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  • 1.
    Ahnström, Johan
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden; Länsstyrelsen i Uppsala län, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Jan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Ecology, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Berg, Åke
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hallgren, Lars
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Boonstra, Wijnand J.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Uppsala, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Johanna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Farmers' Interest in Nature and Its Relation to Biodiversity in Arable Fields2013Ingår i: International Journal of Ecology, ISSN 1687-9708, E-ISSN 1687-9716, 617352Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiversity declines in farmland have been attributed to intensification of farming at the field level and loss of heterogeneity at the landscape level. However, farmers are not solely optimizing production; their actions are also influenced by social factors, tradition and interest in nature, which indirectly influence biodiversity but rarely are incorporated in studies of farmland biodiversity. We used social science methods to quantify farmers’ interest in nature on 16 farms with winter wheat fields in central Sweden, and combined this with biodiversity inventories of five organism groups (weeds, carabid beetles, bumblebees, solitary bees, and birds) and estimates of landscape composition andmanagement intensity at the field level.Agricultural intensity,measured as crop density, and farmers’ interest in nature explained variation in biodiversity, measured as the proportion of the regional species richness found on single fields. Interest in nature seemed to incorporate many actions taken by farmers and appeared to be influenced by both physical factors, for example, the surrounding landscape, and social factors, for example, social motivations.This study indicates that conservation of biodiversity in farmland, and design of new agri-environmental subsidy systems, would profit from taking farmers’ interest in nature and its relation to agricultural practices into account.

  • 2.
    Björklund, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Eksvärd, Karin
    Inspire and action research ab.
    Schaffer, Christina
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm,. Sverige.
    Assessing ecosystem services in perennial intercropping systems: participatory action research in Swedish modern agrofores2014Ingår i: Farming systems facing global challenges: Capacities and strategies / [ed] Schobert, H., Riecher, M.-C., Fischer, H. Aenis, T. & Knierim, 2014, 112-113 s.Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is on how to assess ecosystem services in complex agroforestry systems using a case of edible forest gardens. Benefits of doing these assessments in a participatory learning and action research (PLAR) context are elaborated, as well as difficulties and questions that this has raised. The PLAR group comprised farmers on 13 smallholdings, researchers and a facilitator, which through collaboration and participatory methods have developed a general design of a forest garden, 60 m2 in size and established it on all 13 participating farms. Important values of the work are that ecosystem services are related to specific local contexts and that methodology for multi-criteria assessments of the generation of ecosystem services on a farm scale are being developed. Farmers engaged in formulating research questions, development of field trial designs, sampling and analysis of results improves the relevance and quality of the research as well as advance the adoption of new knowledge.

  • 3.
    Börjesson, T.
    et al.
    Grain Department, Lidköping, Sweden.
    Stenberg, B.
    Precision Agriculture, Department of Soil Science, SLU, Skara, Sweden.
    Schnürer, Johan
    Department of Microbiology, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Near-infrared spectroscopy for estimation of ergosterol content in barley: A comparison between reflectance and transmittance techniques2007Ingår i: Cereal Chemistry, ISSN 0009-0352, E-ISSN 1943-3638, Vol. 84, nr 3, 231-236 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The fungal-specific lipid ergosterol correlates with fungal biomass and often also with the degree of mycotoxin contamination of cereals. We compared the ability of a near-infrared reflectance (NIR) instrument with a broad wavelength range (400-2500 nm) and a near-infrared transmittance (NIT) instrument with a narrower wavelength range (850-1050 nm) to predict the ergosterol content of naturally infected barley samples. The two instruments were equally good at predicting ergosterol content in Swedish samples (r(2) = 0.81 and 0.83 for NIT and NIR, respectively). The NIT instrument was then used for samples from three countries (Sweden, Ireland, UK). This model had about the same root mean-squared error (approximate to 5 mg of ergosterol/kg, db, of grain) as the dataset with only Swedish samples, although the r(2) value was lower (0.58). The investigation has shown that it is possible to predict ergosterol content in whole barley samples using NIR or NIT instrumentation, and acceptable models can be obtained using different barley cultivars and samples from different countries and harvest years. This should make it possible to routinely predict the fungal biomass at grain terminals.

  • 4.
    Wang, Thanh
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik. State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Yu, Junchao
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Wang, Pu
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Zhang, Qinghua
    State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Levels and distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the aquatic and terrestrial environment around a wastewater treatment plant2016Ingår i: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 23, nr 16, 16440-16447 s.Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The distribution and fate of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in a riparian ecosystem nearby a wastewater treatment plant effluent were investigated. Different aqueous and terrestrial samples such as soil, sediment, plants, and invertebrates were collected and analyzed for tri- to heptabrominated PBDEs. Furthermore, the food web structure was elucidated using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. The highest PBDE levels were found for sediment- and soil-dwelling invertebrates, such as earthworms (Σ13 PBDEs 144 ng/g lipid weight), Tubifex tubifex (77 ng/g lw), and scarab larvae (49 ng/g lw). Differences in congener composition profiles among the different matrices show that the environmental distribution and fate of PBDEs in ecosystems can be very complex. Among the analyzed PBDEs in this ecosystem, the tetra-brominated BDE-47 was the dominant PBDE congener and followed by the penta-brominated BDE-99. A potential trend of increasing BDE-47/99 ratio with the increase of δ(15)N was observed for species with similar energy sources (δ(13)C), indicating a higher bioaccumulation potential for BDE-47 in this ecosystem. A significant correlation was also found between PBDEs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), indicating similar sources and fate between the two compound groups in this area. The biota-soil or biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were somewhat different among the PBDE congeners and species, but were generally highest for those with log Kow values around 6.5-7.

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