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  • 1.
    Beck, Silke
    et al.
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Esguerra, Alejandra
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Borie, Maud
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Chilvers, Jason
    University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom.
    Görg, Christoph
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Heubach, Katja
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Marquard, Elisabeth
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Nesshöver, Carsten
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Hulme, Mike
    King's College, London, United Kingdom.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Miller, Clark
    Arizona State University,Tempe, USA.
    Nadim, Tahani
    Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, Germany.
    Settele, Josef
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany.
    Turnhout, Esther
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Vasileiadou, Eleftheria
    Eindhoven Univesity of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Towards a reflexive turn in the governance of global environmental expertise: The cases of the IPCC and the IPBES2014In: GAIA, ISSN 0940-5550, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role and design of global expert organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) or the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) needs rethinking. Acknowledging that a one-size-fits-all model does not exist, we suggest a reflexive turn that implies treating the governance of expertise as a matter of political contestation.

  • 2.
    De Majo, Veronica
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Global Governance: A promising scenario for disaster risk reduction2014In: Proceedings of the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference, Global Risk Forum (GRF) , 2014, p. 196-199Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global governance implies cooperative measures designated for solving problems on global scale, in which diverse actors interact through different channels and networks establishing steering mechanisms and rule systems. While each state has the primary responsibility for systematically implementing measures to reduce vulnerability and increase resilience, there are other actors that have an influence (to different degrees) on the decision-making process, not least at the global level. Consequently, we are in the presence of an emergent global governance system in disaster risk reduction (DRR)-quite young in comparison to other policy fields-characterized by non-hierarchical and networked relations among different actors in different arenas, and even across and within their boundaries. Global networks have led to significant achievements in DRR but they have also presented obstacles and challenges, often endogenous to the system's complexity. It is necessary therefore to understand this complexity in order to enhance the benefits that global governance provides to DRR, seeking at the same time to diminish its constraints. Thus, the aim of this paper is to gain a better understanding of global networks in DRR within a nascent global governance system. The study of the International Strategy for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) and related documents showed that there are instruments and shared practices, a common language, and global networks (as well as regional and national) of actors and institutions engaged in DRR. Even though HFA is normative and non-binding, it contains the core principles for integrative disaster risk management and can be seen as the manifestation of commitment to systematically incorporating DRR into policies and programs that lead to sustainable development and poverty reduction. Hence, the post- 2015 framework for DRR offers the opportunity to strengthen and improve this system, especially with regard to coordination and implementation.

  • 3.
    De Majo, Veronica
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Global networks: Building a culture of disaster preparedness worldwide2014In: Proceedings of the Second ANDROID Doctoral School in Disaster Resilience 2014: Work Package III / [ed] Srinath Perera, Hans Jorgen Henriksen, Alexandra Revez, Irina Shklovski, Android Disaster Resilience Network , 2014, p. 45-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the era of globalization, i.e. the growing influence of global processes in local, national and regional arenas, natural disasters are considered a ‘global’ problem. In this context, global networks have led to significant achievements in disaster risk reduction (DRR) but they have also presented obstacles and challenges, often endogenous to the system’s complexity. It is necessary therefore to understand this complexity in order to enhance its benefits and reduce its constraints. The purpose of the paper is to introduce a PhD project that aims to gain a better understanding of the role of global networks in building resilience worldwide, focusing particularly on norms, rules and steering mechanism that shape behaviors, attitudes and beliefs. Resilience is defined as the capacity of a community potentially exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, and adapt in order to cope with natural disasters. The preliminary content analysis on the Hyogo Framework for Action and related documents showed that there are instruments and shared practices, a common language, and institutions engaged in DRR. Consequently, there are patterns of a nascent system of global governance that encompasses cooperative measures to solve problems on global scale, in which diverse actors interact through different channels establishing steering mechanisms.

  • 4.
    Husovic, Alma
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Beijing Consensus: världen utifrån ett Världssystemperspektiv2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 5.
    Lundberg, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A pluralist state?: civil society organizations’ access to the Swedish policy process 1964-20092014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Including civil society organizations in the policy process is a distinctive trait of democratic governance. But, while being highly valuable from a democratic point of view, not all civil society organizations are represented in the policy process. This dissertation draws attention to the role of the government in shaping the representation of civil society organizations in the Swedish government consultation referred to as the ‘remiss procedure’. The overall aim is to increase empirical and theoretical understanding of civil society organizations’ access to the national Swedish policy process. Drawing on various empirical data sources, it analyzes how access has changed during the second half of the 20th century, the factors influencing access, and the significance of the access provided by the government.

    The results are based on four empirical studies, and show that the government has encouraged an increasing number and more diverse types of civil society organizations to be represented in the remiss procedure. In addition, organizations with plenty of resources, such as labor and business organizations, are not overrepresented. However, access is slightly skewed in favor of civil society organizations with an insider position within other access points at national government level, which is consistent with a privileged pluralistic pattern of interest representation. In addition, civil society organizations seem to be invited into an arena for political influence of less relevance. Theoretically, the dissertation moves beyond the neo-corporatist perspective that dominated Swedish research during the second half of the 20th century by drawing attention to five different theoretical lenses: pluralism, neo-corporatism, political opportunity structures, policy network theory, and resource exchange theory. It concludes that a variety of theories are needed for access to be understood.

    List of papers
    1. Changing balance: the participation and role of voluntary organisations in the Swedish policy process
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing balance: the participation and role of voluntary organisations in the Swedish policy process
    2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 347-371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the changing level of participation of voluntary organisations in the policy process between 1964 and 2009 and its implication for the role played by voluntary organisations to the state. Drawing on data from the remiss procedure – one of the most understudied parts of the Swedish policy-making process – the results implicate a reduced role for voluntary organisations in formal arenas for policy making. While the number of participating voluntary organisations has remained stable, the relative share of participating organisations has declined and an increasing proportion of organisations have abstained from participating. In addition, the shares of conflict-oriented and member-benefit-oriented organisations have decreased while consensus-oriented and public-benefit-oriented organisations appear to have increased slightly. These findings are discussed in the context of changes in the coordination and implementation of public policies, implying that over time the role of voluntary organisations as arenas for deliberation and mediators of individual interests tend to have gradually lost ground in relation to the state while the share of organisations taking direct welfare responsibility has slightly increased. Although it may be premature to speak about a shifting role of voluntary organisations from input to output in the political system, the result suggest an emerging trend in that direction. Further research is needed to clarify whether this changing pattern of participation is evident in other arenas for policy making in Sweden or is an isolated feature explained from the outset of the remiss procedure.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
    National Category
    Political Science
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24476 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9477.2012.00292.x (DOI)000309593500004 ()2-s2.0-84867397514 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2012-08-16 Created: 2012-08-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Does the government selection process promote or hinder pluralism?: exploring the characteristics of voluntary organizations invited to public consultations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the government selection process promote or hinder pluralism?: exploring the characteristics of voluntary organizations invited to public consultations
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Civil Society, ISSN 1744-8689, E-ISSN 1744-8697, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 58-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    To what extent does the government selection process practised in public consultations promote or hinder pluralism in the policy-making process? This article addresses this question by exploring and analysing the characteristics of voluntary organizations invited to public consultations. Evidence is drawn from the formerly corporatist Scandinavian country of Sweden and the policy-making process referred to as the ‘remiss procedure’. The article shows that the government selection process encourages a multitude of organizations to participate. Consistent with recent studies on Scandinavian corporatism, this study provides weak support of corporatist practices in the Swedish policy process. However, and without challenging the seemingly pluralistic nature of the remiss procedure, voluntary organizations with ‘insider status’ in the policy process are more frequently invited to formal decision-making arenas such as the remiss procedure. It is argued that the policy network literature and the theory of political opportunity structures may further the understanding of the government selection process practised in public consultations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis: Taylor & Francis Group, 2013
    National Category
    Humanities
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32553 (URN)10.1080/17448689.2013.771086 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-11-28 Created: 2013-11-28 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. En försumbar arena?: Organisationerna och remissväsendet 1964-2009
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>En försumbar arena?: Organisationerna och remissväsendet 1964-2009
    2012 (Swedish)In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 114, no 1, p. 29-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how the participation of voluntary organisations in the remiss-procedure has changed between 1964 and 2009 and how to interpret this. Drawing on evidence from 33 remiss-directories in nine different policy fields, the results conclude that the proportional level of voluntary organisations has declined and more organisations have chosen to abstain from participating in the remissprocedure. In addition, the number of conflict-oriented organisations has declined while the number of consensus-oriented organisations active in the output side of the political system has increased. It is argued that the result can be understood in relation to the changing mode of governance, new challenges presented by the welfare state and the rise of transnational organisations that seek influence in less formal arenas for policy making.

    Keywords
    Civilsamhället, intresseorganisationer, remissväsendet, deltagande, policy, välfärdsstaten
    National Category
    Political Science
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-23404 (URN)
    Available from: 2012-06-12 Created: 2012-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Is Bureaucratic Policy-Making Eroding Institutions?: A Bottom-up Perspective on the Swedish Governmental Commissions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Bureaucratic Policy-Making Eroding Institutions?: A Bottom-up Perspective on the Swedish Governmental Commissions
    (English)In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the recurrent “erosion thesis” in the governance literature  arguing  that  bureaucratic  or  procedural government institutions have come to play a less significant role in the formation of  public  policy.  This  article  supports  these  claims  by  drawing evidence  from  the  Swedish  and  neo-corporatist  policy-making institutions  referred  to  as  the ‘governmental  commissions’  and  the perspective  of  interest  organizations.  Using  various  theories  on institutional change I show that increasing government steering has reduced  the  role  of  the  governmental  commissions  in  influencing policy, but has not eliminated interest organizations’ belief that they are  legitimate  institutions.  The  resulting  article concludes  that although the governmental commissions have eroded, the capability of the state to steer or govern society has not necessarily declined.

    National Category
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38225 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-10-29 Created: 2014-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 6.
    Quennerstedt, Ann
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Robinson, Carol
    School of Education, University of Brighton, Brighton, England.
    I'Anson, John
    Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    The UNCRC: The Voice of Global Consensus on Children's Rights?2018In: Nordic Journal of Human Rights, ISSN 1891-8131, E-ISSN 1891-814X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 38-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    That the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) encompasses contradictions is known. Despite this knowledge, attention to conflicting aspects within the convention is limited, and instead, the assumption that the convention represents an international consensus on the meaning of children's human rights seems to be widespread in policy and academic work. Furthermore, the available literature within the field of children's rights is largely silent regarding precise and elaborated knowledge about the inherent contradictions within the UNCRC. This paper expands upon and specifies the knowledge about consensus and inconsistencies within the convention. Through an in-depth study of the drafting process of the UNCRC, the paper identifies and displays both contradictions within the convention, and ways in which the text of the convention can be seen to express consensus. The analysis shows how a certain consensus was produced for respectively civil and political rights, and socio-economic rights, but that different and inconsistent children's rights logics underlay the formation of these respective consensus-formations.

  • 7.
    Singleton, Benedict
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Clumsiness and elegance in environmental management: applying cultural theory to the history of whaling2016In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 414-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global whaling debate is one of the most well-known environmental disputes; despite the continued moratorium, both whaling and conflict continue. This endless discord has been criticised as deleterious to whale conservation and as imperialistic towards whaling communities. The history of the whaling debate is examined through the lens of cultural theory (CT). CT argues that there is productive potential in respectful interaction between different perspectives on an environmental issue. Using CT, modern whaling past and present is reconstructed, tracking how different actors have come to prominence, altering the nature of the policy landscape through their actions. Since the onset of modern whaling, whales and whaling practice have been conceived in narrow terms, depending on the dominance of particular actors on either side of the debate. Proposed solutions to the impasse are assessed according to the maxims of CT.

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