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  • 1.
    Arneback, Emma
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Moral imagination in education: a Deweyan proposal for teachers responding to hate speech2014In: Journal of Moral Education, ISSN 0305-7240, E-ISSN 1465-3877, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 269-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is about moments when teachers experience hate speech in education and need to act. Based on John Dewey’s work on moral philosophy and examples from teaching practice, I would like to contribute to the discussion about moral education by emphasizing the following: 1) the importance of experience, 2) the problem with prescribed morals, and 3) the need for moral imagination in education. My Deweyan proposal for teachers responding to hate speech in education is to use moral imagination in education and take contextual elements into consideration when deciding how to act. Doing this would facilitate work related to doing morals and help to prevent prescribing morals as something that has already been done and that teachers (and students) have to adjust to in schools without being part of the process.

  • 2.
    Sund, Louise
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Swedish teachers’ ethical reflections on a study visit to Central America2014In: Journal of Moral Education, ISSN 0305-7240, E-ISSN 1465-3877, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 316-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we argue that culturally variable values and morals have a key role in educational initiatives that address a global dimension. The article suggests that looking at values and morals in relation to a teaching practice is a way of adding knowledge to this field. Our study inquires into how an intercultural experience can evoke ethical reflections on environmental and sustainability issues. The article is based on a qualitative empirical study of teachers’ experiences of a teacher development programme, where we analyse the variety of ethical reflections that emerge during a study visit to a Central American country. We build on a pragmatic analytical approach that takes John Dewey’s ethical thoughts on moral situations as a point of departure and deals with teachers’ ethical reflections in a way that takes the contextual and situated nature of morals into account.

  • 3.
    Öhman, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Humanities.
    Östman, Leif
    Continuity and change in moral meaning-making – a transactional approach2007In: Journal of Moral Education, ISSN 0305-7240, E-ISSN 1465-3877, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 151-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, research within the sociocultural perspective on moral learning has contributed important knowledge about how individuals develop their moral ability by participating in sociocultural activities. To a lesser extent, sociocultural research has focused on the role of individual continuity in these processes. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the progress of the sociocultural perspective by suggesting an approach that allows for an in situ analysis of how individuals' prior experiences take part in the processes of moral meaning-making, which also takes sociocultural activity into consideration. The philosophical and methodological basis for this approach consists of a combination of Dewey's transactional perspective on meaning-making and Wittgenstein's first-person perspective on language use. The article contains an empirical example that illustrates this approach. This analysis shows how prior experiences are re-actualised in an event and thus participate in the process of moral meaning-making, as well as contributing to the substance of the meanings made.

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