allele and the 1841A-allele were in complete linkage and the haplotype 1816(–)-1841A may possibly have a tHcy raising effect. The 1314G>A and 1928C>T mutations had no association to tHcy.

    The genotype prevalences and haplotype frequencies of the MTHFR 677C>T, 1298A>C and 1793G>A polymorphisms were determined in a population sample of Swedish children and adolescents (Paper III). The MTHFR 677T-allele was associated with increased tHcy concentrations in both children and adolescents. A small elevating effect of the 1298C-allele and a small lowering effect of the 1793A-allele could be shown. In an epidemiological sample of adults from the Canary Islands, Spain, data for serum folate and vitamin B12 were used for a broader study of the nutrigenetic impact on tHcy (Paper IV). The 677T-allele had a significant tHcy increasing effect in men but not in women. The 1298C-allele had a minor elevating effect on tHcy in men with the 677CT genotype. It was not possible to document any effect of the 1793A-allele on tHcy due to its low prevalence. A slightly superior explanatory power for the genetic impact was obtained using the MTHFR haplotypes in the analysis compared to the MTHFR 677C>T genotype-based approach in both the Swedish children and adolescents and in the Spanish adults. Therefore MTHFR haplotypes should be considered when analysing the impact of the MTHFR 677C>T, 1298A>C and 1793G>A polymorphisms on tHcy.

    Notwithstanding the large geographical distance between our study populations the haplotype composition is quite similar. The MTHFR 677T-allele is slightly more prevalent in Spain compared to Sweden but it has only an effect on tHcy in the Spanish men. Age, gender and factors linked to the ethnicity of the studied subjects, seem to be able to override the nutrigenetic impact of tHcy-raising genotypes or haplotypes in particular settings, such as in the Spanish women in our study. Gene-nutrient interactions on plasma tHcy levels thus may or may not exist in a certain population. The transferability of nutrigenetic findings may therefore be limited, and must be re-evaluated for each particular setting of age-gender-ethnicity.

    List of papers
    1. Novel mutations in the 5'-UTR of the FOLR1 gene
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel mutations in the 5'-UTR of the FOLR1 gene
    2006 (English)In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, Vol. 44, no 2, 161-167 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously reported two novel mutations in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of the gene for folate receptor-alpha (FOLR1). In our search for additional mutations, 92 patient samples with elevated levels of homocysteine were screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) between nt -425 and -782, and -712 and -1110. Between nt -425 and -782 we did not find any mutations. Between nt -712 and -1110 there were three novel mutations. One subject had two mutations very close to each other, c.-856C>T and c.-921T>C. Two subjects had a c.-1043G>A mutation. To get an idea of the prevalence of FOLR1 mutations in an unselected population, we also screened 692 healthy school children for mutations. In this cohort, between nt -188 and +272 we discovered one novel mutation, a single nucleotide substitution, c.-18C>T, in addition to five children with the 25-bp deletion mutation previously described by us. Thus, so far we have discovered six novel mutations in the 5'-UTR region of the gene for folate receptor-alpha. We genotyped all 17 subjects with a FOLR1 mutation for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T polymorphism, and developed new single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping protocols for MTHFR 1298A>C and 1793G>A utilising Pyrosequencing technology. None of the 17 subjects had the 677TT genotype, which ruled out this as a cause of elevated homocysteine levels, which was observed in some of the subjects. Further studies of mutations in the 5'-UTR of FOLR1, and in particular of their interplay with folate intake status, are warranted.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3035 (URN)10.1515/CCLM.2006.029 (DOI)16475900 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-11-15 Created: 2008-11-15 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Mutations in exons 2 and 3 of the FOLR1 gene in demented and non-demented elderly subjects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mutations in exons 2 and 3 of the FOLR1 gene in demented and non-demented elderly subjects
    2007 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 20, no 5, 653-662 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously reported six novel mutations in the 5'-UTR of the gene for folate receptor-alpha (FOLR1). In our search for additional mutations we screened patients, referred for investigation of suspected dementia (DGM subgroup) by SSCP and DNA sequencing from the end of exon 1 to the first bases of intron 3. We found 4 sequence variations, FOLR1 g.1314G>A, g.1816delC, g.1841G>A, and g.1928C>T. Pyrosequencing genotyping assays were developed for all of them, and 389 active seniors (AS subgroup) and the 202 DGM patients were genotyped for these mutations. The frequency q of the mutated allele was, among the AS subjects, 0.068, 0.0026, 0.0026, and 0.024 respectively, and among the DGM subjects, 0.067, 0.0076, 0.0078, and 0.023. The g.1816delC and g.1841G>A mutations thus were more frequent in the DGM than in the AS subgroup, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. The mutated alleles, FOLR1 1816(-) and 1841A, always occurred together in the same subjects, suggestive of a rare double-mutant haplotype. The two common polymorphisms, FOLR1 g. 1314G>A and g.1928C>T seemed not to raise tHcy plasma levels, whereas the double-mutated g.1816(-)-g.1841A haplotype may possibly have a slight tHcy-raising effect. Thus, so far 8 novel rare FOLR1 mutations with a combined prevalence of approximately 1.3% in Whites as well as two common polymorphisms with 5% and 13%, respectively, have been demonstrated. Only a few of the rare mutations may potentially be associated with raised plasma tHcy concentrations. No association with dementia was found.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Athens, Greece: D.A. Spandidos, 2007
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3036 (URN)17912458 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-11-15 Created: 2008-11-15 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Association of total plasma homocysteine with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotypes 677C>T, 1298A>C, and 1793G>A and the corresponding haplotypes in Swedish children and adolescents
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of total plasma homocysteine with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotypes 677C>T, 1298A>C, and 1793G>A and the corresponding haplotypes in Swedish children and adolescents
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 19, no 4, 659-665 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We studied 692 Swedish children and adolescents (aged 9-10 or 15-16 years, respectively), in order to evaluate the effect of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C>T, 1298A>C, and 1793G>A polymorphisms on total plasma homocysteine concentrations (tHcy). Genotyping was performed with Pyrosequencing technology. The MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism was associated with increased tHcy concentrations in both the children and the adolescents (P<0.001 for both age groups) in both genders. The effect of MTHFR 1298A>C was studied separately in subjects with the 677CC and 677CT genotypes, and the 1298C allele was found to be associated with higher tHcy levels both when children were stratified according to 677C>T genotypes, and when using haplotype analyses and diplotype reconstructions. The 1793A allele was in complete linkage disequilibrium with the 1298C allele. It was still possible to show that the 1793A allele was associated with lower tHcy levels, statistically significant in the adolescents. In conclusion, a haplotype-based approach was slightly superior in explaining the genetic interaction on tHcy plasma levels in children and adolescents than a simple genotype based approach (R2 adj 0.44 vs. 0.40). The major genetic impact on tHcy concentrations is attributable to the MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism. The common 1298A>C polymorphism had a minor elevating effect on tHcy, whereas the 1793G>A polymorphism had a lowering effect on tHcy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Athens, Greece: D.A. Spandidos, 2007
    Keyword
    Molecular medicine
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Medical Genetics
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3037 (URN)17334642 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-11-15 Created: 2008-11-15 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Plasma homocysteine and MTHFR genotypes and haplotypes: gene-nutrient interactions in the Canary Islands Nutrition Study (ENCA)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma homocysteine and MTHFR genotypes and haplotypes: gene-nutrient interactions in the Canary Islands Nutrition Study (ENCA)
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Keyword
    molecular medicine, medical genetics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Medical Genetics
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3038 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-11-15 Created: 2008-11-15 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 33.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Den veterinäre livsmedelshygienikern: från patolog till risk- och faroanaytiker2004In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 56, no 10, 19-23 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Döden i grytan1996In: Icke mat allenast: En vänbok till Carl Jan Granqvist 1946-1996 / [ed] Jan Hagenfeldt, Sture Nilsson och Magnus von Platen, Örebro: Kulinariska Samfundet , 1996, 35-44 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Endringar i det mikrobiologiska økosystem: Betydning for næringsmiddelshygienen. Tilbake till hygienen? Hva bringer fremtiden av infeksjons-og resistensproblemer? Hvordan møter vi problemene? Hva kan internasjonale organer gjøre, hva gjør vi selv?1996In: Etterutdanning i veterinærmedisin, Veterinærhygienisk Forening , 1996, 1-3 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Fekala funderingar2003In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 55, no 15, 53-53 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hurdan veterinär vill det svenska samhället ha?2004In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 56, no 1, 39-41 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kontroll av animaliska livsmedel: reflektioner över situationen i Sverige1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Köttkontrollens historia: från allmänna slakthus till Livsmedelsverket2003In: Vår Föda, no 5, 20-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lura rötmånaden!1995In: SLU just nu! – Personaltidning för Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, ISSN 1102-0954, no 5, 20-20 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tiden mellan den 22 juli och 23 augusti benämns i folkmun rötmånaden. Denna månad är känd för allehanda ruskigheter. Då föds kalvar med två huvuden, såren vill inte läka och mjölken surnar.

  • 41.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Med ögat på rötmånaden1994In: Fakta – Konsumentgillet, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Mjölkontrollens historia: förfalskad grädde och TBC – problem på 1800-talet2003In: Vår Föda, no 6, 12-14 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ny teknologi och nya mattrender: hygieniska synpunkter1996In: Etterutdannning i veterinærmedisin, Trondheim: Veterinærhygienisk Forening , 1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rapport från veterinärutbildningens nya antagningssystem2000In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 52, no 14, 781-782 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Så slipper vi matförgiftningar2005In: Miljöforskning, Formas tidning för ett hållbart samhälle, no 3, 24-25 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vad har hänt sedan Arlandamötet?1995In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, Vol. 47, no 6, 289-290 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Vatten på butelj eller från kran: trender och vetenskap2004In: Vatten på butelj eller från kran?: rapport från KSLA:s konferens 13 oktober 2004 / [ed] Roger Olsson, Stockholm: Kungliga Skogs- och Lantbruksakademien , 2004, 5-9 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Bannerman, Elisabeth
    Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
    Bille, Jacques
    Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Ericsson, Henrik
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Jacquet, Christine
    Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
    Loncarevic, Semir
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Rocourt, Jocelyne
    Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Ursing, Jan
    Malmö Allmänna Sjukhus, Malmö, Sweden.
    The characterization of Swedish human Listeria monocygtogenes strains isolated 1958–19941995In: Proceedings of the XII International Symposium on Problems of Listeriosis, Canning Bridge: Promaco Conventions , 1995, 469-469 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Dormling, Ingegerd
    Institutionen för skogsgenetik, Lantbruksuniversitetet, Stockholmsavdelningen, Stockholm.
    Hur åstadkomma jämnare könsfördelning bland lärare/forskare vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet1980Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala.
    Eriksson, E.
    Department of Bacteriology, National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala.
    Helmersson, Seved
    1Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala.
    Leffler, My
    Section of Veterinary Service and Food Control, County Administrative Board of Gävleborg, Gävle, .
    Lüdtke, Lena
    1Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala.
    Steen, Margareta
    Section of Veterinary Service and Food Control, County Administrative Board of Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Sørgjerd, Sölvi
    1Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    1Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala.
    Causes behind a human cheese-borne outbreak of gastrointestinal listeriosis2004In: Foodborne pathogens and disease, ISSN 1556-7125, Vol. 1, no 3, 153-159 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous paper, we reported an outbreak of gastrointestinal listeriosis due to consumption of fresh cheese made from raw milk and manufactured on a summer farm. The aim of the present study was to investigate why the cheese harbored Listeria monocytogenes. To our knowledge, this is the first documented outbreak of listeriosis caused by raw milk cheese where the human epidemic strain has been cultured from a dairy animal, whose milk has been used for cheese production. The conditions on a summer farm can hardly fulfil the requirements for hygienic and strictly controlled conditions necessary for safe processing of fresh cheese.

12345 1 - 50 of 208
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