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  • 1.
    Andersson, Helen
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Media and Communication Studies.
    Recontextualizing Swedish nationalism for commercial purposes: a multimodal analysis of a milk marketing event2019In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 583-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I carry out an analysis of an event in Sweden called 'the spring turnout'. It is a traditional event where cows are allowed out into the fields after the winter. I show how it has been colonized by Arla Foods, the diary company which controls part of the milk production in Sweden and in many other countries. Of interest in this analysis is how Arla infuses the event, and its own marketing, with discourses about nature that are specifically Swedish and can be traced to the nation building of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, used systematically as part of the social democratic project for equality and progress through a strong welfare system. The paper examines how Arla recontextualizes these discourses for commercial purposes. I show how such recontextualized discourses carry reassurances to Swedish people that this project is still intact despite huge social political changes in Swede over the past decades embracing neoliberalism, global capitalism and becoming one of the fastest deregulating countries in the world.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Helen
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Uppsala University, Department of Scandinavian Languages, Uppsala, Sweden.
    “THE PATH TO A LONG-TERM HEALTHY LIVING” – A MULTIMODAL CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS OF THE SELF-CARE APP LIFESUM2021In: Digitalizing Social Practices: Changes and Consequences. SDU, Odense on 23-24 February 2021: Book of abstracts, 2021, p. 14-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At a time when everyone is expected to take responsibility for but also optimize health (Petersen and Lupton, 1996) and pursue a ‘healthy living’ (Petersen et al., 2010), apps, 'self-tracking' and ‘everyday analytics’ become crucial. In this paper I examine the design of a self-care application, Lifesum, in relation to its socio-political context. More specifically, the purpose of the paper is to show how the design of the app not only shapes how practices that affect health, such as healthy eating, exercise and social engagement, are represented and communicated, but how the design itself reproduces and encourages certain ideas, values and actions that are highly valued in contemporary society. Previous research shows that apps and self-tracking devices contribute to self-monitoring and self-advocacy (Sanders, 2017; Doshi, 2018) and enable self-government and self-care (Whitson, 2015). However, not many studies critically examine the practices, ideas and values that the design of these apps promotes or facilitates.

    The data consists of data from the Lifesum app. The study draws on the principles of multimodal critical discourse analysis (MCDA) (Machin and Mayr, 2012) using a discourse-design approach (Ledin and Machin, 2016). More particularly, I explore how practices that affect health are represented through writings, quantifications, spatialization, graphic shapes and icons, temporality and causality. I discuss how the design serves certain purposes and how it interacts with the user and encourages certain choices. The analysis shows that a sustainable "healthy life", as represented by the Lifesum app, should be understood in relation to values such as choice, individual freedom, personal responsibility, agency and consumer loyalty. Design is central to the process of shaping the user into a "good" and "healthy" citizen.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Helen
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Media and Communication Studies.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Media and Communication Studies.
    The masculinization of domestic cooking: a historical study of Swedish cookbooks for men2022In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 252-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes how men's domestic cooking is represented and masculinized in cookbooks, written by men for men and published in 1975, 1992, and 2010, respectively. Departing from the concept of domestic masculinities, it uses the methods of Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis. It asks: what kind of values and ideas connected to men, food, and the home are realized in texts and images? And how are these legitimized and naturalized? As the study's context is Sweden, a country known for its pursuit of gender equality, the study focuses on how men's domestic cooking has been represented in cookbooks published roughly 20 years apart. The analysis shows that, while the first two books are characterized by a 'real man' discourse and working-class masculinity, the 2010 book represents a masculinity in line with a 'new man image' closely linked to consumption and materiality. However, structurally, there are few differences. Values associated with traditional middle-class masculinities, traditional gender norms, and gendered division of domestic labor are reproduced. Men's cooking is recontextualized as a playful leisure activity. In all three books, cooking becomes another way for a man to appear successful - both in relation to other men and women, and in socioeconomic terms.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Helen
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Media and Communication Studies.
    Smith, Angela
    Faculty of Arts and Creative Industries, University of Sunderland, Sunderland, UK.
    Flags and fields: a comparative analysis of national identity in butter packaging in Sweden and the UK2023In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 861-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have shown that it is common to use nationalist appeals when marketing food products. Research has also shown that geographical places play an important role in creating feelings of national identity and national belonging. To a much lesser extent, research has shown how these “places” are represented and reproduced in the packaging of food products in specific national environments and to an even lesser extent, compared these representations and reproductions. In this article, using multimodal critical discourse analysis, we examine how butter packaging in Sweden and the UK represents nature in ways that create associations that are linked to the national identity that exists in each country. We argue that commercial interests, through their choice of packaging design, not only exploit cultural and political ideas and values but also reinforce them by connecting to prevailing national sentiments. In times of political and social change, this can be used to strengthen national affiliation and thus ally with political interests.

  • 5.
    Baath, Evonne Yi Fang
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    "A Change In Power?": A Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) on selected news articles after Lee Kuan Yew’s death in Singapore2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 6.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Agency, agents and artifacts: Performing and accounting for languaging and identity2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution has a threefold interest: first, to make visible the active work that participants and institutions “do” with symbols and artifacts through detailed descriptions of naturally occurring communication and interactions across time and space. Secondly, by using a range of representational techniques, the paper illustrates the ways in which multimodal analysis allows for revisiting the dimension of agent-artifact-agency. Agency here gets accounted for not as the sole property of human agents, but rather in terms of an intrinsic performatory dimension of agents-cum-artifacts-in-concert. Finally, the study illustrates the incongruence between individual actors talk and institutional accounting of language, learning and identity on the one hand, and the performance of languaging, learning and identity on the other.

    Drawing upon multidisciplinary and multisited studies of social practices in different settings across time and space allows for juxtaposing of micro scale analysis of the unfolding of identity positions as well as the dynamic and chained obstacles, resistance, support, meaning-making that characterizes everyday social life at a meso scale. This data-driven contribution is based upon analyses of ethnographic recordings of activities from projects that can be conventionally described in terms of (i) virtual platforms and social media; (ii) expert lead public discussions on gendered spaces in a megacity in Asia; and, (iii) segregated special schools in Sweden.

    This empirical contribution takes both a socially oriented perspective and a postcolonial framework on ways-with-words and ways-of-being. The ways in which human beings “live in language” and their “languaging” has a bearing upon socialization, including the learning of conventional language varieties and identity positions in different settings. Focusing performatory and accounting practices shifts the analytical lens away from actors “pure” intentions, motivations and desires, and the “real” meanings that reside in and are ascribed to human talk.

  • 7.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Forskning om mångfald och utbildningsinstitutioner som arenor för mångfald: demokratiska aspekter2004In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 115-149Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Languaging: Ways-of-being-with-words across Disciplinary Boundaries and Empirical Sites2014In: Language Contacts at the Crossroads of Disciplines / [ed] Heli Paulasto, Helka Riionheimo, Lea Meriläinen & Maria Kok, Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014, p. 89-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This empirically driven multidisciplinary study takes a socioculturally oriented postcolonial perrtidisciplinary, ethnographic data, ostcolonialism, languaging, performativity, chaining, meaning-makingspective on social life and language. The point of departure is that human beings communicate with one another and they create meaning together, irrespective of whether this communication occurs in one, two or more linguistic varieties, dialects, registers or written-, pictorial-, oral-, signing- modalities. Analysis of multi-site and multi-scale ethnographic data are presented from different language sets that are often studied in traditionally segregated academic fields (for instance, fields such as Swedish/mother tongue, bilingualism, reading and writing, multimodality, deaf communication, gender etc) enable juxtaposing the explorations against one another. The role of the written word as a technology in relationship to languaging broadly and how written, oral, signed words are handled in daily life across time and space are explored.

    An overarching aim is to contribute to the academic domain of (what is glossed as) bi/multilingual research from bi/multilingual perspectives. The analysis highlights that ways of conceptualizing, reporting and “talking about bi/multilingualism” are not in sync with mundane languaging or ways-of-being-with-words, or peoples engagement in everyday “bi/multilingual communication” inside and outside institutional settings. The ways in which written, oral, signed words are handled across everyday life spaces is explored through a range of representations like “thick accounts”, “transcripts at the meso and micro scales”, “video-grabs” and “maps”. Focusing the ways in which individuals in different communities language – convened in public spaces or in more stable organizations like work places or schools – makes visible the performative active work that participants (and institutions) “do” with symbols and tools. Language is empirically accounted for not as the sole property of an individual, community of practitioners or geopolitical state, but rather in terms of an intrinsic performatory dimension of interlinked language varieties and modalities on the one hand and humans in concert with tools on the other in face-to-face and textually mediated sites. Focusing social practices – what gets communicated and the ways in which the same occurs – allows for problematizing the dominating monolingual-monomodality position in addition to the “monological” essentialistic colonial perspectives on language.

  • 9.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Performing and accounting language and identity: Agency as actors-in-(inter)action-with-tools2014In: Theorizing and Analyzing Agency in Second Language Learning: Interdisciplinary Approaches / [ed] P. Deters, Xuesong Gao, E. Miller and G. Vitanova-Haralampiev, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2014, p. 113-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sociocultural perspective on communication and development recognizes that artifacts and cultural tools, including language, the most significant of tools, (Lantolf, 2000; Perret-Clermont, 2009; Vygotsky, 1962) are in a mediational symbiotic relationship with actors (Säljö, 2012; Wertsch, 1998). A central tenant here is the irreducible actor-tool concert and mediation that frames cognition and agency. Drawing upon a sociocultural ”Mind as Social Action” position (Wertsch, 1998), the empirically framed analysis in this chapter shows that rather than being a dimension of individual actors, motivations or desires, agency has an intertwined situated, distributed nature (Hutchins, 1993; Lave & Wenger, 1991). Here communication is learning and is seen as “appropriating and sharing power, a more or less legitimate behavior not independent of social positions, including gender” (Perret-Clermont 2009:8). In other words, this locally situated (in the here and now) and distributed (across time, space, actors and tools) character of agency is embedded in social action.

    Taking these sociocultural views as points of departure, a multi-scaled approach (Bucholtz & Hall, 2005; Hult, 2010; Scollon & Scollon, 2004), informs my analysis of agency in a couple of specific ways here. First, I discuss agency analytically and empirically through the actorstools continuum. Second, I relate it specifically to fields that are conventionally clothed in terms of bi/multilingual and multimodal learning. Finally, the empirical explorations in this chapter highlight the situated and distributed nature of identity-positions and belonging (Antaki & Widdicome, 1998; Krzyzanowaki, 2010; Lave & Wenger, 1991; Näslund, 2013; Rogoff, 1990). My overall aim is to make visible how a theoretically framed analysis of agency and identity can be represented by focusing on multi-scaled empirical data.

  • 10.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Messina Dahlberg, Giulia
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Learning on the go while staying at home: languaging in virtual learning spaces2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As Technology Mediated Communication increasingly becomes a dimension of human everyday life, individuals can engage in communication anywhere they go, without being concerned with logistical issues. Learning is understood as participation and distributed in networks of relationships across geographical spaces that come together when individuals communicate in virtual spaces. This allows an analytical focus on externalizing human experiences through a range of practices, inscriptions and technologies.

    The study presented in this paper has a twofold aim: (i) to present salient features of virtual institutional learning spaces where language learning is focused within higher education; (ii) discuss issues of fieldwork boundaries in netnographic research and theorise methodologies that follow participants not only across time and space but also across language varieties and modalities that are afforded when human-beings interact in synchronous virtual learning spaces.

    The empirical data in the study presented here is drawn from a larger project at the CCD (Communication, Culture and Diversity) research group in Sweden and includes netnographic data with approximately 40 hours of naturally occurring interactional material, generated through screen recordings of online sessions which are part of an Italian for Beginners course offered by a Swedish university. The present study investigates analytical and theoretical-methodological issues related to languaging and participation in virtual institutional environments from micro and macro levels. Sociocultural and postcolonial points of departure are deployed with the aim of throwing light upon netbased language learning and social positionings therein.

    The language varieties that are used in the virtual glocal community are framed in terms of what Pennycook calls complex ”mobile resources” (2012:27) that move across contexts and modes and across time and space. Mobility “affects the nature and function of the conventional conception of language in linguistics” (Blommaert, 2010:21) also when individuals in virtual language courses are not required to leave their homes and commute to a specific site where the course is offered.

  • 11.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Messina Dahlberg, Giulia
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Online-offline learning spaces in language focused higher education: (re)visiting boundaries2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As Technology Mediated Communication increasingly becomes a dimension of everyday life in different parts of the globe, human-beings have access to substantially different ways of engaging in learning and instructional practices “on the go”. Logistical issues take on newer dimensions here. Learning gets more clearly framed in terms of participation in distributed networks of relationships across both geopolitical and virtual spaces. From a researcher position, this allows for an analytical focus upon externalizing human experiences through a range of practices, inscriptions and technologies.

    The study presented in this paper has a dual aim: (i) present salient features of virtual institutional spaces where language learning is focused within higher education; (ii) discuss issues of fieldwork boundaries in netnography and theorise methodologies that follow participants both across time and space and across language varieties and modalities that are afforded when human-beings communicate in synchronous online-offline spaces (Bagga-Gupta, Messina Dahlberg & Gynne, 2014).

    The empirical data focused here is drawn from a large project at the Communication, Culture and Diversity, CCD research group in Sweden (www.oru.se/humus/ccd/) which includes 80 hours of naturally occurring interactional materials, generated through screen recordings of online sessions of an Italian for Beginners course offered by a Swedish university (www.oru.se/english/research/CINLE, Dahlberg & Bagga-Gupta, 2013). The study investigates analytical and theoretical-methodological issues related to languaging and participation in virtual institutional environments across micro-macro scales. Sociocultural and postcolonial framings are deployed with the aim of throwing light upon netbased language learning and social positionings therein.

    The language varieties used in the virtual glocal community we focus are framed in terms of complex ”mobile resources” (Pennycook, 2012:27) that shift fluidly across contexts, modes, time and space (Bagga-Gupta, 2013). Mobility “affects the nature and function of the conventional conception of language in linguistics” (Blommaert, 2010:21) when human-beings are not required to leave their physical settings in order to participate in the physical sites where a course is delivered.

    Our preliminary findings suggest that interactional spaces of virtual courses are co-created by members in the situated-distributed practices across space and time. The epistemologies of ‘Timespace’ in such open-spaces are contingent upon members’ (im)mobility in that they are participants in different constellations distributed in online-offline spaces simultaneously. Here the notion of mobility is twofold: on the one hand, participants negotiate their rights as members of online glocal spaces of the virtual classroom across the boundaries of different geopolitical locations; on the other hand mobility is framed in terms of the manipulation of offline-online information and artifacts in the virtual collaborative setting. Attending to the fallacy of thinking in terms of fieldwork in static geopolitical spaces and communities, our take on mobility is also related to dismantling the dichotomies real/virtual, face-to-face/technology-mediated, etc in favour of a nexus-like perspective. Here the focus lies on the distributed-discursive constitution of the participants’ worlds in concert with artifacts where the boundaries of what is real and tangible and what is curtailed and obscure become both fluid-diffuse and concrete-tangible.

  • 12.
    Bedward, Alice
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Sark Newspaper and the 2012 General Election: A Critical Discourse Analysis ! !2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 13.
    Begovic, Ena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lindholm, Albin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    VÄRK? LITA PÅ OSS.: Visuell retorik i marknadsföringen av konventionella läkemedel och naturpreparat.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsatsen är en retorisk studie som behandlar marknadsföringen av utvalda konventionella läkemedel och naturpreparat. Studiens huvudsakliga tillvägagångssätt är att genom visuell retorik finna och analysera de delar i reklambildernas utformning som är av retoriskt intresse. Intressant är att se hur de olika produkterna marknadsförs för att skapa förtroende genom dess argumentation inom retoriska övertygandemedel. Resonemang förs även för att se hur reklamerna förhåller sig till publikens normer, rådande regler och trosföreställningar där även de platser för reklamens publicering vägs in. Med analysernas resultat som utgångspunkt följer en diskussion kring de övertygandemedel som finns i de olika reklambilderna.

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  • 14.
    Bennett, Samuel
    et al.
    Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    ter Wal, Jessika
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Lipinski, Artur
    Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    Fabiszak, Malgrzata
    Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The representation of third country nationals in european news discourse: journalistic perceptions and practices2013In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 248-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on semi-structured interviews with journalists in six European countries, this article examines the extent to which the findings of recent literature about the representation of migrants in European media content are reflected in the perceptions of journalists themselves about the way in which migrants are represented in the media discourses produced by their outlets. It finds that the four key findings of the literature were by and large confirmed, namely inaccurate group labelling and designation, negative or victimised representation, underrepresentation of migrants in quotations, and the scarce reference to a wider European context. Finally, the article discusses media professionals’ self-reported awareness about general professional ethics versus diversity-specific ethics, and about the way in which their outlets cover news involving ‘‘new’’ immigrants, i.e. nationals of non-European Union countries residing in the European Union, and examines the differences between media practices and perceptions in ‘‘old’’ and ‘‘new’’ immigration countries.

    For a full explanation of the methodology of the research project, please see the introduction in this themed section: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2012.740213.

  • 15.
    Blom, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Fristedt, Emma
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Matsituationen i förskolan som språklig arena2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 16.
    Breazu, Petre
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow, Institute for Diplomacy and International Governance, Loughborough University London, London, UK.
    Machin, David
    Department of Linguistics, School of International Studies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China.
    ‘It’s still them’: concealed racism against Roma in Romanian television news2022In: Social Identities, ISSN 1350-4630, E-ISSN 1363-0296, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 90-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that news media around the world carry negative representations of ethnic minorities which incite violence, hatred or lead to more marginalisation and social exclusion [Bhatia, M., Poynting, S., & Tufail, W. (2018). Media, crime and racism. Springer; Elias, A., Mansouri, F., & Paradies, Y. (2021). Media, public discourse and racism. In A. Elias, F. Mansouri, & Y. Paradies (Eds.), Racism in Australia today (pp. 211–240). Palgrave Macmillan]. It is also the case that overt racism has become less tolerated in society and, therefore, racist discourses now tend to take more subtle forms, often disguised as reasonable concerns about threats to national culture, economic burdens or disruptions of social order [Bonilla-Silva, E. (2006). Racism without racists: Color-blind racism and the persistence of racial inequality in the United States. Rowman & Littlefield]. This is very much the case regarding the Roma. Yet, less research has been carried out on the way that the affordances of television – juxtaposition of images, captions, sound and voice-overs, editing, and resequencing – may have very specific ways to conceal racism. In this paper, using Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis, we examine the representation of the Roma in a Romanian television news report, in the case of a highly mundane story – a failure to pay electricity bills. We show how television news with its affordances can camouflage racism, and distract from the extreme poverty and social exclusion that Romani people experience in contemporary Europe. 

  • 17.
    Brewster, Robert L.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A Conflict of Rights: A critical analysis of discourse between the rights of free speech and freedom of religion as seen on the Huffington Post2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 18.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Cedersund, ElisabetHälsohögskolan, Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Välfärdspolitik i praktiken: om perspektiv och metoder i forskning2007Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Förändringar av människors villkor i samhället kräver nya sätt att forska. I den här antologin presenteras olika redskap för kvalitativ forskning om välfärd. I antologin utgår forskarna från redan välkända traditioner inom samhällsvetenskaplig forskning, men argumenterar inte bara för etablerade forskningsmetoder och teoretiska perspektiv inom välfärdsforskningen utan också för nya. Antologin har arbetats fram inom ramen för Nordiska Sommaruniversitetet och därmed influerats av olika forskningstraditioner som förekommer vid universitet och högskolor i Norden.

    Nya forskningsmetoder där människornas egna utsagor och upplevelser tillvaratas kan tolkas utifrån redan etablerade teoretiska perspektiv som fenomenologi, hermeneutik och interaktionism. De forskningsansatser som presenteras möjliggör att människor även själva är med och formulerar bilden av sina livsvillkor. I antologin visas hur forskning med dessa ansatser kan ske tillsammans med människor i olika åldrar och livssituationer. I antologin visas också att komparativa ansatser kan öppna för nya insikter om olika dimensioner i välfärdsystemet som en kulturell praktik.

  • 19.
    Bugge, Sofia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    "The more you grasp the culture, the more you realize how little you actually understand": A rhetorical analysis of democratic potentials in cross-border leadership through the lens of western leaders operating within a Chinese context. 2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government states that increased relations and collaborations with China will promote democratization. Leaders working cross-border can beviewed as a major source for influence. This thesis will use a rhetorical framework when aiming to examine democratic potentials in Swedish leaders operating in a Chinese context. Here communication is viewed as a possible tool for democratic influence. Rhetoricians believes that for influence to occur, the establishment of ethos is crucial, therefore will the thesis also explore how the leaders maintain and establish ethos in their daily interactions. The material mainly consists of interviews and field work carried out with leaders located in Shanghai and Hong Kong.

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  • 20.
    Carlzohn, Bianca
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    I svallvågorna av en kris: En studie av ledarskapet i krissituationen under tsunamikatastrofen idecember 20042016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 21.
    Celander, Linda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ”Vi vill reparera något som gått sönder: Ditt   förtroende”: En jämförande kvalitativ analys av Volkswagens krisretorik i  Sverige,   Tyskland,USA och Italien efter  emissionsskandalen2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 22. Chen, Ariel
    Changing visual representations and visual designs in Chinese women’s lifestyle magazine: The path to consumerism and new female identity2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Chen, Ariel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    “With Great Taste Comes Great Responsibility”: A Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis of corporate storytelling2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Chen, Ariel
    et al.
    Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Machin, David
    Brunel University, Kingston Ln, United Kingdom.
    Changing genres and language styles in contemporary Chinese lifestyle magazines2013In: Media International Australia: Incorporating Culture & Policy, ISSN 1329-878X, E-ISSN 2200-467X, no 147, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Chen, Ariel
    et al.
    Sch Journalism Media & Cultural Studies, Cardiff Univ, Cardiff, UK.
    Machin, David
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The local and the global in the visual design of a Chinese women's lifestyle magazine: a multimodal critical discourse approach2014In: Visual Communication, ISSN 1470-3572, E-ISSN 1741-3214, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 287-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses a multimodal critical discourse analytic approach to analyse how a Chinese women's magazine has changed visually over 17 years, partly through the gradual adoption of international branding design styles and partly through consumer product influences from Japan that are used to recontextualize core Chinese values and women's identities. The authors conclude that, like established international magazine brands, this title signifies freedom, but of a very different order to that found in those counterparts.

  • 26.
    Christians, Astrid
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Englund, Eddie
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ”Alltid med medlemmarnas bästa för  ögonen”: -   En retorisk studie av Kommunals  kriskommunikation  i sambandmed förtroendekrisen  inom Kommunal2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 27.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Interprofessionell kommunikation, kunskap och makt2008In: Vårdkommunikation i teori och praktik / [ed] Rolf Stål, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2008, p. 81-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Dornbos, Stina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Mobarak Nilsson, Amanda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hur anhöriga till brottsoffer framställs i kvällstidningar: En komparativ textanalys om gestaltningar inom svensk brottsjournalistik2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Studiens syfte är att undersöka hur journalister i Aftonbladet och Expressen framställer människor, som inte är brottsoffer eller förövare, vid brottshändelser. Brottshändelserna som står i fokus är “McCann-fallet” och “Englamordet”. Den primära teorin är gestaltningsteorin, men studien faller även tillbaka på medielogik, storytelling, nyhetsvärdering samt moraliska och etiska värderingar. Tidigare forskning som legat till stöd för studien har främst behandlat hur kidnappningar framställs i medierna, journalisters moraliska tänk kring exponering av barn i medierna, relationen mellan brott och medier, samt hur journalister ramar in och gestaltar händelser. Den tillämpade metoden är komparativ textanalys med interpersonell struktur. Studien har en kvalitativ form där sammanlagt 20 nyhetsartiklar från Aftonbladet och Expressen har studerats. Samtliga artiklar blev utvalda genom ett målstyrt urval. Ett genomgående resultat är att journalister vinklar och gestaltar personer via personifiering, dramatisering, storytelling och stereotypisering för att locka läsare. 

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    Hur anhöriga till brottsoffer framställs i kvällstidningar
  • 29.
    Ekström, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Östman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Family talk, peer talk, and young people’s civic orientation2013In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 294-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on interpersonal communication in the family and among peers in order to empirically examine the general idea that everyday civic talk might develop young people’s civic orientation. Two questions are addressed: (1) What is the significance of civic talk in relation to key dimensions of young people’s civic orientation? (2) What does civic talk in peer settings specifically contribute to young people’s civic orientation? The study is based on survey data from high school students and their parents (N = 1148). The findings offer clear support to the idea that civic talk in everyday contexts matters for young people’s development of political knowledge, democratic values and different forms of civic practices. Civic talk in peer settings contributes uniquely to all dimensions of youths’ civic orientation. Implications of the findings for political socialization research and theories of the democratic mechanisms of civic talk are discussed.

  • 30.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Al Jazeera and Political Scandal in the Middle East2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Arab Diaspora Media2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Decline of Freedom of Internet in Egypt 20132013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Egyptian Blogsphere and the Egyptian Revolution2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Fake News… New logo to an old trade2022In: Journalism in A time of Fake News / [ed] Ahmed El Gody, Örebro University , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ICT and gender inequality in the Middle East2008In: Global information technologies: concepts, methodologies, tools and applications / [ed] Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2008, p. 3250-3259Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ICTs and Gender Inequality in the Arab World2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Images of Denmark and Sweden in the arab blogsphere: readings from Al Arabiya.net2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Journalism education in a digital society2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Journalism in a network2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Social Networks, Media, and the Egyptian Revolution: Building Democratic Front?2020In: Examining the Roles of IT And Social Media in Democratic Development and Social Change / [ed] Vikas Kumar and Geetika Malhotra, IGI Global, 2020, p. 133-155Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The utilisation of social media in Egypt has irrevocably changed the nature of the traditional Egyptian public sphere. One can see the Egyptian online society as a multiplicity of networks. These networks have developed, transformed, and expanded over time, operating across all areas of life. Audiences started to utilise social media platforms providing detailed descriptions of Egyptian street politics, generating public interest and reinforcing citizen democracy. This trend changed the way audiences consumed news, with media organisations starting to expand their presence online so that, as well as providing news content, they also provided audience a 'space' to interact. This chapter establishes understanding on the role of social media in developing an Egyptian networked public sphere. Further, the chapter discusses the role social media plays in post 2011 revolution democratisation process. This study employed qualitative ethnography (nethnography) and network analysis on 20 Egyptian news and social media newspapers and websites to monitor online deliberation.

  • 41.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sosyal Medya ve Misir Devrimi: Demokratik Bir Kapasite Olusturabilir mi?2014In: Yeni Medya-yeni Pratikler-yeni Olanaklar / [ed] Emel Basturk Akca, Kocaeli: Umuttepe Yayinlari , 2014, p. 129-154Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sweden Democrats representation of immigrants on Social media: A critical Multimodal Analysis2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of social media in order to disseminate political communicational strategies has increased in Sweden. Previous studies have showed that social media can benefit right-wing political parties and other ideologically marginalised parties. The Sweden Democrats (SD) have since long preferred social media over main stream media. This paper presents a multimodal critical discourse analysis of a sample from a larger corpus of multimodal posts and video material about immigrants from the social media pages of right-wing populist part Sweden Democrats (SD). Drawing on Van Leeuwen’s and David Machin’s framework for the representation of social actors, this paper investigate how multimodal resources contribute to shaping immigration discourse and to its bias, highlighting exclusionary ideologies through the decontextualisation of social practices. The result of this study show that SD are using the five communication strategies similar to that used by nativist propaganda to emphasise the view of immigrants as a threat to Swedish society. The othering of immigrants as non-natives is enacted through biased representation based on covert racist stereotypes. At the same time, visual anti-immigration rhetoric allows the leaders to “build their people” and self-promote their role as gate-keepers of the nation-state, and the public is urged to vote for them in order to restore security.

  • 43.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Revolution Continues: Mapping the Egyptian Twittersphere a Decade After the 2011 Revolution2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Use Of Information and Communication Technologies in Egyptian Newsrooms2014In: International Communication Association (ICA), Communication and the Good Life, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Elmadagli, Cansu
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Media and Communications.
    Machin, David
    Department of English, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China.
    The gains and losses of identity politics: the case of a social media social justice movement called stylelikeU2023In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 415-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    StyleLikeU is a hugely successful online social media platform that presents itself as a social justice movement related to body acceptance. Presenting moving personal stories, it offers a site for what it calls 'diverse individuals' to share their experiences as part of promoting individual self-acceptance in the face of a world that prioritizes one kind of body over another, which take the form of ableism, racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ageism, sizeism and prejudice against disfigurement. Drawing out the discursive script carried across the platform, we show how, beneath the rhetoric of progressiveness, social justice becomes a kind of personal therapy, related to empowerment and transformation, which erases actual differences in personal circumstances and the very forces of injustice. We place StyleLikeU into broader scholarly concerns about the neoliberal colonization of identity politics, diversity and intersectionality in institutions and in branding, drawing attention to how this can form one part of what are now presented as social justice movements.

  • 46.
    Eriksson, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Östman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Receptionsanalys2010In: Metoder i kommunikationsvetenskap / [ed] Mats Ekström, Larsåke Larsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2010, 2, p. 305-330Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Eriksson, Marcus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kihlgård, Emil
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ett vinnande koncept: En retorisk studie av Casinostugan & Leo vegas reklamfilmer2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 48.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Att informera om kärnavfall: från ingenjörskonst till informatörskonst1997Report (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Crisis Communication and Improvisation in a Digital Age2014In: The Routledge handbook of strategic communication / [ed] Derina Rhoda Holtzhausen, Ansgar Zerfass, Routledge, 2014, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the network landscape, ICT and social media have become an increasingly important tool in the strategic crisis communicator’s toolbox. Through the possibilities presented by communication technology, new work methods for and approaches to crisis communication are also being developed (Eriksson 2009, 2011). The modern strategic crisis manager and communicator are told to look to the work models within improvisational theater for the ideal logic (see, e.g., Finch and Welker 2004). Without direction, the theater ensemble often solves a challenging task and then takes the stage with success:

    ”Improvisation expands participants’ abilities to perceive and reduces the need for intense and specific scripted preparation” (2004:192).  The idea is that the organization’s and the crisis communicator’s ability to improvise and to take action in a crisis can be trained much like the abilities of a theater ensemble – all in the name of finding the best work methods for a particular situation rather than following the rules, directions and plans that characterized the classic crisis communication logic. Here, instead, prevails a greater need to dare to abandon controlling plans and understand the need for a crisis organization and communication that develops in symbiosis with the particular crisis at hand (see e.g. Czarniavska 2009; Gilpin & Murphy 2006, 2008; Holder 2004; McConnell & Drennan 2006).  

     

    Due to this development, the significance of the concept of strategy can be expected to undergo certain changes within the field of crisis communication. Perhaps strategy as a tool has even played out its role? Or is the meaning of concept simply changing? Via social media, many organizations today communicate with their surroundings in an undirected, improvisation- and situation-oriented way through which the perception of a crisis is developed in interaction with the user. Watchwords like control and steering have tended to become passé, or are at least changing. The question is how communicators’ attitudes toward previously developed crisis management plans and strategies change in such situations. What happens to the strategy logic – with its roots in the military sphere – that has so long characterized the field of crisis management when the communicator is forced to improvise to an ever-increasing degree?

     

    The aim of this chapter is to examine the role of strategy in a digital landscape of crisis communication, where all too rigid plans and guidelines are said to risk tying the hands of the communicator. The concept of strategy and as well as its meaning are discussed (see, e.g., Gilbert et al. 1988; Liddell Hart 1967), followed by a discussion of theories concerning the phenomenon of improvisation within crisis management and communication (e.g., Carniavska 2009; Gilpin & Murphy 2006, 2008; Weick 1988, 1993; Weick & Sutcliff 2007). The study’s empirical material is from qualitative interviews with 12-16 public relations officers, marketing managers and other strategic communicators who have worked with social media in their crisis communication. The study’s main research questions are: (1) How do the fields’ communicators combine today’s possibilities for improvisation (via social media) in relation to drilled strategies, tactics, action patterns and routines? (2) How can we understand the concept of strategy in this crisis communication context?

  • 50.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    En kunskapsöversikt om krishantering, kriskommunikation och sociala medier2014Report (Other academic)
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