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  • 1. Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    et al.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Office type in relation to health, well-being, and job satisfaction among employees2008In: Environment and Behavior, ISSN 0013-9165, E-ISSN 1552-390X, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 636-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the hypothesis that office type has an influence on workers' health status and job satisfaction and 469 employees in seven different types, defined by their unique setup of architectural and functional features, have rated their health status and job satisfaction. Multivariate regression models were used for analysis of these outcomes, with adjustment for age, gender, job rank, and line of business. Both health status and job satisfaction differed between the seven office types. Lowest health status was found in medium-sized and small open plan offices. Best health was among employees in cell offices and flex offices. Workers in these types of offices and in shared room offices also rated the highest job satisfaction. Lowest job satisfaction was in combi offices, followed by medium-sized open plan offices. The differences between employees could possibly be ascribed to variations in architectural and functional features of the office types.

  • 2.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Office type in relation to health, well-being, and job satisfaction among employees: Erratum2010In: Environment and Behavior, ISSN 0013-9165, E-ISSN 1552-390X, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 887-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reports an error in "Office type in relation to health, well-being, and job satisfaction among employees" by Christina Bodin Danielsson and Lennart Bodin (Environment and Behavior, 2008[Sep], Vol 40[5], 636-668). In the original article, a symbol was missing from Table 7 on p. 654. In that table, an open circle ("o") should have been present to show that the odds ratio indicated low risk for having poor quality of sleep among those who worked in the flex office. The corrected table is present in the erratum. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2008-12036-003). This article investigates the hypothesis that office type has an influence on workers' health status and job satisfaction and 469 employees in seven different types, defined by their unique setup of architectural and functional features, have rated their health status and job satisfaction. Multivariate regression models were used for analysis of these outcomes, with adjustment for age, gender, job rank, and line of business. Both health status and job satisfaction differed between the seven office types. Lowest health status was found in medium-sized and small open plan offices. Best health was among employees in cell offices and flex offices. Workers in these types of offices and in shared room offices also rated the highest job satisfaction. Lowest job satisfaction was in combi offices, followed by medium-sized open plan offices. The differences between employees could possibly be ascribed to variations in architectural and functional features of the office types. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

  • 3.
    Ojala, Maria
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Recycling and ambivalence: quantitative and qualitative analyses of household recycling among young adults2008In: Environment and Behavior, ISSN 0013-9165, E-ISSN 1552-390X, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 777-797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theories about ambivalence, as well as quantitative and qualitativeempirical approaches, are applied to obtain an understandingof recycling among young adults. A questionnaire was mailedto 422 Swedish young people. Regression analyses showed thata mix of negative emotions (worry) and positive emotions (hopeand joy) about the environmental problems was positively relatedto recycling. The opposite pattern was found for attitudinalambivalence toward recycling. Thereafter, semistructured interviewswere performed. In a group of reluctant recyclers, the ambivalentattitudes consisted of views that recycling is something beneficialfor the environment and is a civic duty. On the other hand,they wanted more information, were unable to integrate youthfulideals about living in an environmentally friendly way withthe everyday life of young adulthood, and felt low self-efficacy.In addition, strategies to activate positive emotions alongsidea high degree of environmental worry were explored in a groupwho recycle regularly.

  • 4.
    Ojala, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bengtsson, Hans
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Young people’s coping strategies concerning climate change: Relations to perceived communication with parents and friends and pro-environmental behavior2019In: Environment and Behavior, ISSN 0013-9165, E-ISSN 1552-390X, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 907-935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking its departure in the transactional theory of coping and socialization theories this questionnaire study investigates how coping with climate change among late adolescents (N=705) relates to pro-environmental behavior and communication with significant others about societal problems. De-emphasizing the problem was negatively associated with pro-environmental behavior, while problem-focused and meaning-focused coping were positively associated with pro-environmental behavior. Two communication patterns with fathers, mothers, and friends were identified: One solution oriented and supportive and one dismissive and doom-and-gloom oriented. The positive patterns correlated positively with problem-focused and meaning-focused coping, whereas the negative patterns correlated positively with de-emphasizing. Communication with fathers was particularly important in explaining de-emphasizing and problem-focused coping. A SEM-analysis showed that coping mediates the effects of communication patterns on behavior, while problem-focused coping mediates the other coping strategies’ influence on behavior. The study demonstrates the importance of considering coping as a factor in the socialization of pro-environmental behavior.

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