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  • 1.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Power and group work in physical education: A Foucauldian perspective2017In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 339-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Group work is used in physical education (PE) to encourage student-directed, collaborative learning. Aligned with this aim, group work is expected to shift some power from teacher to students and enable students to make decisions and co-construct meaning on their own. There are, however, very few investigations focusing on power in group work situations in PE, with most research focusing on learning and content. Assumptions about the nature of power and its mechanisms have been largely implicit. The purpose of this paper was consequently to explore power relations in PE group work. To do this, we have drawn primarily on observational data of three groups working together to choreograph a dance performance in a Swedish PE lesson. A small amount of pre- and post-lesson interview material is used as a complementary data source. Michel Foucault’s notion of power as action-on-action is used to identify different types of power relations in this group work. Four specific kinds of relations are presented concerning: (1) the students’ task; (2) other cultures; (3) gender; and (4) interactions with one another. These relations suggest that power relations are not simply created locally between group members, nor are power relations only a function of the members’ proficiency in the task. In these respects, the results encourage a reconsideration of learning in group work and open up new avenues for further research. The paper is concluded with practical considerations that relate to common assumptions about student power, teacher authority and the potential benefit of ambiguous tasks in group work.

  • 2.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wallhead, Tristan
    Division of Kinesiology and Health, University of Wyoming, Wyoming, USA.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Student learning through interaction in physical education2017In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 273-278Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Caldeborg, Annica
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Intergenerational touch in physical education in relation to heteronormativity: Female students’ perspectives2020In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 392-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research within the field of intergenerational touch has shown that there is a tension between the need to use physical contact as an obvious pedagogical tool, and the no-touch discourse. Within this tension physical contact between physical education teachers and students has also been shown to be a gender/ed issue with heteronormative points of departure. The aim of this study is to investigate how young adult female students’ talk about physical contact between teachers and students in physical education is related to heteronormativity. The study takes its starting point in Foucault’s work on discourses and Butler’s performative perspective. Thirteen female students in upper secondary school were interviewed in four focus groups using photo elicitation. In the findings, three performatives are identified that show how the students’ talk about physical contact between teacher and student in physical education is related to heteronormativity. The three performatives are: (a) gendering with age; (b) being wary of men; and (c) feeling sympathy for men. The paper discusses the effects the heteronormative discourse has on young adult female students and male teachers in relation to physical contact in physical education.

  • 4.
    Casey, Ashley
    et al.
    School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Cooperative learning in physical education encountering Dewey’s educational theory2020In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 1023-1037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperative learning can be considered as an umbrella term for a number of classroom practices. In this paper we consider the educative nature of cooperative learning in physical education, and we have challenged ourselves to examine how cooperative learning can enhance the education of young people. We do this by revisiting cooperative learning’s Deweyan foundations and hold that such a move would be a constructive way forward for cooperative learning in physical education. We argue that there is a risk, in not going back to its educational roots, that cooperative learning might just become another way to teach, for example, games or sports, and that it currently puts too much emphasis on destination rather than journey. We suggest that using Dewey’s idea of education and experience would add: a situational element, a directional element, a temporal element, a communal element and an educative element. In this way, the use of cooperative learning in physical education can move away from exclusively developing students’ skills, towards an open-ended process of becoming where a diversity of students transform and are being transformed by one another.

  • 5.
    Gibbs, Beatrice
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Håkan
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Teaching dance in physical education using exergames2017In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 237-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the different ways in which a dance exergame can be used to teach dance in upper secondary school physical education. Particular attention is paid to the learning processes that students are involved in when the dance game is used as a teaching resource. A socio-cultural perspective on learning constitutes the analytical framework. The study demonstrates three different uses: instructor, facilitator and inspirer. In relation to these uses the students are involved in the following learning processes: learning by imitating, repeating, communicating, negotiating, instructing, modelling and using metaphors. It is argued that dance exergames can be used pedagogically to teach dance because they focus on the moves and steps and allow the teacher to focus on observing, supporting, assigning tasks and providing feedback.

  • 6.
    Janemalm, Lucas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Barker, Dean
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), Sweden.
    What is complex in complex movement? A discourse analysis of conceptualizations of movement in the Swedish physical education curriculum2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1146-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, the Swedish National Agency for Education introduced a new national curriculum. Thecurriculum contained a number of new terms. One in particular proved problematic for physicaleducators – complex movement. The confusion surrounding the term could be seen as somewhatunexpected since movement is and has been a central element of practically all physical education(PE) curricula. The specific aim of this paper is to identify how the discourse regarding complexmovement is assembled, and by doing so, provide insights into the meaning(s) of complexmovement within the context of PE policy in Sweden. Following Englund and Quennerstedt (2008),the study is framed within a Swedish curriculum theory tradition and six policy texts are examinedusing a discourse analytic methodology. The results suggest three different inferences of complexmovement discourse: advanced with a wide meaning; context-dependent and related to sports forolder pupils; and knowledge-dependent where different views about knowledge exist. From theseresults, three discussion points are raised related to: the diversity of possible meanings presentedin policy; the connection between knowledge and understanding; and the probability of differentaudiences reading the texts in different ways. The paper is concluded with a consideration of theconsequences of different inferences concerning complex movement and whether greater consensusis necessary.

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    What is complex in complex movement? A discourse analysis of conceptualizations of movement in the Swedish physical education curriculum
  • 7.
    Kamoga, Seguya
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Varea, Valeria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    ‘Let them do PE!’: The ‘becoming’ of Swedish physical education in the age of COVID-192022In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 263-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden received worldwide attention for its approach to managing the COVID-19 pandemic. Notably, throughout the pandemic, Sweden was one of the few countries that did not implement any lockdown measures. This meant that primary schools remained open and classes proceeded as usual, including the delivery of physical education (PE). This paper explores PE teachers’ perceptions of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on Swedish PE. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with seven PE teachers. Results suggest that teaching PE during COVID-19 has led to disparate challenges and changes for teachers, including modifications in context, content, roles and responsibilities, as well as the handling of issues concerning physical contact and proximity among students and teachers. The conclusions of this study reveal that in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the parameters of PE in Sweden are changing more rapidly now than ever before. Understanding how the pandemic has impacted the subject of PE and its delivery might create opportunities for further discussions, possible solutions and subsequent necessary adjustments in dealing with the ongoing COVID-19 situation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    ‘Let them do PE!’: The ‘becoming’ of Swedish physical education in the age of COVID-19
  • 8.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Journeying into the kinescape of unicycling: A Deleuzian perspective2022In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 651-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement learning has become a prominent issue in recent sport pedagogy research, including a particular concern about the new perspectives of movement learning. The turn towards new perspectives is partly spurred by discontent with the conventional perspectives of movement learning. The purpose of the article is to explore a journey into the kinescape of unicycling. The article can be seen as a case study of what it means to learn (how) to unicycle for one student teacher in the midst of a pedagogical research module and with the aid of the Deleuzian notion of a triadic relationship between percepts, affects and concepts. The analysis points to how a student, in the midst of material features such as equipment, the sport hall, other people, and instructional video clips, is mapping connections between concepts (what unicycling can be), percepts (a-ha moments) and affects (what moves him to continue practising unicycling), in ways that allow him to learn to unicycle with astonishing pace. His practising of unicycling is guided by particular strategies for exploration and experimentation that his experiences of board culture offer him. Rather than any general principles of movement learning, of importance here are the particular ways in which kinesio-cultural exploration may offer non-linear resources for movement learning. We conclude that this approach to learning may stimulate pedagogies that are not only effective but also more inclusive because they are more creative and more open than linear approaches to movement learning.

  • 9.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Being a competent athlete or a competent teacher?: Aestetic experiences in physical education teacher education2014In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 407-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore physical education teacher education students’ meaningmaking of participating in lessons – in this case gymnastics and basketball – based on their aesthetic judgements, expressed in written stories. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of John Dewey, was used in the study and the empirical data was generated through observations and collection of students’ written stories. A practical epistemology analysis was used in order to explore the students’ meaning-making in-depth. The purposes that the students ascribed to participating in the lessons were to develop both as athletes and as teachers. When analysing the stories, the importance of being a competent athlete emerged as the main purpose of participating in the lessons, and the majority of the students never included the purpose of developing as a teacher in their stories at all. By making the competent athlete the centre of their participation, other positions of participation were excluded or marginalized. However, even if all the students’ stories contribute to the collective appropriation of the type, the majority did not include the projected, ideal type in all respects. In their stories, it was clear that many of the students expressed a tension between doing gymnastics or basketball within the context of competitive sport and doing the same activities within the context of physical education teacher education. Even if the students did not fulfil this awareness of contrasting ideals by undoing ‘the competent athlete’ completely, many of them did highlight the conflict.

  • 10.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    Univeristy of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Exploring gender habits: A practical epistemology analysis of exergaming in school2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1176-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitisation is an ongoing process in society as well as in physical education (PE) and research has identified digital technologies as a trend that influences the PE curriculum. A number of studies have explored the topic from different angles, although very few have empirically looked at the critical aspects of digitised PE in educational practice. This is particularly striking when it comes to issues of gender. Against this background, the aim of the paper is to explore gender habits in a digitised PE practice. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of the pragmatist feminist Shannon Sullivan, is used in the study. The data consists of video- and audio-recordings of ongoing video gaming organised by the PE teacher. A practical epistemology analysis is employed to explore the teenagers’ gender habits in depth. In the analysis, it is clear that the use of exergames in school reinforces traditional gender habits, rather than weakening them. This is particularly evident when the teenagers play in single sex groups. This is also the case when playing in mixed gender groups, although here some changes in gender habits can be identified. However, gender habits are not easily transformed and the findings support the argument that deliberate teaching is important when issues of gender are raised in practice.

  • 11.
    Mustell, Jan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Geidne, Susanna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Barker, Dean
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
    The transformation of ball games as pedagogic discourse within physical education teacher education2023In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have long questioned the impact of teacher education programmes. Persistent claims are that pre-service teachers have fixed ideas about pedagogy when they enter training and that they become enculturated once in the profession. Within physical education (PE), similar concerns have been raised with respect to ball games. Research suggests that pre-service PE teachers typically have substantial experience of ball sports and find it difficult to implement non-traditional ball games pedagogies when they enter schools. Against this background, the aim of the study is to explore how pre-service teachers recontextualise ball games as pedagogic discourse in their transitions from university to school placement. Bernstein's pedagogic device and pedagogic discourse are employed as the theoretical framework. The investigation focuses on a Swedish PETE programme and the participants are six pre-service teachers. The empirical material consists of written assessments, observations of the pre-service teachers' lessons during school placements, and individual interviews. Findings suggest that the pedagogic discourse of ball games at the university was aligned with course learning outcomes and included the need to communicate goals, adapt and modify teaching, and combine different approaches. The pedagogic discourse at school placement involved traditional ball games, minimal curriculum references, progression in two or three lessons, and inclusive, enjoyable lessons. Factors that regulated the discourse were: familiarity with the pupils; the conceptualizing of inclusive teaching; norms regarding ball games in PE; expectations of the pre-service teachers; and the framing of ball games education in PETE. Recontextualising rules highlight challenges in transitions related to ball games.

  • 12.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Gothenburg Univ, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Dept Food & Nutr & Sport Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlefors, Inger
    Dept Educ, Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden; Luleå Univ Technol, Luleå, Sweden.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Redelius, Karin
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan GIHGymnastik och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    What did they learn in school today?: A method for exploring aspects of learning in physical education2014In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 282-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper outlines a method for exploring learning in educational practice. The suggested method combines an explicit learning theory with robust methodological steps in order to explore aspects of learning in school physical education. The design of the study is based on sociocultural learning theory, and the approach adds to previous research within the field, both in terms of the combination of methods used and the claims made in our studies. The paper describes a way of collecting and analysing the retrieved data and discusses and illustrates the results of a study using this combination of explicit learning theory and robust methodological steps.

  • 13.
    Tolgfors, Björn
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Transformative assessment in physical education2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1211-1225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on assessment processes in the school subject of physical education (PE). Inspired by Torrance, the overarching research question is: ‘What might assessment involve if it focuses on the development and identification of collective understanding, collaboratively produced through educational experiences?’ The purpose of the study is to illustrate what characterises transformative assessment and show how it can be addressed in PE practice. A combination of group interviews with teachers, lesson observations and individual interviews with students and teachers was used to gather the empirical material. The analysis was based on three aspects of transformative assessment: responsibilisation; subjectification; and collaboration. Three empirical illustrations show what transformative assessment might involve in relation to learning tasks such as: the training log; the group choreography; and the case of exercise physiology. The views presented in this article contribute to the knowledge about the field in the following ways. First, the illustrations show that the ‘whats’, ‘hows’, ‘whoms’ and ‘whys’ in the assessment practice are often negotiable, which prevents a simplified understanding of the four aspects of assessment literacy: comprehension; application; interpretation; and critical engagement. Second, the notion of transformative assessment could hinder a reductive use of assessment for learning and promote collaborative learning and social justice in today’s heterogeneous PE practices.

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    Transformative assessment in physical education
  • 14.
    Tolgfors, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Backman, Erik
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Between ideal teaching and 'what works': The transmission and transformation of a content area from university to school placements within physical education teacher education2021In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 312-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore the recontextualisation of Assessment for Learning (AfL) as a particular content area in the transition between a university course and a school placement course within Swedish Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE). By combining Basil Bernstein’s (1996) pedagogic device and Stephen Ball’s (2000, 2003) performativity perspective, we alternately ask how AfL is constructed as a pedagogic discourse and what AfL becomes in different contexts within PETE. Nine students attending a Swedish PETE programme participated in the study. The empirical material was collected through one seminar and two group interviews at the university as well as through nine individual interviews based on lesson observations at different school placements. Our findings highlight five recontextualising rules, which indicate that: (1) the task of integrating assessment into teaching enables the use of AfL; (2) an exclusive focus on summative assessment and grading constrains the use of AfL; (3) a lack of critical engagement with physical education teaching traditions constrains the use of AfL; (4) knowing the pupils is crucial for the use of AfL; and (5) the framing of the school placements determines how AfL can be used. As a consequence of these rules, AfL was transformed into three different fabrications: (1) AfL as ideal teaching; (2) AfL as correction of shortcomings; and (3) AfL as ‘what works’. One conclusion from this study is that increased collaboration between teacher educators and cooperating teachers in schools can help strengthen PETE’s influence on school physical education.

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    Between ideal teaching and ‘what works’: The transmission and transformation of a content area from university to school placements within physical education teacher education
  • 15.
    Tolgfors, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Backman, Erik
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Enacting assessment for learning in the induction phase of physical education teaching2022In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 534-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries, assessment for learning (AfL) is recommended in both policy and research as a concept that should be integrated into the teaching of physical education (PE) in schools. AfL is also part of physical education teacher education (PETE) programs in several countries and, consequently, something future PE teachers are expected to practice in their teaching. In a previous study (Tolgfors et al., 2021), we showed how AfL was transmitted and transformed between a university course and a school placement course within Swedish PETE. In the current study, we have more closely followed three of the preservice teachers who took part in our initial study into their first year of PE teaching. The purpose of this follow-up study is thus to explore how AfL is enacted in the induction phase of PE teaching. The more specific research question is: how is AfL enacted in beginning teachers’ PE practices under the contextual conditions provided at the schools where they are employed? The data were generated through Stimulated Recall interviews and follow-up interviews via the online meeting software Zoom. The analysis was based on Braun et al.’s (2011) contextual dimensions of policy enactment and Bernstein’s (1996) pedagogic device. Our findings illustrate how AfL is generally enacted through (1) progression and (2) “rich tasks.” However, the contextual dimensions of each school provide different conditions that either support or hinder the use of AfL in PE. AfL is accordingly enacted in different ways in the induction phase of PE teaching.

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    Enacting assessment for learning in the induction phase of physical education teaching
  • 16.
    Tolgfors, Björn
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The implications of assessment for learning in physical education and health2016In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 150-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the implications of assessment for learning (AfL) in upper secondary physical education and health (PEH). Inspired by the research field that emanates from the concept of governmentality, the study is concerned with how AfL guides teachers’ and students’ actions in certain directions. Based on teachers’ descriptions of how they integrate formative assessment in their teaching practice, the purpose of this article is to investigate the possible consequences of AfL for the teacher, the student and the subject content. The findings highlight different implications of AfL when it is viewed as (i) governance through freedom, (ii) governance through control and (iii) a dialectic form of governance. These concepts constitute certain teacher and student subjects and imply specific conditions for the subject content. In their different roles, for example as coach, deliverer/administrator and moderator, teachers expect different things from their students. In the first instance, students are expected to reach the open goals by self-regulation, in terms of individual choice and personal responsibility. In the second instance, students are subjected to disciplinary normalisation through criteria compliance by means of conformative assessment. In the third instance, students are activated as learning resources for one another using physical activities followed by group reflection. The tension between freedom and control can be described as allowing students to make their own choices but ensuring that they do this in relation to a predetermined idea about what is correct.

  • 17.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Exploring play in school recess and physical education classes2018In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 194-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore children’s play during recess and in physical education (PE) classes from the perspective of Huizinga’s theory of play. Specifically, this study investigated how primary school PE teachers used the concept of play, how it was understood by student participants, and how the participants engaged in the different phases of play during recess. Two groups of Year 3 children from two different schools participated in the study. Observations and unstructured group and individual interviews were used to collect data. The results reveal that PE teachers used the concept of play to propose activities, therefore employing play as a pedagogical tool. Participants engaged in some short breaks during the different parts of the PE class, during which they engaged in a ludic mode of play. Finally, the players communicated with each other in different ways while playing in a ludic mode during recess, using verbal and non-verbal communication and a combination of both. The results suggest that PE teachers need to determine which approaches to play are more appropriate to use in their classes.

  • 18.
    Varea, Valeria
    et al.
    School of Education, University of New England, Australia.
    González-Calvo, Gustavo
    Departamento de Didáctica de la Expresión Musical, Plástica y Corporal, University of Valladolid, Spain.
    Alcalá, David Hortigüela
    Didáctica de Expresión Corporal, University of Burgos, Spain.
    The influence of consumerism on Spanish physical education teachers2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 949-963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumer culture and neoliberalism have significantly influenced contemporary globalised, Western(ised) and highly visual societies. These influences have also infiltrated physical education settings, contributing to market-driven surveillance of physical education teachers’ physical appearance. This paper examines the reflections of a group of physical education teachers working at the primary and secondary levels in Spain concerning subjectivities of bodies and professional practices. It draws on semi-structured interview data and the Foucauldian concepts of Panopticon and surveillance to explore the ways in which the participants were influenced by the market and neoliberalism. The results of the study invite us to reflect on how images and messages from media may promote certain expectations for physical education teachers concerning physical appearance, dress and sports supplements consumption. The findings have implications for teacher education and the preparation of physical education teachers to resist dominant discourses promoted by the media.

  • 19.
    Varea, Valeria
    et al.
    School of Education, University of New England, Australia.
    Underwood, M.
    School of Social Science, The University of Queensland, Australia.
    ‘You are just an idiot for not doing any physical activity right now’: Pre-service Health and Physical Education teachers’ constructions of fatness2016In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 465-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research among former Physical Education (PE) school students has demonstrated how fat phobia in PE classes is oppressive and makes it extremely difficult for most students to develop positive subjectivities. This study explores how a group of pre-service Health and Physical Education (HPE) specialist teachers from an Australian university construct fatness discourses. Taking a Foucauldian perspective, focusing particularly on the concepts of surveillance and normalisation, this paper explores the dominant discourses that pre-service HPE specialist teachers construct about fatness. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews (three interviews per participant) were conducted with 14 students (11 females and three males) aged between 18 and 26 at the time of the first interview. The results of a content analysis of the interview data suggest that students generally tend to classify certain bodies as ‘decent’ and ‘normal’, implying the existence of ‘indecent’ and ‘abnormal’ bodies. Participants also expressed a paternalistic approach and moral judgments towards people they considered to be fat. The results suggest that HPE specialist teachers have certain constructions of fatness that could be explored in their undergraduate degrees so as to minimise any possible ramifications for their teaching.

  • 20.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Losing touch: Teachers’ self-regulation in physical education2017In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 297-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of physical interaction is especially relevant in school physical education, where a lot of the teaching and activities are based on body movements. However, the issue of ‘touching’ has been questioned in recent years. This paper takes its starting point in the discourse of child protection and the growing anxiety around intergenerational touch in educational settings. The purpose is to examine PE teachers’ self-regulation in relation to the child protection discourse and no touch policies. What sort of strategies have the teachers developed for dealing with physical contact in their teaching? It is a matter of problematising teachers’ pedagogical interactions in PE practice.

    The study takes its starting point in a discourse-analytical tradition using a methodology based on Foucault’s ideas about governmentality. Twenty-three teachers (10 women and 13 men) aged 30–63 and at different stages in their careers were interviewed. The results show two different self-regulating processes: (1) adaptation using avoidance-oriented strategies and (2) resistance using downplaying-oriented strategies. The paper discusses potential consequences for PE teachers’ pedagogical work if they feel that they have to protect themselves instead of operating in a way that is in the best interest for students’ learning and development. The study aims to contribute to the literature on child protection and ‘no touch’ policies and to a more multifaceted understanding of physical interaction in PE. 

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    Losing Touch : Teachers’ Self-regulation in Physical Education
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