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  • 1.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Sport and its potential as a violent preventive arena2018In: World Congress of Sociology of Sport: ISSA 2018 ABSTRACTS, 2018, p. 48-48Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through an increased knowledge of the causes of violence, violence prevention can be more effective. Such knowledge thus generates profits for society at large. The sports movement is often perceived as a health supporting arena. However, critical researchhas shown the opposite: For example there is a connection between (male athletes’) sexist and homophobic jargon and the inclination to practice violence against other men and women outside the sports environment. The purpose of this ongoing project is to examine how two traditionally male dominated, Swedish sports (ice hockey and football) can be understood as arenas for political socialization. By interviewing sports men and identifying their attitudes to violence (in a wide sense) a more qualified knowledge can be created about the potential of sports as a violent aggravating arena. Is there a homophobic, sexist and in other ways discriminating discourse in these team sports, and, if so, how can we use this knowledge to create a more adequate basis for preventative actions? Theoretically, inspiration is drawn from critical studies on men and masculinities (e.g. works by Connell, Hearn, Messner) and methodologically the study employs a discursive approach inspired by works from Wetherell and Edley. The discussion will focus on the complex constructions of ‘men’ and ‘masculinities’ and the somewhat contradictive links to violence in these constructions.

  • 2.
    Alsarve, Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Emma
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; RF-SISU Örebro län, Sweden.
    A gang of ironworkers with the scent of blood: A participation observation of male dominance and its historical trajectories at Swedish semi-professional ice hockey events2022In: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, ISSN 1012-6902, E-ISSN 1461-7218, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 54-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ice hockey has traditionally been a male-dominated culture that has both promoted and legitimised masculine dominance and gender inequality. The question is, how might ice hockey games, or other male-dominated sports, be organised differently and thus become more gender equal? Our ambition in this article is to initiate a discussion about how the construction of gender in ice hockey events operationalises or opposes the dominance of men and the marginalisation of women. The specific purpose is to identify techniques that configure men/masculinities as dominant in the ice hockey culture. Taking critical studies of men and masculinities as the point of departure, with a specific focus on the situational aspects of gender construction, this case study makes use of participatory observations of eight qualification games in Swedish semi-professional ice hockey. Our results show that men and certain types of masculinity dominate in the events framing the game and how this links the ice hockey players and the club with the local body-worker culture and its industrial, economic and historical context. Identification with these men is ideally created amongst male spectators, given that children and women do not have the same obvious place in the event’s narrative. Some clubs seek to include women and children in their matches, which affects both the atmosphere and the situation. By focusing on the events’ introductions and general narratives, and how they make use of a (masculine) version of the place’s past in the present, we discuss how the ice hockey culture contributes to the current hegemony of men and masculinities.

  • 3.
    Alsarve, Jenny
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Friendship, reciprocity, solidarity: Lone mothers and their relationships with friends2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Alsarve, Jenny
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lone mothers: Work-care dilemmas and strategies2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Alsarve, Jenny
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Boye, Katarina
    Institutet för social forskning (SOFI), Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.
    Roman, Christine
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Realized plans or revised dreams? Swedish parents’ experiences of care, parental leave and paid work after childbirth2019In: New parents in Europe: work-care practices, gender norms and family policies / [ed] Daniela Grunow, Marie Evertsson, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, p. 68-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Alvinzi, André
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Working for a Wage - What´s the Point? Lived Experiences of Meaningfulness and Meaninglessness in Professional and Manual Occupations2022Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores experiences of meaningfulness and meaninglessness in wage labor, and how these work experiences relate to social and organizational factors in work situations (situational meaning). It also explores the centrality and value of wage labor in life in a broader sense (existential meaning). In the research field ‘meaning of work’, previous research is primarily leadership-oriented, psychological and quantitative. Sociological studies have remained scarce, and the concept of meaning tends to be used in confused ways. An explicit philosophically informed sociological perspective of lived experience, action and meaning is lacking. The thesis argues that this can be initiated through theorizing and interviews with a social phenomenological focus. Theoretically and empirically, the thesis contributes with a sociological perspective that integrates social phenomenological and structure-oriented perspectives. Based on 20 interviews with presently employed and recently retired individuals from professional and more manually oriented occupations, the findings suggest that (a) the wage is fundamental for employees’ initial conceptions and experiences of the purposive meanings of working. (b) People are not really themselves at work. Such inauthenticity has consequences for work experiences of meaning. (c) Employees perceive that managers do not understand their work situations and what is realistic to achieve in them. This can become a source of meaninglessness at work. (d) Some experience working life as a whole meaningful for its broader life structuring temporal and practical functions in terms of socializing, routines and habits in everyday life. (e) Working life biographies matter. Previous work experiences from past and current occupations are central for understanding employees’ expectations of- and ways of framing their experiences of meaning in the current job. (f) At work, non-work activities may be experienced as more meaningful than work tasks. (g) Habits and routines from work may generate an embodied form of work centrality. They may become internalized and embodied and spill over to life outside of work; (h) Employees across occupations value disconnecting from work, either at or in life outside work. This may be difficult to achieve because of (g).

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  • 7.
    Amnå, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Stigendal, Mikael
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Samhällsorientering: för en hållbar integration2021Book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Andersen, Jon Aarum
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Managers' Motivation Profiles: Measurement and Application2018In: SAGE Open, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 8, no 2, article id 2158244018771732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To promote leadership research on managers' motivation, a measurement (Andersen Motivation Profile Indicator [AMPI]) has been developed and tested that (a) measures achievement, affiliation, and power motivation; (b) measures the relative strengths of these factors; (c) rests explicitly on the definitions of McClelland; and (d) measures managers' work motivation. The questionnaire has been tested for reliability and validity with responses from 580 managers. The application of the instrument in four studies with responses from 565 managers in other organizations supported McClelland's theoretical claims: (a) managers have motivation profiles, (b) there are differences in motivation profiles between managers across organizational types, (c) there are no significant differences in motivation profiles between female and male managers, and (d) managers who are predominantly power motivated enhance organizational effectiveness. Arguably, the application of the instrument may be an indicator of its quality. The instrument facilitates leadership research on the relationship between managers' motivation profiles and organizational specifics, gender, sociocultural factors, and organizational outcomes.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tänk om man tycker det är gott då?: Elevers perspektiv på alkoholprevention2013In: Samverkande föräldrastöd : nätverk för forskning och utveckling / [ed] Bengt Sandin & Disa Bergnéhr, Linköping: Tema Barn, Linköpings universitet , 2013, p. 19-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Utvärdering av BRIS Internetbaserade stödkontakter2012Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Arnell, Linda
    Department of Social Work and Umeå Centre for Gender Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Narrating family: Talk about a troublesome girlhood within the Swedish context2017In: Nordic girlhoods: new perspectives and outlooks / [ed] Bodil Formark, Heta Mulari, Myry Voipio, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 1, p. 161-178Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter Linda Arnell examines how conceptions and norms regarding families and family patterns influence girls’ lives and the constructions of their subjectivity. Arnell focuses on 18-year-old Amanda’s narrative about her families and her troublesome upbringing. The narrative is understood as a continuous creation in relation to a broader societal narrative that occurs in intra-action with the researcher, and in relation to discursive possibilities and constraints. Through this one narrative the chapter examines how normative ideas about family can be understood as regulatory power structures that are ever-present in a complex and troubled narrative about family, girlhood, and a girl with experience of acting out.

  • 12.
    Arnell, Linda
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Tjejers våld, Våldets tjejer: En diskursanalytisk studie om våld, kön och femininitet2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Arnell, Linda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Vogel, Maria A
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Introducing the Lives of Girls in a European Context and Beyond: Agency, Social Vulnerability and Welfare Measures2021In: Living like a girl: Agency, social vulnerability and welfare measures in Europe and beyond / [ed] Maria A Vogel; Linda Arnell, New York: Berghahn Books, 2021, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Beck, Silke
    et al.
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Esguerra, Alejandra
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Borie, Maud
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Chilvers, Jason
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Görg, Christoph
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Heubach, Katja
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Marquard, Elisabeth
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Nesshöver, Carsten
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Hulme, Mike
    King's College, London, United Kingdom.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Miller, Clark
    Arizona State University,Tempe, USA.
    Nadim, Tahani
    Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, Germany.
    Settele, Josef
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Turnhout, Esther
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Vasileiadou, Eleftheria
    Eindhoven Univesity of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Towards a reflexive turn in the governance of global environmental expertise: The cases of the IPCC and the IPBES2014In: GAIA, ISSN 0940-5550, E-ISSN 2625-5413, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role and design of global expert organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) or the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) needs rethinking. Acknowledging that a one-size-fits-all model does not exist, we suggest a reflexive turn that implies treating the governance of expertise as a matter of political contestation.

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    Towards a reflexive turn
  • 15.
    Bejerot, Eva
    et al.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasselbladh, Hans
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kankkunen Forsberg, Tina
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Classroom heterogeneity in Swedish schools: policies and teachers’ opinion2014In: Velferdsmodeller i endring : Implikasjoner for praktisk profesjonsutøvelse og profesjonsutdanning, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After the reform in 1962 Sweden had an educational system that mixed a certain amount of level grouping and theoretical and practical streams with social coherence in the sense that classes contained pupils opting for different alternatives in those respects. In the first part of the 1990s a series of rapid reforms entirely transformed Swedish education which, amongst other things, abolished all forms of differentiated teaching and different tracks. The new school is an entirely unitary school, underpinned by principles of inclusiveness. As such, the reforms are a remarkable example of reforms committed to ideological (in the wide sense) principles, which is testified by the way they were orchestrated and subsequently evaluated. To this day, there is a consensus within politics, top administration and academia th at any form of differentiation of levels or into tracks is detrimental at it stigmatize andperpetuate class society. The present study presents how the Swedish education was made to a completely unitary system in a series of intervention, ranging from a new grading system to a thoroughly redesigned teacher education. The main empirical contribution is a survey which display how teachers regard the effects of the different forms of heterogeneity at classroom level that often follow suit with a unitary school system. The effects of heterogeneity at the classroom level are a highly charged issue not only in Sweden and extent research is at best ambiguous regarding the effects. Teachers in theoretical subjects from lower and upper secondary schools were included (n=973, response rate 63 percent). The results show that heterogeneity is largest where the pupils are socio-economically disadvantaged. A large share of the teachersr eports that they find it difficult to fulfil the needs of both weak and strong pupils. Heterogeneity also seems to be connected to other aspects of the teachers working conditions, such as influence, tasks that are perceived as illegitimate and emotional strain. These results are finally discussed with reference to the ideological commitments that shaped the advent of these reforms and that still prevail.

  • 16.
    Berg, Monika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pathways to deliberative capacity: the role of the IPCC2018In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 148, no 1-2, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the arguments for expanding deliberation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and scrutinizes their implications for the deliberative capacity of global environmental governance (GEG). An analysis of the IPCC is presented that builds on a systematic literature review and thus a broad set of scientific debates concerning the IPCC. Based on this analysis, two different paths are outlined, one moderate and one radical; these paths ascribe different democratizing functions to the IPCC and rely on different epistemologies. The moderate path emphasizes decision capacity, whereas the radical path strives to create deliberative space and to identify the value inherent in different claims. It is argued that the IPCC cannot accommodate the aspirations of these different pathways in a single assessment. Parallel assessments must be developed in complementary subject areas with different science-policy relations.

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    Pathways to deliberative capacity: the role of the IPCC
  • 17.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting: Swedish media's coverage of wildfires in three continents2019In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 381-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines domestic media’s coverage of foreign wildfires from a climate change perspective. It explores Swedish newspapers’ coverage of wildfires in Australia, the Mediterranean region and the USA during a three-year period (February 2013–March 2016), focusing on how and to what extent climate change is viewed as an underlying cause. A central result is that climate change is mentioned far more often in the case of Australian wildfires than of fires in the other two regions. Another finding is that the climate change issue became more prominent after a severe domestic wildfire in 2014. These observations are also examined qualitatively through a combined frame and discourse study where the importance of foreign news values, the use of foreign sources, cultural proximity/distance, and domestication procedures are analyzed. In conclusion, foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting in relation to extreme events are further discussed.

  • 18.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Arnell, Linda
    Umeå University.
    Being a Responsible Violent Girl? Exploring Female Violence, Self-management and ADHD2018In: Girlhood Studies, ISSN 1938-8209, E-ISSN 1938-8322, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 111-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore how young women in Sweden negotiate their gendered subject positions in relation to psychiatric diagnoses, particularly Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and the meanings of their own violent acts. The data consists of transcripts of face-to-face interviews with young women who have experienced using aggressive and violent acts. Given that the analysis is informed by ideas developed in discursive psychology, we identified the centrality of the concepts of responsibility and self-management. In this study responsibility is connected to gendered notions of passivity and activity. What we call the ordinary girl is neither too active nor too passive, and the extraordinary girl is either too active or too passive in the managing of herself. Similar to those of a troublesome past, the narratives of ADHD enable the understanding of an intelligible violent self, and therefore make female externalized violence what we describe as narrative-able.

  • 19.
    Boström, Magnus
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    A Missing Pillar? Challenges in theorizing and practicing social sustainability: introductory article in the special issue2012In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since publication of the Brundtland Report in 1987, the notion of sustainable developmenthas come to guide the pursuit of environmental reform by both public and private organizations and to facilitate communication among actors from different societal spheres. It is customary to characterize sustainable development in a familiar typology comprising three pillars: environmental, economic, and socialThe relationships among these dimensions are generally assumed to be compatible and mutually supportive. However, previous research has found that when policy makers endorse sustainable development, the social dimension garners less attention and is particularly difficult to realize and operationalize. Recent years though have seen notable efforts among standard setters, planners, and practitioners in various sectors to address the often neglected social aspects of sustainability. Likewise, during the past decade, there have been efforts to develop theoretical frameworks to define and study social sustainability and to empirically investigate it in relation to “sustainability projects,” “sustainability practice,” and “sustainability initiatives.” This introductory article presents the topic and explains some of the challenges of incorporating social sustainability into a broad framework of sustainable development. Also considered is the potential of the social sustainability concept for sustainability projects and planning. This analysis is predicated on the work represented in this special issue and on related initiatives that explicitly discuss the social pillar of sustainable development and its relationship to the other dimensions.

  • 20.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Between Monitoring and Trust: Commitment to Extended Upstream Responsibility2015In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 239-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the current trend toward sustainability and CSR, organizations are pressured to assume extended responsibility. However, taking such a responsibility requires serious and challenging efforts as it appears to involve a wider range of issues and increased need for close interaction between actors along commodity chains. Using a qualitative case study approach, the present article focuses on Swedish public and private procurement organizations with attention paid to textiles and chemical risks. It focuses on two crucial aspects of buyers’ relationships with suppliers in their efforts to advance environmental responsibility-taking—monitoring and trust—as well as how they intersect. The aim is to demonstrate, both theoretically and empirically, the limits and possibilities of monitoring and trust for developing extended upstream responsibility. The article demonstrates the problems with, on one hand, simple ritualistic monitoring and, on the other, simple trust, and explores potentially constructive pathways to extended upstream responsibility at the intersection of monitoring and trust. In connection with the findings, the article argues that theories on responsible and sustainable supply chain management must also take the enormous variety of organizations into account: not only large, private, transnational companies, which the literature has until now been preoccupied with.

  • 21.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Framtiden närmar sig2022In: En mänsklig natur: Risker, reglering och representationer / [ed] Rolf Lidskog; Erik Löfmarck, Örebro universitet, sociologiämnet , 2022, p. 105-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lifestyle transformation and reduced consumption: a transformative learning process2022In: sozialpolitik.ch, E-ISSN 2297-8224, no 1, article id Article 1.2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overconsumption habits and structures have a huge environmental impact. The ar-ticle uses a qualitative interview study of environmentally conscious Swedish citizens undertaking a lifestyle transformation process to reduce their overall consumption in the context of mass consumption society. The purpose is to emphasise the importance of a transformative learning perspective to understand pathways and challenges for transforming towards less consumerist lifestyles. The study demonstrates five mutually bolstering aspects of learning experiences in this lifestyle transformation process: 1) factual and theoretical learning; 2) practical, corporal and tacit learning; 3) personal and emotional learning; 4) social relational learning; and 5) critical learning. It stresses the importance of a social dimension including the interplay of macro, meso and micro levels.

  • 23.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Rejecting and embracing brands in political consumerism2019In: The Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism / [ed] Magnus Boström, Michele Micheletti, Peter Oosterveer, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 205-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Review of: David Hess. Good Green Jobs in a Global Economy: Making and Keeping New Industries in the United States2014In: American Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0002-9602, E-ISSN 1537-5390, Vol. 119, no 6, p. 1809-1811Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Social relations and challenges to consuming less in a mass consumption society2021In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 383-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing numbers of people in welfare societies express worries about their ecological footprint. Some make efforts to significantly reduce their consumption. Because people have been socialized into a society of mass/excess consumption, there are great challenges. How can someone learn to downsize when society incessantly compels her to continue with mass consumption habits? This article demonstrates, theoretically and empirically, how social relations, within a societal context of mass consumption, shape the conditions for transforming lifestyles to reduce consumption. It contributes to sociology as well as a growing interdisciplinary literature on reduced consumption by focusing specifically on challenges related to social relations. The study uses a qualitative approach and an interview study of 24 people in Sweden making significant efforts to reduce their consumption. Findings – both perceived challenges and creative ways of coping with them – are related to four analytical themes: (1) the intersection of everyday rituals and consumption; (2) the norms and normality of mass consumption; (3) social comparison and status consumption; and (4) social and community support for reducing consumption.

  • 26.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sustainable development by the multi-stakeholder model?2014In: International Handbook on Social Policy and the Environment / [ed] Tony Fitzpatrick, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 349-375Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Boström, Magnus
    Environmental Science, Södertörn University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The problematic social dimension of sustainable development: the case of the Forest Stewardship Council2012In: International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, ISSN 1350-4509, E-ISSN 1745-2627, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is broad support worldwide for the concept of sustainable development and the integration of its three pillars: economicdevelopment, environmental protection and social development. Nevertheless, previous research shows substantial difficul-ties associated with fully incorporating and operationalising social sustainability features in various sectors. The presentarticle aims to explore further the reasons why incorporation of social sustainability aspects appears to pose a challenge.The article has a twofold explorative aim. First, the aim is to identify opportunities/benefits or difficulties/detriments thatemerge when actors try to incorporate social aspects into sustainability projects. Second, the article probes for explanationsfor the observed challenges. This is done by referring to a case study examining how the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)has attempted to incorporate social sustainability goals, principles and criteria. Using qualitative interviews, FSC-relateddocuments, participant observation, as well as previous research, the article examines the successes and challenges asso-ciated with including social sustainability features in the standards and certification process. Observed achievements anddifficulties are highlighted in relation to four general aspects: (1) improvement of substantive social sustainability goals; (2)local organisation, empowerment and employment; (3) communication; and (4) small-scale and community-based forestry.The article suggests and analyses eight reasons for these challenges, which relate to discursive, structural or organisationalaspects. The findings presented here may also be useful in attempts to understand other similar integrative transnationaland/or local sustainability projects

  • 28.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Social Life of Unsustainable Mass Consumption2023Book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Börjeson, Natasja
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Gilek, Michael
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Media and Communication Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Responsible procurement and complex product chains: the case of chemical risks in textiles2012In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to gain insights about the opportunities andchallenges that private and public organisations face regarding the developmentof responsible procurement in a complex and uncertain issue. The paper focuseson chemicals in textiles, and uses a qualitative methodology with semi-structuredinterviews. Key elements of a pro-active, responsible procurement strategy aredefined, including criteria such as using a preventive, systematic, responsive,integrative and reflective approach. The analysis includes the following topics: (1)priorities and knowledge; (2) communicative strategies; (3) policy instruments; (4)monitoring and trust in relation to suppliers. The results show a fairly modestlevel of organisational responsibility, although it is possible to observe an initialpositive development.

  • 30.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Casula Vifell, Åsa
    Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Department of Sociology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Soneryd, Linda
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Score, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Score, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Social sustainability requires social sustainability procedural prerequisites for reaching substantive goals2015In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 131-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synergies and trade-offs between the various dimensions of sustainable development are attracting a rising scholarly attention. Departing from the scholarly debate, this article focuses on internal relationships within social sustainability. Our key claim is that it is diffi cult to strengthen substantive social sustainability goals unless there are key elements of social sustainability contained in the very procedures intended to work toward sustainability. Our analysis, informed by an organizing perspective, is based on a set of case studies on multi-stakeholder transnational sustainability projects (sustainability standards). This article explores six challenges related to the achievement of such procedures that can facilitate substantive social sustainability. Three of these concern the formulation of standards and policies, and three the implementation of standards and policies. To achieve substantive social sustainability procedures must be set in motion with abilities to take hold of people's concerns, frames, resources, as well as existing relevant institutions and infrastructures.

  • 31.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Davidson, Debra J.University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada.
    Environment and Society: Concepts and Challenges2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Davidson, Debra J.
    University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada.
    Introduction: Conceptualizing environment-society relations2018In: Environment and Society: Concepts and Challenges / [ed] Magnus Boström and Debra J. Davidson, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Davidson, Debra J.
    University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, Canada.
    Lockie, Stewart
    James Cook University, Douglas QLD, Australia.
    Conclusions: A proposal for a brave new world of conceptual reflexivity?2018In: Environment and Society: Concepts and Challenges / [ed] Magnus Boström and Debra J. Davidson, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 351-373Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gilek, Michael
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology, and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hedenström, Eva
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology, and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    School of Culture and Education, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    How to achieve sustainable procurement for ‘peripheral’ products with significant environmental impact?2015In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from previous theoretical and empirical studies on sustainable supply-chain management, we investigate organizational commitment (drivers and motivations) and capabilities (resources, structures, and policy instruments) in sustainable procurement of “noncore” products. By focusing on chemicals in textiles, the article explores the activities of differently sized organizations and discusses the potentials and limitations of sustainable procurement measures. The study is based on a qualitative and comparative approach, with empirical findings from 26 case studies of Swedish public and private procurement organizations. These organizations operate in the sectors of hotels/ conference venues, transport, cinema, interior design, and hospitals/daycare. While this work demonstrates major challenges for buyers to take into account peripheral items in sustainable procurement, it also identifies constructive measures for moving forward. A general sustainability/environmental focus can, as an effect, spill over to areas perceived as peripheral.

  • 35.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    School of Culture and Education, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lockie, Stewart
    The Cairns Institute, James Cook University, Douglas QLD, Australia.
    Mol, Arthur
    Environmental Policy Group Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Oosterveer, Peter
    Environmental Policy Group Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Sustainable and responsible supply chain governance: challenges and opportunities2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 107, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the Special Volume on sustainable and responsible supply chain governance. As globalized supply chains cross multiple regulatory borders, the firms involved in these chains come under increasing pressure from consumers, NGOs and governments to accept responsibility for social and environmental matters beyond their immediate organizational boundaries. Governance arrangements for global supply chains are therefore increasingly faced with sustainability requirements of production and consumption. Our primary objectives for this introductory paper are to explore the governance challenges that globalized supply chains and networks face in becoming sustainable and responsible, and thence to identify opportunities for promoting sustainable and responsible governance. In doing so, we draw on 16 articles published in this Special Volume of the Journal of Cleaner Production as well as upon the broader sustainable supply chain governance literature. We argue that the border-crossing nature of global supply chains comes with six major challenges (or gaps) in sustainability governance and that firms and others attempt to address these using a range of tools including eco-labels, codes of conduct, auditing procedures, product information systems, procurement guidelines, and eco-branding. However, these tools are not sufficient, by themselves, to bridge the geographical, informational, communication, compliance, power and legitimacy gaps that challenge sustainable global chains. What else is required? The articles in this Special Volume suggest that coalition and institution building on a broader scale is essential through, for example, the development of inclusive multi-stakeholder coalitions; flexibility to adapt global governance arrangements to local social and ecological contexts of production and consumption; supplementing effective monitoring and enforcement mechanisms with education and other programs to build compliance capacity; and integration of reflexive learning to improve governance arrangements over time.

  • 36.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Can we rely on ‘climate friendly’ consumption?2019In: Journal of Consumer Culture, ISSN 1469-5405, E-ISSN 1741-2900, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 359-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In policy and research on sustainable consumption in general, and climate-oriented consumption specifically, key questions centre around whether people are motivated and prompted to support such consumption. A common claim in the scholarly debate is that policy makers, in face of fundamental governance challenges, refrain from taking responsibility and instead invest unrealistic hopes in that consumers will solve pressing environmental problems through consumer choice. Although green consumption is challenging, specifically climate-friendly consumption is even more so, due to the particularly encompassing, complex and abstract sets of problems and since climate impact concerns the totality of one’s consumption. Nevertheless, consumers are called to participate in the task to save the planet. This article draws on existing literature on climate-oriented consumption with the aim of contributing to a proper understanding of the relation between consumer action and climate mitigation. It provides a synthesis and presents key constraining mechanisms sorted under five themes: the value-action gap, individualisation of responsibility, knowledge gap, ethical fetishism and the rebound effect. This article concludes with a discussion of perspectives that endorse a socially embedded view of the citizen-consumer. The discussion indicates pathways for how to counteract the constraining mechanisms and open up room for climate-friendly citizen-consumers.

  • 37.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eco-standards, product labelling and green consumerism2008Book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mass Consumption and Political Consumerism2019In: The Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism / [ed] Magnus Boström, Michele Micheletti, Peter Oosterveer, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 855-875Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Micheletti, Michel
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Oosterveer, Peter
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
    Political consumerism: Research challenges and future directions2019In: The Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism / [ed] Magnus Boström, Michele Micheletti, Peter Oosterveer, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 879-898Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Micheletti, Michel
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Oosterveer, Peter
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
    Studying political consumerism2019In: The Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism / [ed] Magnus Boström, Michele Micheletti, Peter Oosterveer, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019, p. 1-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Micheletti, MichelStockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.Oosterveer, PeterWageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
    The Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Rabe, Linn
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Rodela, Romina
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Environmental non-governmental organizations and transnational collaboration: The Baltic Sea and Adriatic-Ionian Sea regions2015In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 762-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies of environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGO) have primarily taken place within a nation-state perspective without considering multiple levels of politics and governance. Because environmental problems are usually cross-border phenomena, environmental movements must develop transnational features to play constructive roles in politics and governance. This study contributes to the theorizing and study of transnationalization of ENGOs by illuminating the different regional conditions for this process. The conditions for ENGOs to develop transnational collaboration are explored by comparing ENGOs from six countries in two macro-regions: Sweden, Germany, and Poland in the Baltic Sea region, and Italy, Slovenia, and Croatia in the Adriatic-Ionian Sea region. Grounded in the literatures on social movement theory and ENGO transnationalization, the study identifies how different national, macro-regional, and European institutional structures shape the conditions under which ENGOs develop cross-border collaborations, and demonstrate the importance of long-term and dynamic interplay between processes that occur at the domestic and transnational levels.

  • 43.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Römmelmann, Helena
    School of Humanities, Education, and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandström, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Could practices of reduced consumption during the Covid-19 pandemic facilitate transformative change for sustainability? Experiences from Sweden and Ireland2022In: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic implied a disruption of several consumer practices, which offers an opportunity to explore experiences and possibilities to switch toward more sustainable lifestyles with reduced consumption. This article asks if there is long-term transformative potential toward more sustainable and climate friendly consumption practices embedded in these new experiences. By the use of qualitative interviews, the article explores learning experiences gained by “mainstream” consumers in Sweden and Ireland. A theoretical framework consisting of five themes, also related to previous COVID-19 research, guide the analysis of empirical findings: 1) desired objects; 2) confirmation of social relations by non- or alternative consumption; 3) temporal and spatial aspects; 4) de-normalization of mass consumption; 5) new competences and social support. Findings suggest that the long-term lifestyle transformation possibilities are not vast, but neither are they insignificant. Various positive experiences, with implications for reduced/alternative consumption, can be stored in collective memories even if several consumer practices bounce back to “normal” after the pandemic. Based on the findings, the long-term transformative potential is discussed through the lenses of transformative learning, reflectivity, and adaptative abilities. The study contributes to the literature on sustainable and reduced consumption, including literature on degrowth, suciency, and downsizing.

  • 44.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hansson, Viktor
    Örebro University. Örebro universitet Holding AB .
    Environmental representatives: whom, what, and how are they representing?2018In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 114-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature on environment and representation in politics, management, and deliberation has paid little attention on the people involved: environmental representatives. The aim of this paper is to illuminate how environmental representatives in various organizational and professional contexts understand their role as representatives, and how they are shaped by their contexts. The paper argues that it is crucial to learn about the everyday reality of individual representatives to better understand the limitations and possibilities they face. The study is based on 19 interviews with environmental representatives from five organizational and professional contexts: the state, civil society, business, science, and media in Sweden. The paper concludes that some differences in experiences, for example, in freedom and constraint, can be understood in relation to the representatives’organizational and professional affiliation. Other experiences are common: (i) all categories stated the importance of being impartial and well read; (ii) complex layers of affiliation imply that representation requires sensitivity and adjustment between different situations; and (iii) the performative aspects of representation include the representatives’claims-making, others’attributions, and long-term learning of their role. The article contributes an understanding of organizational conditions and the often paradoxical, layered, multifaceted, and cautious representation these individual actors perform.

  • 45.
    Boye, Katarina
    Institutet för social forskning (SOFI), Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How children impact on parent’s division of labour: a longitudinal study of changes in housework following the birth of a childManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Boye, Katarina
    Institutet för social forskning (SOFI), Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Relatively different?: how do gender differences in well-being depend on paid and unpaid work in Europe?2009In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 509-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Absolute as well as relative hours of paid and unpaid work may influence well-being. This study investigates whether absolute hours spent on paid work and housework account for the lower well-being among women as compared to men in Europe, and whether the associations between well-being and hours of paid work and housework differ by gender attitudes and social context. Attitudes towards women's and men's paid work and housework obligations may influence how beneficial or detrimental it is to spend time on these activities, as may social comparison of one's own hours to the number of hours commonly spent among similar others. A group of 13,425 women and men from 25 European countries are analysed using country fixed-effects models. The results suggest that while men's well-being appears to be unaffected by hours of paid work and housework, women's well-being increases with increased paid working hours and decreases with increasing housework hours. Gender differences in time spent on paid work and housework account for a third of the European gender difference in well-being and are thus one reason that women have lower well-being than men have. Gender attitudes do not appear to modify the associations between hours and well-being, but there is a tendency for women's well-being to be higher the less housework they do compared to other women in the same family situation and country. However, absolute hours of paid work and housework appear to be more important to women's well-being than relative hours.

  • 47.
    Dahl, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Self-Selection or Socialization?: The Longitudinal Relation Between Civic Engagement and Political Orientations Among Adolescents2017In: Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, ISSN 0899-7640, E-ISSN 1552-7395, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1250-1269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social capital theory states that civic engagement generates positive outcomes, such as social trust and political interest. Likewise, studies show that those involved in civic engagement generally report higher levels of social trust and political interest. It is still unclear, however, whether these differences are the result of socialization or selection. We used between-effects and fixed-effects regressions to examine the development of political orientations in a three-wave longitudinal sample of 1,050 adolescents. From our results, volunteering seemed to have no socialization effect whatsoever on political interest and potentially a weak enhancing effect on social trust. Associational membership did not predict social trust over time, but it seemed to socialize members into increased political interest over time. The results are discussed in light of the social capital debate about how civic engagemend in associational life and volunteering do - or do not - function as schools of democracy.

  • 48.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ekström, Mats
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan Ch
    Karlstads University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Jacobsen, Liselott
    Karlstads University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Explaining Society: Critical Realism in Social Sciences2015Book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Darwish, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Moomin Memes and Cuteness in Ecofascist Propaganda2021In: Aww-Struck: Poetic and Critical Responses to the Theme of Cuteness / [ed] Isabel Galleymoore; Caroline Harris; Astra Papachristodoulou, Poem Atlas , 2021Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    How does cuteness, positive affect and ecofascism convene? This paper shows how cute, loving and positive imaginaries work to propagate, mainstream and legitimise fascism. 

  • 50.
    de Boise, Sam
    Department of Sociology, University of York, York, UK.
    Patriarchy and the Crisis of Masculinity2013In: New Left ProjectArticle in journal (Other academic)
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