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  • 1. Ahlgren, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Vad fungerar i Sverige?: Om svenska utvärderingar av insatser till ungdomar som begår brott2010In: Ungdomar som begår brott: vilka insatser fungerar? / [ed] Henrik Andershed, Anna-Karin Andershed, Kerstin Söderholm Carpelan, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2010, 1, p. 126-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alexopoulou, Sofia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pavli, Antonia
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    ‘Beneath this mask, there is more than flesh, beneath this mask there is an idea’: The 19th International Roundtable for the Semiotics of Law (IRSL 2018). Örebro, Sweden, May 23-252018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Once upon a time, there was the legend of Robin Hood, the English folklore hero who was not only a skillful archer but also swordsman. Not surprisingly, the famous outlaw didn’t act alone in the deep Sherwood Forest but with the help of his band of Merry Men. His mission was to steal money from the rich and give it back to the poor. Therefore, the peasants considered Hood both as their protector and friend. Even today, Robin Hood represents in our minds a clear exemplar against any sort of oppressive authority, which in his time took the form of the Sheriff of Nottingham. Do modern heroes still exist to get inspiration by? The answer to this question is not trouble-free. A great part of people would say that the group of ‘Anonymous’ -known as ‘Anons’- falls into the category of contemporary heroes. Anons could be discerned as a ‘reincarnation’ of the digital version of Robin Hood since they fight against corruption, repression, and injustice, as he did. More precisely, the group of Anonymous is a global, Internet-based social movement of mostly young and dissatisfied people who decided to provide their own answer towards the established global governance and order. This paper will investigate the latest hacking activity of the Anonymous against a number of governmental websites in Greece. The purpose of Anonymous -as stated on their Facebook page- was to protect/defend the Greek citizens who sternly suffer because of the financial crisis and to give a ‘strong lesson’ to the elected politicians in office. Drawing on material from newspapers articles, weblogs and videos, this article aims to understand whether the group of Anonymous continues the long tradition of Robin Hood as a heroic figure/icon, or it symbolizes something radically new.

  • 3.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Kronlid, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Pragmatiska studier av meningsskapande2008In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the article is to present a pragmatic approach for studies of meaning-making used in the articles of this issue. The approach, which is developed within the SMEDgroup (Studies of Meaning-making in Educational Discourses), mainly builds on the writings of John Dewey, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. A common ambition for the researchers in SMED is to enable studies and discussions on questions concerning how meanings are made in people’s actions. Another ambition is to carry out these studies beyond assumptions of dualism, essentialism, causality and determinism. In this perspective learning and socialization are viewed in a communicative perspective. We argue in the article that our approach makes it possible, and important, to study meaning-making in action in different kinds of educational practices.

     

  • 4.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Kronlid, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tema: Didaktiska undersökningar2008In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 5-10Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En presentation av det didaktiska angreppssättet som ligger till grund för temat Didaktiska undersökningar i Utbildning och demokrati nr 3, 2008.

  • 5. Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Östman, Leif
    Pragmatic investigation: studies of meaning-making in educational practices2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this paper is to present and discuss a pragmatic approach for studies of meaning-making in different educational practices. The approach – built on a framework developed within the SMED-group (Studies of Meaning-making in Educational Discourses) at the universities of Uppsala and Örebro – is illustrated in a number of empirical studies. The main point of departure in the studies is taken in pragmatic curriculum theory and sociocultural perspectives on learning, and is inspired mainly by John Dewey, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. A special focus is directed to communication practices and content selection within Physical education, Environmental education and Science education. A common ambition is to offer a language that enables studies and discussions on questions concerning how meanings are made in people’s actions. Another ambition is to make these investigations beyond assumptions of dualisms, essentialism, causality and determinism. In this perspective learning and socialisation is viewed in communicative perspective. Therefore, many of the studies are built on video recorded classroom conversations, but also on analysis of various kinds of written texts. We argue in the paper that this approach makes it possible to study meaning-making – learning and socialisation – in different kinds of educational practices.

  • 6. Ambrosio, Fabrisia
    et al.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lexell, Jan
    Fitzgerald, G. Kelley
    Boninger, Michael L.
    Huard, Johnny
    The effect of muscle loading on skeletal muscle regenerative potential: an update of current research findings relating to aging and neuromuscular pathology2009In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skeletal muscle is a dynamic tissue with a remarkable ability to continuously respond to environmental stimuli. Among its adaptive responses is the widely investigated ability of skeletal muscle to regenerate after loading or injury or both. Although significant basic science efforts have been dedicated to better understand the underlying mechanism controlling skeletal muscle regeneration, there has been relatively little impact in the clinical approaches used to treat skeletal muscle injuries and wasting. The purpose of this review article is to provide an overview of the basic biology of satellite cell function in response to muscle loading and to relate these findings in the context of aging and neuromuscular pathology for the rehabilitation medicine specialist.

  • 7.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Farrington, David P.
    Risk- och skyddande faktorer för psykosociala problem bland förskolebarn: vad vi vet från forskning och hur det kan användas i praktiken2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Söderholm Carpelan, Kerstin
    Om insatser som kan användas i ungdomsvård och deras effekter2010In: Ungdomar som begår brott: vilka insatser fungerar? / [ed] Henrik Andershed, Anna-Karin Andershed, Kerstin Söderholm Carpelan, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2010, 1, p. 51-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ongoing activities to summarize effective work with children: the Nordic countries2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stability and change of psychopathic traits: what do we know?2010In: Handbook of child and adolescent psychopathy / [ed] Randall Salekin, Donald Lynam, New York: Guilford Press, 2010, 1, p. 233-250Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The importance of using knowledge from research on risk and protective factors in practice with children2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Andershed, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Externalizing and internalizing problems among Youths and the need to understand the heterogeneity of these problems2012In: For the sake of the children: social paediatrics in action. A festschrift in honour of Staffan Jansson / [ed] Martin McKee, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2012, 1, p. 60-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Andershed, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Subgroups of children with conduct problems2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Andershed, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ungdomsbrottslighet: hur vanligt är det och vad beror det på?2010In: Ungdomar som begår brott: vilka insatser fungerar? / [ed] Henrik Andershed, Anna-Karin Andershed, Kerstin Söderholm Carpelan, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2010, 1, p. 25-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Andershed, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Söderholm Carpelan, Kerstin
    Hur fungerar insatser till ungdomar som begår brott och hur kan vi bli bättre i praktik?2010In: Ungdomar som begår brott: vilka insatser fungerar? / [ed] Henrik Andershed, Anna-Karin Andershed, Kerstin Söderholm Carpelan, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2010, 1, p. 150-177Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Andershed, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Anna-Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Söderholm Carpelan, Kerstin
    Brännström, Lars
    Nyström, Marie
    Bokens bakgrund, syfte, innehåll och målgrupp2010In: Ungdomar som begår brott: vilka insatser fungerar? / [ed] Henrik Andershed, Anna-Karin Andershed, Kerstin Söderholm Carpelan, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2010, 1, p. 13-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Andersson, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Carling, Charlotte
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Aktivitet i trädgård som ett arbetsterapeutiskt redskap – en systematisk litteraturstudie2009Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det går att läsa om rehabilitering i trädgårdsmiljö i dagstidningar, facktidningar och magasin. Arbetsterapeuter använder aktivitet för att utveckla, bibehålla och förbättra funktionsförmåga. Syftet var att beskriva de förändringar i människors vardag som aktivitet i trädgård möjliggör - effekt och upplevelse.

    På ett systematiskt sätt söktes studier i databaserna Amed, Cinahl, OvidMedline och PsycInfo. Tio studier valdes. Analys gjordes i två delar med hjälp av frågeställningar och teorier den ena för att beskriva behandling och effekt och den andra för att beskriva deltagarnas upplevelse av aktivitet i trädgård. Den första analysen presenteras i text och tabellform, den andra genom citat.

    Studierna visar att trädgård erbjuder möjlighet till förändring då deltagarna genom aktivitet får tillfälle att göra och att vara. Glädje och tillfredställelse i aktivitetsutförandet gjorde att många deltagare upplevde aktiviteterna som välgörande och meningsfulla.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Staden som livsmiljö: vision och verklighet: slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Allt fler människor koncentreras till städer och andra urbana samhällen. Stadsmiljön är attraktiv och efterfrågad samtidigt som den innebär sociala, psykiska  och fysiska påfrestningar för invånarna. Förändrade villkor för utvecklingen av städer och regioner har lett till en ökad efterfrågan på mångvetenskaplig kunskap och kompetens. När det FORMAS-finanserade forskningsprogrammet Staden som livsmiljö - vision och verklighet formulerades tod vi fasta på den motsägelsefulla bilden av staden med plats för både visionerna och verkligheten. Den teoretiska ramen kring projekten kombinerar statsvetenskapligt förankrad regimteori med vardagslivsteori som hämtat inspiration från strömningar i kulturgeografi, sociologi och andra discipliner. Detta utgör slutrapporten för projektet.

  • 19.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    The management of radioactive waste: a description of ten countries2002Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ungas politiska delaktighet som pedagogiskt förhållningssätt2018In: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskap: Grundläggande perspektiv / [ed] Thomas Johansson och Emma Sorbring, Stockholm: Liber, 2018, 1, p. 163-177Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Andersson, Helena M.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    The physiological impact of soccer on elite female players and the effects of active recovery training2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Female soccer is becoming more popular and professional in the world. There are, however, limited scientific data available on how elite female players respond to physical stress during soccer games. An effective recovery strategy following a game is important, because there are few recovery days between the games in international tournaments. The present thesis, which was designed to mirror a competitive situation, aimed to investigate changes in several physiological systems occurring in female elite players in response to two soccer games. It also aimed to investigate the effects of active recovery training on the recovery of several physiological systems. METHODS: Two elite female soccer teams played two 90-min games separated by 72 h active or passive recovery. The active recovery training (cycling at 60% HRpeak, resistance training at <50% 1RM) lasted one hour and was performed 22 and 46 h after the first game. Countermovement jump (CMJ), 20-m sprint time and isokinetic knee strength were measured before, immediately, 5, 21, 45, 51, and 69 h after the first game, and immediately after the second game. The physical stress markers (CK, urea), oxidative stress markers (e.g., GSSG, lipid peroxidation), endogenous (e.g., UA, thiols) and dietary antioxidants (e.g., tocopherols, carotenoids) and a large battery of cytokines (e.g., IL-6, TNF-α) were analysed in blood. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed in the performance parameters, oxidative stress and antioxidant levels or inflammatory response between the active and passive recovery groups. Sprint and isokinetic knee strength were reduced by the same extent after both games. CMJ decreased after the first game and remained reduced throughout the study period. Blood physical stress markers, GSSG and endogenous antioxidants increased with similar amplitude after both games together with unchanged lipid peroxidation. The dietary antioxidants showed either a rapid and persistent change (e.g., tocopherols) or a delayed rise (carotenoids) after the first game. A transient increase occurred in several pro- (e.g., IL-12, TNF-a, MCP-1), anti-inflammatory (e.g., IL-4, IL-10, INF-a) and mixed (IL-6) cytokines after the first game. Fewer cytokines increased in response to the second game. CONCLUSION: Two repeated elite female soccer games separated by 72 h induced similar acute changes in several physiological parameters. After the first game, differences in the recovery pattern of the neuromuscular parameters occurred. In particular, the slow recovery of CMJ indicates that special attention should be devoted to the training of explosive force. Furthermore, the recruitment of antioxidants in response to the transient increase in GSSG resulted in the maintenance of the redox-balance in female players. Similarly, a strong and balanced pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine response occurred after one single female soccer game. The consequences of the dampened cytokine response during repeated soccer games are, however, unknown. In general, the majority of the parameters had recovered prior to the second game and the physiological alterations induced by the first game did not affect the performance of players in the second game. Finally, active recovery training conducted after a soccer game does not accelerate the recovery time for neuromuscular, oxidative stress, antioxidant and inflammatory responses in elite female players.

    List of papers
    1. Neuromuscular fatigue and recovery in elite female soccer: effects of active recovery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neuromuscular fatigue and recovery in elite female soccer: effects of active recovery
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    2008 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the time course of recovery from neuromuscular fatigue and some biochemical changes between two female soccer matches separated by an active or passive recovery regime. METHODS: Countermovement jump (CMJ), sprint performance, maximal isokinetic knee flexion and extension, creatine kinase (CK), urea, uric acid, and perceived muscle soreness were measured in 17 elite female soccer players before, immediately after, 5, 21, 45, 51, and 69 h after a first match, and immediately after a second match. Eight players performed active recovery (submaximal cycling at 60% of HRpeak and low-intensity resistance training at < 50% 1RM) 22 and 46 h after the first match. RESULTS: In response to the first match, a significant decrease in sprint performance (-3.0 +/- 0.5%), CMJ (-4.4 +/- 0.8%), peak torque in knee extension (-7.1 +/- 1.9%) and flexion (-9.4 +/- 1.8%), and an increase in CK (+ 152 +/- 28%), urea (15 +/- 2), uric acid (+ 11 +/- 2%), and muscle soreness occurred. Sprint ability was first to return to baseline (5 h) followed by urea and uric acid (21 h), isokinetic knee extension (27 h) and flexion (51 h), CK, and muscle soreness (69 h), whereas CMJ was still reduced at the beginning of the second match. There were no significant differences in the recovery pattern between the active and passive recovery groups. The magnitude of the neuromuscular and biochemical changes after the second match was similar to that observed after the first match. CONCLUSION: The present study reveals differences in the recovery pattern of the various neuromuscular and biochemical parameters in response to a female soccer match. The active recovery had no effects on the recovery pattern of the four neuromuscular and three biochemical parameters.

    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5025 (URN)10.1249/mss.0b013e31815b8497 (DOI)18202563 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-01-21 Created: 2009-01-21 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Plasma antioxidant responses and oxidative stress following a soccer game in elite female players
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma antioxidant responses and oxidative stress following a soccer game in elite female players
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    2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 600-608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed to investigate markers of oxidative stress and levels of endogenous and dietary antioxidants in 16 elite female soccer players in response to a 90-min game (average intensity 82+/-3% HRpeak). Blood samples were taken before, immediately and 21 h after the game. Plasma-oxidized glutathione, the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH:GSSG) and lipid peroxidation measured by d-ROMs were used as markers of oxidative stress. Plasma endogenous [uric acid, total glutathione (TGSH)] and dietary antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, total carotenoids and polyphenols) were analyzed using liquid chromatography and the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Exercise induced an acute increase (P<0.05) in GSSG, uric acid, TGSH, alpha-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid. In parallel, the GSH:GSSG ratio and polyphenols decreased (P<0.05). GSSG, GSH:GSSG ratio, uric acid, TGSH, and ascorbic acid returned to baseline at 21 h, while polyphenols and alpha-tocopherol remained altered. Total carotenoids increased above baseline only at 21 h (P<0.05). Lipid peroxidation, measured by d-ROMs, remained unchanged throughout the study. Thus, intermittent exercise in well-trained female athletes induces a transient increase in GSSG and a decrease in the GSH:GSSG ratio, which is effectively balanced by the recruitment of both endogenous and dietary antioxidants, resulting in the absence of lipid peroxidation measured by d-ROMs.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010
    Keywords
    d-ROMs, glutathione, lipid peroxidation, polyphenols, intermittent exercise, endurance training
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Physiology; Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-10875 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0838.2009.00987.x (DOI)000279905400008 ()19706000 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77955127862 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2010-06-02 Created: 2010-06-01 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
    3. Differences in the inflammatory plasma cytokine response following two elite female soccer games separated by a 72-h recovery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in the inflammatory plasma cytokine response following two elite female soccer games separated by a 72-h recovery
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    2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 740-747Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated changes in a large battery of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in elite female soccer players following two 90-min games separated by a 72-h active or passive recovery. Blood samples were taken from 10 players before, within 15-20 min, 21, 45 and 69 h after the first game and within 15-20 min after the second game. The leukocyte count was analyzed, together with several plasma pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, using a multiplex bead array system. After the first and second game, the total leukocytes and neutrophils increased significantly. Likewise, increases (P<0.05) in pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), IL-17], chemokines [monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8 and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG)], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, INF-alpha) and the mixed cytokine IL-6 were observed. Leukocyte and cytokine levels were normalized within 21 h. Active recovery (low-intensity exercises) did not affect the cytokine responses. A dampened cytokine response was observed after the second game as only IL-12, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-8 and MIG increased (P<0.05). In conclusion, a robust pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine response occurs after the first but not the second soccer game. The implications of the dampened cytokine response in female players after the second game are unknown.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010
    Keywords
    Inflammation, intermittent exercise, active recovery, chemokines, training
    National Category
    Sport and Fitness Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Research subject
    Physiology; Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-10876 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0838.2009.00989.x (DOI)000281666200006 ()19765242 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77956495319 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2010-06-02 Created: 2010-06-01 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
    4. Active recovery training does not affect the antioxidant response to soccer games in elite female players
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Active recovery training does not affect the antioxidant response to soccer games in elite female players
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in plasma endogenous and dietary antioxidants and oxidative stress markers were studied following two 90-min elite female soccer games separated by 72 h of either active or passive recovery. The active recovery group (n=8) trained for one hour at 22 and 46 h after the first game (low-intensity cycling and resistance training)while the passive group rested(n=8). Blood samples were taken before, immediately after, 21, 45 and 69 h after the first and immediately after the second game. The oxidative stress markers and antioxidants were not affected by active recovery. The oxidative stress marker oxidized glutathione increased by the same extent after both games, while the lipid peroxidation marker diacrons reactive-oxygen metabolites remained unchanged. The endogenous antioxidants total glutathione, uric acid and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay increased immediately after both games with the same amplitude, while increases in cysteine, cysteine-glycine and total thiols reached significant levels only after the second game. The changes in dietary antioxidants after the first game were either rapid and persistent (tocopherols, ascorbic acid increased; polyphenols decreased) or delayed (carotenoids). This resulted in high pre-second game levels of tocopherols, ascorbic acid and carotenoids. Polyphenols returned to baseline at 69 h and were not affected by the second game. In conclusion, the soccer-associated dietary but not endogenous antioxidant defence is persistent. Similar acute oxidative stress and endogenous antioxidant responses and dissimilar dietary antioxidant reactions occur during two repeated female soccer games. Finally, the complex antioxidant response to soccer is not affected by active recovery training.

    Keywords
    Intermittent exercise, training, recovery, free radicals, football
    National Category
    Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Physiology; Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-10881 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-06-02 Created: 2010-06-01 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 22.
    Andersson, Helena M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bøhn, S. K.
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Raastad, T.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Paulsen, G.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Blomhoff, R.
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Differences in the inflammatory plasma cytokine response following two elite female soccer games separated by a 72-h recovery2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 740-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated changes in a large battery of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in elite female soccer players following two 90-min games separated by a 72-h active or passive recovery. Blood samples were taken from 10 players before, within 15-20 min, 21, 45 and 69 h after the first game and within 15-20 min after the second game. The leukocyte count was analyzed, together with several plasma pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, using a multiplex bead array system. After the first and second game, the total leukocytes and neutrophils increased significantly. Likewise, increases (P<0.05) in pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), IL-17], chemokines [monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8 and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG)], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, INF-alpha) and the mixed cytokine IL-6 were observed. Leukocyte and cytokine levels were normalized within 21 h. Active recovery (low-intensity exercises) did not affect the cytokine responses. A dampened cytokine response was observed after the second game as only IL-12, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-8 and MIG increased (P<0.05). In conclusion, a robust pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine response occurs after the first but not the second soccer game. The implications of the dampened cytokine response in female players after the second game are unknown.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Helena M
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Krustrup, Peter
    Elite football on artificial turf versus natural grass: movement patterns, technical standards, and player impressions2008In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 113-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to examine the movement patterns, ball skills, and the impressions of Swedish elite football players during competitive games on artificial turf and natural grass. Time - motion analyses (36 observations) and technical analyses (16 team observations) were performed and 72 male and 21 female players completed a questionnaire. No differences were observed between artificial turf and natural grass in terms of total distance covered (mean 10.19 km, s = 0.19 vs. 10.33 km, s = 0.23), high-intensity running (1.86 km, s = 0.10 vs. 1.87 km, s = 0.14), number of sprints (21, s = 1 vs. 22, s = 2), standing tackles (10, s = 1 vs. 11, s = 1) or headers per game (8, s = 1 vs. 8, s = 1), whereas there were fewer sliding tackles (P < 0.05) on artificial turf than natural grass (2.1, s = 0.5 vs. 4.3, s = 0.6). There were more short passes (218, s = 14 vs. 167, s = 12) and midfield-to-midfield passes (148, s = 11 vs. 107, s = 8) (both P < 0.05) on artificial turf than natural grass. On a scale of 0-10, where 0 = "better than", 5 = "equal to", and 10 = "worse than", the male players reported a negative overall impression (8.3, s = 0.2), poorer ball control (7.3, s = 0.3), and greater physical effort (7.2, s = 0.2) on artificial turf than natural grass. In conclusion, the running activities and technical standard were similar during games on artificial turf and natural grass. However, fewer sliding tackles and more short passes were performed during games on artificial turf. The observed change in playing style could partly explain the male players' negative impression of artificial turf.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Helena M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Karlsen, A.
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Blomhoff, R.
    Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Raastad, T.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Plasma antioxidant responses and oxidative stress following a soccer game in elite female players2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 600-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed to investigate markers of oxidative stress and levels of endogenous and dietary antioxidants in 16 elite female soccer players in response to a 90-min game (average intensity 82+/-3% HRpeak). Blood samples were taken before, immediately and 21 h after the game. Plasma-oxidized glutathione, the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH:GSSG) and lipid peroxidation measured by d-ROMs were used as markers of oxidative stress. Plasma endogenous [uric acid, total glutathione (TGSH)] and dietary antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid, total carotenoids and polyphenols) were analyzed using liquid chromatography and the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Exercise induced an acute increase (P<0.05) in GSSG, uric acid, TGSH, alpha-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid. In parallel, the GSH:GSSG ratio and polyphenols decreased (P<0.05). GSSG, GSH:GSSG ratio, uric acid, TGSH, and ascorbic acid returned to baseline at 21 h, while polyphenols and alpha-tocopherol remained altered. Total carotenoids increased above baseline only at 21 h (P<0.05). Lipid peroxidation, measured by d-ROMs, remained unchanged throughout the study. Thus, intermittent exercise in well-trained female athletes induces a transient increase in GSSG and a decrease in the GSH:GSSG ratio, which is effectively balanced by the recruitment of both endogenous and dietary antioxidants, resulting in the absence of lipid peroxidation measured by d-ROMs.

  • 25.
    Andersson, Helena M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Raastad, Truls
    Nilsson, Johnny
    Paulsen, Göran
    Garthe, Ina
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Neuromuscular fatigue and recovery in elite female soccer: effects of active recovery2008In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the time course of recovery from neuromuscular fatigue and some biochemical changes between two female soccer matches separated by an active or passive recovery regime. METHODS: Countermovement jump (CMJ), sprint performance, maximal isokinetic knee flexion and extension, creatine kinase (CK), urea, uric acid, and perceived muscle soreness were measured in 17 elite female soccer players before, immediately after, 5, 21, 45, 51, and 69 h after a first match, and immediately after a second match. Eight players performed active recovery (submaximal cycling at 60% of HRpeak and low-intensity resistance training at < 50% 1RM) 22 and 46 h after the first match. RESULTS: In response to the first match, a significant decrease in sprint performance (-3.0 +/- 0.5%), CMJ (-4.4 +/- 0.8%), peak torque in knee extension (-7.1 +/- 1.9%) and flexion (-9.4 +/- 1.8%), and an increase in CK (+ 152 +/- 28%), urea (15 +/- 2), uric acid (+ 11 +/- 2%), and muscle soreness occurred. Sprint ability was first to return to baseline (5 h) followed by urea and uric acid (21 h), isokinetic knee extension (27 h) and flexion (51 h), CK, and muscle soreness (69 h), whereas CMJ was still reduced at the beginning of the second match. There were no significant differences in the recovery pattern between the active and passive recovery groups. The magnitude of the neuromuscular and biochemical changes after the second match was similar to that observed after the first match. CONCLUSION: The present study reveals differences in the recovery pattern of the various neuromuscular and biochemical parameters in response to a female soccer match. The active recovery had no effects on the recovery pattern of the four neuromuscular and three biochemical parameters.

  • 26. Andersson, Åsa G.
    et al.
    Kamwendo, Kitty
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Appelros, Peter
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Fear of falling in stroke patients: relationship with previous falls and functional characteristics2008In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 261-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between fear of falling and functional characteristics of patients after stroke as well as to determine what characterizes fallers who score high fall-related self-efficacy, and nonfallers who score low fall-related self-efficacy. Patients (n=140) treated in a stroke unit during a 12-month period were included. On follow-up, fallers were identified and patients answered the questions in the Falls Efficacy Scale, Swedish version (FES-S). Assessments of motor capacity, functional mobility and balance were also made. In univariate analysis, low fall-related self-efficacy was significantly associated with increased age, female sex, earlier falls, visual and cognitive impairment, low mood and impaired physical function. In multivariate analysis, only earlier falls and physical function remained significant. Twenty percent of the patients scored low fall-related self-efficacy without having experienced a fall, and 11% who experienced a fall scored high fall-related self-efficacy. Impaired physical function was significantly associated with scoring low fall-related self-efficacy, for both fallers and nonfallers. Fear of falling is significantly associated with poor physical function and earlier falls. Falls Efficacy Scale, Swedish version could add useful information to a fall risk analysis. Patients scoring low fall-related self-efficacy should be offered fall prevention measures whether they have fallen or not.

  • 27.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Kihlgren, Mona
    Skeppner, Gunnar
    Sörlie, Venke
    How physicians and nurses handle fear in children with cancer2007In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on fear in children with cancer has often focused on interventions to alleviate fear related to medical procedures and less on how to meet the challenges related to existential fear. This study aimed to describe how experienced nurses and physicians handle fear in children with cancer. Ten nurses and physicians with more than 10 years of experience in child oncology from a university hospital in Sweden were interviewed, and a qualitative content analysis was performed on the data. Nurses' and physicians' handling of fear encompasses commitment and closeness and yet also a distancing from fear and its expressions

  • 28.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Kihlgren, Mona
    Svantesson, Mia
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Sörlie, Venke
    Children's fear as experienced by the parents of children with cancer2007In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 233-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is known that children with cancer experience and express fear, but little is found in the literature about how the parents experience their child's fear. This study aimed to highlight the parents' lived experience and understanding of their child's fear. Focus group interviews with 15 parents were performed. Data were analyzed through a phenomenological hermeneutic method. Fear in children with cancer is described by the parents as a multidimensional phenomenon, which is somehow difficult to identify. It appears in contrast to the absence of fear. The comprehensive understanding of the results reveals that the parents experience their children's fear as both a suffering and an ethical demand for the parents to answer.

  • 29.
    Armstrong, Jo
    et al.
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Strid, Sofia
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Walby, Sylvia
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Context Study Ireland2008Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Armstrong, Jo
    et al.
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Walby, Sylvia
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Strid, Sofia
    Lancaster University, UK.
    Intersectionality and the quality of gendered employment policy2009Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Babri, Maira
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Corvellec, Hervé
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Stål, Herman
    Umeå university, Umeå, Sweden.
    Power in the development of Circular Business Models: An Actor Network Theory approach2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Aspects of diversity, inclusion and democracy within education and research2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational arenas are important sites for understanding how diversity and democracy become operationalised since they constitute and at the same time must attend to students' different needs. This article focuses on diversity from two specific angles: how research activities allow for particular ways of understanding human differences and how human pluralism is conceptualised in the organisation of education. These discussions emerge from the position that our use of language itself shapes human realities. The organisation of the segregated Swedish special schools for the deaf and research that focuses on this specific “human category” are used to illustrate and discuss issues pertaining to diversity and democracy. Pupils in special schools are conceptualised both as “handicapped” as well as belonging to a “linguistic-minority” group. Democratic tensions related to maintaining a separate school and conducting research on the human category defined on the basis of “deafness” are discussed and alternatives raised. Implications regarding (the lack of) pluralism in research perspectives and agendas are also discussed and the need for integrating studies of marginalisation into mainstream academia is highlighted.

  • 33.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Language learners and learning language in the era of reinforced boundaries: challenging webs-of-understandings related to bilingualism ethnographically2015In: -isms of Oppression in Language Education: / [ed] Damian J Rivers and Karin Zotzmann, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This empirically driven multidisciplinary study takes a socioculturally oriented decolonial perspective on language, identity and learning. It is framed in the intersections of Communication Studies, Literacy Studies and Educational Sciences traditions on the one hand, and the identity research domains of Deaf Studies and Gender Studies on the other. An overarching aim is to present explorations of bi/multilingualism from bi/multilingual multimodal perspectives. Focusing the ways in which individuals’ language, in public spaces, schools or work spaces, makes visible the performative work that participants (and institutions) “do” with semiotic resources. Language is empirically accounted for not as the sole property of an individual, community or geopolitical state, but rather as an intrinsic performatory dimension of both interlinked language varieties and modalities and humans in concert with tools in face-to-face, textually and digitally mediated spaces. Focusing social practices – what gets communicated and the ways in which the same occurs – allows for problematizing dominant hegemonic epistemologies related to language, identity and learning. Alternative decolonial vantage positions together with multisite, multi-scale data (like diaries, field-notes, video-data, narrative biographies, language curricula and archive data across time) from ethnographic projects at the Communication, Culture and Diversity, CCD research group at Örebro University, Sweden have enabled center staging “isms” that currently collate towards reinforcing oppressive boundaries and producing newer web-of-understandings in the Language and Educational Sciences. Together with an oral language bias in academic reporting these webs-of-understandings reinforce dominant monolingual-monomodality positions in addition to monological essentialistic colonial perspectives on language, identity and learning. The analysis highlights that ways of conceptualizing, reporting and “talking about bi/multilingualism” are not in sync with mundane languaging or ways-of-being-with-words, or peoples engagement in everyday “bi/multilingual communication” inside and outside institutional settings. The findings have major relevance for reframing both educational as well as societal agendas in the global North, but also South.

  • 34.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Om att ”göra det omöjliga möjligt” och att ”brinna för kultur, ungdomar och kaffe”. [About ”making possible the impossible” and ”burning for culture, young people and coffee”]: en tredje position i samtal om inklusion och kritiska tankar kring representations-didaktik. [A third position in conversations about inclusion and critical thoughts about representational-didactics]2015In: Perspektiver om inkludering [Perspectives on inclusion] / [ed] Karen Bjerg Petersen, Aarhus: CURSIV, Institut for Uddannelse & Pædagogik, Aarhus Universitet. , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Integrering, inkludering, jämställdhet och likvärdighet konstituerar fundamentala idéer inom ramen för demokratisering i stort i samhället och dess institutioner. Verksamheter som ungdomsskola, högskola, teater, vård, riksdag, mm men även arenor som professionsutbildningar och forskning (särskild inom tvärvetenskapliga fält såsom utbildningsvetenskap och vård och habilitering) är viktiga i detta sammanhang. Hur gränsdragningar sker i samtliga dessa arenor – skola, politik, vård, lärarutbildningen och inte minst forskning – spelar en viktig roll i vilka identiteter uppmärksammas som i längden har relevans för inklusion och det som jag kallar representations-didaktik.

    Tankar om pluralism och likvärdighet i ett samhället-för-alla, en-skola-för-alla och kultur-för-alla bygger på en grundläggande demokratisk idé om allas lika värde i dagens globaliserade tillvaro. Utbildningens nya kontext (och därmed även forskning om utbildningen i stort) i dagens globaliserade tillvaro utgör en dramatisk förändring som har konsekvenser för socialt liv och den mänskliga gemenskapen – från en möjlighet för några till en möjlighet för alla och från en kontext för en viss åldersgrupp till en kontext där hela livet innefattas. Även om de olika kulturella utrycksformer – dans, teater, musik, konst, mm – och dess konsumtion anses vara något för alla, förblir dessa stark begränsade till vissa i samhället. Det samma kan sägas om samhällets beslutsfattande institutioner i ”representativa demokratier”. Medan organ som riksdag, kommun fullmäktige, mm väls av alla och förväntas representera alla, finns det fortfarande en snäv representation av olikhet i dessa världen över.

    Den här artikeln tar avstamp i den forskningsverksamhet som jag ansvarar för inom ramen för det tvärvetenskapliga nätverket CCD (se www.oru.se/humes/ccd) och min egen forskning i såväl den globala Nord som den globala Syd (se www.oru.se/humes/sangeeta_bagga-gupta). Jag kommer, utifrån ett dekolonialt perspektiv och ett sociokulturellt ramverk kring människans kommunikation, lärande och identitet, specifikt att diskutera de föreställningar (eller metaforer) kring ”inkludering” och ”segregering” som vi lever med och som skapar förutsättningar för barn, unga och vuxna i en mängd olika institutionaliserade verksamheter. I artikeln tar jag upp exempel från mina projekt för att illustrera att våra uppfattningar om mänsklig identitet, mångfald och extrem-mångfald (En: super-diversity), inklusive ”en påhittad praxisgemenskap” (En: imaginary community, Andersson 1996), spelar en avgörande roll för samhällets planering och insatser för integrering, inkludering, jämställdhet och likvärdighet. I artikeln presenterar jag kort utgångspunkter som kännetecknar den härskande dikotomi inkludering-segregering, för att därefter gå vidare till ett tredje perspektiv kring människan och hennes potential till deltaganden i praxisgemenskaper. Jag argumenterar att det är väsentlig att gå bortom denna dikotomi såväl metaforisk som i hur samhället organiserar deltagande i sina institutioner. Jag introducerar en tredje position i samtalet om mänsklig gemenskap där omvänt-inklusion och representations-didaktik möjliggör nya föreställningar och institutionella ordningar när det gäller ett samhället-för-alla, en-skola-för-alla och kultur-för-alla.

  • 35.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    MMC, Mumbai
    Accessing global communities through local resources?: a study of barriers and facilitators of first generation women users of new communication technologies2014In: Swedish-Indian International Research Conference LanDpost, Languaging and Diversity in the age of post-colonial glocal-medialization / [ed] Central Institute of Indian Languages., Mysore, India: CIIL , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    India has witnessed a massive transformation in the development and use of information technology in the last decade. The way technology is experienced however, varies; and social class, gender, and age are prominent parameters that frame its use. The present study focuses the spaces of Mumbai Mobile Creches (MMC)[1] – a not for profit organization which works towards ensuring nutrition, health, and safety of migrant families and their children who spend their lives on construction sites in the mega-city of Mumbai. MMC operates day care centres on 25-30 construction sites where trained early childhood care givers, teachers and attached professional staff, including volunteers, deliver a large range of services including qualified crèches, preschools and educational facilities for children between birth and 14 years of age. Currently, 40% women workers at these centers are made up of members of construction workers’ communities. While these women execute a range of tasks creatively and under very challenging conditions, limited exposure and competencies in the use of English restricts their use of digital technologies, including web media. It is these women who constitute the first generation of technology users that this study focuses upon.   

    The study explores the access and reported experiences of women first generation digital users. It aims to understand barriers and facilitators for access to new technologies among these women, what significance these have for them, the role/s these play in shaping their sense of self and role of gender and age in technology use. The main research questions include: How does access to and engagement with new communication technologies look like in the lives of first generation women users in mega-city hubs in present times of flux? How do issues of access shape women first generation users lives? In what arenas do women from the middle and lower economic strata in a mega-city context in India have access to new communication technologies? What do their life trajectories look like and what, if anything, can we learn about development from this type of collaborative research?

    The following empirical materials have been specifically used in this study. In-depth case studies with adult women first generation new technology users based upon a series of audio-recorded conversations and written daily records maintained by the women, video-documentation of Sakhi empowerment monthly meetings, minutes of the Sakhi meetings, and MMC annual reports across two decades, 2000-2014.

    This paper empirically supports often sighted association between women’s entry into workforce and their empowerment. Nuances of the gender role expectations in use of technology and empowerment of women are focused. Empowerment of women emerges as a complex process wherein women transgress some aspects of traditional gender roles while continuing to be framed by others. LanDpost is concerned with intersections of language, gender, and media in an increasingly digital world. The present study illuminates the role digital media and language play in the access to and use of new technologies, including web media and how access to these shapes adult, first generation users lives.

    [1]http://www.mumbaimobilecreches.org/aboutus.htm

  • 36.
    Balkmar, Dag
    Filosofiska fakulteten, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Drive-by shaming: reflections on the emotions on (dangerous) car driving2008In: Thinking with Beverly Skeggs / [ed] Annika Olsson, Stockholm: Centre for Gender studies, Stockholm University , 2008, 1, p. 9-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 37.
    Balkmar, Dag
    Filosofiska fakulteten, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Implicit men in traffic safety discourse: A life course perspective on (auto)mobility, violations and interventions2007In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 127-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is the first country in the world to have introduced the so-called Vision Zero (Nollvisionen): an ethical approach suggesting that road safety cannot be traded for mobility. Policy writings on traffic safety have so far been very limited in terms of explicitly addressing risk taking practices as mainly performed by men or as a way of performing masculinities. In this article I discuss how the gender-neutral language in traffic safety policy constructs adulthood as signifying maturity and good driving practices. In traffic safety policy, implicit adult men are contrasted against the young(er) drivers who are constructed as problematic to traffic safety. Rather than being about maturity or something that ‘just happens’ I suggest understanding (dangerous) driving as a repertoire for some men to perform masculinities linking it with power and entitlement.

    Still, not only dangerous driving practices per se are problematic to road safety. I argue that automobility needs to be understood as much more thoroughly affecting everyday life than is acknowledged in traffic safety discourse. A way of acknowledging the multiplicity of experiences and effects from automobility is to view it as a ‘process of damaging’. This perspective takes into consideration how automobility simultaneously enables and disables ‘safe’ mobility along lines of gender, age and able-bodiedness. Despite the fact that these problematic effects to some extent are acknowledged in policy, automobility remains a privileged mode of transportation in contemporary Sweden.

  • 38.
    Balkmar, Dag
    Tema Genus, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kör så det ryker!: hälsorisker i samspelet mellan män, maskulinitet och bil2010In: Genus och kön inom medicin- och vårdutbildningar / [ed] Barbro Wijma, Goldina Smirthwaite, Katarina Swahnberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2010, 1, p. 401-413Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kvinnor och män är delvis lika, delvis olika. Det innebär att kvinnor och män både har behov av likadan behandling och av behandling som är anpassad till det egna könets förutsättningar. Denna antologi belyser kvinnors och mäns förutsättningar och behov inom en rad olika medicinska områden och tar upp både biologiska och sociala faktorer som påverkar hälsa och behandling. Den behandlar även den roll som kön spelar inom vårdens arbetsliv samt hur köns- och genusperspektiv kan integreras inom olika typer av medicin- och vårdutbildningar. Ett av bokens teman är våld, kränkningar och diskriminering, och inom ramen för detta behandlas några av de olika maktordningar som kommer till uttryck vid behandlingar inom hälso- och sjukvården. Antologin har en stor spännvidd när det gäller ämnen och författare. Förhoppningsvis ska den bredd som antologin uppvisar, leda fram till frågeställningar där läsaren utmanar sina förgivettaganden inom både genusvetenskap och mer traditionell medicin samt väcka nya frågor: Om könet snarare ses som en konstruktion än en fysisk realitet - kan då kvinnor lika gärna äta mediciner som är utprovade på män och opereras med metoder och verktyg anpassade till mäns fysiologi? Å andra sidan - hur objektiv är den naturvetenskapligt inriktade medicinska forskningen egentligen om man börjar granska den utifrån frågeställningar om perspektivval och genus? Antologin vänder sig till lärare på utbildningar inom medicin, hälsa och vård. Andra målgrupper är studenter på sådana utbildningar, vårdpersonal och en intresserad allmänhet.

  • 39.
    Balkmar, Dag
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping.
    Se upp - allt fler kvinnor kör som män!: Nollvisionen som diskurs och problemet män i trafiken2009In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, no 2-3, p. 97-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is the first country in the world to have introduced the so-called Vision Zero (Nollvisionen). This is an ethical approach suggesting that road safety cannot be traded for mobility. Since the beginning of mass-motoring, men have been over-represented in traffic safety statistics, in terms of both ‘causing’ accidents and casualties. Against the background of the Swedish Vision Zero, it is quite extraordinary how little attention work on traffic safety has paid to men’s over-representation in Swedish fatal road accidents (90%), and (auto)mobility as a way of doing gender. The present article discusses how men and women driver subjects are produced through the Vision Zero discourse, with a particular focus on how men in traffic are constructed. This is important since such constructions and modes of address affect possible interventions and ‘solutions’ regarding road safety issues. Here I focus on three contemporary documents of policy making character or with general impact: first, the Governmental Act 2003 on road safety intervention; second, a report from the Swedish Road Administration which is applying a gender equality discourse on transport; and third a brochure issued by the Road Administration addressed to the everyday road user. These documents constitute case material that is illustrative of the Vision Zero as a generative apparatus of gender discourse. The article brings attention to the ambiguous ways in which the Vision Zero may, on the one hand, explicitly address men as problematic driver subjects, as an explicitly gendered high risk category; and, on the other, make men and masculine norms implicit through the rendering of young(er) driver subjects as problematic. This also involves pointing out women as an up and coming high risk category. To improve road safety, the discursive effects of this configuration suggest allocating responsibility partly to the ‘system’, partly to women driver subjects – in effect, to women who drive like men – rather than the men driver subjects.

  • 40.
    Balkmar, Dag
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.
    VINNOVAs FoU-verksamhet ur ett jämställdhetsperspektiv. Yrkesverksamma disputerade kvinnor och män i VINNOVAs verksamhetsområde2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kvinnor är fortfarande i minoritet bland disputerade och inom det tekniska området finns särskilt få disputerade yrkesverksamma kvinnor. Kvantitativ översyn ur ett jämställdhetsperspektiv av regioner, samhällsområden och branscher där disputerade kvinnor förvärvsarbetar och jämför med de regioner, samhällsområden och branscher som VINNOVA tilldelar forskningsmedel.

  • 41.
    Balkmar, Dag
    et al.
    Filosofiska fakulteten, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Iovanni, LeeAnn
    Department of sociology, Social Work and Organization, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Pringle, Keith
    Mälardalen University College, Sweden.
    A Reconsideration of Two "Welfare Paradises": Research and Policy Responses to Men's Violence in Denmark and Sweden2009In: Men and Masculinities, ISSN 1097-184X, E-ISSN 1552-6828, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 155-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares the situation in Denmark and Sweden regarding research and policy making around the issue of men-s violence to women and children. It does so by drawing on two comprehensive reviews of academic and policy data in those countries that were part of a broader European Union-funded project. Although the picture emerging from this comparison is complex, the overall conclusion is that in Sweden over recent years many more examples can be found of a critical, power-oriented approach than is the case in Denmark.    

  • 42.
    Balkmar, Dag
    et al.
    Tema Genus, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Joelsson, Tanja
    Tema Genus, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Den bioniske mannen på autoerotiska äventyr: mäns risktagande i trafikrummet2010In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 27-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “The bionic man goes autoerotic – theoretic keys towards a refined understanding of men’s risk taking in public space”

    Gender construction in relation to mobility and movement gives rise to intriguing questions regarding the interfaces between men, masculinity, technology, “danger” and risk-taking, especially when discussing issues of traffic safety. How can we conceptualize men’s risk taking practices within the traffic realm? By drawing on research from feminist science and technology studies, the authors suggest and develop the figuration the bionic man for how to understand cars and other mobile vehicles such as mopeds as extensions of the (male) body. The construction of masculinity is seen to be interlinked with the use and mastering of motor vehicles. This theoretical frame work is further analysed by introducing the concept of autoeroticism as a meaningful way for understanding the profound embodied and emotional relation between men, technologies of movement and risk taking. The authors argue that the emotional aspects of driving cars and riding mopeds need to be regarded as both vital and crucial aspects when studying men’s risk taking in traffic space.

  • 43.
    Balkmar, Dag
    et al.
    Filosofiska fakulteten, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Ann-Christin
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Luleå, Sweden.
    Genusmedveten tillväxt och jämställd vinst: Om genus och jämställdhet i ansökningar till VINNOVAs VINNVÄXT-program 20052006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

        

  • 44.
    Balkmar, Dag
    et al.
    Stockholms universietet, Stockholm.
    Pringle, Keith
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sweden National Reports on Men's Practices: Reports on Research, Statistical information, Law and Policy Adressing Men’s Practices2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a compilation of three reports that survey - and re-interpret from feminist perspectives - existing material on men-s practices in terms of academic outputs, statistics and legal/governmental policies in Sweden. The period focused upon was primarily the last five to ten years. Although the main focus of the reports was men-s violence, they also survey the material on other areas of men-s lives such as home and work, social exclusion and health - and the connections between these areas and the field of men-s violence. It is important to stress that the analysis underlying the reports was inspired not only by feminist approaches but also, more specifically, by a gender relational perspective. Current debates about socalled -intersectionality- also informed the analysis in the reports - therefore much emphasis was placed on considering the way that gender impacted upon, and was impacted upon by, other social divisions associated with, for instance, age, ethnicity, disability and sexuality.

  • 45.
    Bask, Miia
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Bask, Mikael
    Department of Economics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Social influence and the Matthew mechanism: The case of an artificial cultural market2014In: Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, ISSN 0378-4371, E-ISSN 1873-2119, Vol. 412, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that the Matthew effect, or Matthew mechanism, was present in the artificial cultural market Music Lab in one-fourth of the "worlds" when social influence between individuals was allowed, whereas this effect was not present in the "world" that disallowed social influence between individuals. We also sketch on a class of social network models, derived from social influence theory, that may generate the Matthew effect. Thus, we propose a theoretical framework that may explain why the most popular songs could be much more popular, and the least popular songs could be much less popular, than when disallowing social influence between individuals.

  • 46. Benbenishty, Julie
    et al.
    DeKeyser Ganz, Freda
    Lippert, Anne
    Bulow, Hans-Henrik
    Wennberg, Elisabeth
    Henderson, Beverly
    Svantesson, Mia
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Baras, Mario
    Phelan, Dermot
    Maia, Paulo
    Sprung, Charles L.
    Nurse involvement in end-of-life decision making: the ETHICUS Study2006In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 129-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to investigate physicians' perceptions of the role of European intensive care nurses in end-of-life decision making. DESIGN: This study was part of a larger study sponsored by the Ethics Section of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the ETHICUS Study. Physicians described whether they thought nurses were involved in such decisions, whether nurses initiated such a discussion and whether there was agreement between physicians and nurses. The items were analyzed and comparisons were made between different regions within Europe. SETTING: The study took place in 37 intensive care units in 17 European countries. PATIENTS AND PARTICIPANTS: Physician investigators reported data related to patients from 37 centers in 17 European countries. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Physicians perceived nurses as involved in 2,412 (78.3%) of the 3,086 end-of-life decisions (EOLD) made. Nurses were thought to initiate the discussion in 66 cases (2.1%), while ICU physicians were cited in 2,438 cases (79.3%), the primary physician in 328 cases (10.7%), the consulting physician in 105 cases (3.4%), the family in 119 cases (3.9%) and the patient in 19 cases (0.6%). In only 20 responses (0.6%) did physicians report disagreement between physicians and nurses related to EOLD. A significant association was found between the region and responses to the items related to nursing. Physicians in more northern regions reported more nurse involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians perceive nurses as involved to a large extent in EOLDs, but not as initiating the discussion. Once a decision is made, there is a sense of agreement. The level of perceived participation is different for different regions.

  • 47.
    Bergström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Prell, Hillevi
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wernersson, Inga
    Högskolan Väst, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Åberg, Helena
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Förord2015In: Mat är mer än Mat: Samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv på mat och måltider / [ed] Bergström K., Jonsson I. M., Prell H., Wernersson I., Åberg H., Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap , 2015, p. 7-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Bergström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M.Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.Prell, HilleviInstitutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.Wernersson, IngaHögskolan Väst, Trollhättan, Sweden.Åberg, HelenaInstitutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Mat är mer än Mat: Samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv på mat och måltider2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Bjarnason, Sif
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hörteknik och dess användning i skolan: En litteraturstudie och om behovet av tvärvetenskap2014Report (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Closeness and distance: a way of handling difficult situations in daily care2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 244-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The aim of this study was to describe how care team members caring for patients with advanced cancer describe how they handle difficult situations in daily care. In this paper 'difficult situations' refers to those situations team members themselves describe as difficult. Background. Serious illness and impending death involve great changes in a person's life. The care of patients with advanced cancer is complex and many different factors influence each care situation. This places demands on the way care team members handle problems and difficulties in daily care. Design. Qualitative descriptive study. Methods. The study is based on 16 focus group discussions with care team members who were caring for patients with advanced cancer at three different care units in two Swedish cities. The focus group discussions included 77 participants. The procedure for data analysis was inspired by the phenomenological method. Findings. The results show that care team members handled difficult situations by balancing between being close and distancing themselves. In most situations their choice of strategy seemed spontaneous rather than being a conscious decision, although it was sometimes described as a more conscious approach. Variations of closeness and distance that were identified were Identity, Meaning, Limit-setting and touching, Prioritization, the Team and the Organization. These could also be seen as tools that could facilitate or impede the use of closeness and distance. Conclusions. The results show that care team members have a need to reflect over daily care and to become aware of what governs different care actions. Relevance to clinical practice. If the experienced difficult situation is not handled in a way that is beneficial to the care team member, patient and relatives, it is assumed that this can result in stress, burnout and, above all, non-optimal care.

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