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  • 1.
    Barzangi, Jir
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Specialist Dental Care, Västmanland County Council, Västerås, Sweden; Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    University Health Care Research Center (UFC), Örebro, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University of South-Eastern Norway, Drammen, Norway.
    Experiences and perceptions of infant dental enucleation among Somali immigrants in Sweden: a phenomenographic study2019In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 8, p. 566-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore and describe ways of experiencing and perceiving the Eastern African practice of infant dental enucleation (IDE) among immigrants of Somali origin living in Sweden.

    Material and methods: Six informants, three men and three women aged 26-54 years, were recruited for semi-structured individual interviews. Phenomenographic analysis of the interview transcripts was performed.

    Findings: Informants described four ways of experiencing and perceiving IDE: as an effective, necessary treatment; as a disputed tradition; as an alternative to failure; and as a desperate measure. The experiences and perceptions were highly influenced by the contexts the informants had been in, namely, communities in which traditional treatments were used frequently, in which other people were influential over their daily lives, and in which negative experiences of formal health care were common, as well as other difficult circumstances beyond the informants' individual control.

    Conclusions: The findings contribute to deepened understanding of IDE and the importance of context to the practice of it. Further, the findings deepen understanding of the decision to have the practice performed on infants, which may help dental and health care personnel to adequately communicate with individuals of Somali origin about the harmfulness of IDE.

  • 2.
    Barzangi, Jir
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Publ Dent Serv, Västmanland Cty Council, Västerås, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    Örebro University Hospital. Sch Hlth & Med Sci, Univ Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Söderfeldt, Björn
    Publ Dent Serv, Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Örebro Cty Council, Örebro, Sweden; Fac Odontol, Dept Oral Publ Hlth, Malmö Univ, Malmö, Sweden .
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Publ Dent Serv, Postgrad Dent Educ Ctr, Örebro Cty Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Infant dental enucleation: A literature review on a traditional remedial practice in East Africa2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 168-178Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To summarize and review the literature on infant dental enucleation, a traditional remedial procedure prevalent mainly in East Africa.

    Materials and methods. Literature searches were made electronically using general and specialized search engines. The main search was performed through a systematic strategy in PubMed, comprising tabulated keywords, search codes, and translated and transliterated terms. Criteria for the selection of studies were designed to provide a general understanding of the procedure. The findings were synthesized into two sections: a summary of the population prevalence studies, and a thematic literature review.

    Results. An overview of the known prevalence and clinical specifications was established. Insight was gained into the purpose of the procedure and the factors influencing its performance. Diverging suggestions were seen with regard to the rationale for use of infant dental enucleation between different populations. Moreover, reports of complications and consequences involving the general health and the dentoalveolar structures of patients were examined.

    Conclusions. Prevalence, clinical features and risks of infant dental enucleation point to a need for greater awareness of the procedure. Further, there is a need for specific guidelines regarding management of suspected cases within dental and healthcare communities.

  • 3.
    Carlsson, Gunnar E.
    et al.
    Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Dental Materials Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Johansson, Anders
    Department of Clinical Dentistry-Prosthodontics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden; Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    Örebro University Hospital. School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Post Graduate Dental Education Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Is there a trend of decreasing prevalence of TMD-related symptoms with ageing among the elderly?2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 714-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Older adults have not been studied as much as younger ones regarding prevalence of TMD-related symptoms. The aim was to assess the prevalence of TMD-related symptoms in two population samples, 70 and 80 years old.

    Materials and methods: Identical questionnaires were in 2012 sent to all subjects born in 1932 and 1942 living in two Swedish counties. The response rate was 70.1%, resulting in samples of 5697 70-and 2922 80-year-old subjects. The questionnaire comprised 53 questions. Answers to questions on problems regarding TMD-related symptoms and awareness of bruxism were analysed.

    Results: Twelve per cent of the women and 7% of the men in the 70-year-old group reported some, rather great or severe problems regarding TMD pain. In the 80-year-olds the prevalence was 8% and 7%, respectively. Subjects who had problems with TMJ sounds reported difficulty to open the jaw wide 6-times and TMJ pain 10-13-times more frequently than subjects without such problems. Changes of taste and awareness of bruxism were the only variables significantly associated with TMD symptoms in both age groups. Number of teeth was not significantly associated with any of the TMD-related symptoms.

    Conclusions: Most of the elderly subjects had no severe problems with TMD-related symptoms, but 12% of the 70-year-old women reported some, rather great or severe problems. The marked gender difference at age 70 had disappeared in the 80-year-old group. The prevalence was lower among the 80-compared with the 70-year-old subjects of both sexes. The results support the comorbidity between TMD-related symptoms and general health problems.

  • 4.
    Dimberg, Lillemor
    et al.
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Orthodontics, Eastman Institute, Public Dental Service, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Caroline
    Department of Orthodontics, Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Bertil
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bondemark, Lars
    Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center.
    Agreement between children and parents in rating oral health-related quality of life using the Swedish versions of the short-form Child Perceptions Questionnaire 11-14 and Parental Perceptions Questionnaire2019In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 7, p. 534-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: and P-CPQ, and to evaluate the impact on agreement of oral health including malocclusion and background characteristics (dental fear, family situation, gender of informant).

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: and P-CPQ separately in connection with a clinical examination.

    RESULTS: The participants comprised 247 child-parent pairs: 116 (47%) boys, 131 (53%) girls, 166 (67%) mothers and 81 (33%) fathers. The agreement between the child and parental ratings of the children's OHRQoL was low, with an ICC of 0.22 (95% CI: 0.04-0.37) for the total scale.

    CONCLUSIONS: There was a low agreement between children's and parents' answers. For best care, it is advisable to consider perceptions of both children and parents because they can complement each other in estimating the child's OHRQoL.

  • 5.
    Dimberg, Lillemor
    et al.
    Department of Orthodontics, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Bertil
    Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; , Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bondemark, Lars
    Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Oral health-related quality-of-life among children in Swedish dental care: The impact from malocclusions or orthodontic treatment need2016In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 127-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe oral health-related quality-of-life (OHRQoL) and the impact of malocclusions or orthodontic treatment need in a cohort of children in Swedish dental care, using the Swedish version of the Child Perceptions Questionnaire-Impact Short Form (CPQ(11-14)-ISF:16).

    Subjects and methods: Two hundred and fifty-seven children (mean age = 11.5 years, SD = 0.8, range = 9.8-13.5 years) completed the CPQ(11-14)-ISF:16 in conjunction with a clinical examination. In addition to malocclusions and orthodontic treatment need (based on the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need-Dental Health Component), possible confounders (caries, enamel defects, dental trauma, headache and socio-economic markers) were recorded. Children also rated their own dental fear on the Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Sub-scale (CFSS-DS).

    Results: The mean total CPQ(11-14)-ISF:16 score was 9.31. The logistic regression analyses revealed an impact of orthodontic treatment need on OHRQoL (CPQ), but no clear association between higher severity and higher impact on OHRQoL was seen. Dental fear and headache appeared to discriminate for poorer OHRQoL. No impact from caries, enamel defects, dental trauma, or socio-economic markers was revealed.

    Conclusions: This cohort of children reported good self-perceived OHRQoL. Effects on OHRQoL from malocclusions or orthodontic treatment need were limited and inconsistent. Dental fear and headache were found to be more distinct impact factors on OHRQoL than were malocclusions or orthodontic treatment need.

  • 6.
    Dimberg, Lillemor
    et al.
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Orthodontics, Public Dental Service, Eastman Institute, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lennartsson, Bertil
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bondemark, Lars
    Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center.
    Validity and reliability of the Swedish versions of the short-form Child Perceptions Questionnaire 11-14 and Parental Perceptions Questionnaire2019In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 8, p. 630-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the validity and reliability of the Swedish versions of the short-form Child Perceptions Questionnaire 11-14 (CPQ(11-14)) and Parental Perceptions Questionnaire (P-CPQ) for measuring children's oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL).

    Material and methods: The sample comprised 247 children and parents. OHRQoL was assessed by asking each child and their accompanying parent to complete the relevant questionnaire. To allow test-retest analysis, 30 children and 32 parents were asked to complete the instrument a second time within 2-4 weeks.

    Results: In terms of construct validity, significant correlations were observed between CPQ scale scores and the global ratings of oral health and overall well-being for both the CPQ(11-14) and the P-CPQ. Regarding internal consistency, Cronbach's alphas for the total scales were 0.81 and 0.77, respectively, indicating good reliability, and internal consistency for the subscales (two or four dimensions) was acceptable. Test-retest reliability was good for the CPQ(11-14) total scale (ICC 0.77) and acceptable for the P-CPQ total scale (ICC 0.63).

    Conclusions: The Swedish versions of the short-form CPQ(11-14) and P-CPQ are both valid and reliable, and can be recommended for use among Swedish children aged 11-14 years for evaluation of OHRQoL.

  • 7.
    Edvinsson, Siv Elisabet
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Child and Youth Habilitation Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Inter-rater and intra-rater agreement on the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening examination in children, adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy2014In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater agreement on the Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) examination applied to children, adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP).

    Materials and methods. Using the NOT-S examination, two speech and language pathologists independently assessed video recordings of 48 subjects with CP aged 522 years and representing all CP sub-diagnoses and levels of gross motor function and manual ability. Thirty-one subjects were reassessed. Fifteen out of 17 items in the NOT-S examination domains (1) Face at rest, (2) Nose breathing, (3) Facial expression, (4) Masticatory muscle and jaw function, (5) Oral motor function and (6) Speech were rated using a 'yes' (dysfunction observed)/'no' format, generating an overall score of 0-6.

    Results. Inter-rater agreement: Twelve out of 15 items and five out of six domains showed acceptable unweighted kappa values (kappa = 0.46-1.00). The lowest kappa value was found for domain 4 (kappa = -0.04), although it had high inter-rater agreement (92%). The linear weighted kappa value for the overall NOT-S examination score was 0.65 (95% CI = 0.49-0.82). Intra-rater agreement: All items and domains showed acceptable unweighted kappa values (items 0.58-1.00 and 0.59-1.00, domains 0.81-1.00 and 0.62-0.89) for both raters. The linear weighted kappa value for the overall NOT-S examination score was 0.81 (95% CI = 0.63-0.99) for rater A and 0.54 (95% CI = 0.25-0.82) for rater B.

    Conclusions. The NOT-S examination has acceptable inter-rater and intra-rater agreement when used in young individuals with CP.

  • 8.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Does different wording of a global oral health question provide different results?2015In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 250-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Focusing on 70-year-old adults in Sweden and guided by the conceptual framework of International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH), the purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which socio-demographic characteristics, self-reported oral disease and social/psychological/physical oral health outcome variables are associated with two global measures of self-assessed satisfaction with oral health in Swedish 70-year-olds and if there is a degree of discordance between these global questions.

    Background: It has become an important task to create a simple way to measure self-perceived oral health. In these attempts to find practical ways to measure health, the 'global oral health question' is a possible tool to measure self-rated oral health, but there is limited knowledge about how important the wording of this question is.

    Materials and methods: In 2012, a questionnaire was mailed to all persons born in 1942 in two Swedish counties, Örebro (T) and Östergötland (E). The total population of 70-year-olds amounted to 7889. Bivariate analyses were conducted by cross-tabulation and Chi-square statistics. Multivariate analyses were conducted using binary multiple logistic regression.

    Results: The two global oral health question of 70-year-olds in Sweden was mainly explained by the number of teeth (OR = 5.6 and 5.2), chewing capacity (OR = 6.9 and 4.2), satisfaction with dental appearance (OR = 19.8 and 17.3) and Oral Impact on Daily Performance (OIDP) (OR = 3.5 and 3.9). Conclusion. Regardless of the wording, it seems that the concept of a global oral health question has the same main determinants.

  • 9.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dentistry, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    Dental Public Health, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Satisfaction with dental care and life-course predictors: A 20-year prospective study of a Swedish 1942 birth cohort?2016In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 194-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to assess the impact of care experience, health factors and socioeconomic factors on satisfaction with dental care across time and to assess the stability or change in levels of self-reported satisfaction with dental care in individuals as they progress from middle age to early old age.

    Materials and methods: The present work is based on five separate data collections from a cohort study with 3585 individuals responding in all years of the survey. Data collection was conducted in 1992 when the subjects were 50 years of age and again 5, 10, 15 and 20 years later. Absolute stability in satisfaction with dental care was assessed by calculating the proportion of individuals who maintained their position in the same category from one survey period to another. Changes across time were tested using Cochran's Q test. Satisfaction with dental care across the 20-year survey period was modeled using the generalized estimating equation (GEE).

    Results and conclusion: The result showed that 85% of women and 83% of men remained satisfied with dental care. Binomial GEE revealed no statistical significant change in satisfaction with dental care between 1992-2012. In sum, this study has shown that this age group, born in 1942, was stably satisfied with dental care between age 50 and age 70, despite all changes during this time period. Females are more satisfied than men and the most important factors are the experience of attention during the last visit, satisfaction with dental appearance and good chewing capability.

  • 10.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug
    Institute of Clinical Odontology-Community Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Klock, Kristin
    Institute of Clinical Odontology-Community Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Post Graduate Dental Education Center, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Oral health of 65-year olds in Sweden and Norway: a global question and ICF, the latest conceptual model from WHO2012In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 279-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to identify explanatory factors of satisfaction with oral health among Norwegian and Swedish 65 year olds in terms of items from four different domains of ICF and to compare the strengths of the various ICF domains in explaining satisfaction with oral health. Further it was to assess whether the explanatory factors of ICF domains vary between Norway and Sweden.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2007, standardized questionnaires were mailed to all the residents in certain counties of Sweden and Norway who were born in 1942. Response rates were 73.1% (n = 6078) in Sweden and 56.0% (n = 4062) in Norway.

    RESULTS: In total, 33 questions based on four different ICF domains were chosen to explain satisfaction with oral health. Logistic regression showed that four different ICF domains in terms of body function, body structure, activity/participation and environmental factors explained, respectively, 53%, 31%, 12% and 34% of the explanatory variance in the satisfaction with oral health. In the final analysis, only nine items were statistically significant (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSION: This study indicates that ICF as a conceptual model could cover a broad spectrum of factors embedded in OHRQoL measured by a global question in Sweden and Norway. Nine items, representing four ICF domains, were important in the final model for explaining satisfaction with oral health.

  • 11.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden; Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Community Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug
    Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Community Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Klock, Kristin
    Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Community Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit Östergötland County Council, Sweden; Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Post-Graduate Dental Education Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Variation in subjective oral health indicators of 65-year-olds in Norway and Sweden2009In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 222-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Guided by the conceptual framework of Gilbert and co-workers, this study assesses satisfaction with oral health as reported by 65-year-olds in Sweden and Norway, the relationship of socio-demographic factors, clinical and subjective oral health indicators with satisfaction of oral health, and the consistency of those relationships across countries.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 2007, standardized questionnaires were mailed to all the residents in two counties in Sweden and three in Norway who were born in 1942. Response rates were 73.1% (n=6078) in Sweden and 56.0% (n=4062) in Norway.

    RESULTS: Totals of 76.8% of the Swedish and 76.5% of the Norwegian participants reported satisfaction with oral health. Corresponding figures for toothache were 48.1% (Sweden) versus 51.5% (Norway), and for temporomandibular joint symptoms, 10.9% (Sweden) versus 15.1% (Norway). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that subjects who perceived they had bad health, smoked daily, had missing teeth, experienced toothache, had problems with chewing, bad breath, and oral impacts were less likely than their counterparts in the opposite groups to be satisfied with their oral health status. The corresponding odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.08 (problems chewing) to 0.2 (oral impact). No statistically significant two-way interactions occurred and the model explained 46% of the variance in satisfaction with oral health across the two countries (45% in Sweden and 47% in Norway).

    CONCLUSIONS: The oral condition of 65-year-olds in Norway and Sweden produced impacts in oral symptoms, functional limitations, and problems with daily activities that varied to some extent. Satisfaction with oral health varied by socio-demographic factors and subjective oral health indicators. A full understanding of the oral health and treatment needs of 65-year-olds cannot be captured by clinical measures alone.

  • 12.
    Fägerstad, Anida
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Public Dental Service, Dental research Department, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Jesper
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Windahl, Jenny
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Public Dental Service, Dental research Department, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dental avoidance among adolescents: a retrospective case–control study based on dental records in the public dental service in a Swedish county2019In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of missed dental appointments among 16–19-year-old adolescents in a Swedish county. A second aim was to explore associations between background and concomitant factors and missed appointments and to investigate if these associations differed between areas with different sociodemographic profiles.

    Materials and methods: A list of booked, and missed, appointments for 10,158 individuals during 2012 was used for assessments. Based on the total sample, 522 cases with, and 522 matched controls without, dental avoidance behavior in 2012 were identified. Data on previous missed and cancelled appointments, oral health status, dental treatment, fear or behavior problems, and medical, and, where available, psychosocial or lifestyle factors were extracted from the dental records using a preset protocol covering the period 2009–2012.

    Results: In 2012, 13.1% of 23,522 booked appointments were missed, with a higher proportion of missed appointments among boys than girls. Cases with avoidance behavior more often had a record of sociodemographic load and dental fear or behavior management problems. They also had more oral health problems, more invasive dental treatments, and, in the past, more missed and canceled appointments.

    Conclusion: To enable good oral health and continued regular dental care, we need to pay more attention to adolescents’ individual situation and be observant of early signs of avoidance.

  • 13.
    Gülcan, Ferda
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Klock, Kristin S.
    Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Lie, Stein Atle
    Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug
    Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Exploring the association of dental care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP): a prospective study of ageing people in Norway and Sweden2018In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the association of dental health care utilization with oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) across time focusing ageing Norwegian and Swedish adults adjusting for predisposing, enabling, and need related-factors as defined by Andersen's model.

    METHODS: Data were based on Norwegian and Swedish 1942 birth-cohorts conducted in 2007 (age 65) and 2012 (age 70). In Norway, the response rates ranged from 54% to 58%. Corresponding figures in Sweden were from 72% to 73%. Self-administered questionnaires assessed OIDP, dental care utilization and predisposing, enabling and need related factors. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation was used to adjust for clustering in repeated data.

    RESULTS: Significant covariates of OIDP were satisfaction with dental services, dental care avoidance due to financial constraints, frightening experience with dental care during childhood and patient initiated dental visiting. Frequency and regularity of dental attendance were associated with OIDP in the Swedish cohort, only.

    CONCLUSIONS: In spite of country differences in the public co-financing of dental care, dental care utilization indicators were associated with OIDP across time in both cohorts. Encouraging regular and dentist initiated visiting patterns and strengthening beliefs in keeping own teeth could be useful in attempts to reduce poor oral health related quality of life in ageing people.

  • 14.
    Svenson, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Dental Research Department, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Dental Research Department, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Reet
    Department of Radiology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Fält, Anna
    Dentists' use of digital radiographic techniques: Part I - intraoral X-ray: a questionnaire study of Swedish dentists2018In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The present study aims to gain knowledge about the dentist's use and choice of digital intraoral imaging methods.

    Materials and methods: A questionnaire sent to 2481 dentists within the Swedish Dental Society contained questions about the type of X-ray technique used, problems experienced with digital radiography, and reasons for choosing digital technology, and about indications, clinic size and type of service. Response rate was 53%.

    Results: Ninety-eight percent of the dentists had made the transition to digital radiography; only 2% used film technique, and solid-state detector (SSD) was the most used digital technique. More years in service decreases the likelihood of applying individual indications for performing a full mouth examination. More retakes were done with SSDs compared to storage phosphor plates. Reasons for choosing digital techniques were that work was easier and communication with the patients improved. However, dentists also experienced problems with digital techniques, such as exposure and projection errors and inadequate image quality. The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority states that all radiological examinations should be justified, something not always followed.

    Conclusions: This study showed that 98% of the respondents, Swedish dentists within the Swedish Dental Society, used digital techniques, and the most used was the solid-state technique.

  • 15.
    Svensson, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Dental Research Department, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Båth, Magnus
    Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Reet
    Department of Radiology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Can adaptive post-processing of storage phosphor plate panoramic radiographs provide better image quality? A comparison of anatomical image quality of panoramic radiographs before and after adaptive processing2019In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 328-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to study the effect of adaptive image processing on the visibility of anatomical structures in storage phosphor plate (SPP) panoramic images.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three hundred SPP panoramic X-ray radiographs of children and adolescents were used. The radiographs were post-processed using general operator processor (GOP) technology, resulting in both a standard-processed and a GOP-processed radiograph. Four specialists in dental radiology compared the structural image quality of all standard-processed and GOP-processed panorama images for six anatomical structures, using a six-point scale for visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis.

    RESULTS: For three of the anatomic structures - the root canal space of the mandibular left first premolar, mandibular canal left side and periodontal ligament space of the mandibular right first molar - there was a statistically significant difference to the GOP's advantage. For the three remaining structures - dentino-enamel junction of the maxillary right first molar, crista alveolaris of the mandibular left molar area and floor of maxillary sinus right side - no significant difference between standard processing and GOP processing was obtained.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates that it is possible to improve the quality of SPP radiographs and the visibility of anatomical structures by using the GOP technique. Manufacturers' image-processing programs can be further developed, as there is a possibility of improving the diagnostic content of an image with external processing.

  • 16.
    Svensson, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dental Research, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Båth, Magnus
    Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Reet
    Department of Radiology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Persson, Bo
    Department of Radiology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    A comparison of perceived diagnostic image quality in direct digital panoramic images between standard and advanced external GOP image processing2019In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 8, p. 560-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to study the effect of adaptive image processing (GOP processing) on the visibility of anatomical structures in direct digital panoramic images.

    Material and methods: The study comprised panoramic images of 50 consecutive adult individuals aged 18-60 years. Nine dentists working with dental radiology compared the structural image quality of all standard-processed and GOP-processed panoramic images for six anatomical structures, using a six-point scale for visual grading characteristics analysis.

    Results: For all anatomic structures a statistically significant difference in favour of the GOP was found.

    Conclusions: The present study shows that it is possible to improve perceived diagnostic image quality of direct digital panoramic radiography using GOP technology compared to the manufacturers' standard processing. Manufacturers' image-processing programs can be further developed, as there is a possibility of improving the perceived diagnostic content of an image with external processing

  • 17.
    Svensson, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Dental Research Department, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ståhlnacke, Katri
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Dental Research Department, Postgraduate Dental Education Center, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Reet
    Department of Radiology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Fält, Anna
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dentists' use of digital radiographic techniques: Part II - extraoral radiography: a questionnaire study of Swedish dentists2018In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 150-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to gain knowledge about the dentist's use and choice of digital extraoral imaging methods, panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire sent to 2481 dentists within the Swedish Dental Society contained questions about the panoramic technique and CBCT technique used, education, clinic size and type of service. The response rate was 53%.

    RESULTS: The study showed that 61% of the Swedish dentists had access to panoramic techniques and that 84% used a direct digital sensor, while 6% used storage phosphor plate techniques. Around 8% of the Swedish dentists had access to CBCT. It was also observed that group practices had two times higher odds of having panoramic equipment compared with solo practices. Approximately 40% of the dentists had undergone postgraduate education in oral radiology during the last 5 years. Dental nurses and dental hygienists exposed 92% of the panoramic radiographs and 75% of the CBCTs. Thirty per cent of those clinics with access to a panoramic unit exposed >30 panoramic radiographs per month and 56% of the clinics having access to CBCT did more than 75 examinations per year.

    CONCLUSIONS: Today 61% of Swedish dentists have access to panoramic radiography and 8% have access to CBCT. There is a greater likelihood of having access if the dentist works in the public dental health service or in a group practice and if the dentist has undergone any postgraduate course in oral radiology.

  • 18.
    Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gulcan, Ferda
    Department of Clinical Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Changes in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) related to long-term utilization of dental care among older people2018In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 76, no 8, p. 559-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether long-term utilization of dental care, treatment with fillings and crowns and persistent tooth loss between age 50 and 65 years associate with subsequent changes in OHRQoL from age 65 to 70 years.

    METHOD: In 1992, a census of 50-year-olds received invitation to participate in a questionnaire survey. Of 6346 respondents, 3585 completed follow-ups in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012. OHRQoL was measured using the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP) inventory.

    RESULTS: Around 70.4%, 11.2% and 18.4% confirmed respectively, no change, worsening, and improvement in OIDP scores between age 65 and 70 years. Compared to those being permanent non-routine dental attenders, ORs of improving and worsening of OIDP were respectively, 0.4 and 0.6 if being a permanent routine dental attender. ORs for improving OIDP was 1.6 if reporting persistent specialist attendance and 2.5 if having received crowns and fillings. Participants with permanent tooth loss were most likely to both worsen and improve OIDP.

    CONCLUSION: Long-term routine dental attendance and permanent tooth loss occurred as predictors simultaneously for improvement and worsening of OIDP. Accumulation of advantages and disadvantages throughout the life-course increases and decreases the probability of improvement and worsening in OIDP among older people in Sweden.

  • 19.
    Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug
    et al.
    Institute of Clinical Dentistry-Community Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Social inequality in oral health-related quality-of-life, OHRQoL, at early older age: evidence from a prospective cohort study2011In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 69, no 6, p. 334-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the long-term effect of socio-behavioral characteristics on oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) at age 65 and the influence on OIDP at age 65 of changes in socio-behavioral characteristics between age 50 and 65.

    METHODS: In 1992, all 50-year-olds in two counties of Sweden were invited to participate in a longitudinal survey. A total of 6346 responded and, of those, 4143 completed follow-ups at ages 55, 60 and 65 years.

    RESULTS: At age 65, 26.9% had oral impacts. Subjects being immigrants, being unmarried, reporting economic barriers, bad general health, bad quality dental care, less than annual dental attendance, limited social network and smoking at age 50 experienced oral impacts at age 65 more frequently than their counterparts in the opposite groups. Compared to the stable advantaged groups, stable disadvantaged groups regarding marital status, health status, smoking and reported quality of care had increased ORs for oral impacts. Compared to the stable advantaged groups, those who experienced deterioration with respect to health status, dental attendance and quality of oral health care and those who quitted smoking had increased ORs for oral impacts.

    CONCLUSIONS: Disadvantaged socio-behavioral condition at age 50 had a long lasting detrimental effect on OHRQoL at age 65. Deterioration in socio-behavioral circumstances was associated with increased oral impacts. Early protection against the effect of socio-behavioral adversity by imposing economic barriers, ensure provision of high quality care and by promotion of healthy lifestyles seems to have the potential to reduce oral impacts at older ages.

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