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  • 1.
    Alexopoulou, Sofia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Opening the Digital Pandora΄s Box: The Grey Digital Divide in Greece2020In: Επιθεώρηση Υγείας-Health Review, ISSN 1105-9311, Vol. 31, no 180, p. 14-17Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults constitute a viable resource in some countries of the European Union (EU), which is not found in the social margin that predominantly occurs in Greece. These countries have realised that the usage of digital technologies (ICT’s and the Internet) is an important tool for activating older adults, reducing their loneliness and a first-class opportunity for improving their daily life, e.g. through the use of telemedicine. By contrast, in Greece, which is defined by a rapidly ageing population, the discussion on the “grey digital divide” (the lack of access/usage of digital technologies) in relation to older individuals remains a problem that has not yet been sufficiently explored, while the formal policy is still at an embryonic stage with significant consequences for the entire Greek society. To conclude, the digital divide in Greece is a multi-dimensional matter that reflects the chronic pathogenies of the Greek state and a lack of political imagination to change the current situation.

  • 2.
    Ask, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Taking initial steps towards enterprise architecture in local government2011In: Electronic government and the information systems perspective / [ed] Kim Normann Andersen, Enrico Francesconi, Åke Grönlund, Tom M. van Engers, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 26-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to increase the understanding of immature use of Enterprise Architectures (EAs). In this paper we present results from an eGovernment initiative in a Swedish local government. This longitudinal case study illustrates the problems of taking initial steps of moving towards an EA during the development and implementation an eGovernment initiative. Through an analysis of goal achievements, we develop a better understanding of the challenges of using EA frameworks for local eGovernment-projects. Our results show that the immature use of the EA framework resulted in parts of the organization deviating from plan where individual members began to implement individual solutions, instead of basing decisions on the overall architecture. This impaired project’s possibility to develop towards an EA in an efficient way.

  • 3.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Controling fake news in Arab newsrooms2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    ICT and gender inequality in the Middle East, towards active participation2006In: Encyclopedia of gender and information technology / [ed] Eileen M. Trauth, Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing, 2006, p. 772-779Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ICT, Media and the Egyptian Revolution: Building Networks of Democracy2015In: Promoting social change and democracy through information technology / [ed] Vikas Kumar, Jakob Svensson, Hershey, PA, USA: IGI Global, 2015, 1, p. 94-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Middle East2013Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The revolution continues: Mapping the Egyptian Twittersphere a decade after the 2011 Revolution2022In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 27, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten years after the onset of the Arab revolutions, Facebook and Twitter have turned into powerful enablers of vast disinformation campaigns, harassment, censorship, and incitement of violence against activists, journalists, and human rights defenders. This, however, does not mean that the Egyptian online experience is over. A new generation of digital activists has started to emerge, bringing together disparate individuals and groups educating citizens how to exploit social media tools to support a common cause: democracy. Commemorating the tenth anniversary of the Egyptian Revolution, social media activists remembered the 18–day Revolution, revisiting the besieged networked public sphere and examining the future of activism in Egypt. This study aims to map the Egyptian Twittersphere in its celebration of a decade of the Revolution, exploring the actors present, their voice and interactivity, and the main themes that evolved.

  • 8.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Connecting eGovernment to real government: the failure of the UN eParticipation index2011In: Electronic government: 10th International Conference, EGOV 2011, Delft, The Netherlands, August 29 - September 1, 2011, Proceedings / [ed] Marijn Janssen, Hans J. Scholl, Maria A. Wimmer, Yao-Hua Tan, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, Vol. 6846/2011, p. 26-37Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    eGovernment rankings are increasingly important as they guide countries’ focus of their efforts. Hence indexes must not just measure features of web sites but also accurately indicate underlying government processes. eGovernment rankings are in a process of maturation in that direction, moving from purely measuring web sites to assessing use and government qualities. One such measurement is the UN eParticipation index, intended to measure how well governments connect to their citizens. This paper analyzes the quality of the index by validating it against other indexes of government-citizen relations qualities, democracy, internet filtering, and transparency. Results: The relation between the index and democracy and participation is non-existent. Countries which are authoritarian or obstruct citizen internet use by filtering can score high on eParticipation by window-dressing their webs. We suggest that the eParticipation index includes an element of reality check and propose ways to do that.

  • 9.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Elektroniska omröstningar2001In: Rösträtten 80 år: forskarantologi / [ed] Christer Jönsson, Stockholm: Justitiedepartementet , 2001, p. 233-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    IT, demokrati och medborgarnas deltagande2001Book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Using ICT to combat corruption: tools, methods and results2010In: Increasing transparency and fighting corruption through ICT: empowering people and communities / [ed] Cecilia Strand, Stockholm: Universitetsservice US-AB , 2010, no 3, p. 7-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Grönlund, Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Andersson, Annika
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Accessibility revisited: identifying research gaps2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Grönlund, Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Flygare, Ann-Marie
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    The effect of eGovernment on corruption: measuring robustness of indexes2011In: Electronic government and the information systems perspective / [ed] Kim Normann Andersen, Enrico Francesconi, Åke Grönlund, Tom M. van Engers, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, Vol. 6866, p. 235-248Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One eGovernment proposal is that increased transparency and formalization of processes will reduce corruption. Andersen [4]) and Shim & Eom [6] found such positive effects, but findings are not comparable as different indexes were used and index quality was not tested. To fill this gap this paper uses statistical methods to investigate if the positive effect of eGovernment is robust across different indexes. We find that while corruption is very consistently measured by the CCI and CPI indexes, eGovernment indexes vary widely as predictors. The Economist and ITU indexes are the best predictors. The UN index scores fairly good but none of the other tested indexes can serve as indicator. Findings indicate that including social and institutional analysis improves an index hugely while measuring web sites is pointless. This suggests that indexes would score similarly different also on other eGovernment effects, and that the choice of eGovernment index is very important.

  • 14.
    Grönlund, Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Jakobsson, Mikael
    Electronic services to the citizens: usable and useful?1999In: Users in action: stories of users and telematics in everyday life / [ed] MariAnne Karlsson, Britt Östlund, Stockholm: Kommunikationsforskningsberedningen (KFB) , 1999, p. 51-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Grönlund, Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Wiberg, M.
    Mobility in the wild1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hedström, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Kolkowska, Ella
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Allen, J. P.
    School of Management, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.
    Value conflicts for information security management2011In: Journal of strategic information systems, ISSN 0963-8687, E-ISSN 1873-1198, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 373-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A business’s information is one of its most important assets, making the protection of information a strategic issue. In this paper, we investigate the tension between information security policies and information security practice through longitudinal case studies at two health care facilities. The management of information security is traditionally informed by a control-based compliance model, which assumes that human behavior needs to be controlled and regulated. We propose a different theoretical model: the value-based compliance model, assuming that multiple forms of rationality are employed in organizational actions at one time, causing potential value conflicts. This has strong strategic implications for the management of information security. We believe health care situations can be better managed using the assumptions of a value-based compliance model.

  • 17.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Evaluation of an m-service for farmers in a developing region: a case study from rural Bangladesh2011In: Media Asia, ISSN 0129-6612, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 41-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the issues relating to evaluating a mobile phone-based agricultural market information service designed for farmers in Bangladesh. The paper is grounded on a mixed methods research approach and case study supported by surveys and participant observations. The findings show and confirm that addressing the need assessment and ‘perceived ease of use’ adequately, upholding management efficiency, adopting innovative strategies for sustainability, getting the involvement of local stakeholders, deploying appropriate technology to make the service fully accessible by targeted end-users, and processing and disseminating qualitative, and useful content are the major aspects of a good service. The lessons learned from the case study can be of special interest for academicians as well as for practitioners who are particularly concerned with the use of mobile technologies for rural development in emerging economies.

  • 18.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Andersson, Annika
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Investigating choices of appropriate devices for one-to-one computing initiatives in schools worldwide2016In: International Journal of Information and Education Technology, ISSN 2010-3689, Vol. 6, no 10, p. 817-825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of technology in schools is rapidly increasing - today most notably through theone-to-one (1:1) programs that are being implemented all around the world.Considering how new technologies are emerging fast and obsoleting others in schools,there is a need to continuously monitor and understand the features of various devicesin terms of embedded technology and interaction with the users. This paper thereforepresents the nature of computing devices used in 1:1 computing programs at schoollevel around the world, including investigating the benefits of drawbacks, by means ofa systematic literature review and a survey conducted in some schools in Sweden. Thepaper also presents findings based on how the various uses of technology affectcooperation practices as well as personal exploration.

  • 19.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Agriculture market information E-service in Bangladesh: a stakeholder-oriented case analysis2007In: Electronic government / [ed] Maria A. Wimmer, Jochen Scholl, Åke Grönlund, Berlin: Springer , 2007, , p. 12p. 167-178Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper assesses an e-government project in Bangladesh using design-reality gap analysis and stakeholder theory. The project under study is anAgricultural Market Information System intended to provide timely and accuratemarket information to farmers, wholesalers, and retailers, for the purpose ofmaking actors more informed and markets more effective. The research questionsare; why did the system fail, and what, if anything, can be done toimprove it. The analysis shows deficiencies in both adaptation to stakeholderpreferences, needs and capabilities, as well as in project resources such as staffsupply and qualifications. Yet the project has been technically up-to-date andhas over time exhibited some learning as failures have resulted in adaptation tonew findings. This research suggests use of mobile technologies in combinationwith call centres and locally available human resources as the most importantfactors for success.

  • 20.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Agriculture market information services (AMIS) in the least developed countries (LDCs): nature, scope, and challenges2010In: Electronic government / [ed] Maria A.Wimmer, Jean-Loup Chappelet, Marijn Janssen, Hans J. Scholl, Berlin, Germany: Springer , 2010, p. 109-120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rural growth is seen as an engine to drive the economy ofdeveloping countries and the use of Agriculture Market Information Services(AMIS) is believed to enable this growth. This paper is based on a literaturestudy and investigates the spread and use of AMIS in the least developedcountries (n=49) in terms of users, management, funding, infrastructure, anddata. We investigate success as well as failure aspects, and discuss the role ofnew technologies. Findings show that while new technologies can improvedissemination of information, collecting data economically and meeting highquality requirements remains major challenges. The study contributes byproviding a comprehensive view of the challenges of AMIS in developingcountries and an AMIS project evaluation matrix (IS-PEM) based on thefindings, which together contribute to improving the design of future projects.

  • 21.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Applying design science approach in ICT4D research: mobile phone based agriculture market information service (AMIS) in Bangladesh2012In: Practical Aspects of Design Science: European Design Science Symposium, EDSS 2011, Leixlip, Ireland, October 14, 2011, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Markus Helfert, Brian Donnellan, Springer, 2012, p. 132-143Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the characteristics and scope of Information and Communication Technologies for Development  (ICT4D)  and Design Science Research (DSR), and subsequently presents findings  from a case study regard-ing how the call for future research, practical and methodological, on IS in gen-eral and ICT4D in particular can be well addressed with DSR. The paper con-tributes to the domain of design research knowledge as it critically discusses as well as exemplifies the use of DSR in an interpretive research perspective that aims at solving some socio-economic problems, which is significantly lacking in contemporary research. The major argument here is that DSR can be fruitfully used in ICT4D research as long as the goal of ICT4D research is to innovate or design something new. Furthermore, due to the stage-gate model nature of DSR, its comprehensive use in ICT4D needs an integrated research approach with well-coordinated activities throughout the development process.

  • 22.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Bangladesh calling: farmers' technology use practices as a driver for development2011In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 95-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Making farmers in developing countries more informed about market opportunities is generally considered an important step toward development of the agricultural sector and increasing individual farmers' income. Mobile phones are a useful technology for delivering such information, but are farmers ready? According to Sen [Development as freedom. In J. Ezer (Ed.), Gandhi's third assassination: Information and communication technology education in India (pp. 201-212)], human capability is the basic driver for development. This paper investigates, by means of a survey (n  =  420) to farmers in rural Bangladesh, what factors affect mobile phone ownership and use and what professional information is asked for. We find that access is very high, to a large extent through community use. Neither education nor income is a determining factor, but “modernity” - being young and/or having children - is. Even the very poor have access. Attitudes are very positive not just to the phones, but also to using them for professional information services. Hence, human capacity for development is there, as is technology. What is still lacking is the useful services adapted to the rural usage patterns and social context.

  • 23.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Digital Bangladesh: a change we can believe in ?2011In: Electronic government and the information systems perspective / [ed] Kim Normann Andersen, Enrico Francesconi, Åke Grönlund, Tom M. van Engers, Berlin: Springer, 2011, p. 107-121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turning Bangladesh, one of the world’s least developed countries, into a digitally developed nation by 2021 was one of the main electoral pledges of the present government. This vision, widely known as ‘Digital Bangladesh’, has contributed to a decisive victory for the alliance of ruling parties by securing absolute majority in the parliament. This paper investigates how this vision has been stewarded by measuring the level of commitment of the present government. In order to do so, a qualitative formative evaluation research approach has been followed, using Peña-López’s digital component access model, the National ICT Policy-2009 (NIP) and the national budgets of Bangladesh for the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 fiscal years. The main finding is that the Government’s commitment for initiating widespread digital development is so far not comprehensive and not consistent with the approved policies. There is also evidence of poor progress toward materializing a digital Bangladesh.

  • 24.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    The Bangladesh national biometric database: a transferable success?2010In: Electronic government and the information systems perspective / [ed] Kim Normann Andersen, Enrico Francesconi, Åke Grönlund, Tom M. van Engers, Nerlin, Germany: Springer , 2010, p. 189-203Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Having a reliable voter list for conducting free and fair elections in Bangladesh was earlier considered unachievable due to political instability, widespread corruption, and weak and demoralized leadership. However, in 2008 the PERP project succeeded in building the world’s currently largest biometric database covering the entire Bangladeshi voting age population, 80 million people. This paper describes the PERP project as well as the history of failed projects and analyses success factors based on the IS implementation literature. This is an interpretive case study where both primary and secondary data have been used. The key finding is that the major reason behind the success was to get the project done in a ‘politically controlled’ environment where the people worked in a highly structured management system following a concrete and realistic roadmap. The implications of this finding are discussed.

  • 25.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Scupola, Ada
    Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.
    E-service research trends in the domain of e-Government: a contemporary study2011In: International Journal of E-Services and Mobile Applications, ISSN 1941-627X, E-ISSN 1941-6288, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 38-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Government ‘e-service’ as a subfield of the e-government domain has been gaining attention topractitioners and academicians alike due to the growing use of information and communicationtechnologies at the individual, organizational and societal levels. This paper conducts a thoroughliterature review to examine the e-service research trends during the period between 2005 and2009 mostly in terms of, research methods, theoretical models and frameworks employed aswell as type of research questions. The results show that there has been a good amount ofpapers focusing on ‘e-Service’ within the field of e-government with a good combination ofresearch methods and theories. In particular the findings show that technology acceptance,evaluation and system architecture are the most common themes, that circa half of the studiessurveyed focus on the organizational perspective and that the most employed research methodsare case studies and surveys, often with a mix of both types of methodologies.

  • 26.
    Issaoui, Awatef
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Örtensjö, Jenny
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
    Exploring the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) compliance in cloud services: Insights from Swedish public organizations on privacy compliance2023In: Future Business Journal, E-ISSN 2314-7210, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption of cloud services offers manifold advantages to public organizations; however, ensuring data privacy during data transfers has become increasingly complex since the inception of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This study investigates privacy concerns experienced by public organizations in Sweden, focusing on GDPR compliance. A qualitative interpretative approach was adopted, involving semi-structured interviews with seven employees from five public organizations in Sweden. Additionally, secondary data were gathered through an extensive literature review. The collected data were analyzed and classified using the seven privacy threat categories outlined in the LINDDUN framework. The key findings reveal several significant privacy issues when utilizing public cloud services, including unauthorized access, loss of confidentiality, lack of awareness, lack of trust, legal uncertainties, regulatory challenges, and loss of control. The study underscores the importance of implementing measures such as anonymization, pseudonymization, encryption, contractual agreements, and well-defined routines to ensure GDPR compliance. The findings emphasize the importance of implementing measures such as anonymization, pseudonymization, encryption, contractual agreements, and well-defined routines to ensure GDPR compliance. Furthermore, this research highlights the critical aspect of digital sovereignty in addressing privacy challenges associated with public cloud service adoption by public organizations in Sweden.

  • 27.
    Jaakkola, Hannu
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Henno, Jaak
    Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Mäkelä, Jukka
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    The Digitalization Push in Universities2016In: 2016 39th International Convention on Information and Communication Technology, Electronics and Microelectronics (MIPRO): May 30 - June 3, 2016, Opatija, Croatia : proceedings / [ed] Biljanovic, P.; Butkovic, Z.; Skala, K.; Grbac, T.G.; CicinSain, M.; Sruk, V.; Ribaric, S.; Gros, S.; Vrdoljak, B.; Mauher, M.; Tijan, E.; Lukman, D., New York: IEEE , 2016, p. 1025-1031Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization is spreading across our current society and is a major source of the changes - incremental and also radical - encountered in daily life. It changes the content of jobs: some jobs are no longer needed, and new jobs are also needed. Digitalization in universities has several implications - in teaching, research, and in administration. The opportunities provided by digitalization are manifold. In our paper, we separate two digitalization related topic areas - i.e., networking and digitalization itself. Our paper focuses on academic publishing and we will analyze its role in the current academic world. The approach selected emphasizes the role of an individual researcher and, in particular, publishing the results of their work in academic forums. Digitalization provides a wide variety of new forums but also the means to recognize the impact of the forums and affect it. Networking as a phenomenon is also based on digitalization - physical networks and social networking related applications can be beneficial for researchers. Because teaching is the most visible work of universities, the role of digitalization in this sector is also addressed briefly in this paper.

  • 28.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Lyytikkä, Jani
    Deloitte Oy, Helsinki, Finland.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Kärkkäinen, Hannu
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Value added of social media in open innovation community: the perspective of a community hosting company that produces B2B products2014In: AcademicMindTrek '14: Proceedings of the 18th International Academic MindTrek Conference / [ed] Artur Lugmayr, Heljä Franssila, Janne Paavilainen, New York, NY: ACM Digital Library, 2014, p. 118-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media and open innovation communities are becoming increasingly important not only for business-to-consumer (B2C) companies, in which context they have resulted in relatively large and fast-growing research body, but increasingly also to the development of business-to-business (B2B) products and innovations. In order to find out how social media and open innovation communities can be used to create value for the development of B2B product, we selected a single case study research method. The selected single case represents a unique case regarding open innovation community and social media use in the development of complex B2B products.

  • 29.
    Khando, Khando
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Department of Informatics.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Department of Informatics.
    Gao, Shang
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Department of Informatics.
    The Emerging Technologies of Digital Payments and Associated Challenges: A Systematic Literature Review2022In: Future Internet, E-ISSN 1999-5903, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-21Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interplay between finance and technology with the use of the internet triggered the emergence of digital payment technologies. Such technological innovation in the payment industry is the foundation for financial inclusion. However, despite the continuous progress and potential of moving the payment landscape towards digital payments and connecting the population to the ubiquitous digital environment, some critical issues need to be addressed to achieve a more harmonious inclusive and sustainable cashless society. The study aims to provide a comprehensive literature review on the emerging digital payment technologies and associated challenges. By systematically reviewing existing empirical studies, this study puts forward the state-of-the-art classification of digital payment technologies and presents four categories of digital payment technologies: card payment, e-payment, mobile payment and cryptocurrencies. Subsequently, the paper presents the key challenges in digital payment technologies categorized into broad themes: social, economic, technical, awareness and legal. The classification and categorization of payment technologies and associated challenges can be useful to both researchers and practitioners to understand, elucidate and develop a coherent digital payment strategy.

  • 30.
    Koch, Sabine
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Medical Informatics and Engineering, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Maria
    Department of Medical Sciences, Medical Informatics and Engineering, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Department of Medical Sciences, Medical Informatics and Engineering, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Moström, Dennis
    DataVis AB, Örnsköldsvik, Sweden.
    Towards a virtual health record for mobile home care of elderly citizens2004In: MEDINFO 2004: Proceedings of the 11th World Congress on Medical Informatics / [ed] Fieschi, M., Coiera, E., Li, Y.-C.J., Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2004, p. 960-963Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile work situations within home care of the elderly require immediate and ubiquitous access to patient-oriented data. The ongoing Swedish research project “Technical support for Mobile CloseCare” focuses on the development and evalua-tion of work-scenario oriented ICT support for enhanced home care of elderly citizens. The aim of the project is to pro-vide a seamless and consistent information flow between dif-ferent health care providers and to give intuitive access to information services for the elderly and their relatives. For that purpose, different independent software components are connected through a mobile communication platform. Flexible access to prioritized information for different users in different work situations will be given through a virtual health record. In order to obtain both usable and clinically relevant systems, a user centered system development approach is followed. Evaluation of the project results will be based on usability tests and quasi-experimental studies on how system implemen-tation influences quality of care and job- and life satisfaction for care providers, patients and relatives.

  • 31.
    Kondyli, Vasiliki
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hartmann, Timo
    Systems Engineering, Civil Engineering Institute, TU Berlin, Germany.
    Precedent Based Design Foundations for Parametric Design: The Case of Navigation and Wayfinding2018In: Advances in Computational Design, ISSN 2383-8477, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 339-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parametric design systems serve as powerful assistive tools in the design process by providing a flexible approach for the generation of a vast number of design alternatives. However, contemporary parametric design systems focus primarily on low-level engineering and structural forms, without an explicit means to also take into account high-level, cognitively motivated people-centred design goals.

    We present a precedent-based parametric design method that integrates people-centred design “precedents” rooted in empirical evidence directly within state of the art parametric design systems. As a use-case, we illustrate the general method in the context of an empirical study focusing on the multi-modal analysis of wayfinding behaviour in two large-scale healthcare environments. With this use-case, we demonstrate the manner in which: (1). a range of empirically established design precedents —e.g., pertaining to visibility and navigation— may be articulated as design constraints to be embedded directly within state of the art parametric design tools (e.g., Grasshopper); and (2). embedded design precedents lead to the (parametric) generation of a number of morphologies that satisfy people-centred design criteria (in this case, pertaining to wayfinding).

    Our research presents an exemplar for the integration of cognitively motivated design goals with parametric design-space exploration methods. We posit that this opens-up a range of technological challenges for the engineering and development of next-generation computer aided architecture design systems.

  • 32.
    Mathew Martin, Poothullil John
    Department of Outreach & Extension Services, AYJNIHH, New Delhi, India.
    Web Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities: Evidence from India2008In: Communicator, ISSN 0588-8093, Vol. XLIII, no 1, p. 28-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Websites are today the face of an organization, with Global reach. The Information and Technology (IT) Act 2000 of India, is entirely silent on the subject of web accessibility. However the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) guidelines of 2009, which has been ratified by Govt. of India, of which Article 9.2 (g) & (h) especially lays down that, states should facilitate access for Persons with disabilities (PWDs) to new information and communication technologies, especially the Internet. A study was undertaken on 3rd December 2009, to analyze the qualities of a website designed by Government Organizations (GOs) and Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) working for PWDs in terms of Information & Dissemination, Accessibility, Design and Interactive participatory features. The main contribution of this study is to illuminate the features of websites used by GOs and NGOs working for PWDs in India and its accessibility.

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  • 33.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Lindqvist, Joakim
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tunedal, Tobias
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Duvåker, Axel
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    A study on pre-adoption of a self-management application by Parkinson’s disease patients2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of factors influencing the acceptance by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients of a self-management application for an Internet of Things system. Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) factors including performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence were tested along with sociodemographic (age and gender) and technology-associated (experience with modern technology) factors to determine their contributions for predicting behavioral intention to use the application. Fifty respondents completed the survey. The results show that the UTAUT-based factors, sociodemographic and technology-associated factors account for 82.9% of the variability in PD patients' behavioralintention to use the application. We found that women were significantly more positive than men (p<0.001) in their intention to use the application. If offered the application in the future, 70% of the respondents would use it. Respondents with lower level of experience with technology had less intention to use the application. Performance expectancy and social influence were the only factors that positively predicted intention to use the application. The results showed high scores related to intention to use the application, suggesting high acceptance of the application by the PD patients. Based on qualitative results, the application was seen by PD patients as a useful tool for providing them a better overview of their health status. Finally, the acceptance of the application can be increased by showing its benefits to the PD patients and by developing social strategies to encourage them to stimulate each other to use the application.

  • 34.
    Normann Andersen, Kim
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Francesconi, EnricoDipartimento di Sistemi e Informatica (DSI), Universita`degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy.Grönlund, ÅkeÖrebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.van Engers, Tom M.Leibniz Center for Law; University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Electronic government and the information systems perspective: Second international conference, EGOVIS 2011, Toulouse, France, August 29 – September 2, 2011, Proceedings2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Rexhepi, Hanife
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Moll, Jonas
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Do you want to receive bad news through your patient accessible electronic health record? A national survey on receiving bad news in an era of digital health2020In: Proceedings of the Eighteenth International Symposium for Health Information Management Research, Kalmar: Linnaeus University, University of Sheffield , 2020, p. 169-178Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) have been around for many years in several countries, there is a lack of research investigating patients' preferences for receiving bad news, including through PAEHRs. Little is also known about the characteristics of the patients who prefer to receive bad news through the PAEHR in terms of e.g. medical diagnosis, age and educational level.This study, based on a national patient survey in Sweden (N=2587), investigated this. Results show that, generally, receiving bad news by reading in the PAEHR is still among the least preferred options. Additionally, a higher proportion of men want to receive bad news in the PAEHR compared to women (p=0.001), and the same goes for those who are not working/have worked in healthcare (p=0.007). An effect of disease groups was also found, showing that diabetes patients in particular, want to receive bad news through the PAEHR.

  • 36.
    Riabacke, Mona
    et al.
    Dept. of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    eParticipation galore?: Extending multi-criteria decision analysis to the public2011In: International Journal of Public Information Systems, ISSN 1653-4360, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 79-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New approaches and tools are required because of the increasing request for public participation and democratic decision making. There are two particular major challenges associated with this namely, applications allowing for large numbers of users and the balancing of participation and expertise. This article tests a method attempting to achieve this by combining a multi-criteria decision approach with different forms of discussion and deliberation. The method involves relaxed requirements for user exactness in statements of opinion and was tested on 90 students aged 17-19. Is it possible to extend multi-criteria decision analysis to the public? In order to answer this question, our research focuses on (1) scalability, or the potential for increased participation, as well as (2) decision quality, i.e. whether the alternatives are reflected upon and if there have been reasoned judgments. The test and survey found both these criteria met. The findings suggest that the method can be used for large scale participation during a decision making process, but also that a participatory process is improved by lengthier deliberation and more than one point of measurement so that opinions can stabilize.

  • 37.
    St John, Oliver
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Doing migration digitally: A preliminary analys of migrants’ attitudes to digital resources2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Stenlund, Jörgen
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Institutionen för teknik och naturvetenskap, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Travelling through time: Students’ interpretation of evolutionary time in dynamic visualizations2019Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolutionary knowledge is important to understand and address contemporary challenges such as loss of biodiversity, climate change and antibiotic resistance. An important aspect that is considered to be a threshold concept in teaching and learning about evolution is the time it involves. The history of evolution comprises several scales of magnitude, some of which are far from direct human experience and therefore difficult to understand. One way of addressing this issue is to use dynamic visualizations that represent time, for example, to facilitate teaching and learning about evolution.

    This thesis investigates how students’ comprehension of evolution and evolutionary time can be facilitated by visualizations in educational settings. Two different dynamic visualizations were investigated. In paper I different temporal versions of a spatio-temporal animation depicting hominin evolution were explored. The temporal information was expressed as one or several timelines along which an animated cursor moved, indicating the rate of time. Two variables, the number of timelines with different scales, and the mode of the default animated time rate (either constant throughout the animation or decreasing as the animation progressed), were combined to give four different time representations. The temporal aspects investigated were undergraduate students' ability to find events at specific times, comprehend order, comprehend concurrent events, comprehend the length of time intervals, and their ability to compare the lengths of time intervals.

    In paper II, perceptions and comprehension of temporal aspects in an interactive, multi-touch tabletop application, DeepTree, were investigated. This application depicts the tree of life. The focus was on the interactive aspects, especially how the zooming feature was perceived, but also on any misinterpretations associated with the interaction. The same temporal aspects listed for paper I were also implicitly investigated.

    The findings indicate that handling the problem of large differences in scale by altering the rate of time in the visualization can facilitate perception of certain temporal aspects while, at the same time, can hinder a correct comprehension of other temporal aspects. Findings concerning DeepTree indicate that the level of interactions varies among users, and that the zooming feature is perceived in two ways, either as a movement in time or as a movement in the metaphorical tree. Several misinterpretations were observed, for example the assumption that the zooming time in the tree corresponds to real time, that there is an implicit coherent timeline along the y-axis of the tree, and that more nodes along a branch corresponds to a longer time.

    The research reported in this thesis supports the claim that careful choice, and informed use of visualizations matters, and that different visualizations are best suited for different educational purposes

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    Traveling through time: Students´interpretation of evolutionary time in dynamic visualizations
  • 39.
    Thangavel, Gomathi
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Customized Information and Communication Technology for Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Among Older Adults: Scoping Review2022In: JMIR Mental Health, E-ISSN 2368-7959, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e34221Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Advancements in science and various technologies have resulted in people having access to better health care, a good quality of life, and better economic situations, enabling humans to live longer than ever before. Research shows that the problems of loneliness and social isolation are common among older adults, affecting psychological and physical health. Information and communication technology (ICT) plays an important role in alleviating social isolation and loneliness.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review is to explore ICT solutions for reducing social isolation or loneliness among older adults, the purpose of ICT solutions, and the evaluation focus of these solutions. This study particularly focuses on customized ICT solutions that either are designed from scratch or are modifications of existing off-the-shelf products that cater to the needs of older adults.

    METHODS: A scoping literature review was conducted. A search across 7 databases, including ScienceDirect, Association for Computing Machinery, PubMed, IEEE Xplore, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Science, was performed, targeting ICT solutions for reducing and managing social isolation and loneliness among older adults. Articles published in English from 2010 to 2020 were extracted and analyzed.

    RESULTS: From the review of 39 articles, we identified 5 different purposes of customized ICT solutions focusing on reducing social isolation and loneliness. These were social communication, social participation, a sense of belonging, companionship, and feelings of being seen. The mapping of purposes of ICT solutions with problems found among older adults indicates that increasing social communication and social participation can help reduce social isolation problems, whereas fulfilling emotional relationships and feeling valued can reduce feelings of loneliness. In terms of customized ICT solution types, we found the following seven different categories: social network, messaging services, video chat, virtual spaces or classrooms with messaging capabilities, robotics, games, and content creation and management. Most of the included studies (30/39, 77%) evaluated the usability and acceptance aspects, and few studies (11/39, 28%) focused on loneliness or social isolation outcomes.

    CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights the importance of discussing and managing social isolation and loneliness as different but related concepts and emphasizes the need for future research to use suitable outcome measures for evaluating ICT solutions based on the problem. Even though a wide range of customized ICT solutions have been developed, future studies need to explore the recent emerging technologies, such as the Internet of Things and augmented or virtual reality, to tackle social isolation and loneliness among older adults. Furthermore, future studies should consider evaluating social isolation or loneliness while developing customized ICT solutions to provide more robust data on the effectiveness of the solutions.

  • 40.
    Thangavel, Gomathi
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. College of Business, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Department of Communication, Quality Management and Information Systems, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Information and Communication Technology for Managing Social Isolation and Loneliness Among People Living With Parkinson Disease: Qualitative Study of Barriers and Facilitators2024In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 26, article id e48175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex, noncurable, and progressive neurological disease affecting different areas of the human nervous system. PD is associated with both motor and nonmotor symptoms, which negatively affect patients' quality of life and may cause changes in socialization such as intentional social withdrawal. This may further lead to social isolation and loneliness. The use of information and communication technology (ICT) plays an important role in managing social isolation and loneliness. Currently, there is a lack of research focusing on designing and developing ICT solutions that specifically address social isolation and loneliness among people living with PD.

    OBJECTIVE: This study addresses this gap by investigating barriers and social needs in the context of social isolation, loneliness, and technology use among people living with PD. The insights gained can inform the development of effective ICT solutions, which can address social isolation and loneliness and improve the quality of life for people living with PD.

    METHODS: A qualitative study with 2 phases of data collection were conducted. During the first phase, 9 health care professionals and 16 people living with PD were interviewed to understand how PD affects social life and technology use. During the second phase, 2 focus groups were conducted with 4 people living with PD in each group to gather insights into their needs and identify ways to manage social isolation and loneliness. Thematic analysis was used to analyze both data sets and identify key themes.

    RESULTS: The results showed that the barriers experienced by people living with PD due to PD such as "fatigue," "psychological conditions," "social stigma," and "medication side effects" affect their social life. People living with PD also experience difficulties using a keyboard and mouse, remembering passwords, and navigating complex applications due to their PD-related physical and cognitive limitations. To manage their social isolation and loneliness, people living with PD suggested having a simple and easy-to-use solution, allowing them to participate in a digital community based on their interests, communicate with others, and receive recommendations for social events.

    CONCLUSIONS: The new ICT solutions focusing on social isolation and loneliness among people living with PD should consider the barriers restricting user's social activities and technology use. Given the wide range of needs and barriers experienced by people living with PD, it is more suitable to adopt user-centered design approaches that emphasize the active participation of end users in the design process. Importantly, any ICT solution designed for people living with PD should not encourage internet addiction, which will further contribute to the person's withdrawal from society.

  • 41. Watson, Richard T.
    et al.
    Kunene, K. Niki
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Frugal information systems (IS)2013In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 176-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A discussion of the factors contributing to a likely increase in austerity establishes the case for a greater emphasis on frugal information systems (IS), which is defined as an information system that is developed and deployed with minimal resources to meet the pre-eminent goal of the client. The U-constructs are adopted as a foundation for a frugal IS, and two simple messaging system-based case studies illustrate their application. Design guidelines and practices for frugal IS are considered. The challenges and potential gains of frugal IS are reviewed.

  • 42. Wiberg, Mikael
    et al.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Mobility in the wild social aspects of mobile work: a framework for further research and design1999Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report ongoing research in search of characteristics of mobile work and use of mobile ICT (information and communication technologies) to support such work. Based on an empirical investigation of the work of mobile service technicians at Telia Nära, we outline five areas of social interaction where mobility changes fundamental aspects of the work.

  • 43.
    Åström, Joachim
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Online consultations in local government: what works, when, and why?2011In: Connecting democracy: online consultation and the flow of political communication / [ed] Stephen Coleman, Peter M. Shane, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2011, p. 75-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
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