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  • 1.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    How is civic engagement developed over time?: Emerging answers from a multidisciplinary field2012In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 611-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insights into the development of civic values, attitudes, knowledge, skills and behaviours are greatly demanded by adults worried about a seemingly steady decline in the societal interest of their offspring. Hence, the collection of studies in this special issue on civic engagement in adolescence is not only timely and enlightening, but it also has the potentials to contribute to research in different disciplines on various dimensions, mechanisms and normative models of civic engagement. The studies reveal some promising attempts to bring civil themes into the field of adolescent development. However, to overcome some conceptual, methodological and empirical shortcomings, future developmental studies in the area need to be substantially improved by considering cultural and institutional conditions, by focussing on processes across various everyday life contexts, by merging theories from different disciplinary fields, by conceptualizing adolescents as changeable subjects, and by delineating untested and unwarranted normative assumptions.

  • 2.
    Aunola, Kaisa
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Nurmi, Jari-Erik
    Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä.
    Parenting styles and adolescents' achievement strategies2000In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 205-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigated the extent to which adolescents' achievement strategies are associated with the parenting styles they experience in their families. 354 adolescents (median age 14 yrs) completed a Strategy and Attribution Questionnaire and a family parenting style inventory. Analogous questionnaires were also completed by the adolescents' parents. Based on adolescents' report of the parenting styles, 4 types of families were identified: those with Authoritative, Authoritarian, Permissive, and Neglectful parenting styles. The results further showed that adolescents from authoritative families applied most adaptive achievement strategies characterized by low levels of failure expectations, task irrelevant behavior and passivity, and the use of self-enhancing attributions. Adolescents from neglectful families, in turn, applied maladaptive strategies characterized by high levels of task-irrelevant behavior, passivity and a lack of self-enhancing attributions. The results provide a basis for understanding some of the processes by which parenting styles may influence adolescents' academic achievement and performance.

  • 3.
    Beckman, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Health Metrics Unit, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The cost-effectiveness of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program: Results from a modelling study2015In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 45, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to bullying affects around 3-5 percent of adolescents in secondary school and is related to various mental health problems. Many different anti-bullying programmes are currently available, but economic evaluations are lacking. The aim of this study is to identify the cost effectiveness of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP). We constructed a decision-tree model for a Swedish secondary school, using a public payer perspective, and retrieved data on costs and effects from the published literature. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis to reflect the uncertainty in the model was conducted. The base-case analysis showed that using the OBPP to reduce the number of victims of bullying costs 131 250 Swedish kronor ((sic)14 470) per victim spared. Compared to a relevant threshold of the societal value of bullying reduction, this indicates that the programme is cost-effective. Using a relevant willingness-to-pay threshold shows that the OBPP is a cost-effective intervention. (C) 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.

  • 4.
    Cheah, Charissa S. L.
    et al.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Leung, Christy Y. Y.
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA.
    Predicting filial behaviors of Chinese-Malaysian adolescents from perceived parental investments, filial emotions, and parental warmth and support2012In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 628-637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the mediating role of perceived parental warmth and support in predicting Chinese Malaysian adolescents' filial behaviors from their age, perceived parental investments, and positive filial emotions toward their parents. The effects of these predictors were examined separately for mothers and fathers. Participants included 122 Chinese adolescents (. M = 13.14 years; . SD = 2.22) in Malaysia. Adolescents' perceived parental investments, filial emotions, and warmth and support from each parent were positively, and age was negatively associated with their filial behaviors. No gender differences were found. Perceived maternal warmth and support significantly mediated the effect of age, perceived investments from, and filial emotions toward mothers on adolescents' filial behaviors, but perceived paternal warmth and support did not have a mediating role. The present study sheds light on the unique maternal versus paternal filial role, and important familial processes in Chinese-Malaysian children and adolescents from a cultural perspective.

  • 5.
    Eklund, Jenny M.
    et al.
    Center for Developmental Research, Department of Behavioral, Social, and Legal Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Ctr Hlth Equ Studies, Stockholm Univ/Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Romantic relationships and delinquent behaviour in adolescence: the moderating role of delinquency propensity2010In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 377-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is some evidence that adolescent romantic involvement is associated with delinquent behaviour. One aim of this longitudinal study was to determine whether this holds for romantic relationships deemed important by the participants. A second aim was to test whether this association was stronger for adolescents with pre-existing delinquent behaviour and personality traits of impulsivity and thrill seeking (delinquency propensity). Sex differences also were examined. Participants were 686 7th and 8th grade students who completed three assessments over three years. The results showed that delinquency was associated with earlier romantic relationships among those who were higher in delinquency propensity one year earlier. This association was stronger among girls than boys. Thus, romantic relationships amplified girls' and boys' existing delinquency propensity, but this was strongest among girls. (C) 2009 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Graziano, Federica
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Bina, Manuela
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Giannotta, Fabrizia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ciairano, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Drinking motives and alcoholic beverage preferences among Italian adolescents2012In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 823-831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although drinking motives have been largely studied, research taking into account the Mediterranean drinking culture and focusing on motives specifically associated to adolescents' developmental tasks is lacking. For these reasons the study investigates drinking motives in a group of Italian adolescents and their relationships with drunkenness and high levels of alcohol consumption (wine, beer, spirits and alcopops). A self-report questionnaire on drinking motives and amount of alcohol use was administered to 784 adolescents, boys (46%) and girls, ages 15-19. Using confirmatory factor analysis and stepwise logistic regressions, we found that: 1) motives for drinking were coping, conformity, self-affirmation and experimentation-transgression; 2) coping motives were positively related to the high consumption of all alcoholic beverages and to drunkenness; 3) conformity motives were negatively related to high beer consumption and drunkenness, while experimentation-transgression motives were positively related to high alcopops consumption. Implications for prevention are discussed.

  • 7.
    Kendrick, Kristin
    et al.
    School of Social Work, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Jutengren, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The protective role of supportive friends against bullying perpetration and victimization2012In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 1069-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A crossed-lagged regression model was tested to investigate relationships between friendship support, bullying involvement, and its consequences during adolescence. Students, 12–16 years (N = 880), were administered questionnaires twice, one year apart. Using structural equation modeling, a model was specified and higher levels of support from friends were related to lower levels of bullying and victimization one year later. Additionally, a bidirectional relationship between victimization and depression was found, and greater property crimes commission was related to higher levels of future bullying. These findings support the ‘friendship protection hypothesis’ and suggest the quality of support in friendships can protect against bullying victimization and perpetration. Prior research has shown that friendships can protect against victimization; however this is one of the few longitudinal studies to focus on the quality of friendship, rather than other characteristics of the friends. It is suggested that interventions should focus on increasing perceptions of support within existing friendships.

  • 8.
    Kerr, Margaret
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Trost, Kari
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    To know you is to trust you: parents' trust is rooted in child disclosure of information1999In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 737-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proposed that parental trust is primarily based on knowledge. In this study, 3 types of knowledge of the child were pitted against each other in the prediction of parental trust: knowledge of feelings and concerns; of past delinquency; and of daily activities. Ss were 1,186 14 yr olds and their parents. Results showed that knowledge of daily activities was more important than knowledge of past delinquency. In further analyses, knowledge of daily activities that came from the child's spontaneous disclosure was most closely linked to parental trust. These findings add support to a recent reinterpretation of parental "monitoring" as parental knowledge that mainly comes from spontaneous child disclosure. Additionally, the role of parental trust for dysfunctional family relations was examined and it was found that the relations between the child's delinquency and family dysfunction were mediated by parental trust. Finally, even though there was substantial agreement between parents and children about parental trust in the child, the individual's unique perspectives were important. Family dysfunction from the child's perspective was based on whether they believed that their parents trusted them, and parent perceptions of family dysfunction were based on their own trust in the child.

  • 9.
    Kiesner, Jeff
    et al.
    Università di Padova.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Families, peers, and contexts as multiple determinants of adolescent problem behavior2004In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 493-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present issue we present papers that consider these multiple sources of influence. Four of the papers focus specifically on parents and peers as they relate to the development of problem behavior. Engels et al. (see record 2004-20120-004) examine the parents' role in determining the individual's selection of peers, which is then proposed to have an effect on individual behavior. Persson et al. (see record 2004-20120-007) consider individual characteristics, youth center attendance, and parenting characteristics in predicting peer affiliations, which are then used to predict norm-breaking behaviors. Also focusing on the combination of parents and peers, Dishion et al. (see record 2004-20120-003) present analyses considering reciprocal influences of parenting practices and deviant peer processes examining both intercepts and slopes of these constructs across a six-year period. Each of these papers provides new information and takes us closer to understanding how these different sources of socialization combine to create individuals. In this issue, we present papers examining outcomes such as smoking, drug use, delinquency, political attitudes, willingness to use violence, and youth center attendance.

  • 10.
    Kiesner, Jeff
    et al.
    Università di Padova.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    "Very Important Persons" in adolescence: going beyond in-school, single friendships in the study of peer homophily2004In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 545-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a sample of 1227 Swedish adolescents we examined peer relations across contexts and for multiple peer targets (three "Very Important Persons", VIPs). Specifically, we examined the relations between antisocial behaviour and the types of relationships individuals had with their VIPs (e.g. friend, romantic partner), the contexts in which they had met, and where they spent time (e.g. school, neighbourhood, club). Additionally, we tested an "additive homophily" hypothesis, or the idea that youths would show unique similarities to multiple peers. Results showed that individuals who nominated romantic partners as their first VIPs were the most antisocial (both boys and girls), and individuals who had met and spent time with their first VIPs in the neighbourhood were also the most antisocial. Similar results were found for the antisocial behaviour of the first VIP. Finally, results supported the additive homophily hypothesis, showing that significantly more variance in individual behaviour is explained when including second and third VIPs.

  • 11. Mahoney, Joseph L.
    et al.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Leisure activities and adolescent antisocial behavior: the role of structure and social context2000In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 113-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this study was to understand better how the structure and social context of adolescent leisure activities relates to antisocial behavior. A representative sample of 703 Ss (aged 14 yrs) and their parents were assessed concerning adolescent involvement in community-based leisure activities, peer and adult social relations, and antisocial behavior. Results showed that participation in highly structured leisure activities was linked to low levels of antisocial behavior, while participation in activities with low structure (i.e., a youth recreation center) was associated with high levels of antisocial behavior. Overall the results were similar for boys and girls; however, the combination of involvement in a low structured activity and the absence of any highly structured participation appeared especially problematic for boys' antisocial behavior. Participants of low structured activities were also characterized by deviant peer relations and poor parent-child relations, and they received low support from their activity leader compared to adolescents engaged in more structured community activities. Findings are discussed in terms of their implication for prevention research.

  • 12.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    et al.
    School of Social Work and Family Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, United States.
    Bosdet, Lara
    University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada.
    Information management: considering adolescents’ regulation of parental knowledge2005In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 633-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employing Goffman’s [(1959). The presentation of self in everyday life. New York: Doubleday and Company] notion of impression management, adolescents’ conveyance of information about their whereabouts and activities to parents was assessed employing two methodologies. First, a two-wave panel design with a sample of 121 adolescents was used to test a model of information management incorporating two forms of information regulation (lying and willingness to disclose), adolescents’ perception of their parents’ knowledge about their activities, and adolescent misconduct. Path analysis was used to examine the model for two forms of misconduct as outcomes: substance use and antisocial behaviours. Fit indices indicate the path models were all good fits to the data. Second, 96 participants’ responses to semi-structured questions were analyzed using a qualitative analytic technique. Findings reveal adolescents withhold or divulge information in coordination with their parents, employ impression management techniques, and try to balance safety issues with preservation of the parent-adolescent relationship.

  • 13.
    Marshall, Sheila
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Young, Richard
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Wozniak, Agnieszka
    University of Guelph, Guelph ON, Canada.
    Lollis, Susan
    University of Guelph, Guelph ON, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nelson, Margo
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Goessling, Kristen
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Parent-adolescent joint projects involving leisure time and activities during the transition to high school2014In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 1031-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Masche, Jan Gowert
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Explanation of normative declines in parents' knowledge about their adolescent children2010In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 271-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explain why parental knowledge of adolescents' whereabouts declines with age. Such an investigation is important because previous studies have established an association between behavior problems and low levels of parental knowledge. A time-sequential sample comprising 2415 adolescents aged 13–18 years was investigated on five annual occasions. Each year, parental knowledge declined by .10 SD. Adolescents' establishment of a private sphere (less disclosure; defiance) was the most important mediator of age effects on knowledge. Taken together, declining parental control and the establishment of a private sphere explained 37.5% of the age-related decline in knowledge. Parental control was, however, not a significant predictor any longer when disclosure and defiance were controlled for. Results also revealed that some of the mediating variables were stronger in early-to-mid adolescence. Other variables appeared to slow the age-related decline, especially in mid-to-late adolescence. These variables are therefore interpreted as parents' and adolescents' attempts to balance autonomy development and connectedness. If this balancing fails, adolescent behavior problems might arise along with low levels of parental knowledge early on

  • 15.
    Mazzer, Kelly
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bauducco, Serena
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Longitudinal associations between time spent using technology and sleep duration among adolescents2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 66, p. 112-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology use has been the focus of much concern for adolescents' sleep health. However, few studies have investigated the bidirectional association between sleep duration and time spent using technology. The aim of this study was to test whether time spent using technology predicted shorter sleep duration, and/or vice versa using cross-lagged analyses over one year. Participants were 1620 high school students in the 8th and 9th grade at baseline from 17 public schools in three middle Sweden communities. Students completed questionnaires at school during the spring of 2015 and 2016. Time spent using technology was self-reported and sleep duration was calculated from reported bed-times, wake-times and sleep onset latency. Time spent using technology significantly predicted shorter subsequent sleep duration and vice versa. Public health advocates educating others about the negative impacts of technology on sleep must also be mindful of the opposite, that many young people may turn to technological devices when experiencing difficulty sleeping.

  • 16. Määttä, S.
    et al.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nurmi, Jari-Erik
    Achievement strategies at school: types and correlates2002In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 31-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we made an effort to identify the kinds of strategies adolescents deploy in achievement context in an unselected sample of Swedish adolescents. The participants were 880 14–15-year-old comprehensive school students (399 boys and 481 girls) from a middle-sized town in central Sweden. Six groups of adolescents were identified according to the strategies they deployed. Four of them, i.e. optimistic, defensive pessimistic, self-handicapping and learned helplessness strategies, were similar to those described previously in the literature. The results showed that membership in the functional strategy groups, such as in mastery-oriented and defensive pessimist groups, was associated with well-being, school adjustment and achievement, and low levels of norm-breaking behaviour. By contrast, membership in the dysfunctional, for example self-handicapping and learned helplessness strategy groups, was associated with low levels of well-being, and of school adjustment, and a higher level of norm-breaking behaviour.

  • 17. Noack, P.
    et al.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Olah, A.
    Family relations in adolescence1999In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 713-717Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Persson, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Why a leisure context is linked to normbreaking for some girls and not others: personality characteristics and parent–child relations as explanations2004In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 583-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a study of adolescents in the 1970s, girls were high in normbreaking if they attended youth recreation centers and were heavily involved with peers or boys (Stattin et al., 2003). The present study investigated whether these results could be replicated on a modern sample, and then examined parent–child relationships and personality characteristics as explanations why some girls and not others go to the youth centers and become heavily involved with peers and boys. Participants were 1279 14-year olds from a city in central Sweden. The results showed that personality characteristics and experiences at home partly explained youth center attendance, and personality characteristics partly explained involvement with boys, but neither explained why those who attended the centers and were involved with boys were highest on normbreaking. Thus, personality characteristics and experiences at home seem to be involved when girls choose the youth center context, but socialization by peers at the centers might better explain normbreaking among center goers.

  • 19.
    Salihovic, Selma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Under the surface of adolescent psychopathic traits: high-anxious and low-anxious subgroups in a communiy sample of youths2014In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 681-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examined subgroups of adolescents based on their levels of psychopathic traits and anxiety. Participants were 914 youths from a community sample, with a mean age of 14.28 (SD = .94) years. We used adolescents' self-reports of psychopathic traits and their parents' reports of the adolescent's anxiety to identify distinct subgroups of youths. Using latent class analysis, we identified five groups that varied in levels of psychopathic traits and anxiety. Two groups were characterized by high levels of psychopathic traits and high or low scores on anxiety. Validation of these subgroups revealed that they differed significantly from each other in theoretically meaningful ways the low-anxious subgroup reported higher levels of psychopathic traits, lower levels of impulsivity and hyperactivity, and lower levels of aggression than the high-anxious group. These findings are in line with previous empirical research and provide support that anxiety discriminates between two subgroups of adolescents with psychopathic traits.

  • 20.
    Selfhout, Maarten
    et al.
    Utrecht university.
    Branje, S.
    Delsing, M.
    ter Bogt, T.
    Meeus, W.
    Different types of Internet use, depression, and social anxiety: the role of perceived friendship quality2009In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 819-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study examined the longitudinal associations of time spent on Internet activities for communication purposes (i.e., IM-ing) versus time spent oil Internet activities for non-communication purposes (i.e., surfing) with depression and social anxiety, as well as the moderating role of perceived friendship quality in these associations. Questionnaire data were gathered from 307 Dutch middle adolescents (average age 15 years) on two waves with a one-year interval. For adolescents who perceive low friendship quality, Internet use for communication purposes predicted less depression, whereas Internet use for non-communication purposes predicted more depression and more social anxiety. These results support social compensation effects of IM-ing on depression and poor-get-poorer effects of surfing on depression and social anxiety, respectively.

  • 21.
    Selfhout, Maarten H. W.
    et al.
    Utrecht university.
    Branje, Susan J. T.
    ter Bogt, Tom F. M.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    The role of music preferences in early adolescents' friendship formation and stability2009In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 95-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present Study examines the role of similarity in music preferences in the formation and discontinuation or friendships over a I-year period. Questionnaire data were gathered from 293 Dutch same-sex mutual best friends (mean age = 12.97) in two waves with a I-year Interval. Results show consistent evidence for high similarity in specific music dimensions among friends at both waves. Moderate similarity was found in the overall patterning of preferences for music genres at both waves, even after controlling for similarity in social background. Specific Music similarity in more non-mainstream music dimensions and overall music similarity at Wave I were related to selecting a new friend at Wave 2. However, similarity in music preferences was not related to the discontinuation of an existing friendship at Wave 2. Thus, results suggest that similarity in music preferences is related to friendship formation, and not to Friendship discontinuation. (C) 2007 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The adolescent is a whole person1995In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 381-386Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Challenges in intervention research on adolescent development2009In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 1437-1442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of intervention and prevention research is rapidly growing. In this general discussion of the studies in the special issue on intervention and prevention with adolescents, we highlight some of the challenges facing researchers in this field. One is the community perspective. Family and school are the primary settings for intervention research today, and this special issue covers various approaches to family- and school-based interventions. Taking a community perspective, the question becomes how these different interventions can be co-ordinated across contexts and be integrated in a local community's broader intervention policies and activities. Another challenge for intervention and prevention research is to use better designs in order to better understand how interventions into young peoples′ lives affect their future health and adjustment. Overall, the studies in this special issue illustrate well the many challenges that intervention researchers face when they go from theory to practice.

  • 24.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Latina, Delia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    The severity and spread of adjustment problems of adolescents involved in mutually hostile interactions with others2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 63, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the literature, bully-victims report a wider range of adjustment problems than “pure” bullies or victims. This may not be confined to the school context, but might be found in other settings as well. Involvement in mutually hostile interactions across everyday settings may more reflect adolescents' characteristic way of handling conflicts with others. We used data from a longitudinal study of a community sample of adolescents (N = 992). Cluster analyses for specific everyday settings and across settings yielded clusters high on both exposing others and being exposed to hostility. Adolescents in these clusters, and particularly across settings, reported a wider range of externalizing, internalizing, and academic problems, than adolescents in other cluster groups. Longitudinal analyses showed support for bidirectional relationships between mutually hostile conditions and problematic adjustment. We conclude that adolescents' mutual hostility experiences are associated with profoundly problematic adjustment.

  • 25.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Seiffge-Krenke, Inge
    Mainz University, Mainz, Germany.
    Hendry, Leo
    University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.
    Kloep, Marion
    University of Glamorgan, Trefforest, UK.
    Beyers, Wim
    University of Glamorgan, Trefforest, UK; Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Adolescent psychopathology in times of change: Introduction to the special issue2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 65, p. 228-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this special issue is to understand better the many changes in adolescent psychopathology have taken place over the last decades. The factors associated with adjustment problems and psychopathology in adolescence today are not necessarily the same as the factors that predicted problems and psychopathology in the past. But the basic strategies for connecting negative experiences with adolescent psychopathology remain as important today as they were for understanding adolescent psychopathology decades ago. This is well exemplified in the studies included in this Special Issue. What all this studies have in common is that parenting and the family environment are assumed to play a key role in adolescents' adjustment and psychopathology. Finally, given that all papers in this special issue are based on conference presentations at the 15th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence (EARA), some more information on that conference in included in this introduction.

  • 26.
    Tillfors, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Persson, Stefan
    Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Willén, Maria
    School of Law, Psychology and Social work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Burk, William J.
    Behavioural Science Institute, Raboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Prospective links between social anxiety and adolescent peer relations2012In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 1255-1263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines bi-directional links between social anxiety and multiple aspects of peer relations (peer acceptance, peer victimization, and relationship quality) in a longitudinal sample of 1528 adolescents assessed twice with one year between (754 females and 774 males; M = 14.7 years of age). Lower levels of peer acceptance predicted increases in social anxiety. Social anxiety predicted decreases in relationship support for males and increases in peer victimization for females. Collectively our findings suggest that peers seem to play a significant role for adolescent mental health and social anxiety seems to interfere with healthy peer relations. Importantly, developmental pathways for social anxiety seem to differ for adolescent females and males.

  • 27.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    An introduction to the special issue on sleep2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 68, p. 217-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    An introduction to the special issue on sleep
  • 28.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Science, University of Nebraska, Omaha, United States.
    Vitunski, Erin T.
    University of Victoria, B.C., Canada.
    Galambos, Nancy L.
    University of Victoria, B.C., Canada.
    Five images of maturity in adolescence: what does "grown up" mean?2001In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 143-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focussed on the subjective meanings of maturity in adolescence, or what it means to adolescents to be grown up. Younger (6th grade) and older (9th grade) adolescents’ descriptions (n=236) of their "grown-up" peers were examined through content analysis. This qualitative analysis revealed five images of maturity portrayed by adolescents: balanced maturity (adolescents who show psychosocial and behavioural maturity, and ability to balance work and play); an image focussed on privileges (adolescents who engage in problem behaviour and present what may be a facade of adult-like behaviour); an image focussed on responsibility (adolescents who may be psychosocially mature, but may have taken on inappropriately high levels of responsibility); an image focussed on power and status (adolescents who seem to have usurped an older status, by being bossy and controlling); and an image focussed on physical development (adolescents who show advanced levels of physical maturity). There were some gender and age differences in the frequencies of these five images. Discussion is directed at understanding the hallmarks of each image relative to scholarly notions of adult maturity.

  • 29.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Pakalniskeine, Vilmante
    Tokic, Ana
    Univ Zagreb, Zagreb 41000, Croatia.
    Salihovic, Selma
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Open up or close down: how do parental reactions affect youth information management?2010In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 333-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to test a process model of youths' information management. Using three waves of longitudinal data collected from 982 youths, we modeled parents' positive and negative reactions to disclosure predicting youths' feelings about their parents, in turn predicting youths' disclosure and secrecy about their daily activities. Gender, age, and psychopathic personality traits were examined as potential moderators. The results showed that parents' negative reactions were associated with increases in youths' feeling controlled and decreases in youths' feeling connected to their parents, which in turn, predicted increased secrecy and decreased disclosure. In contrast, parents' positive reactions predicted increased feeling connected to parents, which in turn predicted increased disclosure. Moreover, these predictive pathways were modified by youths' psychopathic personality traits. Our results are consistent with a transactional model suggesting that how parents react to youths' disclosure affects youths' future decisions to provide their parents with information about their daily activities. The results point to the importance of considering youths' feelings and characteristics.

  • 30.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University College West, Sweden.
    Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury during adolescence: Latent patterns of short-term stability and change2019In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 75, p. 163-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury not only increase in prevalence during adolescence, but they can also occur together. Both psychological problems seem to have similar precipitating conditions, suggesting they have transdiagnostic conditions-personal or contextual characteristics that contribute to co-occurrence. We sought to understand when these two problems co-occur and what is related to their co-occurrence.

    METHODS:  = 13.65 years, SD = 0.64), 53.7% boys and 47.3% girls. Most of the adolescents were Swedish (89%), with parents who were married or cohabitating (68%). We also examined the transitions between profiles over time.

    RESULTS: Our results suggest that during this time frame, depressive symptoms and self-injury tend to emerge and stabilize or abate together. We also examined a broad array of predictors, including individual characteristics, emotion dysregulation, experiences with friends, parents' negative reactions to behavior, and school stress. The significant unique predictors suggest that adolescents who reported being subjected to relational aggression, having negative experiences while drinking, and low self-esteem had a greater probability of moving from moderate to high levels or maintaining high levels of depressive symptoms and self-injury, compared to adolescents classified in the other statuses.

    CONCLUSIONS: Focusing on negative interpersonal experiences and selfesteem as transdiagnostic conditions may guide research and aid clinicians in supporting adolescents who feel depressed and engage in self-injury.

  • 31.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Gao, Yu
    Departments of Psychology, Brooklyn College of the City University, New York, USA.
    Wang, Pan
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Raine, Adrian
    Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, USA.
    Botwick, Theodore
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Baker, Laura A.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    The genetic and environmental etiology of decision-making: a longitudinal twin study2013In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 245-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the genetic and environmental etiology of decision-making (Iowa Gambling Task; Bechara, Damásio, Damásio, & Anderson, 1994), in a sample of twins at ages 11-13, 14-15, and 16-18 years. The variance across five 20-trial blocks could be explained by a latent " decision-making'' factor within each of the three times of IGT administration. This latent factor was modestly influenced by genetic factors, explaining 35%, 20% and 46% of the variance within each of the three times of IGT administration. The remaining variance was explained by the non-shared environment (65%, 80% and 54%, respectively). Block-specific non-shared environmental influences were also observed. The stability of decision-making was modest across development. Youth showed a trend to choose less risky decks at later ages, suggesting some improvement in task performance across development. These findings contribute to our understanding of decision-making by highlighting the particular importance of each person's unique experiences on individual differences.

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