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  • 1.
    Hiatt, Cody
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, USA.
    Laursen, Brett
    Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, USA.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Best friend influence over adolescent problem behaviors: Socialized by the satisfied2017In: Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology (Print), ISSN 1537-4416, E-ISSN 1537-4424, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 695-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was designed to examine best friend influence over alcohol intoxication and truancy as a function of relative perceptions of friendship satisfaction. The participants were 700 adolescents (306 boys, 394 girls) who were involved in same-sex best friendships that were stable from one academic year to the next. Participants completed self-report measures of alcohol intoxication frequency and truancy at 1-year intervals. Each member of each friendship dyad also rated his or her satisfaction with the relationship. At the outset, participants were in secondary school (approximately 13-14 years old) or high school (approximately 16-17 years old). More satisfied friends had greater influence than less satisfied friends over changes in intoxication frequency and truancy. Problem behaviors of less satisfied friends increased over time if the more satisfied friend reported relatively higher, but not relatively lower, initial levels of drinking or truancy. The results support the hypothesis that adolescent friends are not similarly influential. The power to socialize, for better and for worse, rests with the partner who has a more positive perception of the relationship.

  • 2.
    van Zalk, Maarten Herman Walter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Branje, Susan J. T.
    Res Ctr Adolescent Dev, Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    Res Ctr Adolescent Dev, Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Peer contagion and adolescent depression: the role of failure anticipation2010In: Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology (Print), ISSN 1537-4416, E-ISSN 1537-4424, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 837-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigated the mechanisms underlying peer contagion of depressive symptoms in adolescence. Five annual measurements of data were gathered from a large (N=842) community-based network of adolescents (M=14.3 years at first measurement). Results showed that, after controlling for selection and deselection of friends on the basis of depressive symptoms, peers' depressive symptoms predicted increases in adolescents' depressive symptoms over time. Failure anticipation mediated effects of peers' depressive symptoms on adolescents' depressive symptoms, particularly for girls. Thus, results suggest that peers' depressive symptoms place adolescents at risk of developing depressive symptoms through increasing in failure anticipation.

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