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  • 1.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    För det allmänna bästa: Kungl. Sällskapet Pro Patria 1766-2016. Ett kungligt sällskap mellan stat och marknad under 250 år2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    de Miranda, Luis
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    30-second AI and robotics: 50 key notions, characters, fields and events in the rise of intelligent machines, each explained in half a minute2019Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    de Miranda, Luis
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Being & Neonness2019Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cultural and philosophical history of neon, from Paris in the twentieth century to the perpetually switched-on present day.

    For most of us, the word neon conjures images of lights, colors, nightlife, and streets. It evokes the poetry of city nights. For Luis de Miranda, neon is a subject of philosophical curiosity. Being and Neonness is a cultural and philosophical history of neon, from early twentieth-century Paris to the electric, perpetually switched-on present day Manhattan. It is an inspired journey through a century of night, deciphering the halos of the past and the reflections of the present to shed light on the future.

    Invented in Paris in 1912, neon first appeared on a modest but arresting sign outside a small barbershop; the sign lit up number 14, Boulevard Montmartre, attracting so many passersby that the barber's revenues soon doubled. A century later, neon is no longer just a sign; it is a mythic object—a metonymy of contemporary identity and a metaphor for the present, signifying the ubiquity of commerce and the tautology of hypermodernity. But perhaps the noble gas of neon whispers something more, something deeper? In ten short, poetic yet precise chapters, de Miranda explores the neon lights of the twentieth century. He considers, among other historical curiosities, the neon compulsions of the Italian Futurists; the Soviet program of “neonization”; the Nazi's deployment of neon for propaganda purposes; Baudelaire's “halo” and Benjamin's “aura”; neon as a gas and crystallized chaos; neon and power; neon and capitalism—all of this backlit by an original reading of Sartre's Being and Nothingness. This English edition has been thoroughly revised and adapted from the French edition, L'être et le neon.

  • 4. de Miranda, Luis
    Ensemblance: The Transnational Genealogy of Esprit de Corps2020Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is esprit de corps the secret engine of history?

    • Unveils the hidden and conflicting ideologies at stake behind the concept of esprit de corps and its contemporary uses 
    • Focuses on the discursive uses of esprit de corps in various transnational contexts and in the long term, from 1700 to present times 
    • Combines intellectual history, cultural history, philosophy, history of ideas, discourse analysis, political theory and labour history 
    • Offers a fresh look into the modern dialectics of individualism and collectivism, structure and agency, laissez-faire and corporatism
    • Deepens our understanding of the history of corporate capitalism and its military influences, as well as to understand the current revival of occidental nationalism

    Esprit de corps has played a significant role in the cultural and political history of the last 300 years. Through several historical case studies, Luis de Miranda shows how this phrase acts as a combat concept with a clear societal impact. He also reveals how interconnected, yet distinct, French, English and American modern intellectual and political thought is. In the end, this is a cautionary analysis of past and current ideologies of ultra-unified human ensembles, a recurrent historical and theoretical fabulation the author calls ‘ensemblance’.

  • 5.
    de Miranda, Luis
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Chabal, Emile
    bHistory, The University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Big Data, Small Concepts: Histosophy as an Approach to Longue-Durée History2019In: Global l Intellectual History, ISSN 2380-1883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay, we sketch out a method, histosophy, which makes possible the study of intellectual history and conceptual genealogy both in depth and over long periods of time. Histosophy uses digital tools to survey ‘large issues within small compasses.’ A genealogy of signifiers, it considers metonymic parts of a problem in order to contribute precisely and coherently to a larger perspective. We outline the theoretical contours of our approach. We exemplify how it works in practice by looking at the signifier ‘esprit de corps’, the study of which is presented in detail in the histosophical book The Genealogy of Esprit de Corps(Edinburgh University Press, 2019). The phrase ‘esprit de corps’ has been widely used since the eighteenth century in different discourses (political, military, sociological, etc.), but it is sufficiently limited that its genealogy can be traced across centuries and nations with precision, coherence, clarity, and with the help of automated search engines. By contrast, related but bigger concepts like freedom, individualism or solidarity are part of dozens of disparate and fuzzy discourses, so often uttered that the analysis of modern uses is problematic. The histosophical methodology is applicable in six discrete stages, here outlined.

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    Big data, small concepts: histosophy as an approach to longue-durée history
  • 6.
    de Miranda, Luis
    et al.
    School of Literatures, Languages and Culture, The University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Ramamoorthy, Subramanian
    School of Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Rovatsos, Michael
    School of Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, UK.
    We, Anthrobot: Learning from Human Forms of Interaction and Esprit de Corps to Develop More Diverse Social Robotics2016In: WHAT SOCIAL ROBOTS CAN AND SHOULD DO, IOS Press, 2016, Vol. 290, p. 48-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We contend that our relationship with robots is too often seen within a universalistic and individualistic mind-frame. We propose a specific perspective in social robotics that we call anthrobotics. Anthrobotics starts with the choice to consider the human-machine intertwining as a dynamic union of more or less institutionalised collectives rather than separated discrete realities (individual humans, on one side, and discrete individualised machines on the other). We draw on our research in types of social interaction and esprit de corps to imagine more plural and harmonious forms of shared natural-artificial cognitive systems. We propose to look at four types of organised groups: conformative, autonomist, creative, and universalistic, that may provide guiding principles for the design of more diverse anthrobots.

  • 7.
    Enelo, Jan-Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Folkbildning och Bourdieus kapitalformer2013In: Nyttan med folklig bildning: en studie av kapitalformer i folkbildande verksamhet / [ed] Bernt Gustavsson, Matilda Wiklund, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2013, 1, p. 62-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Enelo, Jan-Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Jonsson, Bosse
    Mälardalens högskola, Västerås, Sverige.
    Folkbildning och hälsokapital2013In: Nyttan med folklig bildning: en studie av kapitalformer i folkbildande verksamhet / [ed] Bernt Gustavsson, Matilda Wiklund, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2013, 1, p. 234-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Enelo Jansson, Jan-Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Jezierska, Katarzyna
    Gustavsson, Bernt
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Introduction2010In: Altering Politics: Democraxy from the Legal, Educational and Social Perspectives / [ed] Enelo Jansson, Jezierska & Gustavsson, Örebro: Örebro University , 2010, p. 9-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Introduction
  • 10.
    Ericsson, Christer
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    På spaning efter en svensk modell2011In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648, p. 283-288Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ericsson, Christer
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Horgby, Björn
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    The Middle Class Patriarch In The Bourgeois Public2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the second parts of the nineteenth century and the first part of the twentieth century the middle class patriarch played an important role in the formation and transformation of the bourgeoisie in Sweden - especially in the upper middle class dominated by industrialists, wholesalers and owners of "bruk". According to the comic press in the early twentieth century appearance was characteristic. Obviously he was a man. In the caricatures he often carried a high cylinder, wore a sturdy moustache á la Bismarck, was evidently thick and because of that a back leaned posture, and had a authoritative appearance. Often he smoked a fat cigar. Here we will discuss his world view. First of all we discuss him on the basis of the changes in the bourgeois public and its patriarchal relations. Then we consider important parts of the world view and lastly we discuss the middle class patriarch as an industrialist.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 12.
    Forsell, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Självförverkligandets marknad: ekonomi, modernitet, genus och media i svensk korrespondens- och distansutbildning, 1900 - 19752009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hammar, Björn
    Högskolan i Gävle, Ämnesavdelningen för filmvetenskap, historia, litteraturvetenskap, medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap och statsvetenskap.
    On Power, Order and Prudence in Early Modern Spanish Political Thought2008In: Redescriptions : Yearbook of Political Thought, Conceptual History and Feminist Theory, Vol. 12, p. 271-275Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Prestjan, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Idealistic doctors: alcoholism treatment institutions in Sweden 1885-19162007In: On the margins: Nordic alcohol and drug treatment 1885-2007 / [ed] Johan Edman, Kerstin Stenius, Helsingfors: Nordic Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research , 2007, 1, p. 25-49Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Redmalm, David
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Christian Abrahamsson, Fredrik Palm, Sverre Wide (red.): Sociologik [Sociologic]: tio essäer om socialitet och tänkande [Ten essays on sociality and thinking]2011In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 75-78Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16. Roderick, Noah
    Analogize This!: The Politics of Scale and the Problem of Substance in Complexity-Based Composition2013In: The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2012 / [ed] Julia Voss, Beverly Moss, Steve Parks, Brian Bailie, Heather Christiansen, and Stephanie Ceraso, Anderson, South Carolina, USA: Parlor Press, 2013, 1, p. 25-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of recent enthusiasm in composition studies (and in the social sciences more broadly) for complexity theory and ecology, this article revisits the debate over how much composition studies can or should align itself with the natural sciences. For many in the discipline, the science debate—which was ignited in the 1970s, both by the development of process theory and also by the popularity of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions—was put to rest with the anti-positivist sentiment of the 1980s. The author concludes, however, that complexity-based descriptions of the writing act do align the discipline with the sciences. But the author contends that while composition scholars need not reject an alignment with complexity science, they must also be able to critique the neoliberal politics which are often wrapped up in the discourse of complexity. To that end, the author proposes that scholars and teachers of composition take up a project of critical analysis of analogical invention, which addresses the social conditions that underlie the creation and argument of knowledge in a world of complex systems.

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  • 17. Roderick, Noah
    Analogize This!: The Politics of Scale and the Problem of Substance in Complexity-Based Composition2012In: Composition Forum, ISSN 1522-7502, ISSN 1522-7502, Vol. 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of recent enthusiasm in composition studies (and in the social sciences more broadly) for complexity theory and ecology, this article revisits the debate over how much composition studies can or should align itself with the natural sciences. For many in the discipline, the science debate—which was ignited in the 1970s, both by the development of process theory and also by the popularity of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions—was put to rest with the anti-positivist sentiment of the 1980s. The author concludes, however, that complexity-based descriptions of the writing act do align the discipline with the sciences. But the author contends that while composition scholars need not reject an alignment with complexity science, they must also be able to critique the neoliberal politics which are often wrapped up in the discourse of complexity. To that end, the author proposes that scholars and teachers of composition take up a project of critical analysis of analogical invention, which addresses the social conditions that underlie the creation and argument of knowledge in a world of complex systems.

  • 18.
    Roderick, Noah
    Department of English, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.
    Gods, Grammars, and Genres: Towards an Ethics of English Studies in Imperial Sovereignty2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation, the author argues that the post-process movement towards genre-based writing pedagogies is reproducing the logic of neoliberal or free-market ideology. By analyzing the relationship between three paradigms of sovereignty (feudalism, the nation-state, and globalization) and institutionalized language, the author demonstrates that teaching writing as multiple and genred as opposed to teaching it as a single, abstract skill is no a more rational approach, but rather a differently rational approach.

  • 19. Roderick, Noah
    Hawk, Byron. A Counter History of Composition: Toward Methodologies of Complexity. Pittsburgh: UP of Pittsburgh, 2007: 400 pp. [Review]2009In: Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, ISSN 0044-5975, E-ISSN 1588-2543, Vol. 20Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Roderick, Noah
    Lourdes University, Sylvania, OH, USA.
    The Being of Analogy2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Similarity has long been excluded from reality in both the analytical and continental traditions. Because it exists in the aesthetic realm, and because aesthetics is thought to be divorced from objective reality, similarity has been confined to the prison of the subject. In The Being of Analogy, Noah Roderick unleashes similarity onto the world of objects. Inspired by object-oriented theories of causality, Roderick argues that similarity is ever present at the birth of new objects. This includes the emergent similarity of new mental objects, such as categories—a phenomenon we recognize as analogy. Analogy, Roderick contends, is at the very heart of cognition and communication, and it is through analogy that we can begin dismantling the impossible wall between knowing and being.

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    The being of analogy
  • 21.
    Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Rörelsetidskrifter – en genrebeteckning2019In: Arr - idéhistorisk tidsskrift, ISSN 0802-7005, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 21 of 21
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