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  • 1.
    Anderson, Ian
    et al.
    The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
    Tano, Sofia
    School of Business and Economy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Yap, Leslie
    Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu HI, United States.
    Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10040, p. 131-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries.

    Methods: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous health data systems were identified for each country. Data were obtained for population, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality, low and high birthweight, maternal mortality, nutritional status, educational attainment, and economic status. Data sources consisted of governmental data, data from non-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated.

    Findings: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case, and the size of the rate difference varies. We document poorer outcomes for Indigenous populations for: life expectancy at birth for 16 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1 year in 15 populations; infant mortality rate for 18 of 19 populations with a rate difference greater than one per 1000 livebirths in 16 populations; maternal mortality in ten populations; low birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in three populations; high birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in one population; child malnutrition for ten of 16 populations with a difference greater than 10% in five populations; child obesity for eight of 12 populations with a difference greater than 5% in four populations; adult obesity for seven of 13 populations with a difference greater than 10% in four populations; educational attainment for 26 of 27 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 24 populations; and economic status for 15 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 14 populations.

    Interpretation: We systematically collated data across a broader sample of countries and indicators than done in previous studies. Taking into account the UN Sustainable Development Goals, we recommend that national governments develop targeted policy responses to Indigenous health, improving access to health services, and Indigenous data within national surveillance systems.

  • 2.
    Dahl, Izabela A.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Muntlig historia - om berättelsens konstruktion och dekonstruktion2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    De Luigi, Nicola
    et al.
    Department of Sociology and Business Law, University of Bologna , Bologna, Italy.
    Martelli, Alessandro
    Department of Sociology and Business Law, University of Bologna , Bologna, Italy.
    Pitti, Ilaria
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    New forms of solidarity andyoung people: an ethnography of youth participation in Italy2018In: Young people re-generating politics in times of crises / [ed] Pickard, S.; Bessant, J., Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 253-271Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from the findings of the European project ‘Partispace,’ this chapter analyses three solidarity initiatives promoted by youth leftist groups in Bologna (Italy). Materials were collected through an ethnographic study that included in-depth interviews with young activists. This material highlights the connections between the initiatives of these groups, their objectives and practices, in the context of the global financial crisis. The analysis shows that these initiatives, while seeking to mitigate the problems faced by vulnerable groups (i.e. migrants, refugees and the homeless), were also fuelled by practices of self-help aimed at responding to the unheeded ‘generational needs’ of the young people themselves. The projects emerge as ‘laboratories of political resistance’ where strategies for collective action based on mutual help and self-empowerment are experimented with and enacted.

  • 4.
    Forsell, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Metropolitan pedagogy: the discovery of urban society as learning environment2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Joosse, Sofie
    et al.
    Division of Environmental Communication, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Fridge stories and other tales from the kitchen: A methodological toolbox for getting closer to everyday food practices2020In: Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research, ISSN 1552-8014, E-ISSN 1751-7443, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 608-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a methodological toolbox as a useful research approach for investigating domestic food practices. Consumption research often relies strongly on interviews or surveys. While helpful, such methods inevitably create a distance between the verbalization of the studied practice and the practice itself, inviting post hoc rationalization. The toolbox helps the researcher to get closer to the studied practice by combining interviews with methods based on observation, visualization and verbalization, in or close to practice. The toolbox holds a variety of methods and we describe fridge stories, food mapping, shop-alongs and food diaries. Through a practical discussion of the advantages and difficulties of these methods, and their combined use, we hope our paper can be useful to other researchers and students interested in everyday food practices.

  • 6.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Mat- och måltidskultur – en introduktion2022 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Måltidskulturer påverkar alla situationer där lagande, ätande och drickande förekommer. Trots detta tas måltidskulturella aspekter sällan i beaktande i det praktiska arbetet med professionella måltider i Sverige. Med en ökad kunskap om måltidskultur är det möjligt att designa måltider som tilltalar och skänker mening till gäster med olika bakgrund, ideal och preferenser. Det finns därför en stor potential i att arbeta medvetet med måltidskulturella perspektiv. Denna text ger en introduktion till studiet av måltidskultur och synliggör hur måltidskulturen är närvarande och av betydelse för professioner som arbetar med måltider. Texten riktar sig främst till dig som studerar en måltidsinriktad utbildning, men vi hoppas att den ska vara användbar även i andra utbildningar och för alla som arbetar praktiskt med måltider och måltidsutveckling.

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    Mat- och måltidskultur – en introduktion
  • 7.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pripp, Oscar
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westvall, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Kulturproduktion i föreningar med etnisk anknytning2018In: Migration – Musik – Mötesplatser: Föreningsliv och kulturproduktion i ett föränderligt samhälle / [ed] M. Westvall, R. Lidskog & O. Pripp, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 231-246Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Maivorsdotter, N.
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andersson, Joacim
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Health as Experience: Exploring Health in Daily Life Drawing From the Work of Aaron Antonovsky and John Dewey2020In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1004-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has pursued salutogenic and narrative approaches to deal with questions about how everyday settings are constitutive for different health practices. Healthy behavior is not a distinguishable action, but a chain of activities, often embedded in other social practices. In this article, we have endeavored to describe such a chain of activities guided by the salutogenic claim of exploring the good living argued by McCuaig and Quennerstedt. We use biographical material written by Karl Ove Knausgaard who has created a life story entitled My Struggle. The novel is selected upon an approach influenced by Brinkmann who stresses that literature can be seen as a qualitative social inquiry in which the novelist is an expert in transforming personal life experiences into common human expressions of life. The study illustrates how research with a broader notion of health can convey experiences of health, thereby complementing (and sometimes challenging) public health evidence. 

  • 9.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Från hemleverans av is till elberoende kylskåp: – matförvaring och hållbarhetsföreställningar från 1920-tal till 20202022Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    Från hemleverans av is till elberoende kylskåp – matförvaring och hållbarhetsföreställningar från 1920-tal till 2020
  • 10.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper.
    Hållbarhet till middag: En etnologisk studie om hur miljövänligt ätande praktiseras i vardagslivet2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has become a conspicuous term in the public and political debate, as well as in the landscapes of consumption. This study focuses on how people understand and practice sustainability through food in their everyday life. The aim is to describe and analyse sustainability as a collection of meaning-making practices by studying households that in some sense actively aim for an environmentally friendly and sustainable food consumption. The ethnographic fieldwork, mainly interviews and participant observations, included fifteen households in a municipality in northern Sweden during 2012-15. The dissertation centres around reoccurring themes: organic food, local food, food as culture and materiality, morality and distinction. Through these themes it became evident that the participants related sustainable food practices to more than environmental issues. Socioeconomic relations within the locality and the global world, as well as cultural norms, traditions and values related to food, were important aspects of a perceived sustainable society. Although occasionally seeming inconsistent and contradictory in their meaning-making of and commitment to practices revolving around ideals of (ecological) sustainability, the participants balanced multiple sustainabilities simultaneously. Besides the ecological aspect, they also wished for sustainable localities, household economy, social relations and personal wellbeing.

    Influenced by social practice theory the study pays attention to the competences, meanings and materials a practice is dependent on. The participants developed individual repertoires, or practice bundles, of sustainable food related practices that were meaningful in their everyday life. The development and expansion of such a bundle could be understood as a form of acquiring and maintaining green capital; a symbolic capital based upon shared green values which unite the possessors and distinguish them from those lacking such values. Green capital is expressed through green distinction, that is, using taste to differentiate between holders and non-holders of the symbolic capital. The participants separated themselves from both the large majority who did not yet understand or practise sustainability, and from “fanatics” who they perceived took sustainability in an extreme and unsound manner. A balanced approach to sustainability was favoured as the participants to a great extent valued a lifestyle adjustable to the preconditions of the contemporary Swedish society, such as social norms. The study shows how sustainability is constantly renegotiated and filled with new cultural meaning.

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    Hållbarhet till middag
    Download (pdf)
    SPIKBLAD01
    Download (pdf)
    ERRATA01
  • 11.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Kyla, förvara och lagra: Kulturella perspektiv på dryckesförvaring2021In: Måltiden som konstart: Gastronomisk kalender 2022 / [ed] Charlotte Birnbaum; Martin Lind; Christina Möller; Niklas Rådström; Stephan Rössner; Karsten Thurfjell, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2021, p. 133-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Kyla, förvara och lagra: Kulturella perspektiv på dryckesförvaring
  • 12.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Restauranghögskolan, Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kylskåp i beredskap: Matförråd för vardag och kris2018In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 3-4, p. 2-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fridge on standby: Food storage for everyday life and crises

    What can we learn about everyday sustainability through the refrigerator and kitchen cupboards? This explorative article explores challenges and possibilities evolving from the materiality of food storage. Using ethnographic fieldwork from Swedish households and archive material, practices relating to food storage are discussed in the perspective of societal change and issues of sustainability. Food storage, I argue, is dynamic and reveals through its development and contents norms and perceptions about food consumption and everyday life. Modern domestic food storage, such as refrigerators and freezers, have facilitated a relocation of time between different domestic practices and enabled new and safer ways to store food. However, they are also perceived to complicate aspects of sustainable living, e.g. stocking up on food and vegetable gardening.

  • 13.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Matens kulturella död och återuppståndelse2013In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using metaphors of death, the article explores food’s different phases of edibility in terms of perceptions and habits. Perceptions of dirt and expiry dates are cultural factors which may influence the disposal as well as ideas about potentially harmful decay, such as mould. Wasted food can be resurrected by dumpster divers performing attempts of resuscitation in supermarkets’ containers. Additionally, composting and transformation into biofuel can turn food waste into new and useful matter. The waste is thus is in a constant flux and incorporated into the aspiration for a sustainable society.

  • 14.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Prepared for a crisis and the unexpected: Managing everyday eventualities through food storage practices2023In: Food, Culture, and Society: an international journal of multidisciplinary research, ISSN 1552-8014, E-ISSN 1751-7443, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 305-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How and why do people store food? What norms, skills and items are involved in practices of stocking up and keeping food in pantries, refrigerators, and freezers? Despite an increasing interest in everyday food practices within food studies, research on domestic food storage practices is limited. In this article I depart from a practice theoretical framework to explore how food storage practices are made meaningful and involve certain competences and materials, with focus on preparedness. I draw on findings from a study on food storage in Sweden using an open-ended questionnaire and popular consumer magazines. The findings show that storing food is a concrete way of managing daily food work, time, social obligations, and potential societal crises. Households’ food storage practices are attempts to manage and control everyday life with its routines and disruptions, and the immediate, distant, or imagined future. However, societal advice for of long-term storage, for example for crises, is challenged by normalized storage spaces, skills, and values attached to food and food storage. I conclude by proposing that a new rationale relating to storage economy may influence the meaning, competences, and materials of food storage practices in favor of household preparedness.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Prepared for a crisis and the unexpected: managing everyday eventualities through food storage practices
  • 15.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Recension av Simon Ekström: Humrarna och evigheten2021In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 1, p. 40-42Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    The refrigerator as a problem and solution: Food storage practices as part of sustainable food culture2022In: Food and Foodways, ISSN 0740-9710, E-ISSN 1542-3484, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 261-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore how household food storage practices over time relate to environmental conditions and issues and how this has affected the practices and food culture. Through a bricolage of personal accounts, advertisements, magazine articles and kitchen guidelines, I use Sweden as the empirical example. Departing from the introduction of domestic refrigeration until today, I give particular attention to how different societal actors have framed refrigerated food storage as both solution and problem in relation to issues today linked to environmental sustainability, for example local climate conditions, energy consumption, depletion of the ozone layer and food waste. The paper also shows how people refigure the materiality of past storage to fit into modern-day life. The results, I argue, illustrate how food storage, as a culinary infrastructure, influence daily food practices and thereby understandings of sustainable food. The refrigerator and freezer have had a big impact on food culture. Hence, to encourage more sustainable food practices societal actors need to address and problematize culinary infrastructures and the ideas and values these convey regarding food and sustainability. The paper contributes with a cultural historical approach to how food related practices and infrastructures over time interlinks with different ideas of sustainability.

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    The refrigerator as a problem and solution: Food storage practices as part of sustainable food culture
  • 17.
    Marshall, Matilda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. Restauranghögskolan, Umeå universitet, Umeå.
    Hagström, Charlotte
    Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper, Lunds universitet, Lund.
    ”Zone taken!”: Kunskap, förändring och kulturell gemenskap i mobilspelet Turf2018In: Idrott, historia & samhälle, ISSN 0280-2775, p. 72-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How does a mobile game become a sport related community with its own cultural expressions and norms? This explorative article examines Turf, a mobile game where the players use the GPS function to navigate both a digital map and the physical landscape. By locating digital zones in the landscape, similar to the sport ori- enteering, the player gains points. Around the game various social activities, relations and norms have evolved. The purpose of this article is to empirically explore the phenomenon and its develop- ment and to discuss how cultural connections are created and es- tablished. We depart from the assumption that the digital game does not exclude a relation with the physical environment; instead there is an interaction between the digital and physical landscape that create new meanings and relations. Since the introduction in 2010, the game has created its own set of language, patterns of movement, objects and norms. Further, as the game is constantly evolving, so is the players’ use of Turf, which is a prerequisite for the survival of cultural phenomena.

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    ”Zone taken!” Kunskap, förändring och kulturell gemenskap i mobilspelet Turf
  • 18.
    Neuman, Nicklas
    et al.
    Department of Food Studies, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Matkonsumtion och klimatförändringar2019In: Mat och ätande: Sociologiska perspektiv / [ed] Nicklas Neuman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 1, p. 331-350Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Pétursson, Jón Þór
    et al.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Marshall, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pantry Memories: Storing Food and Feelings in Swedish Homes2022In: Ethnologia Fennica, ISSN 0355-1776, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 26-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, references to “old-fashioned pantries” and “classic root cellars” have regularly popped up in real estate ads across Sweden as a potential selling point for people seeking new homes. The use of the words “classic” and “old-fashioned” indicates a shift in the thinking about traditional food storage spaces. In this article, we explore the recontextualisation and emotionalisation of traditional food storage spaces in Swedish society. We base our analysis on an open-ended questionnaire on food storage, preservation, and household preparedness directed to Swedish households. We investigate how our respondents have recounted and shaped embodied memories in the act of writing about past food storage: the different spaces, times, people, practices, emotions, and objects. Viewing these acts of remembering and writing about past food storage as emotional practices has led to an understanding of how emotional experience in the past is reinterpreted in the present. Seeing these acts as emotional practices illustrates the relational nature of emotions, where longing for past food storage spaces is one way to reflexively deal with contemporary issues by managing everyday life. Finally, we argue that reflexive nostalgia helps to create and interpret emotions – making past and present food storage meaningful.

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    Pantry Memories: Storing Food and Feelings in Swedish Homes
  • 20.
    Westvall, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Lidskog, RolfÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.Pripp, OscarUppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Migration – Musik – Mötesplatser: Föreningsliv och kulturproduktion i ett föränderligt samhälle2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I takt med att Sverige blir alltmer globalt får frågor om musikens betydelse nya innebörder. Musik är ofta en viktig del av livet och kan bidra till att människor inkluderas i olika sammanhang. Men sällan fördjupas resonemangen om vad musik egentligen innebär i frågor om människors transnationella förflyttningar, etniciteter och medborgarskap.

    I Migration – Musik – Mötesplatser undersöker forskare från olika discipliner de innebörder och roller som musik har för medlemmar i föreningar bildade på etnisk grund i Sveriges tre största städer. En gemensam fråga är hur samspelet ser ut mellan musik, föreningarnas verksamheter och medlemmarnas engagemang och meningsskapande.

    Genom att knyta an till musikvetenskaplig, musikpedagogisk, etnologisk och sociologisk forskning, ger denna antologi en rik och mångfasetterad bild av musikens betydelse för individer och grupper och, inte minst, på en samhällsnivå. I centrum står musikande (musicking) som inbegriper de interaktiva processer som förknippas med musik såsom att spela, sjunga, dansa, lyssna på och samtala om musik.

    Migration – Musik – Mötesplatser riktar sig till studerande vid samhällsvetenskapliga, humanistiska och konstnärliga utbildningar, som intresserar sig för vad musik som kulturell företeelse betyder för individer och grupper. Boken är också relevant för alla som i sin yrkesutövning eller i sitt frivilliga engagemang kommer i kontakt med frågor som rör kulturproduktion, migration och musik.

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