oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 132
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tänk om man tycker det är gott då?: Elevers perspektiv på alkoholprevention2013In: Samverkande föräldrastöd : nätverk för forskning och utveckling / [ed] Bengt Sandin & Disa Bergnéhr, Linköping: Tema Barn, Linköpings universitet , 2013, p. 19-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Utvärdering av BRIS Internetbaserade stödkontakter2012Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Beck, Silke
    et al.
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Esguerra, Alejandra
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Borie, Maud
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Chilvers, Jason
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Görg, Christoph
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Heubach, Katja
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Marquard, Elisabeth
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Nesshöver, Carsten
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Hulme, Mike
    King's College, London, United Kingdom.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Miller, Clark
    Arizona State University,Tempe, USA.
    Nadim, Tahani
    Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, Germany.
    Settele, Josef
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Turnhout, Esther
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Vasileiadou, Eleftheria
    Eindhoven Univesity of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Towards a reflexive turn in the governance of global environmental expertise: The cases of the IPCC and the IPBES2014In: GAIA, ISSN 0940-5550, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role and design of global expert organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) or the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) needs rethinking. Acknowledging that a one-size-fits-all model does not exist, we suggest a reflexive turn that implies treating the governance of expertise as a matter of political contestation.

  • 4.
    Bejerot, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hasselbladh, Hans
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kankkunen Forsberg, Tina
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Classroom heterogeneity in Swedish schools: policies and teachers’ opinion2014In: Velferdsmodeller i endring : Implikasjoner for praktisk profesjonsutøvelse og profesjonsutdanning, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After the reform in 1962 Sweden had an educational system that mixed a certain amount of level grouping and theoretical and practical streams with social coherence in the sense that classes contained pupils opting for different alternatives in those respects. In the first part of the 1990s a series of rapid reforms entirely transformed Swedish education which, amongst other things, abolished all forms of differentiated teaching and different tracks. The new school is an entirely unitary school, underpinned by principles of inclusiveness. As such, the reforms are a remarkable example of reforms committed to ideological (in the wide sense) principles, which is testified by the way they were orchestrated and subsequently evaluated. To this day, there is a consensus within politics, top administration and academia th at any form of differentiation of levels or into tracks is detrimental at it stigmatize andperpetuate class society. The present study presents how the Swedish education was made to a completely unitary system in a series of intervention, ranging from a new grading system to a thoroughly redesigned teacher education. The main empirical contribution is a survey which display how teachers regard the effects of the different forms of heterogeneity at classroom level that often follow suit with a unitary school system. The effects of heterogeneity at the classroom level are a highly charged issue not only in Sweden and extent research is at best ambiguous regarding the effects. Teachers in theoretical subjects from lower and upper secondary schools were included (n=973, response rate 63 percent). The results show that heterogeneity is largest where the pupils are socio-economically disadvantaged. A large share of the teachersr eports that they find it difficult to fulfil the needs of both weak and strong pupils. Heterogeneity also seems to be connected to other aspects of the teachers working conditions, such as influence, tasks that are perceived as illegitimate and emotional strain. These results are finally discussed with reference to the ideological commitments that shaped the advent of these reforms and that still prevail.

  • 5.
    Berglez, Peter
    et al.
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting: Swedish media's coverage of wildfires in three continents2017In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines domestic media’s coverage of foreign wildfires from a climate change perspective. It explores Swedish newspapers’ coverage of wildfires in Australia, the Mediterranean region and the USA during a three-year period (February 2013–March 2016), focusing on how and to what extent climate change is viewed as an underlying cause. A central result is that climate change is mentioned far more often in the case of Australian wildfires than of fires in the other two regions. Another finding is that the climate change issue became more prominent after a severe domestic wildfire in 2014. These observations are also examined qualitatively through a combined frame and discourse study where the importance of foreign news values, the use of foreign sources, cultural proximity/distance, and domestication procedures are analyzed. In conclusion, foreign, domestic, and cultural factors in climate change reporting in relation to extreme events are further discussed.

  • 6.
    Boström, Magnus
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    A Missing Pillar? Challenges in theorizing and practicing social sustainability: introductory article in the special issue2012In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, ISSN 1548-7733, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since publication of the Brundtland Report in 1987, the notion of sustainable developmenthas come to guide the pursuit of environmental reform by both public and private organizations and to facilitate communication among actors from different societal spheres. It is customary to characterize sustainable development in a familiar typology comprising three pillars: environmental, economic, and socialThe relationships among these dimensions are generally assumed to be compatible and mutually supportive. However, previous research has found that when policy makers endorse sustainable development, the social dimension garners less attention and is particularly difficult to realize and operationalize. Recent years though have seen notable efforts among standard setters, planners, and practitioners in various sectors to address the often neglected social aspects of sustainability. Likewise, during the past decade, there have been efforts to develop theoretical frameworks to define and study social sustainability and to empirically investigate it in relation to “sustainability projects,” “sustainability practice,” and “sustainability initiatives.” This introductory article presents the topic and explains some of the challenges of incorporating social sustainability into a broad framework of sustainable development. Also considered is the potential of the social sustainability concept for sustainability projects and planning. This analysis is predicated on the work represented in this special issue and on related initiatives that explicitly discuss the social pillar of sustainable development and its relationship to the other dimensions.

  • 7.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Between Monitoring and Trust: Commitment to Extended Upstream Responsibility2015In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 239-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with the current trend toward sustainability and CSR, organizations are pressured to assume extended responsibility. However, taking such a responsibility requires serious and challenging efforts as it appears to involve a wider range of issues and increased need for close interaction between actors along commodity chains. Using a qualitative case study approach, the present article focuses on Swedish public and private procurement organizations with attention paid to textiles and chemical risks. It focuses on two crucial aspects of buyers’ relationships with suppliers in their efforts to advance environmental responsibility-taking—monitoring and trust—as well as how they intersect. The aim is to demonstrate, both theoretically and empirically, the limits and possibilities of monitoring and trust for developing extended upstream responsibility. The article demonstrates the problems with, on one hand, simple ritualistic monitoring and, on the other, simple trust, and explores potentially constructive pathways to extended upstream responsibility at the intersection of monitoring and trust. In connection with the findings, the article argues that theories on responsible and sustainable supply chain management must also take the enormous variety of organizations into account: not only large, private, transnational companies, which the literature has until now been preoccupied with.

  • 8.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Review of: David Hess. Good Green Jobs in a Global Economy: Making and Keeping New Industries in the United States2014In: American Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0002-9602, E-ISSN 1537-5390, Vol. 119, no 6, p. 1809-1811Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Boström, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sustainable development by the multi-stakeholder model?2014In: International Handbook on Social Policy and the Environment / [ed] Tony Fitzpatrick, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 349-375Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Boström, Magnus
    Environmental Science, Södertörn University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The problematic social dimension of sustainable development: the case of the Forest Stewardship Council2012In: International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, ISSN 1350-4509, E-ISSN 1745-2627, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is broad support worldwide for the concept of sustainable development and the integration of its three pillars: economicdevelopment, environmental protection and social development. Nevertheless, previous research shows substantial difficul-ties associated with fully incorporating and operationalising social sustainability features in various sectors. The presentarticle aims to explore further the reasons why incorporation of social sustainability aspects appears to pose a challenge.The article has a twofold explorative aim. First, the aim is to identify opportunities/benefits or difficulties/detriments thatemerge when actors try to incorporate social aspects into sustainability projects. Second, the article probes for explanationsfor the observed challenges. This is done by referring to a case study examining how the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)has attempted to incorporate social sustainability goals, principles and criteria. Using qualitative interviews, FSC-relateddocuments, participant observation, as well as previous research, the article examines the successes and challenges asso-ciated with including social sustainability features in the standards and certification process. Observed achievements anddifficulties are highlighted in relation to four general aspects: (1) improvement of substantive social sustainability goals; (2)local organisation, empowerment and employment; (3) communication; and (4) small-scale and community-based forestry.The article suggests and analyses eight reasons for these challenges, which relate to discursive, structural or organisationalaspects. The findings presented here may also be useful in attempts to understand other similar integrative transnationaland/or local sustainability projects

  • 11.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Börjeson, Natasja
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Gilek, Michael
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    Media and Communication Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Department of Life Sciences, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden;.
    Responsible procurement and complex product chains: the case of chemical risks in textiles2012In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study is to gain insights about the opportunities andchallenges that private and public organisations face regarding the developmentof responsible procurement in a complex and uncertain issue. The paper focuseson chemicals in textiles, and uses a qualitative methodology with semi-structuredinterviews. Key elements of a pro-active, responsible procurement strategy aredefined, including criteria such as using a preventive, systematic, responsive,integrative and reflective approach. The analysis includes the following topics: (1)priorities and knowledge; (2) communicative strategies; (3) policy instruments; (4)monitoring and trust in relation to suppliers. The results show a fairly modestlevel of organisational responsibility, although it is possible to observe an initialpositive development.

  • 12.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Casula Vifell, Åsa
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Department of Sociology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Soneryd, Linda
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Score, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Score, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Social sustainability requires social sustainability procedural prerequisites for reaching substantive goals2015In: Nature and Culture, ISSN 1558-6073, E-ISSN 1558-5468, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 131-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synergies and trade-offs between the various dimensions of sustainable development are attracting a rising scholarly attention. Departing from the scholarly debate, this article focuses on internal relationships within social sustainability. Our key claim is that it is diffi cult to strengthen substantive social sustainability goals unless there are key elements of social sustainability contained in the very procedures intended to work toward sustainability. Our analysis, informed by an organizing perspective, is based on a set of case studies on multi-stakeholder transnational sustainability projects (sustainability standards). This article explores six challenges related to the achievement of such procedures that can facilitate substantive social sustainability. Three of these concern the formulation of standards and policies, and three the implementation of standards and policies. To achieve substantive social sustainability procedures must be set in motion with abilities to take hold of people's concerns, frames, resources, as well as existing relevant institutions and infrastructures.

  • 13.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gilek, Michael
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology, and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hedenström, Eva
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology, and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    School of Culture and Education, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    How to achieve sustainable procurement for ‘peripheral’ products with significant environmental impact?2015In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, ISSN 1548-7733, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Departing from previous theoretical and empirical studies on sustainable supply-chain management, we investigate organizational commitment (drivers and motivations) and capabilities (resources, structures, and policy instruments) in sustainable procurement of “noncore” products. By focusing on chemicals in textiles, the article explores the activities of differently sized organizations and discusses the potentials and limitations of sustainable procurement measures. The study is based on a qualitative and comparative approach, with empirical findings from 26 case studies of Swedish public and private procurement organizations. These organizations operate in the sectors of hotels/ conference venues, transport, cinema, interior design, and hospitals/daycare. While this work demonstrates major challenges for buyers to take into account peripheral items in sustainable procurement, it also identifies constructive measures for moving forward. A general sustainability/environmental focus can, as an effect, spill over to areas perceived as peripheral.

  • 14.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Jönsson, Anna Maria
    School of Culture and Education, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lockie, Stewart
    The Cairns Institute James Cook University, Australia.
    Mol, Arthur
    Environmental Policy Group Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Oosterveer, Peter
    Environmental Policy Group Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Sustainable and responsible supply chain governance: challenges and opportunities2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 107, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the Special Volume on sustainable and responsible supply chain governance. As globalized supply chains cross multiple regulatory borders, the firms involved in these chains come under increasing pressure from consumers, NGOs and governments to accept responsibility for social and environmental matters beyond their immediate organizational boundaries. Governance arrangements for global supply chains are therefore increasingly faced with sustainability requirements of production and consumption. Our primary objectives for this introductory paper are to explore the governance challenges that globalized supply chains and networks face in becoming sustainable and responsible, and thence to identify opportunities for promoting sustainable and responsible governance. In doing so, we draw on 16 articles published in this Special Volume of the Journal of Cleaner Production as well as upon the broader sustainable supply chain governance literature. We argue that the border-crossing nature of global supply chains comes with six major challenges (or gaps) in sustainability governance and that firms and others attempt to address these using a range of tools including eco-labels, codes of conduct, auditing procedures, product information systems, procurement guidelines, and eco-branding. However, these tools are not sufficient, by themselves, to bridge the geographical, informational, communication, compliance, power and legitimacy gaps that challenge sustainable global chains. What else is required? The articles in this Special Volume suggest that coalition and institution building on a broader scale is essential through, for example, the development of inclusive multi-stakeholder coalitions; flexibility to adapt global governance arrangements to local social and ecological contexts of production and consumption; supplementing effective monitoring and enforcement mechanisms with education and other programs to build compliance capacity; and integration of reflexive learning to improve governance arrangements over time.

  • 15.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Can we rely on ‘climate friendly’ consumption?2017In: Journal of Consumer Culture, ISSN 1469-5405, E-ISSN 1741-2900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In policy and research on sustainable consumption in general, and climate-oriented consumption specifically, key questions centre around whether people are motivated and prompted to support such consumption. A common claim in the scholarly debate is that policy makers, in face of fundamental governance challenges, refrain from taking responsibility and instead invest unrealistic hopes in that consumers will solve pressing environmental problems through consumer choice. Although green consumption is challenging, specifically climate-friendly consumption is even more so, due to the particularly encompassing, complex and abstract sets of problems and since climate impact concerns the totality of one’s consumption. Nevertheless, consumers are called to participate in the task to save the planet. This article draws on existing literature on climate-oriented consumption with the aim of contributing to a proper understanding of the relation between consumer action and climate mitigation. It provides a synthesis and presents key constraining mechanisms sorted under five themes: the value-action gap, individualisation of responsibility, knowledge gap, ethical fetishism and the rebound effect. This article concludes with a discussion of perspectives that endorse a socially embedded view of the citizen-consumer. The discussion indicates pathways for how to counteract the constraining mechanisms and open up room for climate-friendly citizen-consumers.

  • 16.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Södertörn University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Klintman, Mikael
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eco-standards, product labelling and green consumerism2008Book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Rabe, Linn
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Rodela, Romina
    School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Environmental non-governmental organizations and transnational collaboration: The Baltic Sea and Adriatic-Ionian Sea regions2015In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 762-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies of environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGO) have primarily taken place within a nation-state perspective without considering multiple levels of politics and governance. Because environmental problems are usually cross-border phenomena, environmental movements must develop transnational features to play constructive roles in politics and governance. This study contributes to the theorizing and study of transnationalization of ENGOs by illuminating the different regional conditions for this process. The conditions for ENGOs to develop transnational collaboration are explored by comparing ENGOs from six countries in two macro-regions: Sweden, Germany, and Poland in the Baltic Sea region, and Italy, Slovenia, and Croatia in the Adriatic-Ionian Sea region. Grounded in the literatures on social movement theory and ENGO transnationalization, the study identifies how different national, macro-regional, and European institutional structures shape the conditions under which ENGOs develop cross-border collaborations, and demonstrate the importance of long-term and dynamic interplay between processes that occur at the domestic and transnational levels.

  • 18.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hansson, Viktor
    Örebro University. Örebro universitet Holding AB .
    Environmental representatives: whom, what, and how are they representing?2018In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 114-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature on environment and representation in politics, management, and deliberation has paid little attention on the people involved: environmental representatives. The aim of this paper is to illuminate how environmental representatives in various organizational and professional contexts understand their role as representatives, and how they are shaped by their contexts. The paper argues that it is crucial to learn about the everyday reality of individual representatives to better understand the limitations and possibilities they face. The study is based on 19 interviews with environmental representatives from five organizational and professional contexts: the state, civil society, business, science, and media in Sweden. The paper concludes that some differences in experiences, for example, in freedom and constraint, can be understood in relation to the representatives’organizational and professional affiliation. Other experiences are common: (i) all categories stated the importance of being impartial and well read; (ii) complex layers of affiliation imply that representation requires sensitivity and adjustment between different situations; and (iii) the performative aspects of representation include the representatives’claims-making, others’attributions, and long-term learning of their role. The article contributes an understanding of organizational conditions and the often paradoxical, layered, multifaceted, and cautious representation these individual actors perform.

  • 19.
    Boye, Katarina
    Institutet för social forskning (SOFI), Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How children impact on parent’s division of labour: a longitudinal study of changes in housework following the birth of a childManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Boye, Katarina
    Institutet för social forskning (SOFI), Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Relatively different?: how do gender differences in well-being depend on paid and unpaid work in Europe?2009In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 509-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Absolute as well as relative hours of paid and unpaid work may influence well-being. This study investigates whether absolute hours spent on paid work and housework account for the lower well-being among women as compared to men in Europe, and whether the associations between well-being and hours of paid work and housework differ by gender attitudes and social context. Attitudes towards women's and men's paid work and housework obligations may influence how beneficial or detrimental it is to spend time on these activities, as may social comparison of one's own hours to the number of hours commonly spent among similar others. A group of 13,425 women and men from 25 European countries are analysed using country fixed-effects models. The results suggest that while men's well-being appears to be unaffected by hours of paid work and housework, women's well-being increases with increased paid working hours and decreases with increasing housework hours. Gender differences in time spent on paid work and housework account for a third of the European gender difference in well-being and are thus one reason that women have lower well-being than men have. Gender attitudes do not appear to modify the associations between hours and well-being, but there is a tendency for women's well-being to be higher the less housework they do compared to other women in the same family situation and country. However, absolute hours of paid work and housework appear to be more important to women's well-being than relative hours.

  • 21.
    Dahl, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Self-Selection or Socialization?: The Longitudinal Relation Between Civic Engagement and Political Orientations Among Adolescents2017In: Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, ISSN 0899-7640, E-ISSN 1552-7395, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1250-1269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social capital theory states that civic engagement generates positive outcomes, such as social trust and political interest. Likewise, studies show that those involved in civic engagement generally report higher levels of social trust and political interest. It is still unclear, however, whether these differences are the result of socialization or selection. We used between-effects and fixed-effects regressions to examine the development of political orientations in a three-wave longitudinal sample of 1,050 adolescents. From our results, volunteering seemed to have no socialization effect whatsoever on political interest and potentially a weak enhancing effect on social trust. Associational membership did not predict social trust over time, but it seemed to socialize members into increased political interest over time. The results are discussed in light of the social capital debate about how civic engagemend in associational life and volunteering do - or do not - function as schools of democracy.

  • 22.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ekström, Mats
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg.
    Karlsson, Jan Ch
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad.
    Jacobsen, Liselott
    Karlstad universitet, Karlstad.
    Explaining Society: Critical Realism in Social Sciences2015Book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    de Boise, Sam
    Department of Sociology, University of York.
    Patriarchy and the Crisis of Masculinity2013In: New Left ProjectArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    de Boise, Sam
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art. School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Leeds.
    The Coming Crisis?: Some Questions for the Future of Empirical Sociology in the UK2012In: Graduate Journal of Social Science, ISSN 1572-3763, E-ISSN 1572-3763, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 40-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working in commercial research, it was interesting to note that many researchers had little grounding in academic social research methods or social theory. Organizations dealing with research often took for granted that to get at ‘the truth’ involved either simply ‘talking to people’ and looking at an aggregation of opinions, or carrying out a mix of ‘pre’ and ‘post’ (usually online) surveys and ‘ad-hoc’ pieces which privilege Likert scales as the primary tool of ‘measurement’. As Mike Savage and Roger Burrows (2007) note, such industries have challenged the public legitimacy of empirical sociological inquiry. Such a challenge arguably hinges on political rhetoric around demonstrable ‘impact’ and ‘maximising efficiency’. However, a lack of attention to research design poses significant problems for the authority that these industries lay claim to. Noting sociology’s ethical value and personal experience of commercial, ‘client led’ research, this paper seeks to outline a case for the continued importance of rigorous, ethical social research in contemporary society and against narrow conceptions of impact.

  • 25.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    En förfalskad, paranoid barnavårdsutredning i Socialstads kommun2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose is to critically examine and clarify methods and thinking in an extremely inferior child protection investigation where the father is persecuted. 

  • 26.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Vegelius, Jan
    Uppsala university.
    Livskvalitet1976Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Results from a questionnaire about the meaning of the concept of quality of life are presented and the concept is discussed. A bibliography (4 pages) is presented. 

  • 27.
    Ekman, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Online Islamophobia and the politics of fear: manufacturing the green scare2016In: Muslims, Migration and Citizenship: Processes of Inclusion and Exclusion / [ed] Bulmer, Martin & Solomos John, London: Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Negative attitudes and explicit racism against Muslims are increasingly visible in public discourse throughout Europe. Right-wing populist parties have strengthened their positions by focusing on the ‘Islamic threat’ to the West. Concurrently, the Internet has facilitated a space where racist attitudes towards Muslims are easily disseminated into the public debate, fuelling animosity against European Muslims. This paper explores part of the online Islamophobic network and scrutinizes the discursive strategies deployed by three ‘prominent’ online actors. By combining social network analysis and critical discourse analysis, the study shows that Islamophobic web pages constitute a dynamic network with ties to different political and geographical milieus. The discourses create a seemingly mainstream political position by framing racist standpoints as a defence of Western values and freedom of speech. The study also shows that Islamophobic discourse is strengthened by xenophobic currents within mass media, and by the legitimization of intellectuals and political actors.

  • 28.
    Esguerra, Alejandro
    et al.
    University of Potsdam, Germany.
    Beck, Silke
    Department of Environmental Politics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany; Governing Council of the Science and Democracy Network, Harvard University, United States .
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Stakeholder engagement in the making: IPBES Legitimization Politics2017In: Global Environmental Politics, ISSN 1526-3800, E-ISSN 1536-0091, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 59-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of expert organizations aim to provide knowledge for global environmental policy-making. Recently, there have also been explicit calls for stakeholder engagement at the global level to make scientific knowledge relevant and usable on the ground. The newly established Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is one of the first international expert organizations to have systematically developed a strategy for stakeholder engagement in its own right. In this article, we analyze the emergence of this strategy. Employing the concept “politics of legitimation,” we examine how and for what reasons stakeholder engagement was introduced, justified, and finally endorsed, as well as its effects. The article explores the process of institutionalizing stakeholder engagement, as well as reconstructing the contestation of the operative norms (membership, tasks, and accountability) regulating the rules for this engagement. We conclude by discussing the broader importance of the findings for IPBES, as well as for international expert organizations in general.

  • 29.
    Evertsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Evertsson, Sanna
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kvinnor, identitet och kläder i dagens konsumtionssamhälle: En sociologisk studie om kvinnligt identitetsskapande2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 30.
    Evertsson, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Boye, Katarina
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Erman, Jeylan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Fathers on call: a study on the sharing of care work among parents in Sweden. A mixed methods approach2015Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By combining quantitative analyses of survey data with qualitative analyses of interviewswith first-time parents, this study gives new insights into parents’ division of parental leavein Sweden and the links between fathers’ leave length and the division of child care whenboth are back at work again. Quantitative results show that mothers’ and fathers’ parentalleave lengths vary substantially with the reasons for division of leave and that fathers’parental leave length is related to the long-term division of child care as well as to mothers’satisfaction with it. Qualitative results suggest that although gender equality and equalparenting is central to the first-time, middle-class parents that were interviewed, moretraditional norms and ideals about the mother as the primary caretaker may stand in the wayof an equal sharing of the leave during the child’s first year. The study also suggests severalmechanisms through which fathers’ parental leave may causally influence later division ofchildcare, including a development of a closer relationship between the father and the childand a greater understanding between the parents.

  • 31.
    Fogde, Marinette
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Att göra sig anställningsbar [To make oneself employable]: om instrumentella identitetspositioner och könad säljbarhet [instrumental identity positions and gendered marketability]2011In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 25-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To make oneself employable – instrumental identity positions and gendered marketability The article takes up the question of the negotiation of expert discourses in career advice and constructing the self in the practice of CV writing. Drawing on data from semi-structured interviews with 19 students (11 women and 8 men) the stories about job search are analyzed. The concept of discursive positioning is used in order to analyze how the students position themselves in relation to career advice and position the self in CV writing. The results show that the female students had difficulties embodying the position as a marketing self as they described it as conflicting with feelings of ‘who they were’. ‘Being you’ in CVs and job interviews is, further, an ideal that is negotiated in relation to what to display as a job-seeking subject. CV writing involves a process of identifying suitable characteristics in an instrumental manner, but it is also combined with an introspective reasoning and identification to find ‘authentic’ strengths and characteristics in ‘who you are’.

  • 32.
    Folkesson, Klara
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Invisible activity: the case of muslim women migrants in Fittja, Sweden2011In: The ethnically diverse city / [ed] Eckardt, Frank & Eade, John, Berlin: Berliner Wissenschafts-Verlag, 2011, 1, p. 115-140Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Narrating on the fly: a case study of the monarch butterfly and the management of scientific ambiguity, complexity, and uncertainty2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To translate scientific knowledge into actions in social practices outside of science has been highlighted as one of the biggest challenges in environmental conservation. What has been presented as a key in this process is to balance between the need of new knowledge to explain details of nature’s complexity and the need to simplify the complexity to make it manageable, a balance that is supposed to contribute to transform knowing into doing. As this challenge is faced to meet the need of science based environmental decisions, it becomes more and more important to also ask the question of how this translation is done, this to understand what consequences it brings to what is, and could be, known and done.

    By using the case of themonarch butterfly, this study provides knowledge of how the translation of knowledge between different social settings, such as science, citizen science, and policy, are being executed in an ongoing scientific and policy discussion. The study combines document studies with an interview study including scientists, citizen scientists, and ENGO representatives, all positioned in the center(s) of the monarch community. The analysis shows how a strong and engaging narrative are being constructed of the monarch butterfly by balancing detailed knowledge with general descriptions, inclusion and common knowledge with particularities and expertise, and consensus with conflicts.

    The study shows how scientific ambiguity, complexity, and uncertainty are managed throughout the process of trying to translate knowing into doing, findings of importance to environmental conservation as well as to scientific communication more generally

  • 34.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Narrating the Monarch Butterfly: Managing Knowledge Complexity and Uncertainty in Coproduction of a Collective Narrative and Public Discourse2017In: Science communication, ISSN 1075-5470, E-ISSN 1552-8545, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 492-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In January 2014, the monarch butterfly reached North American political agendas due to reports of a long-term population decline. Requests were made for reliable descriptions of what was known about the butterfly, its population and migration, and the actions needed to protect it. This article studies the construction of the collective narrative that has come to dominate the public discourse on the butterfly. The analysis demonstrates how complexity and uncertainty in monarch knowledge have been managed through a process of coproduction, where focus has been on emphasizing knowledge certainty by portraying science and conservation as two separate but dependent social spheres.

  • 35.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Organizing experts: IPBES and the construction of epistemic authority2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What role organizational preconditions play for the constitution of expertise and the construction of epistemic authority? This is the guiding question for this paper, which studies how expertise is shaped in the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services (IPBES). The IPBES has been described as an organizational blue print of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). By organizing the world’s experts on biodiversity, IPBES set out to produce policy-relevant knowledge. However, while IPCC is delimited to organize scientific knowledge, IPBES also acknowledges the importance to find ways to synthetize different knowledge forms, including indigenous and local knowledges. Thus, for IPBES, policy-relevant knowledge is created through the enrolment of fundamentally different knowledge practices and multiple forms of experts.

    In the light of IPBES’s ambitions to become an epistemic authority through synthetization of heterogeneous knowledge forms, we need to revisit the classic questions of who is an expert and its relation to epistemic authority. What does expert mean for IPBES and how does the expert contribute shape the epistemic authority of the IPBES?

    Based on a combination of documents and interviews, this study explores the organizational structure of IPBES through which expertise are determined and experts enrolled. Experts and expertise has previously been understood as either created relationally, or as being qualities possible to acquire. However, the result of this study shows how expertise and epistemological authority also have important organizational preconditions. IPBES’s institutional design is pivotal in the making of expertise and the shaping of the epistemic authority of IPBES.

  • 36.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Producing expertise: the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services’ socialisation of young scholars2018In: Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, ISSN 1943-815X, E-ISSN 1943-8168, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 21-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expert organisations, such as the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity & Ecosystem Services (IPBES), have become increasingly important in global, regional, and local efforts to manage current environmental challenges. As producers of environmental knowledge assessments, these expert organisations are epistemic authorities in their field of expertise. To achieve and maintain epistemic authority, expert organisations constantly need to reproduce and develop their expertise. By using the first cohort of IPBES’s fellowship program as a case study, the current paper examines the production of expertise and the socialisation of new experts into expert organisations. The paper also examines the importance of these socialisation processes in the institutionalisation of expert organisations. By analyzing interviews, observations, and documents, the current study explores the expected goals, the performance, and the results of the socialisation. The study shows how the fellows learned and acquired new roles and norms. The study also shows that whoever controls the socialisation process also control the production of expertise and the institutionalisation of the expert organisation.

  • 37.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Reproducing expertise: The role of young scholars in IPBES’s capacity building efforts2016In: 3rd ISA Forum of Sociology: Book of abstracts, 2016, p. 278-279Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being an expert organization in the making, the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) faces the challenge to create an organisation which is able to facilitate a dialogue between science and policy today, and to remain credible, relevant, and legitimate tomorrow. In this, how do IPBES work to recruit and reproduce expertise needed for delivering assessments? How is new researchers socialized and integrated into the expert organizations’ epistemic perspective and social practices? What function does reproducing expertise have in the institutionalization of expert organizations? These questions are central for this paper, which analyze IPBES’s pilot fellowship program for young scholars.

    The fellowship program was launched early 2015 with the explicit aim to integrate young scholars in the Platform’s regional and sub-regional assessment processes, thereby strengthening its capacity and knowledge foundations. The ambition is that the program will be expanded to eventually “create a pool of competent professionals able to carry forward the Platform agenda”. The participating young scholars will have a unique position and role in the making of IPBES. Participating in the program implies that they will have to balance (i) the expectations of having both a contributory and a learning position; and (ii) the commitment to work pro bono (without any economic compensation) in an assessment processes with keeping engagement with home institutions.

    Through a combined analysis of documents and interviews with IPBES representatives involved in the fellowship program, this study explores this program, in particular what capacities IPBES are looking for and what role the young scholars play in the assessment process as well as for IPBES general development. The analysis finds that there are both benefits and risks attached to the involvement of young scholars in the assessment process. By way of conclusion, some general remarks on the conditions of recruiting and socializing new expertise is raised.

  • 38.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The importance of boundaries: Boundary work in IPBES2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Expert organizations in nature conservation are often described as boundary organizations that facilitate science-policy interfaces. Besides the boundary between science and policy, boundary organizations need to manage other social boundaries, such as between different knowledge forms and between different categories of actors. In order to shape credible, legitimate, and policy relevant knowledge a boundary organization has to make use of competences from both sides of these boundaries. However, this boundary management is to a large extent concealed for those external to it. Focusing the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), this study explores how boundaries are created and managed, as well as how they become important in order to shape credible, legitimate, and policy relevant knowledge. In particular, three boundaries are analyzed: between science and policy, between scientific knowledge and indigenous and local knowledge, and between senior and young experts. Three questions are central; how are boundaries created and managed in the process of knowledge production?; how does boundary work on different boundaries in the same organization intersect and influence one another?;  how is boundary work important, and what role does it play for the production of policy relevant knowledge? The empirical material consists of official documents from IPBES and interviews with IPBES fellows. By showing how different boundaries intersect in the construction of expert knowledge, this study deepens the understanding of the preconditions for expert-based policy recommendations in nature conservation.

  • 39.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The metamorphosis of the monarch butterfly: a study of the (re)framing of a species worthy of protection2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Gustafsson, Karin M.
    et al.
    Department of Science and Technology Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    Agrawal, Anurag A.
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    Lewenstein, Bruce V.
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    Wolf, Steven A.
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    The Monarch Butterfly through Time and Space: The Social Construction of an Icon2015In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 612-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we explore the social construction of the monarch butterfly as a conservation icon in order to understand how the butterfly has come to be endowed with the power to shape public conversations and potentially alter policy and practice. Our analysis is guided by the sociological concepts of coproduction and boundary objects, which reveal how this butterfly has animated and sustained conversations across diverse organizational boundaries. We find that engagement with narratives of beauty, natural wonder, scientific discovery, conservation imperatives, and civic duty has allowed the monarch to enroll actors in a broad network that gives rise to surprising, emergent properties. These properties make the monarch a powerful communication vehicle and a potent ally in environmental politics. Our analysis of the historical and contemporary construction of the monarch as an icon contributes to ongoing efforts to bring resources from critical social science to bear on the strengthening of science-policy–practice interfaces.

  • 41.
    Gustafsson, Karin M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Boundary organizations and environmental governance: Performance, institutional design, and conceptual development2018In: Climate Risk Management, E-ISSN 2212-0963, Vol. 19, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept boundary organization has been introduced to identify and explain a specific way of organizing the interface between science and policy. Although the original meaning of the concept has been criticized, the term has come to be frequently used in studies of knowledge transfer and science-policy relations. This usage constitutes the reason for this paper, which investigates how the concept of boundary organization has come to be used and defined and explores its contribution to the discussion of the organization of the science-policy interplay. The analysis finds that despite its spread and usage, the concept boundary organization does not refer to any specific form of organization and does not per se give any guidance about how to organize science-policy interplay. Instead, boundary organization is mainly used as an empirical label when studying the governance of expertise and the management of science-policy interfaces. This finding is also true for studies of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which describe that organization as a boundary organization without saying anything about what that label means in terms of institutional design and practical implications. However, to label an organization as a boundary organization nevertheless works performatively; it shapes an organization’s identity, may provide legitimacy, and can also stabilize the interactions between it and other organizations. Therefore, boundary organization is an important concept, but primarily as a way to facilitate interaction. Thus, the focus of research should be on analyzing how the concept is used and what its implications are for the organization studied.

  • 42.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Wolf, Steven A
    Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca NY, USA.
    Agrawal, Anurag A
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca NY, USA.
    Science-Policy-Practice Interfaces: Emergent knowledge and monarch butterfly conservation2017In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 521-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study how knowledge is produced at the intersection of science, environmental policy and public engagement. Based on analysis of monarch butterfly conservation, we critically evaluate models of knowledge production. The monarch butterfly and its migration have engaged science and enchanted people for over a century, and current threats to monarchs catalyze debates and actions. This paper traces the historical development of knowledge regarding (i) long-term monarch population trends, (ii) the monarch’s dependence on a particular food plant, the milk-weed, and (iii) the monarch as a pollinator. Our analysis indicates that knowledge production and science–policy–practice interfaces cannot be satisfactorily understood through reference to the classical linear model and more recent conceptions of relationally produced knowledge (i.e. co-production). We identify powerful and sometimes contradictory knowledge claims that emerge from unmediated interactions among scientists, advocates, policy makers and diverse publics. The emergent model complements existing models of knowledge production, thereby expanding the conceptual foundation available for making sense of science–policy–practice interfaces.

  • 43.
    Hasselbladh, Hans
    et al.
    School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bejerot, Eva
    National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Webs of knowledge and circuits of communication: constructing rationalized agency in swedish health care2007In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 175-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyse an institutional transformation of Swedish health care that is underway. We combine the recent work from the ‘Governmentality’-tradition with contributions by John Meyer and associates. The latter is used to explain how these changes are rendered as necessary and natural. The main part of our analysis concerns how the institutional construction of rationalized agency is instrumented. To accomplish that, Dean’s (1999) categories technologies of agency and technologies of performance are used to conceptualize some of the means and principles mobilized in the ongoing institutional transformation of Swedish health care. Firstly, we display the emergence of a complex landscape of new actors, arenas and new practices that regulate and coordinate medical practice. Secondly, various attempts to imbue agency into the patients are analysed as an example of a technology of agency put to use. The conclusions present a more comprehensive picture of governing through new forms of agency. Technologies of agency are closely intertwined with appeals to common goods, the formation of new arenas and forms of expertise.

  • 44.
    Hasselbladh, Hans
    et al.
    School of Economics and Commercial Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kallinikos, Jannis
    Department of Business Administration, The Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece.
    The project of rationalization: a critique and reappraisal of neo-institutionalism in organization studies2000In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 697-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article critically approaches various neo-institutional accounts of the process of formal organizing. While acknowledging the importance of the overall orientation marked by neo-institutional studies, the article identifies several crucial aspects that have escaped the attention of neo-institutional research. In particular, it criticizes the inability of neo-institutionalism to provide an account of the means linking situated forms of organizing with wider instrumental beliefs and practices, in terms other than adaptivist, diffusionist. Such a limitation is partly a consequence of unwillingness of neo-institutionalism to focus on and analyze the very architecture of the rationalized patterns and relationships which neo-institutionalists claim to be diffusing across organizational populations and fields. Drawing on several sources, the article develops a framework that seeks to outline the conceptual means for decomposing the carriers of rationalized patterns, models and techniques and showing the distinctive ways in which they implicate the building blocks of formal organizing.

  • 45. Hasselbladh, Hans
    et al.
    Kallinikos, Jannis
    Work, Control and Computation: Rethinking the Legacy of neo-Institutionalism2009In: Research in the Sociology of Organizations: A Research Annual, ISSN 0733-558X, Vol. 27, p. 257-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter claims technology to be a principal mode of regulation in formal organizations alongside social structure and culture. Such a claim breaks with the conventional neo-institutional outlook that considers technology outside the object of institutional analysis of organizations. The distinctive regulative logic of computational technology is manifested in the increasing entanglement of domain-specific practices and their underlying cognitive and normative order with the decontextualized principles and methods that have traditionally been deployed in the management and control of work operations. Such entanglement and the effects it generates reflect the reshuffling of the regulative reach of technology, social structure and culture under the pressures exercised by the dynamics of current technological change and the impressive involvement of computational systems and artefacts in human affairs.

  • 46.
    Hjorth Aronsson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Department of Sociology.
    Struktur, handling och rumslig morfologi: Två fall av förnyelse och byggande i urban miljö1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Sociologi, Södertörns högskola, Huddinge, Sverige.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS), Södertörns högskola, Huddinge, Sverige.
    Ministerskandalen hösten 2006 i moralsociologisk belysning2010In: Känslan för det allmänna: medborgarnas relation till staten och varandra / [ed] Jacobsson, Kerstin, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag, 2010, p. 267-294Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Jetzkowitz, Jens
    et al.
    Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Methods of empirical social research and statistics, Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg, Germany.
    van Koppen, C. S. A. Kris
    Environmental Policy, Department of Social Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ott, Konrad
    Department of Philosophy, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Voget-Kleschin, Lieske
    Department of Philosophy, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Wong, Cathrine Mei Ling
    Maison des Sciences Humaines, Porte des Sciences, Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, Université du Luxembourg, Esch-Belval, Luxembourg.
    The significance of meaning: Why IPBES needs the social sciences and humanities2018In: Innovation. The European Journal of Social Sciences, ISSN 1351-1610, E-ISSN 1469-8412, Vol. 31, no S1, p. 38-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term “biodiversity” is often used to describe phenomena of nature, which can be studied without a reference to the socially constructed, evaluative, or indeed normative contexts. In our paper, we challenge this conception by focusing particularly on methodological aspects of biodiversity research. We thereby engage with the idea of interdisciplinary biodiversity research as a scientific approach directed at the recognition and management of contemporary society in its ecological embedding. By doing this, we explore how research on and assessments of biodiversity can be enhanced if meaning, aspiration, desires, and related aspects of agency are methodically taken into account. In six sections, we substantiate our claim that the discourse on biodiversity (including the IPBES (Intergovernmental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services) debate) is incomplete without contributions from the social sciences and humanities. In the introduction, a brief overview of biodiversity’s conceptual history is provided showing that “biodiversity” is a lexical invention intended to create a strong political momentum. However, that does not impede its usability as a research concept. Section 2 examines the origins of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) by way of sociological discourse analysis. Subsequently, it proposes a matrix as a means to structure the ambiguities and tensions inherent in the CBD. The matrix reemphasizes our main thesis regarding the need to bring social and ethical expertise to the biodiversity discourse. In Section 3, we offer a brief sketch of the different methods of the natural and social sciences as well as ethics. This lays the groundwork for our Section 4, which explains and illustrates what social sciences and ethics can contribute to biodiversity research. Section 5 turns from research to politics and argues that biodiversity governance necessitates deliberative discourses in which participation of lay people plays an important role. Section 6 provides our conclusions.

  • 49.
    Johansson, Sara
    Karlstads universitet, FoU Välfärd Värmland.
    Kartläggning av behov och förutsättningar för en avhopparverksamhet i Värmlands län2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna rapport redovisas resultatet av en regional kartläggning genomförd vid FoU Välfärd Värmland på uppdrag av Brottsofferjouren Värmland. Projektet har genomförts under 2014 och möjliggjorts genom medel från Myndigheten för ungdoms- och civilsamhällesfrågor. Kartläggningens syfte var att utifrån ett verksamhetsperspektiv undersöka behov och förutsättningar för en avhopparverksamhet i Värmlands län, med tonvikt vid behovsfrågan och särskilt fokuserad på individer från politiskt extrema organisationer. De verksamheter som representeras i studien är socialtjänst, polis, skola och politik, och data har insamlats via en webbenkät. De olika verksamheterna har valts då de bedömts som sannolika att möta den problematik som omgärdar våldsbejakande miljöer och avhopp.

    Med webbenkäten har de olika verksamheternas befintliga beredskap samt erfarenheter av de aktuella miljöerna kartlagts. Utifrån detta har en bedömning av överensstämmelsen mellan befintliga samt önskvärda åtgärder och rutiner gjorts, varefter en bild kunnat tecknas av situationen samt av behov och förutsättningar för en lokalt förankrad avhopparverksamhet. Utöver enkäten har ett antal kvalitativa intervjuer genomförts med särskilt sakkunniga inom området. Dessa intervjuer har bidragit med ytterligare en dimension till analysen av behov och förutsättningar.

    Resultatet visar inte på ett entydigt eller akut överhängande behov av en avhopparverksamhet, även om det finns en utbredd upplevelse av att behovet kommer att öka i och med att politisk extremism uppfattas som en växande problematik. Webbenkäten visar dessutom att det bland annat finns ett behov av:

    • Utökad samverkan mellan berörda aktörer och upprättande av nätverk för de som kommer i kontakt med problematiken
    • Förbättrade informationskanaler
    • Ökad kunskapsförsörjning i frågorna
    • En förstärkning av det förebyggande arbetet

    Intervjuerna visar dessutom på vikten av att uppmärksamma den smittoeffekt som kan uppstå när en politiskt extrem organisation finns etablerad på en ort. Vidare framhålls de anhöriga som viktiga resurser i arbetet runt såväl avhoppare samt aktiva extremister – och även som en grupp som kan ha egna behov som behöver mötas av en eventuell avhopparverksamhet. Intervjuerna betonar även vikten av närhet, omedelbarhet och tillgänglighet i arbetet med avhoppare – något som accentuerar vikten av en lokal beredskap.

    I rapporten kommenteras förutsättningar för ett framtida arbete med avhoppare genom en bedömning av nuvarande beredskap och rutiner, och ett antal åtgärdsförslag att arbeta vidare med formuleras.

  • 50.
    Jämte, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A withering storm?: The development of the Danish radical libertarian left 2000-20152017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mid-2000s saw an upsurge in radical left-libertarian activism in Denmark. The struggle for the Youth house in 2006, Church-asylum in 2008 and the UN Climate-summit of 2009 drew thousand of protesters to the streets, cementing the historical picture of Denmark as a focal point for modern radical left-libertarian activism (Hare, 2009). However, only a year later the outburst of movement activity and urban unrest was replaced by dead calm. In the early 2010s, many activists made a withdrawal from the streets, transforming from a vigorous movement into a “fragmented and disoriented” milieu (Karpantchof & Mikkelsen, 2014).

    In this paper I describe the development of the radical left-libertarian movement in Denmark throughout the 2000s, and analyze it´s growth, decline and transformation through both movement-internal and external factors. The Danish case provides an opportunity to analyze the ebb and flow of a radical movement, as well as to investigate the causes and effects of these shift. Particular focus is placed on how changes in opportunity structures, either factual or perceived, have affected the activists’ collective action frames, mobilization patterns and repertories of action. The analysis is based on data from protest events, semi-structured interviews with activists as well as movement documents such as magazines, leaflets, web pages, films and books.

123 1 - 50 of 132
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf