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  • 1.
    Allard, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Flerspråkighet och teckenspråkiga miljöer2017In: Språklig mångfald i klassrummet / [ed] Åsa Wedin, Stockholm: Lärarförlaget , 2017, p. 137-Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Allard, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Chen Pichler, Deborah
    Gallaudet University, Washington DC, USA .
    Multi-modal visually-oriented translanguaging among Deaf signers2018In: Translation and Translanguaging in Multilingual Contexts, ISSN 2352-1805, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 384-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Translanguaging is often regarded with great skepticism in the context of Deaf education, as an approach that has already been tried, with disastrous results. Already in the 1960’s educators understood the critical importance of allowing deaf children to exploit their full linguistic repertoire for learning: not only listening, lip-reading and reading/writing, but also sign language, fingerspelling, gesture, and other strategies that render language visually accessible. The resulting teaching philosophy, Total Communication (TC), quickly became the dominant approach employed in Deaf education. Yet despite its progressive stance on multilingualism and multimodality, TC ultimately failed to provide deaf students with full access to a natural language. This chapter contrasts the ineffective multilingual practices under TC with characteristically “Deaf ways” of multilingual meaning-making observed among skilled Deaf signers. Excerpts from life story interviews illustrate the impact these practices have for scaffolding learning among Deaf students newly arrived in Sweden. We conclude that prioritizing visually-oriented practices and supporting both students and teachers to become skilled signers offer the best assurance for successful translanguaging in Deaf education without engendering the problems that caused TC to fail.

  • 3.
    Allard, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Roos, Carin
    Karlstad universitet, Karlstad.
    Framgångsfaktorer i läs- och skrivlärande för döva barn och barn med hörselnedsättning: en systematisk litteraturstudie2016Book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Allard, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Högskolan Dalarna, Falun.
    Skrift i teckenspråkiga skolmiljöer2013In: Flerspråkighet, litteracitet och multimodalitet / [ed] Åsa Wedin och Christina Hedman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, 1, p. 209-231Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Archer, Arlene
    et al.
    University of Cape Town, South Africa.
    Westberg, Gustav
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Establishing authenticity and commodifying difference: a social semiotic analysis of Sámi jeans2022In: Visual Communication, ISSN 1470-3572, E-ISSN 1741-3214, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 195-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates a semiotic phenomenon within the global fashion industry: the branding of designer jeans as ‘authentic’ and ‘genuinely local’, focusing on the Swedish brand Sarva. Drawing on a social semiotics approach, the authors see authenticity as a discursive construct and look at the ways in which Sarva authenticate their jeans as Sámi in multimodal texts. The aim is: (1) to reveal how places and narratives are commodified in texts that accompany the jeans; and (2) to explore how authenticity is materially instantiated in the jeans by using different resources. The article focuses on the connotative provenance and affordances of different semiotic materials for the rendering of authenticity. The analysis of the jeans as semiotic entities reveals how the thickness of the garment, texture and leather details, and the choice of materials, languages as well as iconography, evoke ideas about historical and local ‘Sáminess’, whilst at the same time indexing a global ideology that regiments what quality jeans are. The analysis shows how authenticity can be reinvented and relocated in ways that allow a commodity to travel between the local and the global. It also shows how this movement is not neutral or straightforward, but rooted in power relations that underlie globalization and advanced capitalism.

  • 6.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Current challenges of researching literacies in “multilingual, multimodal” glocal settings in the North and South2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent shifts in media and digital spaces have created new conditions that frame our lives. For instance, how people engage with information, the visual, the written, the cultural; how they find, engage with, experience the written word and other cultural and intellectual tools. Issues related to time-space explicitly or implicitly frame ways in which identity and language broadly, and literacy specifically gets (re)searched. This study explicates challenges related to timespace – here, there, where, now, then, when and the virtual, mobility – across time-and-space (both geographical and virtual), and identity-positions through empirical examples from on-going ethnographically framed research at institutions in the Global North and South. Taking both a socially oriented perspective and a decolonial framework on language and identity, this contribution juxtaposes data from projects at the CCD research environment in Sweden (projects DoT, LISA-21) and Mumbai, India (project GTGS) where individuals have access to and engage with a number of language varieties including their written modalities. The analysis builds upon (i) video-recordings of mundane activities, (ii) data-prompted discussions and (iii) archives and policy related to institutions.

     

    The analysis illustrates: (i) challenges of doing fieldwork currently; and (ii) contrasting accountings of literacy, learning and identity between individuals and institutions on the one hand, and the doing of these on the other. The doing of fieldwork highlights some important assumptions regarding timespace that have a bearing on ethnographies, including netnographies. The doing of languaging, learning and identity-work illustrates the chained ecology and hybridity of communication and use of technologies in vastly different geopolitical physical and virtual spaces. The latter can be understood in terms of intrinsic performatory hybrid dimensions of individuals-cum-technologies-in-concert-across-time-and-space. Flexibility and the hybridity of languaging in physical as well as digital spaces are both restricted as well as afforded by the glo-cal nature of linguistic landscapes.

  • 7.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Languaging: a multi critique of the prefx bi and multi!2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Multilingual, Multimodal Languaging.: Theorizing Communication Across Sites.2013In: CROSSLING Symposium:Language Contacts at the Crossroads of Disciplines. 28 Feb – 1 March 2013.University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Signed Languages and Bilingual Education2014In: Bilingual Education / [ed] Stefan May, Rotterdam: Springer, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The terms bilingualism and bilingual education (BE) have been recognized over time as being simplistic, if not miss-representative of the complex and diverse set of human behaviors that they index (Baker 2006, Garcia 2009, Grosjean 1982). A concern here relates to moving beyond dominating (colonially) framed mololingual, monoglossic understandings of bounded language systems, to recognize the fluidity inherent in languaging and translanguaging, including multimodalities that comprise the heteroglossic nature of human communication (Hasnain et al 2013, Blackledge & Creese 2014, García 2009, Linell 2009). In addition, different BE models like two-way bilingual programs, content and language-integrated programs, plurilingual/multilingual programs, segregated programs, etc, are ideologically framed sites of contestation and are not uncommonly connected to academic fields of expertise in either the Language Sciences or the Education Sciences. This means that the institutional activity system of BE is often seen as an extension of the theoretically framed domain in research called BE (Bagga-Gupta 2012).

    Different Signed Languages (SLs) have also been, and continue to be, framed in simplistic/reductionist terms in both the popular imagination as well as in some dominating scientific domains. Different SLs have evolved and exist in different communities where large numbers of members are deaf (Groce 1985), in similar fashion as different oral languages have evolved in hearing communities. In other words, SLs are, at least since the 1960s, recognized within science, and since the 1990s in national policy contexts, as unique human languages, similar and just as complex in their make up as oral/articulated languages (OLs). Five types of cheremic unit variation in SLs, similar to phonological variation in OLs, are recognized: handshapes, sign location, palm orientation, movements and non-manual embodied features. While SLs are often denied recognition and continue to be contested in policy as well as in some scientific domains, they have existed in different formats in communities worldwide, and especially so within deaf education (DE) even in institutional settings where they have been formally forbidden.

    This chapter aims to identify and account for the place and meaning of SLs in BE broadly and DE specifically. While I will give an account of the field, I will steer clear of the binary hegemonic ideologies that have continued to frame understandings related to SLs on the one hand, and BE, including DE on the other. Using brush strokes across the canvas (rather than specific areas on the canvas or individual colors or lines), my aim here is to trace salient developments and make visible the multiplicity of mainstream academic domains that contribute to and intersect in the field SLs in BE.

  • 10.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gynne, Annaliina
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Young people’s languaging and multimodal practices: “Bilingualism” in a Swedish school and in virtual spaces2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presented in this paper examines young people’s languaging in two separate, though intertwined spaces; in a ”bilingual” school in Sweden and in social media spaces.  The study is part of a larger project which explores young people’s doing of multilingualism as well as social positioning in and through everyday social practices where literacy, including multimodality, is salient. The project is framed within debates on linguistic and cultural minorities more generally. However, it has followed a group of 11-13 year old children both inside a Sweden Finnish (minority) bilingual school and in virtual spaces.

    Anchored in perspectives that highlight the social construction of reality, and located in the geopolitical spaces of Sweden, but also glocal digital spaces, the present study investigates everyday life in an educational setting where Swedish and Finnish are used as the primary languages of instruction as well as social media settings where both multilingual and multimodal aspects are salient. The following issues are empirically discussed in the paper: What types of languaging resources, including different language varieties and literacies do young people enjoy in different arenas – institutional school practices and in social media? How, and in what ways, are aspects of communicative repertoires and modalities related in these practices?

    Broadly, this study takes sociocultural perspectives on learning and communication and ethnographic perspectives including videotaping and virtual ethnography as methodological points of departure. The data include video recordings of classroom interaction, screen grabs of participants’ interaction in social media and participant observations in both spaces. Thus, analytical descriptions of everyday mundane activities and language usage from classroom settings and web-arenas form the basis for throwing light upon linguistic and multimodal repertoires that the young people are members of. Furthermore, the analysis explores the interconnectedness of different oral, written and multimodal language varieties in human meaning-making.

  • 11.
    Björkvall, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Westberg, Gustav
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Representation som möjlighet: Att ta steget bortom kritisk beskrivning2019In: Design för lärande Historia: Medeltiden som exempel / [ed] Eva Insulander, Fredrik Lindstrand, Staffan Selander, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 1, p. 161-176Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Borgström, Eric
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Att skriva prov: om normer och textstruktur i gymnasieskolans skriftliga nationella prov.2010In: Språk och stil, ISSN 1101-1165, E-ISSN 2002-4010, Vol. 20, p. 132-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is the national writing tests administered in Swedish upper secondaryschools. One important role of these tests is to serve as an interpretation and concretization of thecurriculum. The aim of this article is therefore to examine the textual consequences of the testsituation. The article takes a critical stance towards the test construction. The instructions say thatwhen assessing the pupils’ writing abilities, the teacher is to judge to what extent the pupils’ textscould function in the fictitious situation and genre specified in the writing task. I argue that thepupils’ texts should be understood as actions situated in a test context. Through an analysis of linearand hierarchical global text structure in pupils’ texts, I show how the writing task regularizes whatis historically institutionalized as a good text in the test situation: namely the expository essay.

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    Borgström 2010 Att skiva prov
  • 13.
    Borgström, Eric
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Vad räknas som belägg för skrivförmåga? ett textkulturellt perspektiv på skrivuppgifter i den svenska gymnasieskolans nationella prov2012In: Sakprosa, ISSN 1502-6000, E-ISSN 1891-5108, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines writing tasks in Swedish national tests from 2007-2012. My aim is to examine some ways in which writing ability are conveyed by the test. For this purpose I combine concepts such as construct and target domain from test theory, with a text theoretical/sociocultural approach to writing. Within this framework I examine which written mediations count as evidence of writing proficiency (i.e. that are given text value) in the test context. The writing tasks are analyzed through the dimensions of themes, text structures, and acts of writing. I also analyze the writer roles implied by these tasks. The analysis shows that the test construction brings four distinct and recurrent task types to the fore. Based on those results I reconstruct the target domains of the tests, and discuss the prerequisites of their validity, from the perspective of writing theories on the one hand, and of the established course objectives on the other.

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    Borgström 2014 Vad räknas som belägg för skrivförmåga
  • 14.
    Boström, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Velander, Eleonor
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Om pedagogers möte med elever som har annat modersmål än svenska: -En intervjustudie2007Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 15.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Jennie
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Kattungen - en ´förskola för alla` med teckenspråket som grund: utvärdering efter att hörande barn inkluderats i verksamheten hösten 2006 : ett uppdrag från Örebro kommun2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den tvåspråkiga förskolan Kattungen i Örebro är en förskola där verksamheten bygger på svenskt teckenspråk och svenska. Men det har inte alltid varit så. Kattungen startade 1990 och var då en förskola för döva och gravt hörselskadade barn där miljön var enbart teckenspråkig. År 1998 etablerades för första gången en talspråkig grupp som förskoleklass. Hösten 2006 fick förskolan ett förändrat uppdrag och började ta emot även hörande barn. Våren 2007 när utvärderingen genomfördes fanns sammanlagt 27 barn på Kattungen och av dem var det 17 barn döva/hörselskadade och 10 hörande. Syftet med utvärderingen är att beskriva och analysera förändringen som skett på Kattungen hösten 2006 utifrån föräldrars och pedagogers perspektiv. Studien granskar en verksamhet där barn utan funktionshinder integrerats i en grupp av barn med funktionshinder, alltså det omvända mot vad som brukar förekomma. Underlaget till utvärderingen är dels en enkätstudie med föräldrar och dels fokusgrupper med pedagoger respektive föräldrar. Resultatet visar att Kattungen är en komplex verksamhet där de kommunikativa och språkliga behoven kan vara mycket olika för olika barn men också för olika föräldrar. Att hörande barn inkluderats i förskolans verksamhet uppfattas som positivt av alla grupper. Det har lett till ökade möjligheter för barnen till samspel med jämnåriga samtidigt menar framförallt döva föräldrar att den teckenspråkiga miljön försvagats något. De hörande barnen som Vt 2007 fanns på Kattungen var barn med döva eller hörselskadade föräldrar, syskon eller andra släktingar. De hörande barnen hade alltså en anknytning till teckenspråket i sin hemmiljö även om det inte finns ett sådant krav för att få börja på förskolan.

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    fulltext
  • 16.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindén Boström, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Berglund, Mats
    Lund university.
    Self-rated mental health, school adjustment, and substance use in hard-of-hearing adolescents2008In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, E-ISSN 1465-7325, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 324-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This survey, "Life and Health—Young People 2005," included all 15/16-year-old adolescents in mainstream schools in the county of Örebro, Sweden. Just students with a slight/mild or moderate hearing loss were included. There were 56 (1.9%) "hard-of-hearing (HH) students with multiple disabilities," 93 (3.1%) students who were "just HH," 282 (9.7%) students with some "other disability than HH," and 2,488 (85.2%) students with "no disability." "HH with multiple disabilities" reported considerably higher scores for mental symptoms, substance use, and school problems than the "no disability" group. Those with "just HH" and those with "other disability than HH" had more mental symptoms and school problems than the "no disability" group but no significant differences in substance use. In conclusion, the combination of a hearing loss and some other disability strongly increases the risk for mental symptoms, school problems, and substance use. This group, thus, is an important target for preventive measures.

  • 17.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindén Boström, Margareta
    Persson, Carina
    Att höra eller nästan inte höra: Liv & hälsa ung 2005 och 2007 i Örebro län2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I linje med FN:s barnkonvention och Konventionen om rättigheter förpersoner med funktionshinder ska ungdomars röst göras hörd. Den härrapporten bygger helt på ungdomars uppgifter om sin verklighet.Studierna Liv & hälsa ung 2005 och 2007 visar att i den reguljära skolanupplever drygt fem procent av eleverna att de har ett funktionshinder närdet gäller hörseln och de rapporterar ofta en utsatt situation. Det finns även hörselskadade ungdomar på specialskolan/riksgymnasiet för döva och hörselskadade. De hörselskadade ungdomarna är en grupp som rapporterar en mängd hälsorelaterade problem, många känner sig mobbade av kamrater eller kränkta av vuxna i skolan. Det är också en grupp som förhållandevis ofta rapporterar bruk av alkohol, tobak och narkotika. De kan även ha andra funktionsnedsättningar eller tinnitus. De hörselskadade ungdomarna är en högriskgrupp som behöver uppmärksammas och få ett bättre anpassat stöd. Det behövs fördjupade studier hur stödet kan utformas på ett relevant sätt, speciellt gäller det dem med flera funktionshinder. För att göra detta är det viktigt att ungdomarna själva involveras i arbetet. Fördjupade studier behövs också om hur hörselskadade ungdomars delaktighet i den reguljära skolan kan förbättras samt om vad som skapar exempelvis stress, trötthet och olyckor. Det behövs åtgärder för att minska den mobbning som sker och inte minst minska det ungdomar rapporterar om kränkning från vuxna. Det behövs riktade insatser för att öka de hörselskadade ungdomarnas simkunnighet och fysiska aktivitet. Det är också av stor betydelse för de hörselskadade och döva ungdomarna att det finns kompetent tvåspråkig (svenska och teckenspråk) personal på ungdomsmottagningar och barnahus.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 18. Chen, Ariel
    Self-help genres in the changing Chinese magazine market2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Dennhag, Inga
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Anders
    Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hakelind, Camilla
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Exploring gender stereotypes about interpersonal behavior and personality factors using digital matched-guise techniques2019In: Social behavior and personality, ISSN 0301-2212, E-ISSN 1179-6391, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 1-13, article id e8150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study explores gender stereotypes among Swedish university students (n=101) studying a course in psychology, using a matched-guise experimental design. The gender identity of a speaker in a dialogue, manifested by voice, was digitally manipulated to sound male or female. Responses to the recordings indicated that an actor with a male voice was rated significantly less conscientious, agreeable, extraverted, and open to experience than the same actor with a female voice. On social behavior, there was a tendency for the actor with a male voice to be rated as more hostile than the same actor with a female voice. The study suggests that stereotype effects rather than real behavioral differences may have an impact on perceived gender differences.

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    Exploring gender stereotypes about interpersonal behavior and personality factors using digital matched-guise techniques
  • 20.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Borgström, Eric
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Yassin Falk, Daroon
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Steinvall, Anders
    Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svensson, Johan
    Department of Statistics, Umeå School of Business, Economics, and Statistics, Umeå University, Sweden.
    "It ain't what you say. It's the way you say it": adapting the matched guise technique (MGT) to raise awareness of accentedness stereotyping effects among Swedish pre-service teachers2023In: Language Awareness, ISSN 0965-8416, E-ISSN 1747-7565, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 255-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study describes a pedagogic adaptation of the matched guise technique with the aim to raise linguistic self-awareness of L2 accentedness stereotyping effects among Swedish pre-service teachers. In the experiment, 290 students attending teacher training programs were exposed to one of two matched guises, representing either L1 accented Swedish, or L2 accented Swedish. Both guises were based on the same recording, but the L2 accented version had been digitally manipulated using cut-and-paste techniques in order to replicate certain vowel sounds (the [u:]-sound in particular) associated with low-prestige Swedish L2 accentedness. The findings from this experiment were then used as starting point for language awareness raising activities. Our overall results show that the L2 accented manipulated recording was evaluated more favourably than the original L1 accented recording on all investigated variables. One proposed explanation is that respondents were inadvertently influenced by so-called shifting standards effects, i.e. lower standards/expectations are being used as reference points when evaluating the L2 accented recording. This tendency, however, seemed to be less apparent among respondents with bi/multilingual linguistic identities. Following debriefing discussions based on the experiment findings, there were clear indications that respondents did become more aware of inadvertent linguistic stereotyping by participating in the activities.

  • 21.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. ESRI, University of Seychelles, Anse Royale, Seychelles.
    Klymenko, Olga
    ESRI, University of Seychelles, Anse Royale, Seychelles.
    Understanding ‘Understanding’: Towards supporting understanding in the classroom through the understanding of curricula studies - an upcoming project2023In: Seychelles Research Journal (SRJ), E-ISSN 1659-7435, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prerequisite for learning is that instructions and other activities take place in a language you understand. This may seem self-evident, but the fact remains that a majority of learners in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are taught in a European second language (L2) that they are unfamiliar with. Frequently, the role of the home languages in supporting learning in the classrooms has been totally removed – so called subtractive transitions – resulting in failures and early drop-outs. According to the World Bank, inadequate language of instruction policies is a major factor contributing to learning poverty in SSA. The project described in this article addresses this problem by furthering knowledge of additive multilingual education (MLE), i.e. models where the use of the L1 is maintained to support learning after the L2 is introduced as the language of learning and teaching. More specifically, the project seeks to gain a better and systematic understanding of the guiding principles behind language-in-education policies, and how steering documents and curricula in various L2 MoI transition systems in SSA acknowledge (or not) the realities and challenges involved in learning and teaching through a second language. Through interviews and observations, the project also explores how language-in-education policy directives and recommendations translate into practice in the field. Four transition systems are explored under the project: immersion, early transition, mid-transition and late transition.

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    Understanding ‘understanding’: Towards supporting understanding in the classroom through the understanding of curricula studies – an upcoming project
  • 22. Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Steinvall, Anders
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gender stereotypes and the apology in a small state: Uncovering Creole male stereotypes in the Seychelles using digital matched-guise methodology2020In: Small States & Territories Journal, E-ISSN 2616-8006, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 99-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research in the Seychelles speaks of a “growing crisis of masculinity”, manifested in statistics such as a ten-year life expectancy difference in favour of women, alarmingly high levels of substance abuse amongst younger men, and underachievement of boys in schools. According to the authors, males are generally disempowered by stereotypical views of males as “irresponsible”, “unreliable” and “secondary to women”. Similar gender patterns have been observed in other ex-slavery Creole cultures such as the small states in the Caribbean, and some scholars argue that these structures have historical origins dating back to slavery. In this study, we seek to explore aspects of Seychellois stereotypes of masculinity through so-called matched-guise experiments. Through digital manipulations of voice quality, we produce identity-warped male and female versions of the same monologue recording – a short apology. We then asked respondents to listen to the recordings and respond to the same in a short online questionnaire, where we ask questions relating to their impressions of the apology and the speaker. Dimensions here include honesty-dishonesty; politenessimpoliteness; weakness-strength; and reliability-unreliability. Differences in results of responses to male and female versions of the apology give strong indications that Seychellois stereotypically view males as dishonest, unreliable, lazy and careless. We discuss potential origins and consequences of such constructions, and propose awareness-raising measures for how these destructive historically produced scripts of gender can be rewritten. 

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    Gender stereotypes and the apology in a small state: Uncovering Creole male stereotypes in the Seychelles using digital matched-guise methodology
  • 23.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Steinvall, Anders
    Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Language, Prejudice, Awareness, and Resistance2020In: Open Linguistics, E-ISSN 2300-9969, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 708-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an introduction to the themed special volume on Language and Prejudice, this short editorial highlights aspects related to prejudice within, through, and towards language as well as how prejudice and stereotyping can affect our perception of language. We provide short summaries of the articles included in the volume and contextualise these within the general thematic framework. The article also discusses the roles and responsibilities of language studies in raising awareness of issues related to language and prejudice, and how this forms part of a more general resistance against xenophobia and sexism.

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    Language, Prejudice, Awareness, and Resistance
  • 24.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Steinvall, Anders
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    ‘To my surprise, I don’t particularly like my own opinions’: Exploring Adaptations of the ‘Open-Guise’ Technique to Raise Sociolinguistic Language Awareness2023In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1502-7694, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 113-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The following study describes a data-driven learning scenario aimed at raising sociolinguistic awareness of matters related to gender, language and stereotyping. The design is inspired by the matched-guise technique (MGT), a quantitative data driven experimental method that has been used extensively to investigate language attitudes. In the scenario, differences in respondents’ response patterns to two gender-manipulated versions (male-female vs. female-male dyads) of the same recorded dialogue were used as a starting point for awareness-raising activities aimed at highlighting how gender stereotypes may affect perceptions of a dialogue. The main focus of the article is a comparison of the learning outcomes of two variants of the setup: a traditional undisclosed MGT-inspired setup, where the design and purpose of the experiment was kept secret until after the response phase, and a so-called open-guise design, where respondents were informed of the design and purpose of the experiment prior to the response phase. Preliminary results suggest that respondents adjust their assessments of a speaker depending on the guise, even when they know it is the same speaker they are listening to. Moreover, the open-guise design seemed to lead to greater pedagogic impact than the scenario based on the undisclosed design. However, further studies are needed to confirm these findings. 

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    ‘To my surprise, I don’t particularly like my own opinions’: Exploring Adaptations of the ‘Open-Guise’ Technique to Raise Sociolinguistic Language Awareness
  • 25.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Steinvall, Anders
    Department of Language Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindvall-Östling, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Raising awareness about gender and language among teacher-training students: A cross-cultural approach2021In: Open Linguistics, E-ISSN 2300-9969, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 666-684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In accordance with the Education 2030 agenda for sustainable development goals, the aim of this study is to contribute to gender-sensitive teacher training and learning environments using matched guise-inspired methods. The article offers an account of activities aimed at raising awareness of issues related to linguistic gender stereotyping among teacher trainees in Sweden and the Seychelles. The cross-cultural comparative approach also provided an opportunity to raise students' awareness of how gender stereo-typing is culture-related, and therefore may differ depending on cultural context. Results show that there seems to be significant differences in how Swedish and Seychellois teacher trainees stereotype men and women. While both groups seem to associate typically feminine linguistic behaviour with features accommodated under Cuddy et al.'s (2008, "Warmth and competence as universal dimensions of social perception: The stereotype content model and the BIAS map." Advances in Experimental Social Psychology 40, 61-149) "warmth dimension" (signalling interest, for example), behaviours typically associated with agentic behaviour and the competence dimension, such as taking space in a conversation and forcefully arguing one's case, seem to be regarded as relatively masculine in Sweden, but not in the Seychelles, arguably a result of a generally negative construction of masculinity in the Seychelles. Based on the responses from a post-survey, it is evident that a majority of those who participated in the exercise gained new insights into the mechanisms of gender stereotyping, knowledge that they also could relate to themselves and their own behaviour.

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    Raising awareness about gender and language among teacher-training students: A cross-cultural approach
  • 26.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Zelime, Justin
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Researching Kreol Seselwa and its role in education in the pursuit of educational equity in the Seychelles2021In: Multilingual Learning and Language Supportive Pedagogies in Sub-Saharan Africa / [ed] Elizabeth J. Erling; John Clegg; Casmir M. Rubagumya; Colin Reilly, Routledge, 2021, p. 61-78Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter addresses two major questions related to language-in-education policies and educational equity in a small African island nation - the Seychelles. Firstly, based on the findings from five studies carried out between 2015 and 2018, we examine the consequences of the current language policies for young learners in the Seychelles. Second, we address the question of why a nation where the vast majority of the school population have the same mother tongue should adhere to strict Second Language of Intsruction (LoI) policies. The article also points to potential alternatives to the current policy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Researching Kreol Seselwa and its role in education in the pursuit of educational equity in the Seychelles
  • 27.
    Doury, Marianne
    et al.
    Laboratoire Communication et Politique, CNRS.
    Tseronis, Assimakis
    Universiteit van Amsterdam.
    Les faits et les arguments: La mise en discours des scores électoraux2014In: Le Langage Manipulateur: Pourquoi et Comment Argumenter? / [ed] Jan Goes, Jean-Marc Mangiante, Françoise Olmo, Carmen Pineira-Tresmontant, Arras: Artois Presses Université , 2014, p. 193-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Göteborgs universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Westin, Agneta
    Göteborgs universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Inlärning och långtidsminne av olika approximationer till språkets statistiska natur1968Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet är att studera inlärning och minnesbehållning hos ordsekvenser med olika grad av approximation till svenska språket samt att bestämma graden av statistiskt samband inom sekvenserna  med gissningsteknik. Resultatet av experimenten innebär att ju högre approximationsgrad hos en ordsekvens, desto lättare att lära in den. 

  • 29.
    Eriksson, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sullivan, Kirk
    Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Linne Univ, Växjö, Sweden.
    Czigler, Peter
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Green, James
    Univ Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    van Doorn, Jan
    Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Detection of imitated voices: who are reliable earwitnesses?2010In: The international journal of speech language and the law, ISSN 1748-8885, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors affecting an individual's ability to identify people aurally are of forensic importance. This paper investigates how topic, dialect, gender, age, and hearing status affect detection of an imitated voice. Two imitations of the same person, but on different topics, were used as familiarization voices. One topic was associated with this person, and the other was not. Using discrimination sensitivity (d-prime) it was found that topic had a significant impact on d', as did age (but only when the topic was not associated with the imitated person). Dialect, gender and hearing status were not significant. The older group of listeners was less convinced by the imitations and in particular the one not associated with the person being imitated. These results imply that the validity of earwitness evidence is negatively affected by age and topic.

  • 30.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Affective factors involved in reading course literature in English at university in Sweden2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    English is increasingly used in parallel with Swedish in tertiary education, particularly as a reading language (Pecorari, Shaw, Malmstr.m, & Irvine, 2011). A majority of course literature across most disciplines in higher education in Sweden today are English-language publications (Bolton & Kuteeva, 2012), even in courses that do not have English as the official medium of instruction (Kuteeva, 2014; Pecorari et al., 2011). Despite this, little research has been done on the use of foreign-language textbooks in contexts where the focus is on content learning (Pecorari et al., 2011). In this presentation, results from a questionnaire and interview study involving university students in Sweden will be presented.

    Initial results show that a majority of students feel they were unprepared to read course literature in English when they started university. Approximately half of students express negative emotions in relation to reading in English. These include emotions such as fear, anxiety, panic and stress, but also that reading in English is considerably more time-consuming than reading in Swedish. In this presentation, I will argue that these negative emotions are caused by a lack of preparation forquote from one of the participants:

    “I have almost never read any English literature in upper secondary school, so when you have to read English literature at university I feel a lot of pressure, that it will be difficult and that I will not understand (…) It’s a difficult transition.”

  • 31.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Difficulties Involved in Academic Reading in English as a Foreign Language in Sweden2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A majority of course literature across most disciplines in higher education in Sweden, a Nordic country where English is a foreign language, are English-language publications (Bolton & Kuteeva, 2012), even in courses that do not have English as the official medium of instruction (Pecorari, Shaw, Malmström & Irvine, 2011). Swedes have a reputation as having high general competence in English and as a result, universities generally expect students to be able to read course literature in English without any help or guidance. Despite this, little research has been done on students' perceptions of academic reading in English or any potential problems that this practice may cause. In my PhD project, I aim to demonstrate not only to what extent Swedish university students have problems reading academic English, but also what the cause of these issues are and how they may be resolved. 

    During the first phase of the project, a sequential explanatory design (Creswell, Plano Clark, Gutmann & Hanson, 2003) has been used, involving two questionnaires with 505 participants in social science and follow-up interviews with 12 of the participants. The closed-ended questionnaire items have been analyzed using a combination of descriptive and inferential statistics, while the open-ended questionnaire items and interview transcripts have been analyzed using content analysis. Results show that more than half of Swedish university students in social science express negative attitudes including fear, anxiety and stress toward reading in English. Students further perceive reading in English to be considerably more time-consuming, and report trying to avoid it entirely. Early results also show that students who are not the highest achievers are actively discouraged from attending additional English in upper secondary school, likely making the transition from school to university more difficult.

    References

    Bolton, K., & Kuteeva, M. (2012). English as an academic language at a Swedish university: Parallel language use and the 'threat' of English. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 33(5), 429-447.

    Creswell, J., Plano Clark, V., Gutmann, M., & Hanson, W. (2003). Advanced mixed methods research designs. In A. Tashakkori, & C. Teddlie (Eds.), Handbook of mixed methods in social and behavioral research (pp. 209-240). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

    Pecorari, D., Shaw, P., Malmstr m, H., & Irvine, A. (2011). English textbooks in parallel language tertiary education. TESOL Quarterly, 45(2), 313-333.

  • 32.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Does English 7 Prepare Students for Reading Academic English at University?2022In: ASLA-Symposiet 7–8 april 2022: Abstractsamling, 2022, p. 30-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to comprehend academic texts is one of the most important skills that university students who speak English as a second or foreign language need to acquire (Dreyer & Nel, 2003), but previous research has showed a majority of Swedish students understand less when the textbook is in English (Pecorari, Shaw, Malmström, & Irvine, 2011). Despite this, the role of upper secondary school in students’ preparedness for reading academic English at university has not been investigated. In this paper, the aim is to explore what role English 7 – an optional course in upper secondary school – has currently and suggest what role it should have in the future by looking at students’ perceptions of the course. In addition, this paper will present the results from quantitative analyses contrasting the reading ability of students who have attended English 7 with students who have not.

    To answer these questions, a sequential explanatory design (Creswell, Plano Clark, Gutmann & Hanson, 2003) has been used, involving two questionnaires with 505 participants and follow-up interviews with 12 of the participants. The closed-ended questionnaire items have been analyzed using a combination of descriptive and inferential statistics, while the open-ended questionnaire items and interview transcripts have been analyzed using content analysis. Results show students who have attended English 7 report fewer difficulties with reading English course literature than students who only attended English 6 on a number of different variables. However, students who have attended English 7 also report having had higher grades in English in previous years (p < .001). Interview data suggests students with lower grades are discouraged from taking the additional course by teachers and other students, seemingly creating two large groups with varying abilities in English.

    References

    Creswell, J., Plano Clark, V., Gutmann, M., & Hanson, W. (2003). Advanced mixed methods research designs. In A. Tashakkori, & C. Teddlie (Eds.), Handbook of mixed methods in social and behavioral research (pp. 209-240). Sage Publications.

    Pecorari, D., Shaw, P., Malmström, H., & Irvine, A. (2011). English textbooks in parallel language tertiary education. TESOL Quarterly, 45(2), 313-333.

     

  • 33.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Perceptions of and Attitudes toward Academic Reading in English amongst Swedish Students2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing importance of internationalization for universities across Europe has resulted in an increasing use of English in higher education in Sweden (Bolton & Kuteeva, 2011), particularly as a reading language (Pecorari et al., 2011). In this paper, I will present the results of a study involving 505 Swedish university and upper secondary school students focused on their attitudes toward reading in English and their perceptions of their ability to read academic English.

    Two questionnaires have been distributed in 36 classrooms and lecture halls, with follow-up interview involving a smaller number of participants. This sequential explanatory design, in which respondents can be asked to elaborate on their answers, allows for the collection of in-depth data (Creswell et al., 2003). The closed-ended questionnaire items have then been analyzed using a combination of descriptive and inferential statistics, while the open-ended questionnaire items and interview transcripts have been analyzed using content analysis.

    Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior (TPB) is used to contextualize the attitudes expressed by the students in this study. In TPB, the impact of attitudes is modified by perceived social pressures and perceived ease or difficulty of performing the behavior (Dörnyei, 2001). In a Nordic context where citizens are exposed to English daily and a majority of the population are said to be bilingual in English (Falk, 2001), the perceived social pressure to be able to read academic English is likely greater than in many other parts of Europe. This could potentially result in the expression of negative attitudes toward the English language in general or the use of English texts in education in particular.

    Results show that more than half of university students express negative attitudes toward reading in English. These attitudes include fear and anxiety, but also stress caused by a perception that reading in English is considerably more time-consuming than reading in Swedish. The results further show that university students perceive academic reading in English to be more difficult than upper secondary school students. Universities depend on upper secondary schools to provide students with the necessary English language skills for further education, but in this paper I will argue that students' negative attitudes are related to a perceived difficulty of performing the behavior which in part may be caused by a lack of preparation for reading academic English.

    References

    Bolton, K., & Kuteeva, M. (2012). English as an academic language at a Swedish university: Parallel language use and the 'threat' of English. Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, 33(5), 429-447. doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/01434632.2012.670241

    Creswell, J., Plano Clark, V., Gutmann, M., & Hanson, W. (2003). Advanced mixed methods research designs. In A. Tashakkori, & C. Teddlie (Eds.), Handbook of mixed methods in social and behavioral research (pp. 209-240). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

    Dörnyei, Z. (2001). Motivational Strategies in the Language Classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Falk, M. L. 2001. Domänförluster i svenskan [Domain Losses in Swedish]. Stockholm, Språkrådet: Nordic Council of Ministers.

    Pecorari, D., Shaw, P., Malmström, H., & Irvine, A. (2011). English textbooks in parallel-language tertiary education. TESOL Quarterly, 45(2), 313-333.

    Phillipson, Robert. 1992. Linguistic Imperialism. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

  • 34.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Student Preparedness for Reading Academic Texts in English at Swedish Universities2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of English has been gaining ground in numerous educational contexts where another language was previously used (Gabriëls & Wilkinson, 2021). At university, students are frequently expected to engage with English texts even though the official medium of instruction is the local language. This shift toward English has resulted in new challenges for students, particularly for students who do not have the proficiency required to read English-language publications (Cenoz, 2012). Previous research on academic reading in higher education has primarily focused on the faculty perspective (Gorzycki et al., 2020). In this paper, I illustrate the issue through the Swedish case by discussing the transition from upper secondary school to university, with a particular focus on first-year university students’ experiences with academic texts in English in Swedish-medium instruction programmes. The ability to comprehend academic texts is one of the most important skills that university students who speak English as a second or foreign language need to acquire (Dreyer & Nel, 2003), but previous research has showed Swedish students understand less when the textbook is in English (Pecorari et al., 2011). The potential impact on student retention and academic success means there is a need for more attention to be paid to students’ experiences with reading in higher education. This paper aims to remediate this issue by providing insights into students’ perceptions and attitudes of English academic texts through a sequential explanatory design involving questionnaires and follow-up interviews. Results show that more than half of university students express negative attitudes toward reading in English and perceive reading in English to be considerably more difficult and time-consuming than reading in Swedish. Universities take it for granted that students have the ability to read academic texts in English without any support (Arnbjörnsdóttir, 2018), but I will argue that students' negative attitudes and self-reported challenges are related to a lack of preparation for reading academic English in upper secondary school. 

    References

    Arnbjörnsdóttir, B. (2018). Using English at university. In B. Arnbjörnsdóttir & H. Ingvarsdóttir (Eds.), Language development across the life span: The impact of English on education and work in Iceland (pp. 143-162). Springer.

    Cenoz, J. (2012). Bilingual educational policy in higher education in the Basque Country. Language, Culture and Curriculum, 25, 41-55.

    Dreyer, C., & Nel, C. (2003). Teaching reading strategies and reading comprehension within a technology-enhanced learning environment. System, 31(3), 349–365. 

    Gabriëls, R., & Wilkinson, R. (2021). Two types of reflections about English as a medium of instruction. European Journal of Language Policy, 13(2), 161-180.

    Gorzycki, M., Desa, G., Howard, P. J., & Allen, D. D. (2020). “Reading Is Important,” but “I Don't Read”: Undergraduates’ Experiences With Academic Reading. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 63, 499-508.

    Pecorari, D., Shaw, P., Malmström, H., & Irvine, A. (2011). English textbooks in parallel language tertiary education. TESOL Quarterly, 45(2), 313-333.

  • 35.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Teachers’ and students’ attitudes and perceptions toward varieties of English in Swedish upper secondary school2019In: Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande): Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12-13 april, 2018 / [ed] Birgitta Ljung Egeland, Tim Roberts, Erica Sandlund, Pia Sundqvist, Karlstad: Karlstads universitet , 2019, 27, p. 207-233Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates teachers’ and students’ attitudes and perceptions toward the teaching and learning of varieties of English in a Swedish upper secondary school context. Data from 129 student questionnaires and nine semi-structured teacher interviews are analyzed. The results show that British English (BrE) appears to retain a prominent role amongst upper secondary students in Sweden as their ideologized values reveal that they feel that BrE sounds more pleasant and intelligent than AmE. However, American English (AmE) is the preferred variety of English amongst the participating students. The results also show that teachers predominantly teach British Standard English (BrSE) and American Standard English (AmSE), which they consider to be the ‘correct’ varieties of English. Teachers agree it is important to teach a wide range of Englishes, but do so by contrasting them with BrSE and AmSE. This study further suggests that other varieties of English are treated as a “funny thing” by the participating teachers, and argues that teachers must be made aware of their own language attitudes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Teachers’ and students’ attitudes and perceptions toward varieties of English in Swedish upper secondary school
  • 36.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The Effectiveness of Modified Inductive versus Deductive Teaching2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Eriksson, Linda
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The Effectiveness of Modified Inductive versus Deductive Teaching2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ervo, Laura
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Facing people through language use - linguistic tools to make proceedings fair2016In: International Journal of Legal Discourse, ISSN 2364-883X, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 277-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Court proceedings should be fair. Accordingly, the right to be heard has traditionally been considered one of the fundamental principles of court proceedings. Earlier, this right was mainly interpreted in a normative and rather passive sense. Recently, however, the interpretation of the right to be heard has developed towards the requirement of active and factual participation of court parties on equal terms with the other parties involved. The explanation for this should be sought in modern (procedural) law, which is more sociologically influenced than has previously been the case. Nowadays fairness is also about feelings. Welfare in courts means not only the rule of law and legal security in its traditional form, but also a good atmosphere and the presence of concrete means to give fair experiences to people who visit courts. This places communication and interaction between judges and parties in a central position as some of the most important instruments for achieving a fair hearing. With regard to the formulation of judgments and decisions, it is important that court lawyers put themselves in the parties’ situation and give careful deliberation to the purpose of their texts and how they will be perceived and understood by those concerned. The media, too, has a key role to play as a communicating link between the courts and citizens. For the media to be able to give an all-round and balanced picture of the courts, decision-making processes in courts must, as far as possible, be observable, or, in other words, transparent. Therefore, courts are in the process of throwing open their doors and judges no longer tend to hide behind their law-books. Post-modern legal decision-making is “doing justice together” rather than isolated use of power. Courts need to face people. And to do that, they need to master the most crucial instrument of all, namely appropriate language use. The present article discusses how to realize/operationalize this “modern” form of fairness in courts and how to maintain it with reference to legal theory and practical needs.

  • 39.
    Ervo, Laura
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Multiculturalism in the fact gathering2013In: Proceedings of The Third International Conference on Law, Translation and Culture. May 31 - June 2, 2013, Hangzhou, China. / [ed] Cheng, L.; Hale, L.; He, Q; Sun, L., Marietta: The American Scholars Press , 2013, p. XXV-XXXChapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the frame of the free reception and evaluation of evidence where the court decides what has been proofed in the case, misunderstandings during the fact gathering can lead to a wrong decision. From this perspective multicultural situations are extremely challenging. Therefore, cultural and multicultural differences should be taken into consideration much more. They should be a part in the legal education and there should be more discussion on the topic. In addition, court proceedings should be organized in such a way:where different cultural needs are taken into consideration. Judges should also be more aware of the legal ethnology.

  • 40. Firth, Mark
    et al.
    Broadbridge, James
    Siegel, Joseph
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pragmatic development and study abroad: Building and maintaining competence2017In: TESOL Voices: Insider accounts of classroom life: Higher education / [ed] Tim Stewart, Alexandria, Virginia: TESOL Press , 2017, p. 81-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    On Linguistic and Discursive Constructions of Concession and Adversativity: Towards a Multilevel Analysis of English in the UK Parliament2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses concessive and adversarial language in UK parliamentary debates and thereby enriches the theoretical and analytical body of knowledge on the language of concession and adversativity in contemporary English. It contributes to existent scholarship on both grammatical constructions of concession/adversativity and on the dynamics of contemporary British parliamentary and political discourse. The study proposes an integrated, multilevel theoretical and analytical model that covers both the micro- and macro-linguistic analysis of concession and adversativity. It fills a significant gap in the existent body of scholarship by arguing that concession and adversativity need to be considered as multilevel phenomena that are linguistic (esp. grammatical) as well as discursive (incl. argumentative/rhetorical) in nature. In its multilevel approach, the study deploys corpus-linguistic methods and utilises tools specially created for the purpose of analysis as well as established instruments and techniques of corpus analysis. All of these are applied to a custom-made corpus of selected UK parliamentary debates covering a variety of debate genres that nest various constructions and dynamics of concession and adversativity. The study concludes that concession is essentially a ‘weak’ yet an indispensable form of adversativity that allows the studied parliamentary language to escape rigidity of expressing either total ‘yes’ or total ‘no’. The often interrelated use of concession and adversativity hence allows political speakers to draw on a continuum of linguistic and discursive resources available in English and indispensable to navigate through complex genre of parliamentary debates. It also enables the specific themes and arguments deployed by speakers in their discourse to be expressed and constructed while relying on linguistic constructions of concession and adversativity that help avoiding the use of language of total opposition or open disagreement.

  • 42.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ilie, Cornelia
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Pseudo-parliamentary discourse in a Communist dictatorship: Dissenter Parvulescu vs. dictator Ceausescu (vol 42, pg 924, 2010)2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2347-2347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Frumuselu, Mihai Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ilie, Cornelia
    Malmo Univ, Malmo, Sweden.
    Strategic uses of parliamentary forms of address: The case of the U.K. Parliament and the Swedish Riksdag (vol 42, pg 885, 2010)2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2347-2347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Garzone, Giuliana
    et al.
    Ilie, CorneliaÖrebro University, Department of Humanities.
    The use of English in institutional and business settings: an intercultural perspective2007Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the intercultural problems related to the widespread use of English in written and oral communication by native and non-native speakers in institutional and business settings. Each chapter looks at a different set of issues emerging from the confrontation of cultures across national, institutional and organizational discourse communities, taking an intercultural or cross-cultural approach. The focus is on workplace settings, both in institutional and business contexts (e.g. politics, public services, media, international corporate communication, advertising, business negotiations, etc.). The theme is all the more interesting today not only in consideration of the sheer magnitude of this phenomenon and its capillary spread, but above all on account of the pervasive penetration of English into professional and workplace contexts as a communication language also for local/internal communication. The complexity of intercultural communication as an object of research is reflected in the variety of the topics explored, the range of settings investigated, and the diversity of methodological approaches taken.

  • 45.
    Gelang, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Towards a political actio2013In: Multimodal Communication in Political Speech. Shaping Minds and Social Action: International Workshop, Political Speech 2010, Rome, Italy, November 10-12, 2010, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Isabella Poggi, Francesca D´Errico, Laura Vincze, Alessandro Vinciarelli, Springer Publishing Company, 2013, p. 30-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a rhetorical, cognitive and contextual view of nonverbal communication (cf. Kjeldsen 2007, e.g. nonverbal resources of rhetoric, Gelang 2008) I will examine the ethos of politicians and the argumentative dimensions of the nonverbal communication of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in their contest for the 2008 American Democratic presidential nomination.

    Actio was an essential part of rhetorical training from the classical period with Aristotle, Quintilian and Cicero setting the standard. Today nonverbal communication concerns a variety of modalities such as facial expressions, hand-gestures, movements, postures and the use of voice. In this articel, I will refer to these nonverbal modalities rhetorically performed in public speaking as actio.

    Unlike rhetoricians from ancient time, I am not only interested in what a speaker does (for instance nodding her head) but especially how she is doing it (nodding eagerly or hesitantly). The way a gesture is performed is at least as important for its rhetorical impact and argumentative dimensions as the gesture chosen. I refer to the performance as actio-qualities meaning the aspects of actio that create the nuances, and make actio appear with variation (Gelang 2008). In judging the how of actio, I distinguish between energy, dynamism and tempo in nonverbal communication. Energy concerns flow, intensity and focus; dynamism concerns variations, and tempo concerns flow, speed and timing (Gelang 2008). A wide range of studies suggests that nonverbal communication affects the audience in their liking or disliking of different debaters/leaders (Sullivan & Masters 1988, Atkinson 1988, Bucy 2000, 2003, Bucy & Bradley 2004). Some research points at energy as an especially important factor in nonverbal communication (McCroskey 2001, Mehrabaian 1972, Babad et al. 2004). One study of 37 television debates concludes that speakers winning the debates were characterized by modulated voice, energetic articulation, intense gaze, energetic posture, eager gesticulations and firm, directive gestures (Jørgensen et al 1994, 1998).

    I will relate what I have found concerning actio-qualities to two nonverbal rhetorical argumentative strategies: enacted actio and restrained actio.

  • 46.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library. Institutionen för språk, litteratur och interkultur (from 2013), Karlstad.
    Wholesale Apocalypse: Brand Names in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake2016In: Names, ISSN 0027-7738, E-ISSN 1756-2279, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 88-98, article id 1159448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coinages pervade Margaret Atwood’s post-apocalyptic novel Oryx and Crake (2003). Most of the neologisms in the novel denote corporations and their products and form part of a thoroughgoing critique of consumerism. The coinages are jarringly hyperbolic and their orthography often evokes contrary connotations. However, in the thematic context of the novel, coining practices follow certain patterns and function as effective, if ambiguous, satirical tools. On one level, the practice of branding is thoroughly satirized. On another, however, the neologisms point to both the limitations and possibilities of satire when dealing with the themes addressed in the novel: commoditization, environmental damage on a planetary scale, and a vision of the imminent end of humanity itself.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Wholesale Apocalypse: Brand Names in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake
  • 47.
    Gynne, Annaliina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Linguistic and cultural ideologies and policies in education: An ethnographic case study of a "bilingual" Sweden Finnish School2013In: Methods, Materials and Analyses for Research on Multilingual Youth and Adults – qualitative perspectives (MeMARY), Stockholms University, Stocksholm, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Gynne, Annaliina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lainio, Jarmo
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Linguistic and cultural ideologies and policies in education: An ethnographic case study of a “bilingual” Sweden Finnish School 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores linguistic-cultural ideologies and educational policies as they emerge and are negotiated in everyday life in a bilingual school setting, located in the geopolitical spaces of Sweden. Taking sociocultural theory and discourse analysis as points of departure, we focus on empirical examples of classroom interaction and locally established formal policing. Linguistic-cultural ideologies and educational policies that frame life at the school are investigated by employing nexus analytical methods, focusing on social (inter)actions through which a number of locally and nationally relevant discourses circulate. Our findings indicate that refocusing ideology and policy research from the lens of a practiced perspective allows the situated and distributed nature of everyday life to inform issues related to bilingualism as well as their relations to wider societal discourses. Furthermore, our analysis highlights the crucial role of educators in (re)locating bilingual education in its societal contexts as well as making these connections visible in classrooms.

  • 49.
    Hansson, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Section of Audiology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Can a 'single hit' cause limitations in language development?: A comparative study of Swedish children with hearing impairment and children with specific language impairment2007In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 307-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies of language in children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment (HI) indicate that they often have problems in phonological short-term memory (PSTM) and that they have linguistic weaknesses both in vocabulary and morphosyntax similar to children with specific language impairment (SLI). However, children with HI may be more likely than children with SLI to acquire typical language skills as they get older. It has been suggested that the more persisting problems in children with SLI are due to a combination of factors: perceptual, cognitive and/or linguistic.

    AIMS: The main aim of this study was to explore language skills in children with HI in comparison with children with SLI, and how children with both HI and language impairment differ from those with non-impaired spoken language skills.

    METHODS & PROCEDURES: PSTM, output phonology, lexical ability, receptive grammar and verb morphology were assessed in a group of children with mild-to-moderate HI (n = 11) and a group of children with SLI (n = 12) aged 5 years 6 months to 9 years 0 months.

    OUTCOMES & RESULTS: The HI group tended to score higher than the SLI group on the language measures, although few of the differences were significant. The children with HI had their most obvious weaknesses in PSTM, vocabulary, receptive grammar and inflection of novel verbs. The subgroup of children with HI (five out of 10) who also showed evidence of grammatical output problems was significantly younger than the remaining children with HI. Correlation analysis showed that the language variables were not associated with age, whereas hearing level was associated with PSTM.

    CONCLUSIONS: Children with HI are at risk for at least a delay in lexical ability, receptive grammar and grammatical production. The problems seen in the HI group might be explained by their low-level perceptual deficit and weak PSTM. For the SLI group the impairment is more severe. From a clinical perspective an important conclusion is that the language development in children with even mild-to-moderate HI deserves attention and support.

  • 50.
    Hedenius, Martina
    et al.
    Unit for Speech and Language Pathology, Department of Neuroscience, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, Jonas
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alm, Per A.
    Unit for Speech and Language Pathology, Department of Neuroscience, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ullman, Michael T.
    Brain and Language Lab, Department of Neuroscience, Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA.
    Howard, James H.
    Department of Psychology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA; Department of Neurology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA; Department of Psychology, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, USA.
    Howard, Darlene V.
    Department of Psychology, Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA.
    Jennische, Margareta
    Unit for Speech and Language Pathology, Department of Neuroscience, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Impaired implicit sequence learning in children with developmental dyslexia2013In: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 3924-3935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been proposed that an impairment of procedural memory underlies a range of linguistic, cognitive and motor impairments observed in developmental dyslexia (DD). However, studies designed to test this hypothesis using the implicit sequence learning paradigm have yielded inconsistent results. A fundamental aspect of procedural learning is that it takes place over an extended time-period that may be divided into distinct stages based on both behavioural characteristics and neural correlates of performance. Yet, no study of implicit sequence learning in children with DD has included learning stages beyond a single practice session. The present study was designed to fill this important gap by extending the investigation to include the effects of overnight consolidation as well as those of further practice on a subsequent day. The results suggest that the most pronounced procedural learning impairment in DD may emerge only after extended practice, in learning stages beyond a single practice session.

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