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  • 1.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Borrmann, André
    Technische Universität München, München, Germany.
    Amor, Robert
    University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Beetz, Jakob
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Architecture, computing, and design assistance2013In: Automation in Construction, ISSN 0926-5805, E-ISSN 1872-7891, Vol. 32, p. 161-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design is one of the most complex of human endeavors requiring an enormous number of often conflicting criteria to be contemplated when identifying optimal solutions. Design is constrained by guidelines, codes, and standards applicable to the specific cultural and locational context that the design will be sited. Furthermore, a design has to be created within a collaborative team consisting of many professionals focused on specific subsystems and expert preferences that provide unique functionality to the overall design. The increasing use and capability of software tools involved in the creation and processing of such spatial information has also led to elevated levels of complexity that spurred a need to structure, query and reason about multiple spatial representations of buildings and their components in new ways.

  • 2.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Freksa, Christian
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Spatial Computing for Design — an Artificial Intelligence Perspective2015In: Studying Visual and Spatial Reasoning for Design Creativity / [ed] Gero, John S., Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands , 2015, p. 109-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The articulation of the Science of Design by Herbert Simon and the paradigmatic relevance of Artificial Intelligence in that context are closely intertwined topics: Simon elaborates the ‘Sciences of the Artificial’ in the context of the design of artefacts. Situated in this AI-centric view of design, we characterize “spatial computing for design” as a specialisation concerned with the development of the general representational and computational apparatus necessary for solving modelling and reasoning problems in spatial design. Several representation and reasoning problems are dis-cussed in the backdrop of relevant examples involving the formal modelling of structural form with respect to a desired/anticipated artefactual function. The discussion, although applicable to any spatial design activity, is grounded in the domain of assistive decision-support in the context of a conventional computer-aided architecture design workflow.

  • 3.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Lewis, Clayton
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Multimodality in Embodied Experience Design: Workshop at INTERACT 2017, Mumbai, INDIA2017In: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2017, Part IV, Springer, 2017, Vol. LNCS-10516, p. 533-534Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The workshop on Multimodality in Embodied Experience Design addresses the role of multimodality and mediated interaction for the analysis and design of human-centred, embodied, cognitive user experiences. Research topics being addressed encompass formal, computational, cognitive, design, engineering, empirical, and philosophical perspectives at the interface of artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and interaction design.

  • 4.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Lieto, AntonioUniversity of Turin, Turin, Italy; ICAR-CNR, Italy.
    Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Cognition and Artificial Intelligence for Human-Centred Design 2017 co-located with IJCAI 20172018Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Schultz, Carl
    Freksa, Christian
    The ‘Space’ in Spatial Assistance Systems: Conception, Formalisation and Computation2014In: Representing space in cognition: Interrelations of behavior, language, and formal models / [ed] Tenbrink, Thora; Wiener, Jan; Claramunt, Christophe, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is about ‘space’: empty space, spatial structures, and the process of structuring. We organize empty space by building-up structures and artefacts of our everyday existence. This structuring transforms empty space into something of a desired form (e.g. a balanced room, a visually pleasing scene), function (e.g. easily navigable), and semantic connotation (e.g. of a ‘place’). The chapter is written from the perspective of spatial informatics and addresses space at the scale of everyday human perception and thinking. The core of this chapter is to present the informatics of spatial structure; this is done at three levels: (1) the conception of structural form, as it accrues in the minds of people, and its expression, using spatio-linguistic modalities; (2) the formalization of space, using representational means for spatial abstraction; and (3) the computation of structural forms in a manner that constructively assures, assists, and empowers those who conceive of those forms. The chapter is grounded to reality with respect to a particular class of spatial assistance systems, e.g. for spatial design, where our interpretations of creative and constructive assistance are applicable. We also present case studies in domains such as design creativity for media pre-production, and real-time emergency assistance, though architectural design remains an area of special emphasis throughout the chapter.

  • 6.
    Hazel, White
    et al.
    University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Pacenti, Elena
    Domus Academy, Milano, Italy.
    Mager, Birgit
    Köln International School of Design, Cologne, Germany.
    What Do Tomorrow’s Service Designers Need to Know?: What should a Masters Level Service Design Curriculum look like?2012Other (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Design i och för offentlig sektor2013In: Swedish Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-964X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 28-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design (Konstfack), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Centrum För Tjänsteforskning (CTF), Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Breaking free from NSD: Design and service beyond new service development2017In: Designing for service: key issues and new directions / [ed] Sangiorgi, D. and Prendiville, A., London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017, p. 95-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kondyli, Vasiliki
    et al.
    DesignSpace Group, Germany.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Spatial knowledge update in rotational locomotion: On the role of visuo-spatial cues and familiarity: A case-study at the Bremen train-station2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial knowledge updating is the ability to keep track of one’s position and orientation while moving with respect to the locations such as the starting point. In everyday navigation tasks that involve rotational locomotion, spatial updating frequently fails as a result of the alignment effect, referring to human’s inability to coordinate various spatial representations and reference frames, and human’s tendency to ignore proprioceptive, visual and auditory cues, as a result of changes in perspective, scale, or orientation.

    In our empirical study conducted in a large-scale built-up environment, the railway station in Bremen, we investigate if and how rotational locomotion affects the navigation performance in a naturalist every-day task of departure and arrival. The experimental group performs an ego-turn of 360◦ as part of the route while they are able to use all the proprioceptive, visual and auditory cues available to initiate a corresponding counter-rotation of the world. The control group performs the same task without rotational locomotion. Participants were categorised according to the level of familiarity with the environment. We use a multi-modal approach (e.g. orientation task, eye-tracking, questionnaires, videos) to investigate user’s spatial behaviour, focusing on the disorientation effect, and the visuo-spatial features they use for reorientation.

    Primary results confirm previous studies suggested that spatial updating is not automatic, it is affected by rotational locomotion and it depends on the level of familiarity of users with the environment. Familiar users tend to proceed an instantaneous spatial updating using different visuo-spatial features than unfamiliar users. Individual differences (gender, mental rotation abilities) are excluded in this study but they are considered significant as a next step. We conclude that people are affected differently by the rotational locomotion, they follow various strategies for reorientation, and so the environment should provide a range of visuo-spatial information to address the user groups.

  • 10.
    Kondyli, Vasiliki
    et al.
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Hartmann, Timo
    Teknische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Towards People-Centred Precedents for Parametric Design: The Case of Wayfinding in Large Scale Buildings2017In: Proceedings of the Joint Conference on Computing in Construction (JC3) / [ed] Fréderic Bosché; Ioannis Brilakis; Rafael Sacks, Edinburgh, UK: Heriot-Watt University , 2017, Vol. 1, p. 803-810Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-scale public buildings need to ensure an effective wayfinding performance for different user groups. Recent precedent based design approaches take spatial cognition into account by analysing the visuo-locomotive experience of users with the aim to interpret their behaviour and integrate it into a people-centred design. The paper focuses on the process from the analysis of precedents and the visuo-locomotive experience to the definition of design constraints that can be embedded into a parametric design for wayfinding. Primarily, we pursue a qualitative analysis of the visuo-locomotive experience of wayfinders in a healthcare built environment, with the use of cognitive-assistive and immersive/ virtual reality technologies. The outcome, presented through immersive reality, is correlated with the morphological analysis of the space and leads to precedents evaluation about design for wayfinding and the definition of new design constraints. The process is approached through an example, the environmental aspect of visual range. We conclude that this practice can overcome some of the experience based design practices of today but is not yet ingrained in the architectural and engineering design processes of public buildings.

  • 11.
    Malmberg, Lisa
    et al.
    Interaktiva och kognitiva system, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Högskolan för design och konsthantverk, Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Design in Public Sector: Exploring Antecedents of Sustained Design Capability2016In: The 20th dmi: Academic Design Management Conference proceedings, Boston: Design Management Institute , 2016, p. 1287-1307Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Vink, Josina
    et al.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University & Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University & Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University & Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University & Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Understanding the Influence of the Co-Design Process on Well-Being2016In: Service Design Geographies: Proceedings of the ServDes 2016 Conference / [ed] Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen and Francesco Grani, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016, p. 390-402Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explicitly link co-design to well-being and expand the conversation about the influence of the co-design process on well-being. This paper highlights considerations for co-design researchers and practitioners interested in enhancing the value created through co-design. The authors draw from discussions in transformative service research (TSR) to better understand how co-design influences well-being. Co-design is defined as a process of joint inquiry and imagination where diverse actors share and combine their knowledge. Based on the broad definition of service set out in service- dominant logic (SDL), the authors take the position that co-design is a form of service and therefore stress the relevance of TSR to co-design. The paper identifies six dimensions of well-being discussed in TSR that extend and highlight gaps in co-design literature related to the influence of the co-design process on well-being. The authors suggest that these dimensions become a component of future evaluations of the co-design process and point to opportunities for further research related to how co-design influences well-being and supports transformation.

  • 13.
    Vink, Josina
    et al.
    Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. County Council of Sörmland, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Rodrigues, Vanessa
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Designing Good(s)?: Exploring the Politics of Social Design Processes2017In: Conference Proceedings of the Design Management Academy: Volume 3 / [ed] Erik Bohemia, Cees de Bont and Lisbeth Svengren Holm, Glasgow, United Kingdom: The Design Society , 2017, Vol. 3, p. 961-977Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As design shifts from designing objects to designing for social transformation, there is an increasing need to address political dimensions within the design process. This paper explores those dimensions by drawing insights from the field of Science and Technology Studies. In doing so, we bring forward issues of ontological politics within social design processes, including: the recognition of situated knowledges, the multiplicity of reality, and the performative nature of methods. The implications of these issues are investigated through the examination of two practice examples in which different methods were used to support reflection on politics in social design processes. This research highlights the need to be more critical of the “good” that social design processes are working towards and the methods used to support political awareness. It also opens-up a host of new questions about how to address political issues amid the complexity and multiplicity of reality.

  • 14.
    Westerlund, Bo
    et al.
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design (Konstfack), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design (Konstfack) , Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dealing with wicked problems, in messy contexts, through prototyping2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, no Sup. 1, p. S886-S899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how designers’ core competencies relate to the emerging paradigmatic shift in design practice, and provides suggestions for design education. The shift is due to the increased interest from design in engaging with social and political contexts and issues the last fifteen years. Designers have several core competencies and in this paper prototyping and thereby the capacity to work with wicked problems are explored. More explicitly, we suggest that designers can design relevant propositions with the help of successive prototyping. Tightly integrating designing propositions with problem setting is necessary when dealing with wicked problems. This works well when designers deal with signs and things. However, in order to deal with increasingly complex contexts, we suggest that design students should get more relevant experience of prototyping in complex contexts and improved reflection by making use of theories from STS in order to deal with these complex contexts. 

  • 15.
    Westerlund, Bo
    et al.
    Industrial Design, University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Industrial Design, University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm.
    Design beyond service and product - Educating for new vistas of design education: Final report2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Konstfack has had financing from KK-stiftelsen (The Knowledge Foundation) for two years to address emerging design challenges in the increasingly complex contexts that design is engaging with. Examples are healthcare, design for sustainable development, social innovation, service design. The objective has been to explore potential expansion and supplementary developments of the currently well-functioning specialisation Individual Study Plan in Design. This has been done in the project Design, beyond service and product – educating for new vistas of design professions. People from academia, consultancy, business and the public sector have been invited to workshops, seminars and symposia in order to learn from them regarding the current situation and anticipated needs. The project has also done study visits to design schools, organisations and businesses. The report presents reflections on design competencies and a few possible ways to proceed at Konstfack.

  • 16.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Camén, Carolina
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Design thinking in public procured contract – is it possible?2013In: QUIS 13. Service Excellence in Management: Proceedings of the QUIS13 International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, June 10-13 2013, Karlstad Sweden / [ed] Erik Wästlund, Bo Edvardsson, Anders Gustafsson, Mary Jo Bitner, Rohit Verma, Karlstad: CTF, Service Research Center , 2013, p. 164-167Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between the increased demands on innovation, the use of design thinking for innovation when prerequisite for the service is stipulated in a contract is investigated. In the study context the service is public procured and stipulations in the contracts brings legal consequences to the innovations process. Insights how the tensions between design thinking and contract research can be used in order to create and better understand how new innovative service can be created is provided. The extended abstract ends with proposing research questions.

  • 17.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Industridesign, Konstfack, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Peter R.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Capturing Context through Service Design Stories2015In: Design thinking: new product development essentials from the PDMA / [ed] Michael G. Luchs, Scott Swan, Abbie Griffin, Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2015, p. 237-251Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moritz, Stefan
    Veryday, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Empowering transformation through design inquiry in public healthcare2015In: Proceedings of the Third European Conference on Design4Health 2015, Sheffield,13 -16 July 2015, Sheffield: Sheffield Hallam University , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In health and care service processes the coordination between different caregivers is one of the crucial challenges. This paper presents The patient journey project  as a practical application of a pragmatist pattern of inquiry (Dewey, 1938) and as fruitful way to work with/achieve transformative design. Situations of lived experience and moments of reflections perform as a carrier of knowledge and development. The paper argues that the design tools and mindset used in this project are of great importance in the ongoing transformation towards the patients focus in a Swedish public health care organization. 

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