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  • 1.
    Boysen, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björneholm, Stina
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effect of the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala on interactions between Penicillium roqueforti, Penicillium carneum, and Penicillium paneum in moist grain under restricted air supply2000In: Postharvest biology and technology, ISSN 0925-5214, E-ISSN 1873-2356, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 173-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penicillium roqueforti was recently reclassified into the three species P. roqueforti, Penicillium carneum, and Penicillium paneum based on differences in ribosomal DNA sequences and secondary metabolites, e.g. mycotoxins. This is the first report on interaction between these closely related mould species under stress conditions. The yeast Pichia anomala (J121) inhibits growth of P. roqueforti in grain stored in malfunctioning airtight storage systems. The ability of P. anomala to inhibit all three species of the P. roqueforti group was examined in separate experiments as well as the competition between the three mould species when co-cultured with or without the yeast in non-sterile wheat grain (a(w) 0.95) under restricted air supply. Mould growth was analysed by dilution plating after 14 days and the individual colonies identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting. When co-culturing the P. roqueforti group in wheat without P. anomala all three species were able to grow to the same extent. Also, when co-culturing all species of the P. roqueforti group together with P. anomala, the growth response of the three species was very similar. Al yeast levels of 10(4) CFU g(-1),grain a pronounced inhibition was observed and at 10(5) CFU g(-1) grain a fungicidal effect was detected, indicating a potentiated effect of P. anomala when co-culturing the three mould species.

  • 2.
    Börjesson, Thomas S.
    et al.
    SIK -the Swedish Institute for Food Research, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stöllman, Ulla M.
    SIK -the Swedish Institute for Food Research, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Off-odorous compounds produced by molds on oatmeal agar: Identification and relation to other growth characteristics1993In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 2104-2111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten Penicillium and Aspergillus species, four with a strong musty off-odor and six reference fungi without any characteristic odor, were cultivated on oatmeal agar for 5 days in cultivation vessels provided with an inlet and an outlet for air. Samples of volatile metabolites were collected on a porous polymer adsorbent attached to the outlet from day 2 through day 5 after inoculation. Adsorbed compounds were desorbed thermally and analyzed with GC/MS and a combined GC and sensory analysis, the GC sniff technique. Multivariate analysis of GC/MS and fungal odor data revealed strong associations between 6 of 65 volatile compounds and musty off-odor. The GC sniff technique showed that five of these, dimethyl disulfide, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-methylisoborneol, and two C11H18 compounds, had prominent off-odors. In addition, geosmin, 1-methoxy-3-methylbenzene, and methylphenol were produced in large amounts by some off-odorous fungi and contributed to their unpleasant odor. 3-Methylfuran, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol were much more commonly produced than the off-odorous compounds. Both odorous and other volatile metabolites could be detected after 2 days of fungal growth. The production of odorous metabolites was enhanced at the time of sporulation.

  • 3.
    Harel, Ben
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel .
    Kurtser, Polina
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel .
    van Herck, Liesbet
    Proefstation voor de Groenteteelt, Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium .
    Parmet, Yisrael
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel .
    Edan, Yael
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel .
    Sweet pepper maturity evaluation via multiple viewpoints color analyses2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maturity evaluation is an important feature for selective robotic harvesting. This paper focuses on maturity evaluationderived by a color camera for a sweet pepper robotic harvester. Fruit visibility for sweet peppers is limited to 65% andmultiple viewpoints are necessary to detect more than 90% of the fruit. This paper aims to determine the number ofviewpoints required to determine the maturity level of a sweet pepper and the best single viewpoint. Different colorbased measures to estimate the maturity level of a pepper were evaluated. Two datasets were analyzed: images of 54yellow bell sweet peppers and 30 red peppers both harvested at the last fruit setting; all images were taken in uniformillumination conditions with white background. Each pepper was photographed from 5-6 viewpoints: one photo of thetop of the pepper, one photo of the bottom and 3-4 photos of the pepper sides. Each pepper was manually tagged by ahuman professional observer as ‘mature’ or ‘immature’. Image processing routines were implemented to extract colorlevel measures which included different hue features. Results indicates high correlation between the sides to the bottomview, the bottom view shows the best 0.86 correlation in the case of yellow peppers while the side view shows the best0.835 correlation in the case of red peppers (the bottom view yields 0.82 correlation).

    Download full text (pdf)
    Sweet pepper maturity evaluation via multiple viewpoints color analyses
  • 4.
    Jennessen, Jennifer
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Kristian Fog
    Center for Microbial Biotechnology, BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Houbraken, Jos
    Department of Services and Applied Research, Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Lyhne, Ellen Kirstine
    Center for Microbial Biotechnology, BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Frisvad, Jens Christian
    Center for Microbial Biotechnology, BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
    Samson, Robert A.
    Department of Services and Applied Research, Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Secondary metabolite and mycotoxin production by the Rhizopus microsporus group2005In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 1833-1840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fast-growing Zygomycetes, most notably Rhizopus oligosporus, are traditionally used in many food fermentations, for example, for soybean tempeh production. R. oligosporus is considered to belong to the Rhizopus microsporus group. Certain R. microsporus strains have been reported to produce either the pharmaceutically active rhizoxins or the highly toxic rhizonins A and B. In this study was investigated the formation of secondary metabolites by R. microsporus, R. oligosporus, and Rhizopus chinensis grown on a wide range of different semisynthetic and natural substrates. Liquid chromatography, combined with photodiode array detection and high-resolution mass spectrometric techniques, was used to identify secondary metabolites. Growth on maize, brown rice, and Pharma agar gave both the highest amounts and the maximum diversity of rhizoxins and rhizonins. Rhizoxins were produced by all four R. microsporus strains, whereas only one strain produced rhizonins. The six R. oligosporus and four R. chinensis strains investigated did not produce any of these two classes of metabolites.

  • 5.
    Lindberg, T.
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bonde, T. A.
    Department of Water and Environmental Studies, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bergström, L.
    Department of Soil Science, Division of Water Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, R.
    Division of Agricultural Ecology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rosswall, T.
    Department of Water and Environmental Studies, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Distribution of15N in the soil-plant system during a four-year field lysimeter study with barley (Hordeum distichum L.) and perennial meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds.)1989In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An annual cereal, barley, and a perennial grass ley, meadow fescue, were grown in field lysimeters in Sweden and fertilized with 12 and 20g Ca(NO3)2-N m-2 yr-1, respectively. Isotope-labeled (15N) fertilizer was added during year 1 of the study, whereafter similar amounts of unlabeled N were added during years 2 and 3. The grass ley lysimeters were ploughed after the growing season of year 3 and sown with barley during year 4. The barley harvest in year 1 removed 59% of the added fertilizer N, while the fertilizer N export by two meadow fescue harvests in year 1 was 65%. The labeled N export decreased rapidly after year 1, especially in the barley, but increased slightly after ploughing of the grass ley.

    The microbial biomass, measured with the chloroform fumigation method, incorporated a maximum of 1.4-1.7% of the labeled N during the first seven weeks after application. Later on, the incorporation stabilized at less than 1% in both cropping systems.

    The susceptibility of the residual labeled N to mineralization was evaluated three years after application by means of long-term laboratory incubations. The curves of cumulative mineralized N were described by a two-component first-order regression model that differentiated between an available and a more recalcitrant fraction of potentially mineralizable N. There was no difference in the amounts of potentially mineralizable N between the cropping systems. The labeled N comprised 5 and 2% of the amounts of potentially mineralizable N in the available and more recalcitrant fraction, respectively. The mineralization rate constants for the labeled N were almost twice as high as for the total potentially mineralizable N. The available fraction of the total potentially mineralizable N was 12%, while twice that proportion of the labeled N was available.

    It was concluded that the short-term ley did not differ from the annual crop with respect to the early disposition of the fertilizer N and the behaviour of the residual organic N.

  • 6.
    Petersson, Stina
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, SLU, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Nils
    Swedish Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, SLU, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pichia anomala as a biocontrol agent during storage of high-moisture feed grain under airtight conditions1999In: Postharvest biology and technology, ISSN 0925-5214, E-ISSN 1873-2356, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 175-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pichia anomala is antagonistic against a range of spoilage molds in vitro as well as against Penicillium roqueforti in high-moisture wheat during malfunctioning airtight storage in laboratory experiments. The use of Pichia anomala to improve the postharvest control of Penicillium roqueforti during airtight storage of feed grain was evaluated in outdoor silos. Inoculated and control winter wheat (cultivar Kosack) in 160-kg portions were stored at a water activity of 0.93 for 12 months in silos that were opened twice a week. During the first 2 months, inoculated Pichia anomala increased to about 10(7) colony-forming units (CFU)/g, while naturally occurring Pichia anomala in the treatments without inoculated yeast increased from 10(4) to 10(6) CFU/g. During the same period, CO2 concentrations increased to almost 70% and stabilized at 50-60%. During the coldest period, O-2 concentrations of <1% could be detected between samplings, whereas during the rest of the storage detectable O-2 levels were only found immediately after sampling. There were no clear differences in CO2 or O-2 levels between treatments. The inoculated Penicillium roqueforti did not grow during the storage period, probably owing to high numbers of Pichia anomala in combination with the high CO2 and low O-2 concentrations in the silos. In laboratory experiments, it was found that Pichia anomala survived long-term storage in airtight sealed test tubes better at 15 degrees C than at - 20 degrees C. The aerobic stability of moist wheat after 10 and 12 months of silo storage was clearly enhanced by an initial inoculation with Pichia anomala.

  • 7.
    Petersson, Stina
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Growth of Penicillium roqueforti, P-carneum, and P-paneum during malfunctioning airtight storage of high-moisture grain cultivars1999In: Postharvest biology and technology, ISSN 0925-5214, E-ISSN 1873-2356, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Penicillium roqueforti is an important spoilage fungus in high-moisture grain stored under airtight conditions where a malfunctioning storage system allows air leakage. It has recently been proposed that P. roqueforti be divided into three different species: P. roqueforti, P. carneum, and P. paneum (Boysen, M., Skouboe, P., Frisvad, J., Rossen, L., 1996. Reclassification of the Penicillium roqueforti group into three species on the basis of molecular genetic and biochemical profiles. Microbiology 142, 541-549). Differences in susceptibility to infection with the three mold species among winter wheat, spring wheat, rye, and barley during airtight storage of high-moisture grain were evaluated using a variety of grain cultivars. To simulate air leakage into such a storage system, grain (0.96 water activity) was inoculated, packed in glass tubes with a restricted air supply and incubated at 25 degrees C for 14 days. Molds and yeasts were quantified as colony forming units (CFU) on selective media. Generally, there was no difference in infection ability between P. roqueforti, P. carneum and P. paneum. All of them reached about 10(6) CFU/g in barley and winter wheat. However, rye appeared to be resistant to infection. A comparison of different barley and spring wheat cultivars revealed that P. roqueforti, P. carneum and P. paneum grew less vigorously on the malt cultivars Maud and Mentor and the spring wheat cv. Dragon than on other cultivars. In addition, batch-related differences in resistance to mold growth were found for spring wheat cv. Dragon.

  • 8.
    Rytkonen, Paulina
    et al.
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Bonow, Madeleine
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Persson, Ylva
    The National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Goat cheese production in Sweden: a pioneering experience in the re-emergence of local food2013In: Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica - Section B, ISSN 0906-4710, E-ISSN 1651-1913, Vol. 63, no Suppl. 1, p. 38-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The re-emergence and modernization of traditional goat-cheese production in Jämtland led to the articulation of a localized agri-food system that represents the frontline of the return and reinforcement of local food in Sweden. Already in the 1970s, some initiatives were undertaken to formalize the productive activities of this branch and to improve the product quality. The most important project was the articulation of a cooperative that, unlike all other Swedish cooperatives, engaged its members in the development of a joint trademark, development of a standardized assortment, common marketing efforts and finding creative solutions for infrastructure problems. Despite the overall success, we also found some downsides. Producing goat cheese requires that at least two people are involved, because the workload often leads to body injuries and illness for people working alone. By studying the institutional frameworks, rules and regulations, the economic function and entrepreneurial dynamics, and the dynamics of knowledge and competences, the article highlights how and why farm dairies in Jamtland became reinforced and modernized. This grasps both the actions of individual economic agents and their interaction with their environment. A special emphasis was put on the role of regional authorities in this process. Even though many obstacles have been removed and the trade has found successful ways to solve strategic issues concerning product development and marketing, there are still important structural shortcomings that might decrease the profitability and endanger the future development of the trade. There is a lack of experience and infrastructure to solve more complex problems like animal healthand the potential risks related to the consumption of unpasteurized cheese and the increasing incidence of Tick-Borne Encephalitis (TBE).

  • 9.
    Schnürer, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Swedish Farmers Crop Supply and Marketing Association, Research and Development, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ergosterol Levels and Mould Colony Forming Units in Swedish Grains of Food and Feed Grade1992In: Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica - Section B, ISSN 0906-4710, E-ISSN 1651-1913, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 240-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although ergosterol is considered to be a suitable indicator of mould growth in cereal grains, there are few reference values available for Scandinavian conditions. We have determined the ergosterol levels in Swedish grain of different origins: cleaned food-grade wheat from a commercial mill, feed-grade cereals (oats and barley) with different odours and cereals (winter wheat, ''American wheat'', triticale and rye) from various field trials conducted in south-central Sweden in 1990. Specific objectives were to elucidate the relationships between ergosterol levels and numbers of mould colony forming units (CFU) and between ergosterol and grain odour.

    Ergosterol levels in the food-grade wheat ranged between 2.4 and 2.8 mug/g DW, and between 3.0 and 5.6 mug/g DW in the field trial cereals, while values in most of the feed grain samples ranged from 8-15 mug/g DW The levels agree with other published data for European grains.

    A positive correlation was found between numbers of colony-forming units and ergosterol concentration. The degree of correlation was higher when numbers of CFU were determined on dichloran-glycerol 18% agar with a low water activity (aw = 0.95) than on malt extract agar (aw = 0.99). There was no agreement between ergosterol levels and grain odour, since even samples described as having a fresh smell had high ergosterol levels. However, the highest level (33 mug/g DW) was found in a sample with a pronounced musty odour, and the lowest (1.1 gg/g DW) in a sample that smelled as if it had been heat damaged.

  • 10.
    Schnürer, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rosswall, Thomas
    Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mineralization of nitrogen from15N labelled fungi, soil microbial biomass and roots and its uptake by barley plants1987In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of nitrogen in15N labelled fungi, soil microbial biomass (Ca(15NO3)2 immobilized by addition of glucose), barley roots and Ca(NO3)2 to barley plants was investigated in a greenhouse experiment. Samples of above-ground plant biomass were taken five times during 76 days. During this time, and at the start of the experiment, the C and N contents of the soil microbial biomass were determined. Microbial biomass-C decreased during the first 41 days, and then increased back to pre-treatment levels. Only 2% of the total soil15N was found in the microbial biomass two days after additions of Ca(15NO3)2. At the final sampling 76 days later, 17% of the15N remaining in soil was found in the microbial biomass. In the other tratments, microbial biomass-N accounted for 20% of remaining soil15N in the one that had received fungi, 29% in the one with barley roots and 35% in the Ca(NO3)2 plus glucose treatment. At harvest, 38% of the soil15N at day 0 added as Ca(NO3)2-N, 29% of fungal-N, 10% of N immobilized in the soil microbial biomass and 7% of N in barley roots was recovered in the above-ground plant biomass.

    It can be concluded that nitrogen in the native soil biomass is resistant to mineralization and plant uptake. The use of laboratory grown organisms for mineralization studies will overestimate the plant availability of nitrogen in soil microorganisms.

  • 11.
    Zhao, Tao
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ganji, Suresh
    Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Schiebe, Christian
    Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bohman, Björn
    Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; School of Molecular Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Weinstein, Philip
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.
    Krokene, Paal
    Department of Plant Molecular Biology, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Ås, Norway.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    Department of Chemistry, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unelius, C. Rikard
    Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Convergent evolution of semiochemicals across Kingdoms: bark beetles and their fungal symbionts2019In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1535-1545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Convergent evolution of semiochemical use in organisms from different Kingdoms is a rarely described phenomenon. Tree-killing bark beetles vector numerous symbiotic blue-stain fungi that help the beetles colonize healthy trees. Here we show for the first time that some of these fungi are able to biosynthesize bicyclic ketals that are pheromones and other semiochemicals of bark beetles. Volatile emissions of five common bark beetle symbionts were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. When grown on fresh Norway spruce bark the fungi emitted three well-known bark beetle aggregation pheromones and semiochemicals (exo-brevicomin, endo-brevicomin and trans-conophthorin) and two structurally related semiochemical candidates (exo-1,3-dimethyl-2,9-dioxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane and endo-1,3-dimethyl-2,9-dioxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane) that elicited electroantennogram responses in the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. When grown on malt agar with C-13 D-Glucose, the fungus Grosmannia europhioides incorporated C-13 into exo-brevicomin and trans-conophthorin. The enantiomeric compositions of the fungus-produced ketals closely matched those previously reported from bark beetles. The production of structurally complex bark beetle pheromones by symbiotic fungi indicates cross-kingdom convergent evolution of signal use in this system. This signaling is susceptible to disruption, providing potential new targets for pest control in conifer forests and plantations.

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