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  • 1.
    Al-Haydar, Sattar
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Time concept and software production in a cross-cultural team: a structurational analysis2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Al-Haydar, Sattar
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Cultural aspects in global systems development: an analytical tool2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Al-Saqaf, Walid
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Open data vital for a new Yemen: how open governments can build on the Arab Spring to deliver true freedom2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The author argues that in order for Yemen to develop, it is important that it develops an open government with the utilization of open data through online means. The argument is that transparency enhances accountability, which in turn improves governance. Information technology is seen as crucial in this process.

  • 4.
    Al-Saqaf, Walid
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Internet as a Catalyst for Change in Yemen2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Andersson, Annika
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Digital divides revisited: towards a model for analysis2004In: Electronic government: Proceedings of the third international conference, EGOV 2004, Zaragoza, Spain, August 30 - September 3, 2004 / [ed] Roland Traunmüller, Berlin: Springer , 2004, p. 289-292Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a model for categories of divides, and how these categories are interrelated. The factors are found by a literature study from different countries attempting to measure various divides. The model is based on earlier research on the ‘divide’ and includes: physical access, autonomy of use, know-how and motivation. Depending on the type of digital divide and the local situation, rectifying efforts must address the most crucial factor, which could be any of the four. The paper also introduces the nature and amount of different proposed divides, and relations among factors.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Annika
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Learning to learn in e-Learning: constructive practices for development2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns technology use in distance educations and learning practices related to this use. The research was carried out over the period 2005 to 2009 in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka and has been reported in 6 published papers. The research is situated within the field of Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) and within this field e-learning. Education is important for development and for many students in developing countries distance education is often the only option to get educated. The research question is if the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in distance education can contribute to development, and if so, how?

    This question is explored through two case studies in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. A variety of data collection methods have been used: interviews, questionnaires, participant observations and document review. The research approach is interpretative and findings are analyzed using Structuration Theory.

    Initial findings showed that a major challenge for students was the change of learning practices that distance education required. Findings also showed that new constructive learning practices emerged through the use of ICT. For development to take place the learning practices of students are important. Students used to learning practices based on uncritical memorization of facts will not easily take initiatives for change, whereas students used to constructive learning practices will.  Notwithstanding the fact that most students found this transition challenging, it was found that by introducing technology into long-established transmission structures, changes towards constructive learning practices occurred.

    A major contribution of this thesis is to increase the understanding of how ICT in distance education can facilitate constructive learning practices. By arguing that constructive learning practices are conducive to societal change this finding also has implications for development. The thesis also makes a theoretical contribution by extending Structuration Theory’s applicability in demonstrating its explanatory power in settings where researcher and informants are geographically and socially distant.

    List of papers
    1. A Conceptual Framework for E-Learning in Developing Countries: A Critical Review of Research Challenges
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Conceptual Framework for E-Learning in Developing Countries: A Critical Review of Research Challenges
    2009 (English)In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, E-ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a critical review of research on challenges for e-learning with a particular focus on developing countries. A comprehensive literature review including 60 papers on e-learning challenges was undertaken for the purpose of understanding how to implement e-learning in developing countries. Research questions were: what has existing research identified as the major challenges for e-learning, and, what differences, if any, are there between developing countries and developed countries in this respect? The literature study found 278 papers which were condensed to 60 based on exclusion and inclusion criteria designed to find papers of best quality as well as papers that clearly investigated well-defined challenges. The research found 30 specific challenges which were grouped into four categories, viz.: courses, individuals, technology and context. The overall conclusion is that these challenges are equally valid for both developed and developing countries; however in developing countries more papers focus on access to technology and context whereas in developed countries more papers concern individuals. A further finding is that most papers focus on one or two categories of challenges; few papers exhibit a comprehensive view. Because challenges are interrelated, based on the findings we propose a conceptual framework of emerging issues for e-learning in developed and developing countries. The framework is useful to guide both practice and research.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Hong Kong: City University of Hong Kong, 2009
    Keywords
    e-learning, challenges, literature review, conceptual framework, developing countries
    National Category
    Information Systems
    Research subject
    Computer Science; informatics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8058 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-10-01 Created: 2009-10-01 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Seven major challenges for e-learning in developing countries: Case study eBIT, Sri Lanka
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seven major challenges for e-learning in developing countries: Case study eBIT, Sri Lanka
    2008 (English)In: International Journal of Education and Development using ICT, ISSN 1814-0556, Vol. 4, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    By using an extensive framework for e-learning enablers and disablers (including 37 factors) this paper sets out to identify which of these challenges are most salient for an e-learning course in Sri Lanka. The study includes 1887 informants and data has been collected from year 2004 to 2007, covering opinions of students and staff. A quantitative approach is taken to identify the most important factors followed by a qualitative analysis to explain why and how they are important. The study identified seven major challenges in the following areas: Student support, Flexibility, Teaching and Learning Activities, Access, Academic confidence, Localization and Attitudes. In this paper these challenges will be discussed and solutions suggested.

    Keywords
    e-learning; challenges, developing countries; support; flexibility; access; academic confidence; localization; interactivity; attitudes
    National Category
    Information Systems Social Sciences Computer and Information Sciences Computer and Information Sciences
    Research subject
    Informatics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5908 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-03-05 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Letters from the field: e-learning students change of learning behaviour in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Letters from the field: e-learning students change of learning behaviour in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh
    2008 (English)In: Proceedings of ECEL 2008: 7th European conference on e-Learning, 2008, p. 29-37Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the findings from two case studies on e-learning in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. In these countries much hope is set on e-learning as a means to disseminate education to a larger population, but statistics show that drop out rates from e-learning courses are much higher than from traditional, classroom based, courses. In this paper it is argued that one reason for this is that the introduction of e-learning and a more student-centred learning model involves a drastic shift for students who are brought up in very teacher-centred didactic educational cultures. In order to investigate how this change in learning is perceived by its main stakeholders (i.e. the students) visits to learning centres in Sri Lanka and Bangladesh were made during 2007 and 2008. To capture the students’ opinions an open approach was chosen where students were asked to write letters about which major challenges they experience in changing their learning behaviour and completing the courses. Altogether the study is based on 107 student letters that have been analyzed and coded based on major differences and challenges identified by the students. Findings show that most students find learning on their own to be the major difference. They find this challenging because they feel very distant and because they do not know how to learn on their own. They have difficulties in managing their time and a lack of flexibility combined with a sloppy administration makes it even worse. Students used to being spoon-fed and learning by memorizing obviously need much support in taking ownership of their own learning in order to be able to learn by themselves. By comparing and mapping these findings to solutions suggested by existing research this study therefore suggests that support functions should be provided for students on ‘how to be an online learner’ and on ‘how to learn by yourself’. The teacher interaction and presence should also, at least in the early stages of the course, be frequent and active in order to make the student confident in his or hers ability to learn on their own. Finally, course flexibility (in regards to delivery mode and pace) should be high and much effort should be put into creating a supportive and well-organized administration

    Keywords
    e-learning, developing countries, educational structures, pedagogical differences, learning behaviour, support functions
    National Category
    Information Systems
    Research subject
    Informatics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5909 (URN)
    Conference
    7th European Conference on e-Learning, Agia Napa, Cyprus, 6-7 November 2008
    Available from: 2009-03-05 Created: 2009-03-03 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Increasing interactivity in distance educations: Case studies Bangladesh and Sri Lanka
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increasing interactivity in distance educations: Case studies Bangladesh and Sri Lanka
    2010 (English)In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 16-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how distance educations in developing countries can enhance interactivityby means of information and communication technologies. It is argued that e-learning involvesa shift in the educational structure from traditional transmission of knowledge to interactivecreation of knowledge. Our case studies are two distance educations in Bangladesh and SriLanka that use different technologies for implementing interactivity; Internet and computersin one case and video and mobile phones in the other. The findings are analyzed based onStructuration Theory and we compare the two approaches based on emerging norms andbeliefs. Findings from both cases show the concurrent enactment of both the transmissionand the interactive structure. Whereas peer collaboration and the use of self-assessment toolsmake students take more ownership of their learning, we also found the idea of a classroomwith an instructive teacher to be deeply rooted in the students’ minds.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2010
    Keywords
    e-learning, interactivity, educational structures, developing countries, Structuration Theory
    National Category
    Information Systems
    Research subject
    Informatics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-10267 (URN)10.1080/02681100903533719 (DOI)000208173200003 ()2-s2.0-78650331369 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2010-03-29 Created: 2010-03-29 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    5. Learning e-Learning: the restructuring of students beliefs and assumptions about learning
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning e-Learning: the restructuring of students beliefs and assumptions about learning
    2010 (English)In: International Journal on E-learning, ISSN 1537-2456, E-ISSN 1943-5932, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 435-461Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper builds on a case study on e-learning in Sri Lanka with focus on students’ underlying beliefs about how one learns. E-learning programs are most often set up with the assumption that students should think, act and learn independently and with underlying values of constructivism and learner–centred learning. For students used to classroom-based, didactic education the transition to the e-learning paradigm is, however, neither predetermined nor immediate. The objective of this paper is to find out if, and how, the e-learning practice manages to transform students into more independent and self sustaining learners. By drawing on Structuration Theory this study analyzes and compares novice and experienced students’ assumptions about learning when asking for a particular support function, because support needs should change if students start adopting the e-learning view on how learning is achieved. Findings show that students increasingly adopt the e-learning view on learning as they progress through the program. Students take increasingly more ownership of their learning and the teacher is no longer seen as the container of all knowledge. The importance of discussions also increases over time indicating that knowledge is no longer seen as being transmitted but rather created.

    National Category
    Information Systems
    Research subject
    Informatics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-10268 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-03-29 Created: 2010-03-29 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    6. Learning from e-learning: emerging constructive learning practices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning from e-learning: emerging constructive learning practices
    2009 (English)In: Doing IT research that matters, 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research is situated within the field of Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) and asks if ICT use can make learning practices change. While constructive learning practices are critical to both individual and societal development, repetitive learning practices are the norm in many developing countries. The study is based on observations and in-depth interviews and uses a structurational approach to understand if and how students views of learning change during an e-learning program in Sri Lanka. We found four constructive learning practices that emerged through technology use; individual exploring, interaction with peers, interaction with teachers, and taking responsibility of the learning. Many constructive learning practices emerged outside the LMS used, in students’ voluntary uses of publicly available resources on the Internet. The study shows that technology use can play a positive role for development, provided an open environment is available; students learn constructive practicesfrom e-learning.

    Keywords
    ICT4D, e-learning, learning practices, Structuration Theory, constructive learning theory
    National Category
    Information Systems
    Research subject
    Informatics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8886 (URN)
    Conference
    International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS), Phoenix 2009
    Note

    ICIS 2009 Proceedings. Paper 51.

    Available from: 2009-12-21 Created: 2009-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Islam, M. Sirajul
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    From one-to-one to integration of multiple toolsIn: Research in Learning Technology, ISSN 2156-7069, E-ISSN 2156-7077Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Wicander, Gudrun
    Karlstad universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Development as Freedom: how the Capability Approach can be used in ICT4D Research and Practice2012In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    “You can't make this a science!”: Analyzing decision support systems in political contexts2012In: Government Information Quarterly, ISSN 0740-624X, E-ISSN 1872-9517, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 543-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on problems and conflicts encountered when using decision support systems (DSS) in political contexts. Based on a literature study and two case studies we describe problems encountered in relation not only to the DSS itself, but also to the political decision process. The case studies have been carried out in two cities in Sweden that at different times but in similar situations have used DSS in order to reach a decision in complicated and contested matters. In both cases we have previously found that the method and IT tool used for decision analysis were appreciated by most participants, but the inherent rationality of the DSS was in conflict with how participants usually make decisions as well as with the political process. The assumption was that a strict and open method would make grounds for clear decisions, but the results of the decision process were none of the cases implemented. In one case the result of the decision analysis was that no clear decision was made. In the other case the lowest ranked alternative was implemented. Furthermore, in neither city the method was ever used again. We therefore ask: What are the challenges and limitations to using DSS in political contexts? Our study shows that challenges relate to selecting and using criteria; eliciting weights for criteria (high level of subjectivity); understanding all the amount of facts available in the system; time constraints; and lack of impact on the final decision. This study contributes to both research and practice by increasing the understanding of what challenges are experienced in DSS use, since the findings can be used as a framework of challenges that should be addressed, in design of systems as well as method for use. The study also contributes to understanding the role of politicians in decision-making and the consequences for the use of DSS. Further, the literature study showed that there are overall very few studies on the actual use of DSS in a political context, and we therefore conclude by encouraging more studies reporting actual use.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Victim, mother, or untapped resource?: Discourse analysis of the construction of women in ICT policies2017In: Information Technologies and International Development, ISSN 1544-7529, E-ISSN 1544-7537, Vol. 13, p. 72-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the construction of women in national ICT policies in South and Southeast Asia. The aim is to unravel the role ascribed to women in these policies and how this affects suggested measures. The research is based on critical discourse analysis and shows that women are mainly constructed as victims, mothers, or an untapped resource. We argue that if women are specifically targeted in policies, careful attention should be given to how they are portrayed. Our analysis also shows that in most cases the suggested solutions on how to include women in the ICT society only deal with the symptoms of gender inequality rather than the structures that prevent equal opportunities. We conclude by discussing implications for research and practice.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Terminologi och begrepp inom informationssäkerhet: Hur man skapar en språkgemenskap2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den här studien är att utvärdera svensk terminologi på informationssäkerhetsområdet med fokus på frågor om målgrupper och grundläggande termer. Baserat på en Delphi-studie, där experter från olika yrkeskategorier har fått definiera en uppsättning grundläggande begrepp, har vi utvärderat både experternas definitioner och processen med att ta fram definitionerna. Vi har identifierat flera problem med svensk terminologi på informationssäkerhetsområdet. För att stödja arbetet med att utveckla svensk terminologi för informationssäkerhet beskriver vi i rapporten förslag på hur arbetet kan bedrivas vidare. De problem vi har identifierat är bl.a. att begrepp som inte finns med i rådande styrdokument blir otydliga och svårtolkade för experter inom området och att det är problematiskt med två olika styrdokument (HB550 och SIS-TR50:2015) i användning med delvis olika definitioner av samma begrepp. Vi har även sett att olika yrkeskategorier ofta definierar begreppen utifrån sin specifika profession, vilket kan innebära att det finns ett behov av att säkerhetsbegrepp kontextualiseras utifrån yrkesroller. Processen med att arbeta med experter enligt Delphi-metoden gav ett bra underlag för att analysera och diskutera olika definitioner av centrala begrepp inom informationssäkerhetsområdet. Dessutom har experterna varit mycket engagerade i processen. Vi föreslår att framtida begreppsutredningar använder sig av denna metod eller varianter av den och att det är experterna, de som i sitt dagliga yrke handhar informationssäkerheten, som ska vara de som skapar definitionerna. Vi ser också ett stort behov av större, effektivare och mer samordnade former för framtida begreppsutredningar.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Konfliktfylld kultur vid framtagande av informationssäkerhetsstandarder2017In: Informationssäkerhet och organisationskultur / [ed] Jonas Hallberg, Peter Johansson, Fredrik Karlsson, Frida Lundberg, Björn Lundgren, Marianne Törner, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Wiklund, Matilda
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Emerging Collaborative and Cooperative Practices in 1:1 Schools2016In: Technology, Pedagogy and Education, ISSN 1475-939X, E-ISSN 1747-5139, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 413-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the authors explored how laptops used in 1:1 classrooms affect cooperation and collaboration practices. Based on an observational time study, the authors found that the most common activity in 1:1 classrooms is group work using the computer. They also found that, despite what the concept 1:1 alludes to about one student working with one computer, most laptop use takes on other forms such as two students working with one computer (1:2) or two students working together using two laptops (2:2). The findings reported in this article about the various different collaboration arrangements have implications for both research and practice. For practice, because teachers can arrange activities based on an awareness of the different student–laptop constellations that emerge when students are given a laptop. Research is likewise informed about the various group work constellations and can build on this knowledge for further analysis of the pros and cons with the different collaborative forms.

  • 14.
    Andreasson, Ester
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Gustafsson, Mariana
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Melin, Ulf
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Söderström, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Vem är vem på nätet?: en studie av elektronisk identifiering2014Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Artefacts produced via design methods as boundary objects and mediating processes among non-designer engineers in idea generation2012In: International Forum on Knowledge Asset Dynamics (IFKAD) and Knowledge Cities World Summit (KCWS) 2012 : Proceedings / [ed] Schiuma, G.; Spender, J.C.; Yigitcanlar, T., Institute of Knowledge Asset Management (IKAM) , 2012, p. 726-736Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the paper - This paper introduces design methods as a mediating process and the produced artefact as a boundary object between different stakeholders in the management of idea generation among non-designers. This paper is multi-disciplinary, based on studies in innovation management, knowledge management and utilization of design processes in industrial management. The concepts of the boundary object and the mediating process as understood in activity theory are introduced in the conceptual part of the paper (Vygotsky, 1978). This paper seeks the answer to the explorative qualitative research question: What kinds of advantages were found when using design methods (in art-based interventions) in idea generation among non-designer engineers? At the end of the paper, some results are revealed along with an analysis of the results.

    The research design and method is a qualitative approach in order to explore the usability of collaboratively made artefacts as boundary objects in idea generation situations. Furthermore, it was recognized during our study that the design methods used functioned as mediating processes between the stakeholders involved in the workshops. The data has been collected from workshop observations and survey questionnaires among the attendees. The research was conducted between 2009-2012 among non-designer engineers from industry (Aramo-Immonen and Toikka, 2009; 2010).

    Originality and value of research - This methodology provides evidence that design workshops, which can be categorized as art-based interventions on a continuum of art-based initiatives (ABIs by Schiuma, 2011, p. 48), function as mediating processes and the artefacts created act as boundary objects in idea generation in the scope of innovation management.

    Practical implications - The outcomes of this research can be utilized as guidelines in designing idea generation sessions in industrial management among non-designer engineers.

  • 16.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    Department of Industrial Management and Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Knowledge management through learning model in industrial projects2012In: International Journal of Knowledge and Learning, ISSN 1741-1009, E-ISSN 1741-1017, Vol. 8, no 3-4, p. 298-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to introduce qualitative analysing method and learning model for project management. The new understanding gained by this analysis is needed in the steering of the project organisation's maintaining systems: control system, working system, information system and support system. The overall aim is to model a method of project learning focused on the organisation's system critical parameters. The conceptual part of this paper deals with organisational learning, activity theory, knowledge management and systems theories. Finally, some case results from industry are introduced in this article.

  • 17.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    Department of Industrial Management, Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Mixed Methods Research Design2013In: Information systems, e-learning, and knowledge management research: 4th World Summit on the Knowledge Society, WSKS 2011, Mykonos, Greece, September 21-23, 2011, revised selected papers / [ed] Miltiadis D. Lytras, Da Ruan, Robert D. Tennyson, Patricia Ordonez De pablos, Francisco José García Peñalvo, Lazar Rusu, Heidelberg: Springer Verlag , 2013, Vol. 278, p. 32-43Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixed methods research is an approach to inquiry that combines or associates both qualitative and quantitative forms. Mixed methods designs provide researchers, across research disciplines, with a rigorous approach to answering research questions. In the case of holistic analysis of complex systems, such as the mega-project, this is a relevant approach. Mixing the data, the specific types of research designs, the notation system, terminology, diagrams of procedures includes a risk of entering to chaos. Therefore research design has to be clearly articulated to readers. Triangulation is an important part of research design. Denzin [10] has identified four basic types of triangulation. In this exploratory paper are discussed mixed method research, theory triangulation, economic science, design science and systems development. Finally is introduced utilization of mixed methods in multiple-case study conducted in industry.

  • 18.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    Department of Industrial Management and Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Projektijohtaminen yrityksen oppimisen välineenä2011In: Yrittäjyyden asialla / [ed] Matti Lähdeniemi, Hanna Rautava-Nurmi, Hanna Valtokivi, Pori: Satakunnan ammattikorkeakoulu , 2011, p. 33-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Bikfalvi, Andrea
    Mancebo, Nuria
    Vanharanta, Hannu
    Project Manager's Competence Identification2013In: Enhancing the modern organization through information technology professionals: esearch, studies, and techniques, Hershey, PA: Business Science Reference , 2013, p. 17-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere Technical University, Tampere, Finland.
    Jaakkola, Hannu V.
    Tampere Technical University, Tampere, Finland; Centre of Software Expertise (CoSE), Pori, Finland.
    Keto, Harri
    Tampere Technical University, Tampere, Finland.
    Multicultural software development: The productivity perspective2013In: Perspectives and Techniques for Improving Information Technology Project Management / [ed] John Wang, IGI Global , 2013, p. 132-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Productivity management is a challenge for software engineering companies and, in this regard, there is a current trend toward globalization. Via acquisitions and mergers, business has become international and employs different national cultures. Therefore, the focus of this article is on the understanding of cultural differences affecting productivity in globalized software production. The relation between productivity and non coding activities in software development projects has not been proven. Software development is expert work, typically made in closely collaborating local teams and global distribution of expert work increases the degree of difficulty. In this paper, the authors analyze multicultural ICT companies from their productivity perspective through the lens of cultural differences. The purpose of this study is to report findings based on general cultural studies and reported experiences that seem to affect productivity in the software industry. Some company cases are also described and analyzed.

  • 21.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Jussila, Jari
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Storytelling as a Factor in Increasing Intellectual Capital of Project-Based Companies2012In: Proceedings of the 4th European Conference on Intellectual Capital / [ed] Surakka, Jukka, Reading, England: Academic Publishing International, 2012, p. 53-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to explore storytelling as a potential lever to gain intellectual capital (IC) in project-based companies. The aim is to open up new ways to understand stories and the role of storytelling in increasing IC in project-based companies. Stories are a manifestation of collective knowledge. Often not documented but embedded in individual minds and forming the valuable human capital. We present essential theoretical information, reviewing the concepts of the project-based company and the project work context, and describing the notion of IC (human, structural and relational) in relation to storytelling. The temporary nature of projects is challenge in IC management of project-based companies. Since each project is unique and may have temporary organization the transfer of knowledge is more challenging for project-based companies than for those operating in stable environments. The existing relational capital may not apply to new project and thus new relational capital must be created and accumulated to company. Considering structural capital, the processes and systems and the documented knowledge may be unique to each project and as such difficult to leverage. Storytelling can provide some ways to overcome these challenges. Storytelling is currently little understood and researched in the context of project-based companies, especially from the perspective of IC. Conceptual part of the article is followed by descriptions of stories and storytelling as a vehicle in increasing IC in project-based companies. We suggest that stories and storytelling are effective modes of human knowledge transfer and learning. Storytelling plays a role in advancing informal learning in project-based companies. Projects are unique and project teams are temporary. Therefore the IC management of project-based companies deserves extended research in academia. Originality and value of the paper is on finding a viable perspective and approach with which project-based companies can understand how they can increase IC through storytelling.

  • 22.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland; Business School, Exeter University, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Jussila, Jari
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Huhtamäki, Jukka
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Visualizing informal learning behavior from conference participants Twitter data2014In: TEEM '14: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality / [ed] Garcia-Penalco, F. J., New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 603-610Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge Management acknowledged organizational learning as a key factor for creating competitive advantage for companies in early 1990. However, studies on informal learning in this connection are still in their infancy. This article contributes to an emerging field of 'small data' research on Twitter by presenting a case study of how community managers in Finland used this social media platform to construct an informal learning environment around an annually organized conference. In this empirical study we explore informal learning behavior in project contexts especially by analyzing and visualizing informal learning behavior from Twitter data from conference participants.

  • 23.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Kärkkäinen, Hannu
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Joel-Edgar, Sian
    Computer Science, Bath University, Bath, UK.
    Huhtamäki, Jukka
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Visualizing informal learning behavior from conference participants' Twitter data with the Ostinato Model2016In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 55, p. 584-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network analysis is a valuable method for investigating and mapping the phenomena driving the social structure and sharing the findings with others. This article contributes to an emerging field of 'smart data' research on Twitter by presenting a case study of how community managers in Finland used this social media platform to construct an informal learning environment around an annually organized conference. In this empirical study we explore informal learning behavior in the project context, especially by analyzing and visualizing informal learning behavior from Twitter data using the Ostinato Model introduced in this paper. Ostinato is an iterative, user-centric, process-automated model for data-driven visual network analytics.

  • 24.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Leppäniemi, Jari
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Soini, Jari
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Innovation diffusion in SME networks: sustainability via green ICT pilots2014In: Innovation for Sustainable Economy & Society, XXV ISPIM Conference, 8-11 June 2014, Dublin, Ireland, International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2014, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the presented green ICT project is primarily to start new and advance existing innovation development in SME networks, secondly to accelerate innovation diffusion in B2B networks and thirdly to improve the operational environment of enterprises through green ICT solutions that support sustainable development. Various technology development projects - and also ideas for further projects - have arisen as a result of this project. In order to answer our research question - how to improve innovation diffusion in SME networks in collaboration with academia -in this article we introduce an academia-driven innovation management model and green ICT pilot case. In the conceptual part of this paper we discuss the process of innovation diffusion and the mediator's role in value creation for SME networks.

  • 25.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Leppäniemi, Jari
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Soini, Jari
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Joel-Edgar, Sian
    Computer Science, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom.
    Mediator’s role in an innovation ecosystem2017In: International Journal of Business and Systems Research, ISSN 1751-200X, E-ISSN 1751-2018, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 229-242, article id 47966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diffusion of new innovations into a business ecosystem is an interesting phenomenon. In order to gain competitive advantage for SMEs and also to add value in SME networks, the dynamic nature of the business ecosystem demands the capability to adapt new ideas. On the other hand, the risk-bearing ability of SMEs alone can be a barrier to the utilisation of novel innovations. In order to answer our research question - how to improve innovation diffusion in a business ecosystem via SME networks in collaboration with academia? - in this article we introduce the mediator-assisted innovation diffusion (MAID) model. The model was tested in multiple case studies where a total of 18 organisations participated. In the conceptual part of this paper we discuss the context of business and innovation ecosystems, the process of innovation diffusion and the mediator's role in value creation for SME networks in such an evolving ecosystem.

  • 26.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Mittilä, Tuula
    Turku University, Pori, Finland.
    The paradigm shift from product innovation to service innovation2012In: Proceedings of the XXIII ISPIM Conference. Action for Innovation: Innovating from Experience, Barcelona, Spain, 17-20 June 2012 / [ed] K.R.E. Huizingh, S Conn, M. Torkkeli, I. Bitran, The International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2012, p. 1-14Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    On Emerging Mobile Learning Environments2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates issues pertaining to the implementation of mobile learning and particularly the use of learning content management systems and mobile devices in university education. The thesis is positioned at the intersection of the research areas of information systems and education. The general view of technology is grounded in the field of information systems, but it is connected to the field of learning using the framework for the rational analysis of mobile education (FRAME). The point of enquiry was chosen based on the fact that the number of people who use mobile devices today is higher than the number of people who use desktop computers. This presents an opportunity for higher education institutions to increase the reach of education services by means of delivering them on mobile devices. This, of course, also presents challenges.

    The thesis is situated in the interpretive paradigm and the methodological approach was action research. Data was collected through review of literature, interviews, focus group discussions, observations and online surveys. Findings suggest that mobile learning cannot replace existing forms of learning in least developed countries but blended learning is a feasible alternative. Three units of analysis were used and found to be significant for studying and evaluating mobile learning, the technical artefact, the social artefact and the information artefact, together making up the information systems artefact. The thesis contributes to theory by discussing how mobile learning can be seen to be constructed as an information systems artefact through these three constructs. Advancements in virtual learning technology may bring a new wave of learning management systems. The nature of the next generation of learning content management systems is a topic for further research.

    List of papers
    1. On mobile learning with learning content management systems: a contemporary literature review
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>On mobile learning with learning content management systems: a contemporary literature review
    2014 (English)In: Communications in Computer and Information Science, ISSN 1865-0929, E-ISSN 1865-0937, Vol. 479, p. 131-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Learning Content management systems (LCMS) are important tools for organizing learning material and communication. Increasingly mobile technologies are used for internet access; particularly important in developing countries where broadband is scarce. Mobile LCMS introduce specific challenges, which are yet not fully addressed. This paper reviews the literature on mobile LCMS for the purpose of identifying current research focus, research gaps, and future research directions regarding how to bridge the gaps and leverage CMS technology to support "mobile learning". The concept matrix method is used to collect and analyze literature. Five prominent research areas are found; Use, access, design and infrastructure; communication and collaboration; engagement and knowledge development; content and service delivery; and implementation experiences and evaluation. A major gap identified is that research does neither clearly nor thoroughly address the intersection between learning and technology. Adjusting technologies to learning contexts and environments is a key area for future research.

    Keywords
    mobile learning, MLCMS, LCMS, LMS, CMS
    National Category
    Computer Sciences
    Research subject
    Computer Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42805 (URN)000348500300013 ()2-s2.0-84908500296 (Scopus ID)
    Conference
    13th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning (mLearn), NOV 03-05, 2014, Istanbul, TURKEY
    Available from: 2015-02-19 Created: 2015-02-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Ubiquitous computing in education: a SWOT analysis by students and teachers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ubiquitous computing in education: a SWOT analysis by students and teachers
    2013 (English)In: QScience Proceedings, 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning from anywhere anytime is a contemporary phenomenon in the field of education that is thought to be flexible, time and cost saving. The phenomenon is evident in the way computer technology mediates knowledge processes among learners. Computer technology is however, in some instances, faulted. There are studies that highlight drawbacks of computer technology use in learning. In this study we aimed at conducting a SWOT analysis on ubiquitous computing and computer-mediated social interaction and their affect on education. Students and teachers were interviewed on the mentioned concepts using focus group interviews. Our contribution in this study is, identifying what teachers and students perceive to be the strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of ubiquitous computing and computer-mediated social interaction in education. We also relate the findings with literature and present a common understanding on the SWOT of these concepts.

    Results show positive perceptions. Respondents revealed that ubiquitous computing and computer-mediated social interaction are important in their education due to advantages such as flexibility, efficiency in terms of cost and time, ability to acquire computer skills. Nevertheless disadvantages where also mentioned for example health effects, privacy and security issues, noise in the learning environment, to mention but a few. This paper gives suggestions on how to overcome threats mentioned.

    Keywords
    Ubiquitous Computing, Education, SWOT, Computer-mediated social interaction
    National Category
    Information Systems, Social aspects
    Research subject
    Informatics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47746 (URN)10.5339/qproc.2013.mlearn.18 (DOI)
    Conference
    12th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning (mLearn 2013), College of the North Atlantic, Qatar, October 22-24, 2013
    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
    3. MLCMS actual use, perceived use, and experiences of use
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>MLCMS actual use, perceived use, and experiences of use
    2015 (English)In: ijEDict - International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1814-0556, E-ISSN 1814-0556, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 101-121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile learning involves use of mobile devices to participate in learning activities. Most elearning activities are available to participants through learning systems such as learning content management systems (LCMS). Due to certain challenges, LCMS are not equally accessible on all mobile devices. This study investigates actual use, perceived usefulness and user experiences of LCMS use on mobile phones at Makerere University in Uganda. The study identifies challenges pertaining to use and discusses how to improve LCMS use on mobile phones. Such solutions are a cornerstone in enabling and improving mobile learning. Data was collected by means of focus group discussions, an online survey designed based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), and LCMS log files of user activities. Data was collected from two courses where Moodle was used as a learning platform. The results indicate positive attitudes towards use of LCMS on phones but also huge challenges whichare content related and technical in nature.

    Keywords
    Mobile learning; LCMS; MUELE; TAM; Mobile phones
    National Category
    Information Systems, Social aspects
    Research subject
    Informatics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47744 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
    4. Practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environment
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Information Systems, Social aspects
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56107 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-03-06 Created: 2017-03-06 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
  • 28.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Opinions of social web users on privacy and online DAM2010In: Journal of Digital Asset Management, ISSN 1743-6540, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 312-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The web today hosts thousands of web user profiles. These profiles contain information, which is sensitive – a reason why the information is protected from illegal use by privacy policies. This kind of information is at times referred to as online digital assets. Online digital assets are either hosted on private or government websites and online systems depending on where users are registered. There is a possibility that after death or impairment of a user, the confidentiality of online digital assets may be compromised due to absence of ownership and weak legal policies. This may result into privacy infringement of the owner, that is, the deceased or the impaired as well as other people related to the affected user such as those that have had sensitive conversations with him or her. Using Facebook as a case study, this research examined social web users’ opinions on privacy and online digital assets management (DAM) after death or impairment of a user. The study used an online questionnaire to collect opinions from 22 Facebook users. Results show that the majority of respondents consider privacy and online DAM to be important issues. On the other hand, other Facebook users think that privacy in social networking websites is a mere illusion. There are also users who are not familiar with the concept of DAM and do not have any means of managing their assets in case of impairment or death.

  • 29.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    E-waste management in east African community2012In: Handbook of research on E-Government in emerging economies: adoption, e-participation, and legal frameworks / [ed] Kelvin Joseph Bwalya, Saul F.C. Zulu, Hershey: IGI Global, 2012, p. 307-327Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapidly increased use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) has increased demand for electronic equipment such as mobile phones and computers. Individuals and government institutions worldwide are adopting ICTs at a fast pace. Increased consumption has resulted in huge amounts of e-Waste generated from scrapped electronics. E-Waste contains chemical substances that have adverse effects on the environment and human health. Consequently, handling of e-Waste needs to be organized in ways that minimize the adverse effects. This chapter investigates how the East African Community (EAC) governments, i.e., Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi, conceive their role in combating negative impact of e-Waste and how their views and current actions compare to the current state of the art practices in e-Waste management. As data on e-Waste handling in EAC countries is not publicly available, semi-structured interviews with high government officials and a literature review were conducted. The results show that EAC governments consider e-Waste to be an emerging problem. Despite this awareness and attempts to mitigate the problem in some of the countries, there are currently no solid solutions that have been crafted to rectify or mitigate this problem. The study suggests practical solutions for resolving e-Waste challenges in EAC.

  • 30.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    MLCMS actual use, perceived use, and experiences of use2015In: ijEDict - International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1814-0556, E-ISSN 1814-0556, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 101-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile learning involves use of mobile devices to participate in learning activities. Most elearning activities are available to participants through learning systems such as learning content management systems (LCMS). Due to certain challenges, LCMS are not equally accessible on all mobile devices. This study investigates actual use, perceived usefulness and user experiences of LCMS use on mobile phones at Makerere University in Uganda. The study identifies challenges pertaining to use and discusses how to improve LCMS use on mobile phones. Such solutions are a cornerstone in enabling and improving mobile learning. Data was collected by means of focus group discussions, an online survey designed based on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), and LCMS log files of user activities. Data was collected from two courses where Moodle was used as a learning platform. The results indicate positive attitudes towards use of LCMS on phones but also huge challenges whichare content related and technical in nature.

  • 31.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environment2017In: ijEDict - International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology, ISSN 1814-0556, E-ISSN 1814-0556, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 103-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reports an interpretative case study investigating practices and challenges in an emerging m-learning environment at Makerere University in Uganda. The research was part of the MobiClass pilot project. Data was collected by means of observations and interviews with teachers and various m-learning support staff, including teacher trainers, systems administrators and a software developer. The Framework for Rational Analysis of Mobile Education (FRAME) is used as an analytic framework. The research focuses on how learning content management systems (LCMS) are implemented and used for m-learning purposes. We observed teacher training and m-learning content development practices and found that teacher skills for developing educational content, institutional m-learning policies and training programs are crucial success factors. The main finding is the importance of the support staff; it takes a long time to implement new technology and change teaching practices, support staff is needed to manage, inspire and support student and teachers.

  • 33.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Technology - Mediated Knowledge Processes (TKP) Research School, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Khan, Sana Zubair
    Technology - Mediated Knowledge Processes (TKP) Research School, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Ubiquitous computing in education: a SWOT analysis by students and teachers2013In: QScience Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning from anywhere anytime is a contemporary phenomenon in the field of education that is thought to be flexible, time and cost saving. The phenomenon is evident in the way computer technology mediates knowledge processes among learners. Computer technology is however, in some instances, faulted. There are studies that highlight drawbacks of computer technology use in learning. In this study we aimed at conducting a SWOT analysis on ubiquitous computing and computer-mediated social interaction and their affect on education. Students and teachers were interviewed on the mentioned concepts using focus group interviews. Our contribution in this study is, identifying what teachers and students perceive to be the strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of ubiquitous computing and computer-mediated social interaction in education. We also relate the findings with literature and present a common understanding on the SWOT of these concepts.

    Results show positive perceptions. Respondents revealed that ubiquitous computing and computer-mediated social interaction are important in their education due to advantages such as flexibility, efficiency in terms of cost and time, ability to acquire computer skills. Nevertheless disadvantages where also mentioned for example health effects, privacy and security issues, noise in the learning environment, to mention but a few. This paper gives suggestions on how to overcome threats mentioned.

  • 34.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Lim, Nena
    Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia.
    Usability of government websites in Uganda2010In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Government websites offer great benefits to citizens and governments. Such benefits, however,cannot be realized if websites are unusable. This study investigates usability of government websites in Uganda.Using the feature investigation method, the study evaluated four Ugandan government websites according tothree perspectives. Results show that websites are partially usable in the design layout and navigationperspectives but are rather weak in stating legal policies. Evaluation results provide the Ugandan governmentwith a clear picture of what needs to be improved according to international website design standards. Moreover,the parsimonious evaluation framework proposed in the research is useful for any country that wants to do aquick and easy evaluation of their government websites.

  • 35.
    Asiimwe, Edgar
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Wakabi, Wairagala
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Using Technology for Enhancing Transparency and Accountability in Low Resource Communities: Experiences from Uganda2013In: ICT for Anti-Corruption, Democracy and Education In East Africa / [ed] Katja Sarajeva, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2013, 6, p. 37-51Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at investigating the user needs, practices, experiences and challenges faced in promoting transparency and accountability using ICT in low-resource communities. The research was conducted on two ICT4D (Information and Communication Technology for Development) initiatives, a call center, and a telecenter supported by two projects; (1) “Promoting Social Accountability In The Health Sector In Northern Uganda”, (2) “Catalyzing Civic Participation And Democracy Monitoring Using ICTs”. The two projects sought to fight corruption by increasing transparency and accountability using ICT to enable “whistle-blowing,” i.e., reporting misconduct in service provision. The projects are based in Uganda and are carried out by Spider (Swedish Program for ICT in Developing Regions) partner organizations:Transparency International (TI) Uganda and Collaboration International ICT Policy in East and Southern Africa (CIPESA). Using interviews, focus group discussions and observations, the study addressed three research questions: (1) How have the two projects provided citizens a trusted and effective channel for “whistle-blowing”? (2) What are the enabling factors for whistle-blowing through ICT and challenges that affect whistle-blowers and how can the challenges be overcome?

    The ICT service-delivery monitoring and reporting methods used by projects include toll free phone calls, blogs, radio talk shows, SMS and e-mail for reaching out; and processes for verification of reports and for communicating reports to government. There are results that indicate these methods are sound enough to serve the purposes of transparency and accountability, and the track record exhibits real change achieved in many instances. ICT users are optimistic and trustful of these ICT methods. Effective whistle-blowing includes efficient and effective reporting processes, convenience in reporting, actual service delivery improvements, availability and privacy, and affordability.There are also a number of challenges, including user education, gender issues, and general issues pertaining to the business model, including economic sustainability and finding the most effective scope of the operations.

  • 36.
    Avdic, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Knowledge sharing and deliberation using a spreadsheet program: two examples from a city planning department2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Avdic, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Mediability of knowledge types: planning for a web based rorum for knowledge sharing about end user development2005In: Promote IT 2005: proceedings of the fifth conference for the promotion of research in IT at new universities and university colleges in Sweden : Borlänge, Sweden 11-13 May, 2005 / [ed] Janis Bubenko jr ..., Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the paper is to describe knowledge categories that can be used as basis for the design of a Web Based Knowledge Sharing Forum for End User Development. The objective of the Web Based Forum is to support the end-user developers when the support is needed. The problem area is situated in the intersection between End User Computing and Knowledge Management. The study is qualitative. Methods used are participant observation and document studies.

  • 38.
    Avdic, Anders
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Pedagogik för växande människor2005In: Swedish Business School: en analys, en idé, en vision, ett förslag, en uppgift och en möjlighet / [ed] Claes Hultman, Per Frankelius, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2005, p. 136-144Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Avdic, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Problem based learning with WebCT discussion groups in higher education2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Avdic, Anders
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    User spreadsheet systems development2005In: Encyclopedia of information science and technology / [ed] Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, PA: Idea Group Reference , 2005, p. 2967-2972Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Avdic, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Users as developers: conditions and effects of user systems development2003In: Computing information technology: the human side / [ed] Steven Gordon, Hershey: IRM Press , 2003, p. 161-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Avdic, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönberg, Pontus
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Olsson, Johan
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Guerra Riveros, Francisco
    Örebro University School of Business, Örebro, Sweden.
    Student and teacher response system: development of an interactive anonymous real-timeformative feedback system2013In: Proceedings of the 2013 Third World Congress on Information and Communication Technologies (WICT 2013) / [ed] Ngo, L. .T., Abraham, A., Bui, L. T. Corchado, E., Yun-Hoi, C. & Ma, K., IEEE, 2013, p. 25-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is focusing IT-supported real-time formative feedback in a classroom context. The development of a Student and Teacher Response System (STRS) is described. Since there are a number of obstacles for effective interaction in large classes IT can be used to support the teachers aim to find out if students understand the lecture and accordingly adjust the content and design of the lecture. The system can be used for formative assessment before, during, and after a lecture. It is also possible for students to initiate interaction during lectures by posing questions anonymously. The main contributions of the paper are a) the description of the interactive real-time system and b) the development process behind it.

  • 43.
    Avdic, Anders
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Wissa, Ulrika Artursson
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Socratic Flipped Classroom: What Types of Questions and Tasks Promote Learning?2016In: Proceedings of the 15th European Conference of e-Learning (ECEL 2016) / [ed] Novotna, J.; Jancarik, A., Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited, 2016, p. 41-48Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socratic questioning stresses the importance of questioning for learning. Flipped Classroom pedagogy generates a need for effective questions and tasks in order to promote active learning. This paper describes a project aimed at finding out how different kinds of questions and tasks support students' learning in a flipped classroom context. In this study, during the flipped courses, both the questions and tasks were distributed together with video recordings. Answers and solutions were presented and discussed in seminars, with approximately 10 participating students in each seminar. Information Systems students from three flipped classroom courses at three different levels were interviewed in focus groups about their perceptions of how different kinds of questions and tasks supported their learning process. The selected courses were organized differently, with various kinds of questions and tasks. Course one included open questions that were answered and presented at the seminar. Students also solved a task and presented the solution to the group. Course two included open questions and a task. Answers and solutions were discussed at the seminars where students also reviewed each other's answers and solutions. Course three included online single-and multiple choice questions with real-time feedback. Answers were discussed at the seminar, with the focus on any misconceptions. In this paper we categorized the questions in accordance with Wilson (2016) as factual, convergent, divergent, evaluative, or a combination of these. In all, we found that any comprehensible question that initiates a dialogue, preferably with a set of Socratic questions, is perceived as promoting learning. This is why seminars that allow such questions and discussion are effective. We found no differences between the different kinds of Socratic questions. They were seen to promote learning so long as they made students reflect and problematize the questions. To conclude, we found that questions and tasks promote learning when they are answered and solved in a process that is characterized by comprehensibility, variation, repetition and activity.

  • 44. Axelsson, Karin
    et al.
    Avdic, Anders
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    IT management during acquisition of ERP-systems: experiences from goal dialogues at two companies2001In: , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Axelsson, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Melin, Ulf
    Linköpings universitet.
    Seven key lessons learned from e-government development: a reflective analysis of an e-government project2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a longitudinal case study of an e-government development project is reported. The authors have followed a development project during three years, from its initiation to its end. The purpose of the paper is to identify and analyze important decisions made and external factors that occurred during the project and discuss their consequences. The findings are presented as seven key lessons that other e-government projects can learn from. The contributions are, thus, both a reflective analysis of an empirical e-government development example and normative statements about how to conduct successful e-government projects.

  • 46.
    Barsaum, Peter
    et al.
    School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Berg, Paul
    School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Hagman, Andreas
    School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Scandurra, Isabella
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Internet of Things Technology for Remote Healthcare: A Pilot Study2016In: Proceedings from The 14th Scandinavian Conference on Health Informatics 2016, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2016, Vol. 122, no 122, p. 43-48Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the latest trends in health informatics is Internet of Things (IoT). IoT consists of various types of technical objects connected to Internet and/or connected to each other, cooperating to reach a common goal. This pilot study explores how chronic patients, potential patients and healthcare personnel (n=100) perceive sensors and implanted sensors as two examples of IoT in remote healthcare. Data was collected through an acceptability questionnaire based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) framework using criteria as: performance expectancy; effort expectancy; attitude towards technology; and social influence. The pilot result indicated e.g. a strong acceptance of implants and that external sensors in a treatment requires further work. Differences between men and women were found: acceptance of sensors was preferred by women, and implants by men. In conclusion, IoT could be used to enhance person-centered healthcare, aiming to better engage patients in their treatment, rather than being a passive recipient of a medical intervention.

  • 47.
    Callagher, Lisa
    et al.
    The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Hibbert, Paul
    University of St Andrews, St Andrews, UK.
    Kim, Hee Sun
    Siedlok, Franciszek
    University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Windahl, Charlotta
    University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Reflexive Practices and Competences for Addressing Change2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this conceptual paper, we explore how individuals respond to a need to change when faced with the revelation of something undesirable about their social – and particularly organizational – context. Our focus is on reflexivity and reflexive practices, and we contribute to theoretical and practical debates in three ways. First, we identify a typology of reflexive practices involved in engaging with, or avoiding, a call to change. Second, we show how some example practices can be enacted in response to this call in each of the categories we describe. Third, we explain how particular reflexive competences are important in understanding how the process of enacting reflexive practices over time may evolve, through the accumulation and interpretation of experience. We also offer concluding suggestions for further research.

  • 48.
    Chen, Zhihao
    et al.
    School of Business Administration, Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, Wuhan, China.
    Zheng, Wenying
    School of Business Administration, Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, Wuhan, China.
    Zhou, Wenyan
    School of Business Administration, Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, Wuhan, China.
    Gao, Shang
    School of Business Administration, Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, Wuhan, China.
    Effect of Lifestyle on the Adoption of Mobile Services2012In: The eleventh Wuhan international conference on e-business / [ed] Duserick, F. G., Alfred University , 2012, p. 390-397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although mobile services have gained huge potential market in recent years, the adoption of mobile services has been far slower than expected. Many scholars put forward mobile services adoption models to explore the causes of low adoption of mobile services. But few researchers have explained why different types of services differ in terms of popularity from the view of lifestyle. The authors attempt to explain the adoption of various mobile services in the view of lifestyle through descriptive analysis and ANOVE analysis in China. And the conclusions are as follows: 1) the adoption of different types of mobile services varies with different groups of users, because 2) different groups of users often have their own lifestyles (e.g., new life consciousness, arbitrary consciousness, financial consciousness, etc.), 3) which can significantly affect their intention to adopt various mobile services.

  • 49.
    El Gody, Ahmed
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Bridging the internal divide: using ICTs to promote gender equality in the Middle East2008In: Global information technologies: concepts, methodologies, tools and applications / [ed] Felix Tan, Hershey PA: Information Science Reference , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Eliason, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hedström, Karin
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Mediated values in Swedish Municipality Website Design2005In: The ethicomp decade 1995-2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Not only in Sweden are governments designing and maintaining web sites, this to be able to improve interaction with their citizens. It is therefore important to choose the best suiting website design, communicating the intended values. In this paper two Swedish municipality front pages are compared with respect to mediated user roles, user groups, action space (action possibilities and restrictions), and communicated producer intent. This highlights how values can be mediated in website design.

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