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  • 1.
    Englund, Hans
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Frostenson, Magnus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Managing performance evaluation uncertainties in schools: When teachers become struggling performers2017In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 885-906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performative technologies are increasingly relied upon as a means of controlling the work of teachers. As noted in the literature, one possible outcome of this trend is the performer, a teacher identity that presupposes the internalization of, and adaptation to, a performative logic. Based on the findings from an empirical study of a Swedish upper secondary school, we suggest that teachers who actually submit to the underlying logic of performative technologies – i.e. who intentionally strive towards a performative identity – will encounter a number of performance evaluation uncertainties, due to how performative technologies may: (a) reflect and recognize teacher performances based on qualitative judgements, (b) fail to take into account their entrepreneurial endeavours, (c) depict essentially collective effects as individual performances, and (d) reflect and recognize performances in a relativizing way. Such performance evaluation uncertainties will, in turn, provoke perceived tensions as performative teachers want to be (perceived as) performers but become uncertain as to when and why they did (not) perform well. And importantly, we find that such tensions tend to turn the ongoing reproduction of a performative identity into a cognitive struggle. Based on this, we introduce and elaborate on a particular type of performative teacher identity; the struggling performer.

  • 2.
    Forest, Emmanuelle
    et al.
    Université Toulouse Jean Jaures, Toulouse, France.
    Lenzen, Benoit
    Université de Genève, Genève, Switzerland.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Teaching traditions in physical education in France, Switzerland and Sweden: A special focus on official curricula for gymnastics and fitness training2018In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 71-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss similarities and differences between the curricula for physical education (PE) in secondary schools in Sweden, France and the canton of Geneva (Switzerland) in the light of PE teaching traditions (PETTs). Teaching traditions concern ideas about the goals of school disciplines and therefore about the kind of learning pupils are expected to acquire. The paper focuses more specifically on two subjects, gymnastics and fitness training, because these physical activities are liable to highlight the similarities and differences across contexts in terms of didactic transposition. A content analysis of current curriculum materials of the three countries was conducted taking the following dimensions into account: (a) the general structure of the curriculum texts; (b) the general recommendations; and (c) the learning outcomes expected from the pupils in terms of knowledge and values, with examples of contents in gymnastics and fitness training. The results show the entanglement of various PETTs in each country: PETT as Sport-Techniques primarily shapes French and Swiss-Genevan curricula, PETT as Health Education is more present in Sweden and, to a lesser extent, in Switzerland, while PETT as Physical Culture Education tends to be more visible in France.

  • 3.
    Håkansson, Michael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Van Poeck, Katrien
    Department of Political Sciences, University of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Östman, Leif
    Department of Education, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The political tendency in environmental and sustainability education2018In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 91-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Sugrue, Ciaran
    et al.
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Bergh, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sutphen, Molly
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Fossland, Trine
    University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    University leaders’ talk about institutional missions and academic developers’ contributions2019In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are increasing external pressures on 21st-century universities to be engines of economic recovery and growth. In this rapidly altering landscape, how university senior leaders articulate the purpose of university education and the contribution of academic developers to fulfil these education purposes is a matter of empirical interest. Senior leaders and academic developers have particular responsibilities since they impact educational quality at an institutional level. Senior leaders are responsible for orienting their institutions, giving direction to colleagues in the process, while their implicit leadership theories animate effort and interactions. Academic developers are employed to provide educational programmes for academics to develop their pedagogical competence, and are increasingly deployed by university leaders to implement new quality assurance systems. Such responsibilities strongly suggest agency and relative autonomy to forge new alliances and collaborative networks where these did not previously exist; they are simultaneously required to be leaders and followers. Consequently, the portfolios of academic developers have expanded exponentially, strategically walking a tightrope between the potentially coercive message of strategic missions and the relative autonomy of academic staff, brokering new horizons of university education in a collegial, collaborative and horizontal manner. The paper captures the dynamics of leading education in four universities: the brokering responsibilities of academic developers.

  • 5.
    Sundberg, Daniel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Standards-based curricula in a denationalised conception of education: the case of Sweden2012In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 342-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the authors examine the development of the Swedish educational reform of 1991 from an international and European perspective, and from the perspective of what counts as knowledge in a recently implemented Swedish curriculum reform. With effect from 2011, the Swedish government has significantly reshaped the curricula for preschool, compulsory school and upper secondary school education, but in terms of governing principles for schools, these curriculum reforms can be regarded as a continuation of the 1991 reform. We argue that this latest reform, as part of an international policy discourse, can be said to represent a denationalised and instrumental conception of education, and that the implications for the formation of knowledge within this conception can be understood as a standards-based curriculum shaped by two powerful international influences: a technical-instrumental discourse of curriculum, emphasising the form, structure and function of the curriculum; and a neo-conservative discourse of curriculum, with an emphasis on curriculum content as a given and uncontested body of knowledge.

  • 6.
    Tveit, Sverre
    et al.
    Department of Education, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Lundahl, Christian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    New modes of policy legitimation in education: (Mis)using comparative data to effectuate assessment reform2018In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 631-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying three modes of policy legitimation in education, illustrated by shifts in Swedish educational assessment and grading policies over the past decades, the article demonstrates significant trends with regards to national governments’ policymaking and borrowing. We observe a shift away from collaboracy—defined as policy legitimation located in partnership and networks of stakeholders, researchers and other experts—towards more use of supranational agencies (called agency), such as the OECD, the European Union and associated networks, as well as the use of individual consultants and private enterprises (called consultancy) to legitimate policy change. Analysing assessment and grading policies reported in Eurydice, the paper discusses functional equivalence of grading policies and validity problems related to the construction and use of policy comparisons. Illuminating the Swedish government and a consultant’s role in reviewing and recommending grading policies, the paper discusses new ‘fast policy’ modes of policy legitimation utilising comparative data to effectuate assessment reform.

  • 7.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A European space for education looking for its public2010In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 432-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The open method of coordination (OMC) within the Lisbon strategy is discussed in terms of a European Space for Education and ‘programme ontology’. The focus is on indicators and the European dimension, and how they ‘work’ in the forming of contents and identities in this European Space for Education. The OMC is analyzed in relation to Nancy Fraser’s theoretical public-sphere approach of discourses about needs, instead of inquiry from needs. Central to the article is the problematization of the shift from national theories and methodologies to theories that might be better suited to an international European educational arena. Hence, in the final part of the article, the publicsphere theory is discussed from the point of view of globalization and within a transnational frame for education.

     

     

  • 8.
    Wahlström, Ninni
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Understanding the universal right to education as jurisgenerative politics and democratic iterations2009In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 520-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT This article examines how the universal human right to education can be understood in terms of what Seyla Benhabib considers ‘democratic iterations’. Further, by referring to the concept of jurisgenerative politics, Benhabib argues that a democratic people reinterpret guiding norms and principles which they find themselves bound to, through iterative acts, so that they are not only the subjects but also the authors of laws. By examining the use of the Article of the universal right to education in the European Convention on Human Rights, not as an Article with an unambiguous meaning, but as an Article which from its very start was the subject of different interpretations and desires, the author argues for an understanding of the process of transforming universal rights into national law and norms as democratic iterations. This way of conceiving democratic iterations is examined empirically, with Sweden as an example, by analyses of three different discursive arenas: a political/legal arena; an arena concerning political contests over independent schools; and a more limited arena for advocating denominational schools. The conclusion is that two different disjunctions – between universal norms and national self-determination and between law as power and law as meaning – are productive interspaces for renegotiating and rearticulating universal law into local/national norms

  • 9.
    Ydesen, Christian
    et al.
    Department of Learning and Philosophy, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark .
    Ludvigsen, Kari
    Stein Rokkan Centre for Social Studies, Uni Research, Bergen, Norway .
    Lundahl, Christian
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Creating an educational testing profession in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, 1910-19602013In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 120-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Norway, Sweden and Denmark national testing communities advocating the introduction and expanded use of standardised educational tests in the national educational systems emerged around World War I. Using international research and cross-border networking activities, these coteries were able to gain power and thus establish and promote a new profession, the educational psychologist, along with instituting practices of alleged scientific tests in the following decades.

    This article presents a historical analysis of the central processes and developments constituting the Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish testing communities. The aim is to understand the workings of these professionalization movements rooted in the creation of an international fellowship of like-mindedness and a knowledge monopoly connected with standardised educational tests. Viewed from a contemporary perspective, this type of analysis is relevant, because specialised knowledge and experts with knowledge monopolies remain prevalent in the modern-day field of education policy and practice. Thus, the roots of this inherent tendency towards expert knowledge in modern welfare state educational settings can be more adequately grasped through a better understanding of the historical precursors.

    The article discusses the importance and actual impact of the Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish testing communities on national educational practices, the significance of the international interplay, and how and to what extent national political and educational climates were shaped by new experts and knowledge.

    It is argued that the testing communities were able to gain authority in the national educational fields through the creation and maintenance of organisations, knowledge, and practices, as well as in the forming of alliances with politicians, universities, and teachers’ unions in a joint endeavour that promoted educational psychology and testing in the three Scandinavian educational fields.

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