oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 190
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, E.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljótsson, B.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedman, E.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Enander, J.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kaldo, V.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindefors, N.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rück, C.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Testing the Mediating Effects of Obsessive Beliefs in Internet-Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, ISSN 1063-3995, E-ISSN 1099-0879, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 722-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although cognitive interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been tested in randomized trials, there are few trials that have tested the specific mechanisms of cognitive interventions, i.e. how they achieve their effects. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mediating effects of a short cognitive intervention in the treatment of OCD and used data from a recently conducted randomized controlled trial where 101 participants were allocated to either Internet-based CBT (ICBT) or to a control condition. Obsessive beliefs were measured at pre-treatment, at the time they had received the cognitive intervention, and also at post-treatment. Weekly OCD symptoms were measured throughout the 10 weeks of treatment. We hypothesized that (1) the ICBT group would have greater reductions in obsessive beliefs (controlling for change in OCD symptoms) after completing the cognitive intervention, and that (2) this reduction would, in turn, predict greater OCD symptom reduction throughout the rest of the treatment period. Contrary to our expectations, the longitudinal mediation analysis indicated that (1) being randomized to ICBT actually increased the degree of obsessive beliefs after receiving the cognitive intervention at weeks 1-3, and (2) increase in obsessive beliefs predicted better outcome later in treatment. However, when repeating the analysis using cross-sectional data at post-treatment, the results were in line with the initial hypotheses. Results were replicated when the control condition received ICBT. We conclude that, although obsessive beliefs were significantly reduced at post-treatment for the ICBT group, early increase rather than decrease in obsessive beliefs predicted favourable outcome.

  • 2.
    Andersson, G.
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cima, R. F. F.
    Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Weise, C.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Autobiographical Memory Specificity in Patients with Tinnitus Versus Patients with Depression and Normal Controls2013In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 116-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies show that patients with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder respond with fewer specific autobiographical memories in a cued memory task (i.e. the autobiographical memory test; AMT) compared to healthy controls. One previous study found this phenomenon among tinnitus patients as well (Andersson, Ingerholt, & Jansson, 2003). The aim of this study was to replicate the previous study with an additional control group of depressed patients and memory errors as measured with the AMT as an additional outcome. We included 20 normal hearing tinnitus patients, 20 healthy controls and 20 persons diagnosed with clinical depression. The AMT was administered together with self-report measures of depression, anxiety and tinnitus distress. Both the tinnitus and depression groups differed from the healthy control group in that they reported fewer specific autobiographical memories. There were, however, differences between the tinnitus and depression groups in terms of the errors made on the AMT. The depression group had more overgeneral memories than the normal control group, whereas the tinnitus group did not differ from the control group on this memory error. The tinnitus group had more semantic associations and non-memories than the other two groups, suggesting that executive functioning may play a role for the tinnitus group when completing the AMT. Clinical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

  • 3.
    Andersson, G.
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hummerdal, D.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bergman-Nordgren, L.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlbring, P.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A 3.5-year follow-up of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for major depression2013In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression has been tested in several trials, but only with follow-ups up to 1.5 years.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ICBT 3.5 years after treatment completion.

    Methods: A total of 88 people with major depression were randomized to either guided self-help or e-mail therapy in the original trial. One-third was initially on a waiting-list. Treatment was provided for eight weeks and in this report long-term follow-up data were collected. Also included were data from post-treatment and six-month follow-up. A total of 58% (51/88) completed the 3.5-year follow-up. Analyses were performed using a random effects repeated measures piecewise growth model to estimate trajectory shape over time and account for missing data.

    Results: Results showed continued lowered scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). No differences were found between the treatment conditions. A large proportion of participants (55%) had sought and received additional treatments in the follow-up period. A majority (56.9%) of participants had a BDI score lower than 10 at the 3.5-year follow-up.

    Conclusions: People with mild to moderate major depression may benefit from ICBT 3.5-years after treatment completion.

  • 4.
    Andersson, G.
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Veilord, A.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Svedling, L.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, F.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sleman, O.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mauritzson, L.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sarkohi, A.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Claesson, E.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Zetterqvist, V.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lamminen, M.
    Redakliniken, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, T.
    Redakliniken, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlbring, P.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Randomised controlled non-inferiority trial with 3-year follow-up of internet-delivered versus face-to-face group cognitive behavioural therapy for depression2013In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 151, no 3, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Guided internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) has been found to be effective in the treatment of mild to moderate depression, but there have been no direct comparisons with the more established group-based CBT with a long-term follow-up.

    Method: Participants with mild to moderate depression were recruited from the general population and randomized to either guided ICBT (n =33) or to live group treatment (n=36). Measures were completed before and after the intervention to assess depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Follow-ups were conducted at one-year and three-year after the treatment had ended.

    Results: Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis using linear mixed-effects regression analysis. Results on the self-rated version of the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale showed significant improvements in both groups across time indicating non-inferiority of guided ICBT, and there was even a tendency for the guided ICBT group to be superior to group-based CBT at three year follow-up. Within-group effect sizes for the ICBT condition at post treatment showed a Cohen's d=1.46, with a similar large effect at 3-year follow-up, d=1.78. For the group CBT the corresponding within group effects were d =0.99 and d=1.34, respectively.

    Limitations: The study was small with two active treatments and there was no placebo or credible control condition.

    Conclusions: Guided ICBT is at least as effective as group based CBT and long-term effects can be sustained up to 3 years after treatment.

  • 5.
    Andersson, G.
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, SwedishInstitute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sarkohi, A.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, SwedishInstitute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Psychiatry, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, J.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, SwedishInstitute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bjärehed, J.
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, SwedishInstitute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Effects of two forms of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for depression on future thinking2013In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, ISSN 0147-5916, E-ISSN 1573-2819, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate if future thinking would change following two forms of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression. A second aim was to study the association between pre-post changes in future thinking and pre-post changes in depressive symptoms. Effects of psychological treatments are most often tested with self-report inventories and seldom with tests of cognitive function. We included data from 47 persons diagnosed with major depression who received either e-mail therapy or guided self-help during 8 weeks. Participants completed a future thinking task (FTT), in which they were asked to generate positive and negative events that they thought were going to happen in the future and rated the events in terms of emotion and likelihood. The FTT was completed before and after treatment. Data on depressive symptoms were also collected. FTT index scores for negative events were reduced after treatment. There was no increase for the positive events. Change scores for the FTT negative events and depression symptoms were significantly correlated. We conclude that ICBT may lead to decreased negative future thinking and that changes in depression symptoms correlate to some extent with reductions in negative future thinking.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Preventiva interventioner för barn i familjehem. En översikt.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna översikt är att beskriva den teoretiska grunden för preventiva interventioner till barn i familjehemsvård som undergått vetenskaplig utvärdering samt att dokumentera de interventioner som används i Sverige. 20 interventioner och deras teoretiska grund beskrivs varav en används i Sverige. Majoriteten av interventionerna är selektiva eller indikerade. En tredjedel är universella. En majoritet av interventionerna är kognitivt-beteendeinriktade med social inlärningsteori som grund. Flest interventioner riktar sig till familjehemsföräldrar. Flera av interventionerna och andra interventioner med samma teoretiska grund används i Sverige, men kommer sannolikt inte familjehemsplacerade barn och ungdomar till del. I översikten konkluderas att det finns förutsättningar för att introducera fler interventioner i Sverige och utvärdera deras effekter i svensk kontext.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Persson, Jerry
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kognitiv träning vid depression2009Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Depression is a widely spread disorder. Cognitive training could be a

    cost effective and easily accessible intervention to treat the disorder in

    an early stage. Previous research indicates that cognitive training is

    effective in alleviating depression and cognitive deficits. The aim of

    this study was to investigate whether cognitive training at home would

    lead to improvements in depression, and whether improvements were

    due to the training per se. Four subjects with depression participated

    in training with the Paced Audity Serial Addition Task (PASAT). The

    study had an n=1-design with pre- and post-measures, and control by

    a pseudo-intervention. Daily and weekly measures showed effects

    only for one participant. Thus the training was not shown to be

    effective. Three participants experienced benefits from the

    intervention. That could be a reason for further studies of cognitive

    interventions of depression.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 8.
    Anniko, Malin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bodland Fielding, Lisa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stressing emotions: A single subject design study testing an emotion-focused transdiagnostic treatment for stress-related ill health2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     Abstract 

    Individual psychological factors have been recognized to play an important role in the development of stress-related symptomatology. Despite extensive comorbidity between stress-related ill health and mood disorders, the advances in research on emotion regulation and transdiagnostics, have not been recognized in stress research to any considerable degree. In the current study, using a single subject design with multiple baselines across individuals (n=6), a transdiagnostic treatment intervention targeting maladaptive emotional regulation strategies was implemented on patients suffering from stress-related symptomatology. Results show that symptoms of exhaustion decreased in five of six participants on post-measures, with considerable convergence between measures of depression, anxiety and stress. Further investigation of treatment effects, alongside the processes linking emotion regulation and stress-related symptomatology are needed. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Stressing Emotions- DIVA
  • 9.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Jussila, Jari
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Huhtamaki, Jukka
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Exploring co-learning behavior of conference participants with visual network analysis of Twitter data2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 51, no B, p. 1154-1162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge management has acknowledged organizational learning as a key factor for creating competitive advantage for companies already from early 1990. However, the studies of co-learning in this connection are in their infancy. This article contributes to an emerging field of 'smart data' research on Twitter by presenting a case study of how community managers in Finland used this social media platform to construct a co-learning environment around an annually organized conference. In this empirical study we explore the co-learning behavior in project contexts especially by analyzing and visualizing co-learning behavior from conference participants Twitter data.

  • 10.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bejerot, Eva
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology,Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brist på kollegialt inflytande urholkar lojalitet med chef och organisation… men inte med patienterna2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 12-13, p. 553-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the investigation was to examine relations between physicians’ experiences of opportunities to exert their competence, and have arenas for collegially influence on the organization’s activities and loyalty, protest and exit. In total, 1 400 physicians participated in a questionnaire study. Strong feelings of loyalty with the organization, workplace and immediate supervisor were 2–3 times more common among those with arenas, than those without the experience of an arena. Loyalty with their profession and patients was high, and independent of access to such arenas. Of those with high access to arenas, 87% reported that their viewpoints on work conditions were taken into consideration, compared to 21% of those with low access. Considerations for changes in profession, employer or workplace were twice as common among those with low access to arenas. In conclusion, employers who want to attract physicians must have arenas where the physicians’ competence can influence the organisational activities.

  • 11.
    Badinlou, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kormi-Nouri, Reza
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Enactment Effect In Development: Comparing Action Memory In School-Aged Children2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Memory works better when we have hands on experience with learning materials. In a same way, children remember action phrases better if they are instructed to enact it rather than when they only read it or watch someone else do it. We investigated this enactment effect in different grades´ children in order to find out the developmental pattern of differences.  In this study, we first tried to replicate typical enactment effect in children. Then, we compared memory in subject-performed tasks, experimenter-performed tasks and verbal tasks using three memory tests (free recall, cued recall, and recognition) in children. Four hundred and ten pupils from four grades (2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th) participated in the study. The results showed that first, there is an enactment effect in school-aged children as well as in adults. Second, the encoding conditions and memory tests determine memory performance in children. And most important, the findings indicated that there were significant differencesfrom grade 2 to grade 8 in free recall and cued recall, but not recognition of all three learning conditions. These findings indicate that action memory develops through school ages. In another word, age has an important role in memory and especially enactment effect; older children had better recall performance in all kind of encoding conditions. These findings can be explained through development of memory strategies, item-specific information processing, and relational information processing.

  • 12.
    Badinlou, Farzaneh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kormi-Nouri, Reza
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Mousavi Nasab, Hossein
    Department of Psychology, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran.
    Knopf, Monika
    Department of Psychology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Developmental differences in episodic memory across school ages: Evidence from enacted events performed by self and others2017In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 84-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine action memory as a form of episodic memory among school-aged subjects. Most research on action memory has focused on memory changes in adult populations. This study explored the action memory of children over time. A total of 410 school-aged child participants, comprising 201 girls and 208 boys in four age groups (8, 10, 12, 14), were included in this study. We studied two forms of action encoding, subject-performed tasks (SPTs) and experimenter-performed tasks (EPTs), which were compared with one verbal encoding task as a control condition. At retrieval, we used three memory tests (free recall, cued recall, and recognition). We observed significant differences in memory performance in children aged 8-14 years with respect to free recall and cued recall but not recognition. The largest memory enhancement was observed for the SPTs in the 8-14-year-old participants under all test conditions. Participants performed equally well on the free recall of SPTs and EPTs, whereas they displayed better performances on the cued recall and recognition of SPTs compared to EPTs. The strategic nature of SPTs and the distinction between item-specific information and relational information are discussed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 13.
    Bauducco, Serena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Flink, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Preventing sleep deficit in adolescents: Long-term effects of a quasi-experimental school-based intervention study2020In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, no 1, article id e12940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents are at risk of sleep deficit, which has serious consequences for their daytime functioning. However, school-based interventions to improve sleep have shown limited success. This might be due to the content of the programmes (e.g., not targeting central factors such as daytime stress and technology use) or because changes have not been captured due to a lack of long-term follow-ups. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of a school-based sleep education curriculum including time-management training. The study used a quasi-experimental design. Participants were 3,622 adolescents (mean age 13.7, 48% girls); 286 were in the intervention group and 3,336 were followed as a natural control group. Data were collected before the intervention and at a 1-year follow-up. We divided participants into three groups according to baseline sleep duration (calculated from self-reported bed- and wake times, minus sleep onset latency): insufficient (<7 hr), borderline (7-8 hr) and adequate (>8 hr). Adolescents in the intervention group were ~2 times less likely to report insufficient sleep at follow-up as compared to controls. Sleep knowledge improved significantly in the intervention group but there were no changes in emotional sleep hygiene (e.g., bedtime worry) and perceived stress. Surprisingly, technology use increased and behavioural sleep hygiene worsened in the intervention group. Although the mechanisms of change need further investigation, the results of this study point to potential long-term benefits of school-based sleep programmes.

  • 14.
    Bendelin, N.
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahl, J.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlbring, P.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nelson, K. Z.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of ClinicalNeuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Experiences of guided Internet-based cognitive-behavioural treatment for depression: A qualitative study2011In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 11, article id 107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internet-based self-help treatment with minimal therapist contact has been shown to have an effect in treating various conditions. The objective of this study was to explore participants' views of Internet administrated guided self-help treatment for depression.

    Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 strategically selected participants and qualitative methods with components of both thematic analysis and grounded theory were used in the analyses.

    Results: Three distinct change processes relating to how participants worked with the treatment material emerged which were categorized as (a) Readers, (b) Strivers, and (c) Doers. These processes dealt with attitudes towards treatment, views on motivational aspects of the treatment, and perceptions of consequences of the treatment.

    Conclusions: We conclude that the findings correspond with existing theoretical models of face-to-face psychotherapy within qualitative process research. Persons who take responsibility for the treatment and also attribute success to themselves appear to benefit more. Motivation is a crucial aspect of guided self-help in the treatment of depression.

  • 15.
    Berg, Iren
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bergquist, Rose-Marie
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    BUP-utredningar: En kritisk granskning2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifteen child psychiatric investigations are critically examined. Serious deficits and lack of objectivity and ethics are pointed out. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    BUPdiva.pdf
  • 16.
    Björk, Lisa
    et al.
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bejerot, Eva
    Department of Psychology, University of Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jacobshagen, Nicola
    Institut für Psychologie, Universität Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Härenstam, Annika
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    I shouldn't have to do this: Illegitimate tasks as a stressor in relation to organizational control and resource deficits2013In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, E-ISSN 1464-5335, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 262-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of tasks that are perceived as unnecessary or unreasonable - illegitimate tasks - represents a new stressor concept that refers to assignments that violate the norms associated with the role requirements of professional work. Research has shown that illegitimate tasks are associated with stress and counterproductive work behaviour. The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the contribution of characteristics of the organization on the prevalence of illegitimate tasks in the work of frontline and middle managers. Using the Bern Illegitimate Task Scale (BITS) in a sample of 440 local government operations managers in 28 different organizations in Sweden, this study supports the theoretical assumptions that illegitimate tasks are positively related to stress and negatively related to satisfaction with work performance. Results further show that 10% of the variance in illegitimate tasks can be attributed to the organization where the managers work. Multilevel referential analysis showed that the more the organization was characterized by competition for resources between units, unfair and arbitrary resource allocation and obscure decisional structure, the more illegitimate tasks managers reported. These results should be valuable for strategic-level management since they indicate that illegitimate tasks can be counteracted by means of the organization of work.

  • 17.
    Blom, K.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tarkian Tillgren, H.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wiklund, T.
    Department of Pain and Rehabilitation Center, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Danlycke, E.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Forssén, M.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Söderström, A.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, R.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Jernelöv, S.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindefors, N.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kaldo, V.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internet-vs. group-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial2015In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 70, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare guided Internet-delivered to group-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. We conducted an 8-week randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with 6-months follow-up. Participants were forty-eight adults with insomnia, recruited via media. Interventions were guided Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) and group-delivered CBT (GCBT) for insomnia. Primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), secondary outcome measures were sleep diary data, depressive symptoms, response- and remission rates. Both treatment groups showed significant improvements and large effect sizes for ISI (Within Cohen's d: ICBT post = 1.8, 6-months follow-up = 2.1; GCBT post = 2.1, 6-months follow-up = 2.2). Confidence interval of the difference between groups posttreatment and at FU6 indicated non-inferiority of ICBT compared to GCBT. At post-treatment, two thirds of patients in both groups were considered responders (ISI-reduction > 7p). Using diagnostic criteria, 63% (ICBT) and 75% (GCBT) were in remission. Sleep diary data showed moderate to large effect sizes. We conclude that both guided Internet-CBT and group-CBT in this study were efficacious with regard to insomnia severity, sleep parameters and depressive symptoms. The results are in line with previous research, and strengthen the evidence for guided Internet-CBT for insomnia.

    Trial registration: The study protocol was approved by, and registered with, the regional ethics review board in Linkoping, Sweden, registration number 2010/385-31.

  • 18.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Pia
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Applying the demand-control-support model on burnout in managers and non-managers2016In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 110-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the demand-control-support (DCS) model on burnout in male and female managers and non-managers, taking into account genetic and shared family environmental factors, contributing to the understanding of mechanisms of how and when work stress is related to burnout.

    Design/methodology/approach: A total of 5,510 individuals in complete same-sex twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry were included in the analyses. Co-twin control analyses were performed using linear mixed modeling, comparing between-pairs and within-pair effects, stratified by zygosity and sex.

    Findings: Managers scored higher on demands and control in their work than non-managers, and female managers seem to be particularly at risk for burnout facing more demands which are not reduced by a higher control as in their male counterparts. Co-twin analyses showed that associations between control and burnout as well as between demands and burnout seem to be affected by shared family environmental factors in male non-managers but not in male managers in which instead the associations between social support and burnout seem to be influenced by shared family environment.

    Practical implications: Taken together, the study offers knowledge that shared environment as well as sex and managerial status are important factors to consider in how DCS is associated to exhaustion.

    Originality/value: Using twin data with possibilities to control for genetics, shared environment, sex and age, this study offers unique insight into the DCS research, which focusses primarily on the workplace environment rather than individual factors.

  • 19.
    Boersma, Katja
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Editorial comment on Nina Kreddig's and Monika Hasenbring's study on pain anxiety and fear of (re) injury in patients with chronic back pain: Sex as a moderator2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 16, p. 89-90, article id S1877-8860(17)30050-2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Boersma, Katja
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Center for Health and Medical Psychology.
    Södermark, Martin
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Division of Psychology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Flink, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Center for Health and Medical Psychology.
    Efficacy of a transdiagnostic emotion-focused exposure treatment for chronic pain patients with comorbid anxiety and depression: a randomized controlled trial2019In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 160, no 8, p. 1708-1718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The comorbidity between chronic pain and emotional problems has proven difficult to address with current treatment options. This study addresses the efficacy of a transdiagnostic emotion-focused exposure treatment ("hybrid") for chronic pain patients with comorbid emotional problems. Adults (n = 115) with chronic musculoskeletal pain and functional and emotional problems were included in a 2-centre, parallel randomized controlled, open-label trial comparing this treatment to an active control condition receiving a guided Internet-delivered pain management treatment based on CBT principles (iCBT). The hybrid treatment (n = 58, 10-16 sessions) integrates exposure in vivo for chronic pain based on the fear-avoidance model with an emotion-regulation approach informed by procedures in Dialectical Behavior Therapy. The iCBT (n = 57; 8 treatment modules) addresses topics such as pain education, coping strategies, relaxation, problem solving, stress, and sleep management using standard CBT techniques. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed before and after treatment as well as at a 9-month primary end point. Across conditions, 78% participants completed post-treatment and 81% follow-up assessment. Intent-to-treat analyses showed that the hybrid had a significantly better post-treatment outcome on pain catastrophizing (d = 0.39) and pain interference (d = 0.63) and significantly better follow-up outcomes on depression (d = 0.43) and pain interference (d = 0.51). There were no differences on anxiety and pain intensity. Observed proportions of clinically significant improvement favoured the hybrid on all but one comparison, but no statistically significant differences were observed. We conclude that the hybrid emotion-focused treatment may be considered an acceptable, credible, and efficacious treatment option for chronic pain patients with comorbid emotional problems.

  • 21.
    Borbely, Danielle
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Abusive Parenting Behavior and its Relation to Adolescent Violence and Violence Victimization.2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Borbely, Danielle
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Are all Children affected by Abusive Parenting in the same Way? The Role of Shyness and Coping in Understanding the Effects of Abusive Home Context.2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Brinkborg, H.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Michanek, J.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Berglund, G.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Acceptance and commitment therapy for the treatment of stress among social workers: A randomized controlled trial2011In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 49, no 6-7, p. 389-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic stress increases the risk of health problems and absenteeism, with negative consequences for individuals, organizations and society. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of a brief stress management intervention based on the principles of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) on stress and general mental health for Swedish social workers (n = 106) in a randomized, controlled trial. Participants were stratified according to stress level at baseline in order to examine whether initial stress level moderated the effect of the intervention. Two thirds of the participants had high stress levels at baseline (Perceived Stress Scale; score of >= 25). The results showed that the intervention significantly decreased levels of stress and burnout, and increased general mental health compared to a waiting list control. No statistically significant effects were, however, found for those with low levels of stress at baseline. Among participants with high stress, a substantial proportion (42%) reached criteria for clinically significant change. We concluded that the intervention successfully decreased stress and symptoms of burnout, and increased general mental health. Evidence is, thus, provided supporting ACT as brief, stress management intervention for social workers.

  • 24.
    Carstens, Johan K. P.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Schrooten, Martien G. S.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Effects of validating communication on recall during a pain-task in healthy participants2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 17, p. 118-125, article id S1877-8860(17)30143-XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Increasing recall of instructions and advice in a pain consultation is important, since it is a prerequisite for adherence to treatment recommendations. However, interference due to pain-related distress may result in poor recall. Whereas there are some indications that recall can be increased by empathic communication that reduces interference, this interesting possibility remains largely untested experimentally. The current experiment aimed at studying effects of empathic communication, and more specifically validation, on recall during a pain test and possible mediators and moderators of this effect.

    METHOD: Participants received either validating (N=25) or invalidating responses (N=25) from the experimenter during a pain provoking task, followed by self-report measures of interference (affect, situational pain catastrophizing) and recall (accurate and false memories of words).

    RESULTS: As expected, the validated group exhibited higher accurate recall and less false memories following the pain test as compared to the invalidated group. This was partly due to the effect of interference being counteracted by moderating the relationship between pain catastrophizing and recall.

    CONCLUSION: These novel results suggest that validating communication can counteract interference due to pain catastrophizing on recall, at least in a controlled experimental setting.

    IMPLICATIONS: Good communication by health professionals is of utmost importance for adherence to pain management. The current results expand our knowledge on the effects of pain communication by establishing and explaining a clear link between empathic communication and recall, highlighting the role of pain catastrophizing.

  • 25.
    Dirkse, D.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina SK, Canada.
    Hadjistavropoulos, H. D.
    Department of Psychology, University of Regina, Regina SK, Canada.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Barak, A.
    Department of Counseling Psychology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel.
    Linguistic Analysis of Communication in Therapist-Assisted Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder2015In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Therapist-assisted Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) involves elements of expressive writing through secure messaging with a therapist. Expressive writing has been associated with psychological and physical health benefits in past research; furthermore, certain linguistic dimensions in expressive writing have been identified as particularly beneficial to health, such as less frequent use of negative emotion words and greater use of positive emotion words. No research, to date, has analyzed linguistic dimensions in client communication over the course of therapist-assisted ICBT for individuals with symptoms of generalized anxiety. This naturalistic study examined messages sent to therapists during the course of ICBT using linguistic analysis, and explored covariation of word use with symptom improvement. Data were obtained from patients with symptoms of generalized anxiety (N=59) who completed 12 modules of therapist-assisted ICBT and rated symptoms of anxiety, depression, and panic at the beginning of each module. Linguistic analysis categorized text submitted to therapists into different word categories. Results found that patients' use of negative emotion, anxiety, causation, and insight words reduced over the course of treatment, while past tense words increased. Furthermore, negative emotion words significantly covaried with symptom ratings over the course of treatment. While causal statements cannot be made, findings improve our understanding of patient communication in ICBT and suggest that the further study of linguistic dimensions as psychological indicators and the potential utility of expressive writing strategies in therapist-assisted ICBT may be worthwhile.

  • 26.
    Edlund, Sara M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Carlsson, Maria L.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fruzzetti, Alan E.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    I see you're in pain: the effects of partner validation on emotions in people with chronic pain2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Edlund, Sara M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Carlsson, Maria L.
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fruzzetti, Alan E.
    Department of Psychology 298, University of Nevada, Reno, USA.
    Tillfors, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    I see you're in pain: the effects of partner validation on emotions in people with chronic pain2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 6, p. 16-21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims

    Chronic pain not only affects the person in pain, but can also have a negative impact on relationships with loved ones. Research shows that chronic pain is associated with difficulties in marital relationships, which in turn is related to a variety of negative outcomes such as psychological distress and conflict within the family. This suggests that couples where chronic physical pain is present also struggle with emotional pain and relationship problems, and thus targeting relationship skills and interpersonal functioning might be helpful for these couples. Although studies in this area are promising, their numbers are few. In the present study, validation as a way of communicating is suggested for handling emotional expression in interpersonal interactions. Validation communicates understanding and acceptance of the other person's experience, and it has been shown to have a down-regulating effect on negative emotions. It has previously been demonstrated to be important for these couples. However, the feasibility and effects of increasing partner validation in these couples are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if a brief training session in validation for spouses would result in more validating and fewer invalidating responses towards their partners with pain, and to investigate if changes in these behavioural responses were associated with changes in emotion and pain level in the partner with pain.

    Methods

    Participants were 20 couples where at least one partner reported chronic pain. The study employed a within-groups design in which spouses of people with pain received validation training (without their partner's knowledge), and their validating and invalidating responses were rated pre- and post-intervention using a reliable observational scale. Also, positive and negative affect and subjective pain level in the persons with pain were rated pre- and post-intervention.

    Results

    Results showed that the validation training was associated with increased validating and decreased invalidating responses in the partners. Their spouses with chronic pain reported a decrease in negative affect from pre- to post-training.

    Conclusions

    Our results indicate that the partner or closest family member, after brief validation training, increased validating responses and decreased invalidating responses towards the person with pain, which had an immediate positive impact on emotions in the other person.

    Implications

    This study suggests that using validation in interpersonal interactions is a promising tool for couples where chronic pain is present.

  • 28.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A critical examination of investigative methods in fifteen cases of alleged child sexual abuse in Sweden1997Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to examine investigative  work in cases of sexual abuse in Sweden. A systematic search for common problem areas in the investigative process was made in 15 cases with extensive documentation. In at least two thirds of the cases four problem themes were found to be important: I. Investigation strategy and generation of data, II. Documentation of data, III. Analysis work, IV. Ethics. The main conclusion is that there are serious defects in the investigative methods in all cases reviewec. The investigative methods are biased and incompatible with the objectivity principle stated in Swedish laws. There is a need for critical and scientific thinking in investigative work.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Alternativa tolkningsmöjligheter av ett material rörande påstådda sexuella övergrepp2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A case with allegations of sexual abuse is critically examined and alternative interpretations and cognitive biases are pointed out.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 30.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Att frigöra människors resurser genom samhällsnyttigt arbete:: Erfarenheter från tre olika grupper1988Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiences from successful groups with participants with psychosocial problems are reported. Success factors are specified and discussed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 31.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Att frigöra människors resurser genom samhällsnyttigt arbete: Ett problematiskt beredskapsarbetsprojekt1989Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to contribute to clarification of how human resources can be liberated in social work. A public relief work project was studied by interviews with both personell and participants. A driving person was lacking and there were some problems e.g. non-attendance. Some hypotheses about liberation of human resources are presented.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 32.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Att i polisförhör med en pojke driva fram uppgifter om sexuella övergrepp i stället för att utreda vad som kan ha hänt: To drive up allegations of sexual abuse in police interrogation with a boy instead of investigating what have happened2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Documents from police interrogations in a case with allegations of sexual abuse are cirtically examined concerning investigative method. Cognitive biases and errors in method are detected.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 33.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Att omvandla arbetsplatsproblem till problem hos person. Grovt kvinnoförtryck vid en forskningsavdelning på universitet.2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical examination of investigative work in a case with notification of illness in a place of work. Problems in the work environment are transformed to individual problems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    individfeldiva.pdf
  • 34.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Barnavårdsutredning enligt BBIC med pseudopsykologi. Grovt missbruk av psykologi av barnpsykiater och psykolog.2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to clarify problems with objectivity in a child protection investigation and an alleged measurement of attachment style by a psychologist. Cognitive biases are specified.

    Download full text (pdf)
    ankndiva.pdf
  • 35.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Barnavårdsutredningar med polisförhör och omfattande pseudopsykologiska insatser från utredningshem och psykologer. Grovt missbruk av psykologi av psykologer.2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to clarify problems and cognitive biases in investigative methods in a complex child protection case. Many errors in investigative methods and many cognitive biases are pointed out. Several investigative methods are judged to be frauds or forgeries.    

    Download full text (pdf)
    KomSdiva.pdf
  • 36.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Beteendeanalys: ett PM2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett summariskt PM på fyra sidor bserat på Kanfer & Saslows modell för beteendeanalys och på Sten Rönnbergs doktorsavhandling om beteendeanalys.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Beteendeanalys.pdf
  • 37.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bordellfallet: Kritisk granskning av utredningsmetodik i dokument i ett fall rörande misstanke om sexuella övergrepp där dold inspelning av telefonsamtal användes som metod2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical examination of the police and court investigations in a case with allegations of sexual abuse. Many errors in thinking and method are pointed out.

    Download full text (pdf)
    SNamdiva.pdf
  • 38.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Content strategies in police interviews of children in alleged child sexual abuse cases2001In: Utlovad konferensvolym utkom ej ö h t., 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to clarify the question of content strategy in police interviews of children. All 87 police interrogations with children from 30 disputable child sexual abuse cases with 41 children in Swedish courts have been examined concerning content strategies. Nearly all of these interviews can be described as extremely biased in their narrow selection of content around only one hypothesis. Six cases are briefly described and discussed to clarify the question of content strategy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 39.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Destruktivt grupptänkande: ett dyrbart fenomen!1995In: Örebro-Kuriren, no 23 janArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Fenomenet destruktivt grupptänkande diskuteras utifrån forskning och relevanta samhällsområden såsom beslutsprocesser i organisationer

    Download full text (tiff)
    fulltext_tiff-image
  • 40.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    En amatöristisk utvärderingskonsult försöker utvärdera barnomsorg genom personalinriktade enkäter2011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Critical evaluation of an evaluation of a child day care project only by questionnaires to personnel. Children and parents are not asked about their points of view and experiences.

    Download full text (pdf)
    amatörkonsultdiva.pdf
  • 41.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    En förföljande vårdnads- och umgängesutredning enligt principen om utredning som anklagelseakt mot ena parten2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical examination of a child custody investigation during conflict between a mother and the investigators who behave persecutory. A lot of errors in method and cognitive errors are found.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 42.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    En perspektiv- och problemfokuserande arbetsmodell1985Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A work model for social work (or other kind of work) is presented. It has four fundamental concepts:

    - underlying perspective

    - problem analysis

    - problemadapted way of work

    - outcome analysis

    Six examples from work with youth and their families are given. The model has been tested by social workers with good evaluations. It is considered a critical, consciousness raising and work developing tool.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 43.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Evolutionsteoretiska och kognitiva aspekter på frågan om långsiktig bärkraft i samhällsutvecklingen2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett PM på 9 sidor i vilket diskuteras diskuteras främst evolutionsteoretiskt och kognitivt frågan om långsiktig bärkraft i samhällsutvecklingen. Olika psykologiska faktorers betydelse berörs.

    Download full text (tiff)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 44.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Frigörelsens dimensioner vid tunga psykosociala livsproblem1990Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on 15 reports a model for release from heavy psychosocial life problems is proposed and discussed. A life triangle with three groups of factors is proposed:

    - own will and own decisions (I)

    - social support, that someone cares (YOU)

    - meaningful life contents (work, leisure time) (MY LIFE)

    Conventional social work often is in conflict with this model.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 45.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Förfalskande utredningsmetodik i barnavårdsutredning med misstanke om sexuella övergrepp: Grovt missbruk av psykologi av psykologer2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A child protection investigation and associated papers from psychologists are critically examined. A lot of errors/biases in method and thinking are pointed out. Alternative hypotheses have been ignored and the overall logic is "circular".

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 46.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Förfalskning och utredningsövergrepp i en personalutredning beställd av Göteborgs universitet från Previa: Previa-Rikshälsans "Psykosocial rapport" samt annat material från Göteborgs universitet i ärendet Ä 6/96 vid Statens ansvarsnämnd rörande professor P2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to show how a personnel investigation with gossip, biased selection etc. can be falsified and involve unfair treatment or injustice against an employee. A large amount of errors of investigative method and thinking are shown.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 47.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Har BUP:s utredande ekologisk validitet?: Ett fall med en familj med ett barn med aggressionsutbrott2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigative methods of child psychiatry in a case with a family with a very aggressive  young child are critically examined and a lot of errors and cognitive biases are specified.

    Download full text (pdf)
    AggrdivaBUP.pdf
  • 48.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hur polisen agerat i ett fall, där misstanke om falsk bekännelse uppkommit - utredningsmetodik, tankefel och källkritik.: Eller konsten att mentalt knäcka en sjukpensionär i ett demokratiskt rättssamhälle.2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet är att klargöra polisens förhörsmetodik och reaktionerna hos den drabbade i ett fall, där en sårbar sjukpensionär misstänks ha skrivit under på en falsk bekännelse. Metodfel, tankefel och källkritiska invändningar klargörs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 49.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Intelligensflum och intelligenssnobberi: ett PM2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett kortfattat, kritiskt PM rörande intelligensbegreppet och organisationen Mensa

    Download full text (pdf)
    Intelligensflum.pdf
  • 50.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kort kommentar till en vårdnads-, boende- och umgängesutredning med tydlig kognitiv patologi. Dualistiskt god-ond-tänkande.2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A child custody investigation is critically examined. A number of cognitive biases are found. A duality in thinking is shown.

    Download full text (pdf)
    godond.pdf
1234 1 - 50 of 190
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf