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  • 1.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Jussila, Jari
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Huhtamaki, Jukka
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Exploring co-learning behavior of conference participants with visual network analysis of Twitter data2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 51, no B, p. 1154-1162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge management has acknowledged organizational learning as a key factor for creating competitive advantage for companies already from early 1990. However, the studies of co-learning in this connection are in their infancy. This article contributes to an emerging field of 'smart data' research on Twitter by presenting a case study of how community managers in Finland used this social media platform to construct a co-learning environment around an annually organized conference. In this empirical study we explore the co-learning behavior in project contexts especially by analyzing and visualizing co-learning behavior from conference participants Twitter data.

  • 2.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Kärkkäinen, Hannu
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Joel-Edgar, Sian
    Computer Science, Bath University, Bath, UK.
    Huhtamäki, Jukka
    Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Visualizing informal learning behavior from conference participants' Twitter data with the Ostinato Model2016In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 55, p. 584-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network analysis is a valuable method for investigating and mapping the phenomena driving the social structure and sharing the findings with others. This article contributes to an emerging field of 'smart data' research on Twitter by presenting a case study of how community managers in Finland used this social media platform to construct an informal learning environment around an annually organized conference. In this empirical study we explore informal learning behavior in the project context, especially by analyzing and visualizing informal learning behavior from Twitter data using the Ostinato Model introduced in this paper. Ostinato is an iterative, user-centric, process-automated model for data-driven visual network analytics.

  • 3.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Crowe, Elizabeth
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Buchanan, Christy
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Internet-specific parental self-efficacy: Developmental differences and links to Internet-specific mediation2018In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 84, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most children spend significant time on the Internet every day, and parents have an important role in helping their children to avoid negative online experiences.  In this study, we examine the potential role of Internet-specific parental self-efficacy (Internet-specific PSE) as an antecedent for Internet-specific parenting practices.  A study of 1025 parents of children in grades 6 (approximately 11-12 years) to 12 (approximately 17-18 years) allowed us to examine the links among Internet-specific PSE, the child’s grade in school, and Internet-specific parenting practices.  The results showed developmental decreases in Internet-specific PSE and Internet-specific parenting practices: Parents of older adolescents felt less efficacious and used less control-based parenting practices than did parents of younger adolescents.  Furthermore, Internet-specific PSE was a significant predictor of Internet-specific parenting practices (both communication-based and control-based practices).  These results suggest the importance of both parental beliefs and children’s grade in school for parenting in the area of children’s online activities. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-31 13:42
  • 4.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    et al.
    Department of Information Management and Logistics, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Kärkkäinen, Hannu
    Department of Information Management and Logistics, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    Department of Industrial Management, Tampere University of Technology, Pori, Finland.
    Social media utilization in business-to-business relationships of technology industry firms2014In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 30, p. 606-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even today, it is a fairly common argument in business-to-business companies, especially in traditional industrial companies, that social media is only useful in the business-to-consumer sector. The perceived challenges, opportunities and social media use cases in business-to-business sector have received little attention in the literature. Therefore, this paper focuses on bridging this gap with a survey of social media use cases, opportunities and challenges in industrial business-to-business companies. The study also examines the essential differences between business-to-consumer and business-to-business in these respects. The paper starts by defining social media and Web 2.0, and then characterizes social media in business, and social media in business-to-business. Finally, we present and analyze the results of our empirical survey of 125 business-to-business companies in the Finnish technology industry sector. This paper suggests that there is a significant gap between the perceived potential of social media and social media use with customers and partners in business-to-business companies, and identifies potentially effective ways to reduce the gap.

  • 5.
    Kim, Yunhwan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. The Ohio State University, Columbus, United States.
    Glassman, Michael
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, United States.
    Beyond search and communication: Development and validation of the Internet Self-efficacy Scale (ISS)2013In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 1421-1429Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Kim, Yunhwan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Glassman, Michael
    Department of Educational Studies, The Ohio State University, Columbus, United States.
    Williams, Michael Steven
    Department of Educational Studies, The Ohio State University, Columbus, United States.
    Connecting agents: engagement and motivation in online collaboration2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 49, p. 333-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the relationship between social engagement and motivation to share knowledge in a hybrid college class using a web infused curriculum. Online social engagement, operationalized through concepts such as connectivity, social presence and social space has been an important topic of research in web based education for more than a decade. An important sub-text of this research is that online social engagement supports higher levels of collaboration. Students who feel comfortable with and connected to their online learning community are much more likely to be active participants in that community, working together to develop and build knowledge systems. Much of this research refers to the more social/participatory based educational theories of John Dewey and L.S. Vygotsky. There is though a second component of collaboration that helps drive community building in this theoretical frameworks; motivation to engage in a shared, relevant, goal oriented activity. While most theories on social engagement assume natural relationships between online social engagement and motivation to participate in a community, this relationship is not often discussed and examined very often. This paper specifically compares the relationship between classroom connectedness and motivation to share knowledge between students in a hybrid, web infused class and a more traditionally oriented class with a small web component. Analysis did find a highly significant relationship between connectedness and motivation to share knowledge in the hybrid class but not in the traditional class, suggesting an important relationship, but one based at least partially in targeted experience. 

  • 7.
    Skoog, Therése
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Sorbring, Emma
    Centre for Child and Youth Studies, Department for Social and Behavioral Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    Centre for Child and Youth Studies, Department for Social and Behavioral Studies, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Facebook as a means to make new peers among early maturing girls2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 48, p. 500-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored, for the first time, links between female pubertal timing and adolescent Internet use, Facebook use, and the size of peer networks on Facebook in a Swedish early adolescent sample (N = 166). Although pubertal timing was not linked to Internet use or Facebook use, it was linked to being more open about oneself and having more Facebook friends in grade 7. These associations had disappeared one year later. Consonant with previous studies of offline contexts, this study provides preliminary evidence to suggest that Facebook is a means to make new peers among early maturing girls in early adolescence.

  • 8.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Bälter, Olof
    The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The current landscape of learning analytics in higher education2018In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 89, p. 98-110Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning analytics can improve learning practice by transforming the ways we support learning processes. This study is based on the analysis of 252 papers on learning analytics in higher education published between 2012 and 2018. The main research question is: What is the current scientific knowledge about the application of learning analytics in higher education? The focus is on research approaches, methods and the evidence for learning analytics. The evidence was examined in relation to four earlier validated propositions: whether learning analytics i) improve learning outcomes, ii) support learning and teaching, iii) are deployed widely, and iv) are used ethically. The results demonstrate that overall there is little evidence that shows improvements in students' learning outcomes (9%) as well as learning support and teaching (35%). Similarly, little evidence was found for the third (6%) and the forth (18%) proposition. Despite the fact that the identified potential for improving learner practice is high, we cannot currently see much transfer of the suggested potential into higher educational practice over the years. However, the analysis of the existing evidence for learning analytics indicates that there is a shift towards a deeper understanding of students’ learning experiences for the last years.

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