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  • 1.
    Brelsford, Craig C.
    et al.
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Center (ViPS), Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Morales, Luis Orlando
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Center (ViPS), Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nezval, Jakub
    Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic.
    Kotilainen, Titta K.
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Center (ViPS), Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hartikainen, Saara M.
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Center (ViPS), Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Aphalo, Pedro J.
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Center (ViPS), Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Robson, Matthew
    Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, Viikki Plant Science Center (ViPS), Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Do UV‐A radiation and blue light during growth prime leaves to cope with acute high light in photoreceptor mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana?2019In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 165, no 3, p. 537-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied how plants acclimated to growing conditions that included combinations of blue light (BL) and ultraviolet (UV)‐A radiation, and whether their growing environment affected their photosynthetic capacity during and after a brief period of acute high light (as might happen during an under‐canopy sunfleck). Arabidopsis thaliana Landsberg erecta wild‐type were compared with mutants lacking functional blue light and UV photoreceptors: phototropin 1, cryptochromes (CRY1 and CRY2) and UV RESISTANT LOCUS 8 (uvr8). This was achieved using light‐emitting‐diode (LED) lamps in a controlled environment to create treatments with or without BL, in a split‐plot design with or without UV‐A radiation. We compared the accumulation of phenolic compounds under growth conditions and after exposure to 30 min of high light at the end of the experiment (46 days), and likewise measured the operational efficiency of photosystem II (ϕPSII, a proxy for photosynthetic performance) and dark‐adapted maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm to assess PSII damage). Our results indicate that cryptochromes are the main photoreceptors regulating phenolic compound accumulation in response to BL and UV‐A radiation, and a lack of functional cryptochromes impairs photosynthetic performance under high light. Our findings also reveal a role for UVR8 in accumulating flavonoids in response to a low UV‐A dose. Interestingly, phototropin 1 partially mediated constitutive accumulation of phenolic compounds in the absence of BL. Low‐irradiance BL and UV‐A did not improve ϕPSII and Fv/Fm upon our acute high‐light treatment; however, CRYs played an important role in ameliorating high‐light stress.

  • 2. Brosché, Mikael
    et al.
    Strid, Åke
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Molecular events following perception of ultraviolet-B radiation by plants2003In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure of plants to UV-B radiation (280–320 nm) results in changes in expression of a large number of genes. Before UV-B radiation or light of other wavelengths can give rise to a cellular response, it has to be perceived by some kind of receptor, and the information transduced via a signalling pathway to the target molecules, be it proteins in the cytoplasm

    or the genetic material in the nucleus. The perception of low levels of UV-B probably occurs via a UV-B photoreceptor followed by several different signalling pathways. These pathways include second messengers such as calcium, kinases and the catalytic formation of reactive oxygen species. High levels of UV-B, on the other hand, probably cause cellular damage

    and oxidative stress, thus activating a general stress signal transduction pathway which leads to a response similar to that which occurs after pathogen attack and other stresses. Some of the genes identified so far as being regulated by UV-B encode proteins involved in the biosynthesis of protective pigments, DNA repair and antioxidative enzymes, photosynthetic genes, cell cycle genes, and stress genes induced by other types of stimuli (i.e. pathogenesis-related proteins and senescence-induced genes). In the light of the information obtained on components necessary for UV-B-induced changes in gene expression, we propose in this mini-review a working model for UV-B perception and signal transduction. This model also takes into account dosage differences for the observations, which imply a separation into UV-B-specific and more general stress signal transduction.

  • 3.
    Comont, David
    et al.
    Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK.
    Martinez Abaigar, Javier
    University of La Rioja, Logroño, Spain.
    Albert, Andreas
    Helmholtz Zentrum, München, Germany.
    Aphalo, Pedro
    Helsingfors universitet, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Causton, David R
    Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK.
    López Figueroa, Félix
    University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.
    Gaberscik, Alenka
    University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Llorens, Laura
    University of Girona, Girona, Spain.
    Hauser, Marie-Theres
    University of Natural Resulrces and Life Sciences-BOKU, Wien, Austria.
    Jansen, Marcel A K
    University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
    Kardefelt, Majlis
    Abisko forskningsstation, Abisko, Sweden.
    de la Coba Luque, Paqui
    University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.
    Neubert, Susanne
    University of Natural Resulrces and Life Sciences-BOKU, Wien, Austria.
    Núnez-Olivera, Encarnación
    University of La Rioja, Logroño, Spain.
    Olsen, Jorunn
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Robson, Matthew
    Helsingfors universitet, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Schreiner, Monika
    Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Großbeeren, Germany.
    Sommaruga, Ruben
    University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Strid, Åke
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Torre, Sissel
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Turunen, Minna
    University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Veljovic-Jovanovic, Sonja
    Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Verdaguer, Dolors
    University of Girona, Girona, Spain.
    Vidovic, Marija
    Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Wagner, Johanna
    University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Winkler, Jana Barbro
    Helmholtz Zentrum, München, Germany.
    Zipoli, Gaetano
    C.N.R. Ibimet, Firenze, Italy.
    Gwynn-Jones, Dylan
    University of Aberystwyth, Aberystwyth, UK.
    UV responses of Lolium perenne raised along a latitudinal gradient across Europe: a filtration study2012In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 145, p. 604-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lolium perenne (cv. AberDart) was grown at 14 locations along a latitudinal gradient across Europe (37–68◦N) to study the impact of ultraviolet radiation (UV) and climate on aboveground growth and foliar UV-B absorbing compounds. At each location, plants were grown outdoors for 5 weeks in a replicated UV-B filtration experiment consisting of open, UV-B transparent (cellulose diacetate) and UV-B opaque (polyester) environments. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy was used to compare plantmetabolite profiles in relation to treatment and location. UV radiation and climatic parameters were determined for each location from online sources and the data were assessed using a combination of ANOVA and multiple regression analyses. Most of the variation in growth between the locations was attributable to the combination of climatic parameters, with minimum temperature identified as an important growth constraint. However, no single environmental parameter could consistently account for the variability in plant growth. Concentrations of foliar UV-B absorbing compounds showed a positive trend with solar UV across the latitudinal gradient; however, this relationship was not consistent in all treatments. The most striking experimental outcome from this study was the effect of presence or absence of filtration frames onUV-absorbing compounds. Overall, the study demonstrates the value of an European approach in studying the impacts of natural UV across a large latitudinal gradient. We have shown the feasibility of coordinated UV filtration at multiple sites but have also highlighted the need for open controls and careful interpretation of plant responses.

  • 4.
    Ekblad, Alf
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Umeå, Sweden.
    Huss-Danell, K.
    Sjöström, M.
    Variation in nitrogenase activity explained by abiotic and biotic factors: a multivariate study1990In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 79, no 2, p. A77-A77Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Morales, Luis Orlando
    et al.
    Department of Biosciences, Plant Biology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tegelberg, Riitta
    Department of Biosciences, Plant Biology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Brosché, Mikael
    Department of Biosciences, Plant Biology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Lindfors, Anders
    School of Geosciences, University of Edinburg, Edinburgh, UK, Climate Change Research, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Siipola, Sari
    Department of Biosciences, Plant Biology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Aphalo, Pedro J.
    Department of Biosciences, Plant Biology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Temporal variation in epidermal flavonoids due to altered solar UV radiation is moderated by the leaf position in Betula pendula2011In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 143, no 3, p. 261-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physiological mechanisms controlling plant responses to dynamic changes in ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation are not fully understood: this information is important to further comprehend plant adaptation to their natural habitats. We used the fluorimeter Dualex to estimate in vivo the epidermal flavonoid contents by measuring epidermal UV absorbance (A375) in Betula pendula Roth (silver birch) leaves of different ages under altered UV. Seedlings were grown in a greenhouse for 15 days without UV and transferred outdoors under three UV treatments (UV‐0, UV‐A and UV‐A+B) created by three types of plastic film. After 7 and 13 days, Dualex measurements were taken at adaxial and abaxial epidermis of the first three leaves (L1, L2 and L3) of the seedlings. After 14 days, some of the seedlings were reciprocally swapped amongst the treatments to study the accumulation of epidermal flavonoids in the youngest unfolded leaves (L3) during leaf expansion under changing solar UV environments. A375 of the leaves responded differently to the UV treatment depending on their position. UV‐B increased the A375 in the leaves independently of leaf position. L3 quickly adjusted A375 in their epidermis according to the UV they received and these adjustments were affected by previous UV exposure. The initial absence of UV‐A+B or UV‐A, followed by exposure to UV‐A+B, particularly enhanced leaf A375. Silver birch leaves modulate their protective pigments in response to changes in the UV environment during their expansion, and their previous UV exposure history affects the epidermal‐absorbance achieved during later UV exposure.

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