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  • 1.
    Borroni, Serena
    et al.
    Fac Psychol, Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; Clin Psychol & Psychotherapy Unit, Hosp San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Somma, Antonella
    Clin Psychol & Psychotherapy Unit, Hosp San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; Dept Human Studies, LUMSA Univ, Rome, Italy.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Maffei, Cesare
    Fac Psychol, Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; Clin Psychol & Psychotherapy Unit, Hosp San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.
    Fossati, Andrea
    Clin Psychol & Psychotherapy Unit, Hosp San Raffaele, Milan, Italy; Dept Human Studies, LUMSA Univ, Rome, Italy.
    Psychopathy dimensions, Big Five traits, and dispositional aggression in adolescence: Issues of gender consistency2014In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 66, p. 199-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to evaluate the nomological network of associations between psychopathy and its sub-dimensions, and Big Five domains and dispositional aggression in adolescence, and its consistency across gender-based sub-groups, 1253 Italian high school students (F = 429, M 824) were administered the Italian translations of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI), Big Five Inventory (BFI) and the Reactive-Proactive Aggression Questionnaire. Males scored on average significantly higher than females on all measures of psychopathy and aggression, whereas females scored significantly higher than males on the BFI O, C, A and N scales. Bivariate correlations between psychopathy scores, and aggression and BFI domains measures were highly similar in females and males. The majority of regression coefficients based on hierarchical regression models were consistently replicated across gender-based groups; effect size estimates for regression models were large, supporting the hypothesis that psychopathy can be described in terms of general personality traits in adolescence and that the relationships between psychopathy, its sub-dimensions and Big Five personality dimensions, and aggression generally are very similar across gender. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Cheng, Helen
    et al.
    Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK.
    Treglown, Luke
    Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK.
    Furnham, Adrian
    Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, UK; BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway.
    Emotional stability, conscientiousness, and self-reported hypertension in adulthood2017In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 115, p. 159-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate social and psychological factors in childhood and adulthood associated with self-reported hypertension in adulthood. Using data from the National Child Development Study, a nationally representative sample of 17,415 babies born in Great Britain in 1958 and followed up at 11, 33, and 50 years of age. Self-reported diagnosed hypertension by 50 years was the outcome measure. In total, 5753 participants with complete data on parental social class at birth, childhood cognitive ability test scores at 11 years, educational qualifications at 33 years, personality traits, occupational levels, and self-reported hypertension (all measured at age 50 years) were included in the study. Using logistic regression analyses, results showed that sex (OR = 0.60: 0.49–0.73, p < .001), educational qualifications (OR = 0.59: 0.37–0.92, p < .05), and traits emotional stability (OR = 0.84: 0.77–0.91, p < .001) and conscientiousness (OR = 0.89: 0.82–0.98, p < .05) were all significantly associated with the occurrence of self-reported hypertension in adulthood. Both psychological factors and socio-demographic factors were significantly associated with self-reported hypertension in adulthood.

  • 3.
    Danielsson, Nanette S.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Jutengren, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Neuroticism and sleep-onset: what is the long-term connection?2010In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 463-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with sleep-onset problems often experience neuroticism. To what extent the one problem leads to the other is unknown. We used self-reported data from a Swedish longitudinal project to examine developmental links between neuroticism and sleep-onset problems. A sample of 212 people, followed from birth to midlife, was part of a cohort study spanning 37 years. Adolescent neuroticism was measured at age 16 with the High School Personality Questionnaire (HSPQ, Form A) and in midlife at age 37 with the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). Sleep-onset problems were measured at ages 15 to 17, 25, and 37 with items developed for the Solna Project. Adolescent neuroticism failed to predict sleep-onset problems. Instead, sleep-onset problems in adolescence and young adulthood predicted midlife neuroticism. We found that sleep-onset problems during adolescence were a direct risk for midlife neuroticism, as well as, an indirect risk through continuance of sleep-onset problems into adulthood. This study provides longitudinal support for adolescent sleep-onset problems as a potent risk factor for heightened neuroticism in midlife.

  • 4. Hafen, Christopher A.
    et al.
    Laursen, Brett
    Burk, William J.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Homophily in stable and unstable adolescent friendships: Similarity breeds constancy2011In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 607-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines homophily among adolescent friends. Participants were drawn from a community-based sample of Swedish youth who ranged from 11 to 18 years old. A total of 436 girls and 338 boys identified their closest friends and described their own delinquent activities, intoxication frequency, achievement motivation, and self-worth. Correlations and difference scores describe similarity between reciprocally nominated friends on each dimension. Adolescents who remained friends from one year to the next tended to be more similar than those who did not, during the friendship and, to a lesser extent, before the friendship. Comparisons with random pairs of same-age peers revealed that age-group homophily accounts for most of the similarity between unstable friends but only a fraction of the similarity between stable friends.

  • 5.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences. Örebro Univ Hosp, Rehabil Res Ctr, Örebro, Sweden.
    The relationship between the Biosocial Model of Personality and susceptibility to emotional contagion: a structural equation modeling approach2008In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using structural equation modeling, the present study investigated the influences of personality, measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory, on susceptibility to emotional contagion, measured by the Emotional Contagion Scale (ECS), in a sample of 423 Swedish university students. Consistent with predictions of the Riosocial Model of Personality and the theory of emotional contagion, reward dependence influenced all basic emotion facets (anger, fear, sadness, happiness, and love) measured by the ECS, and harm avoidance influenced susceptibility to anger and fear, while the temperament dimensions of novelty seeking and persistence had no influence on susceptibility to emotional contagion. Among the character dimensions, self-directedness influenced susceptibility to positive emotions (happiness and love), while cooperativeness and self-transcendence had negative influences on susceptibility to anger and love (cooperativeness) and sadness (self-transcendence). The relation between susceptibility to emotional contagion and the behavior maintenance system proposed by the Biosocial Model of Personality is discussed. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Manzi, Claudia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Paderi, Fabio
    Department of Psychology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.
    Vitrotti, Sara
    Department of Psychology, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The social development of right-wing authoritarianism: The interaction between parental autonomy support and societal threat to safety2017In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 109, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the hypothesis that parental support for autonomy moderates the effects of societal threat to safety on the development of right-wing authoritarianism (RWA). In a quasi-experimental study performed on 241 Italian university students, societal threat to safety fostered RWA only among participants who reported low levels of parental support for autonomy.

  • 7.
    Manzi, Claudia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Meaning buffers right-wing authoritarian responses to societal threat via the mediation of loss of perceived control2015In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 83, no Sept, p. 117-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature shows that exposure to societal threat stemming from criminality can elicit an increase in right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) via the mediation of the loss of perceived control. In this study, we investigated whether the perception of meaning can act as a buffering factor for such process, performing an experiment with 316 Italian university students (67.8% women; mean age = 25.81, SD = 9.18). A moderated mediation model showed that the loss of perceived control mediated the relation between societal threat stemming from criminality and RWA, but that the second link was significant only among people low in meaning. Limitations, implications and possible developments of this research are discussed.

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

  • 8.
    Miklikowska, Marta
    Developmental Psychology, Åbo Akademi University, Vaasa, Finland.
    Psychological underpinnings of democracy: empathy, authoritarianism, self-estemm, interpersonal trust, normative identity style, and openness to experiance as predictors of support for democratic values2012In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 603-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the role of individual differences for political attitudes is undisputed, the psychological determinants of support for democratic values received limited attention. This study aimed at incorporating a variety of measures of stable individual differences and determining their relative effect on support for democratic values as well as at testing a new predictor, i.e. normative identity style. The analysis of a survey in a sample of middle adolescents (N = 1341; 16–17 year olds) showed that (a) right-wing authoritarianism, interpersonal trust, normative identity style, and empathy were good predictors of support for democratic values, (b) empathy and authoritarianism were the strongest predictors of democratic commitments, and that (c) self-esteem was not related to support for democratic values.

  • 9.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    When political talk translates into political action: The role of personality traits2016In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 100, p. 126-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discussing politics in everyday life is quite common but it is not clear how talking politics should prompt the desire to become politically active. We compared two ideas: Information gain, i.e., political talk translates into action when people receive information about activities and organizations; and social influence, i.e., political talk translates into action when people perceive their friends as politically active. Our main goal was to address the role played by two personality traits – Openness to Experience and Agreeableness – within these processes.  Adopting a longitudinal design (N = 895, sample of youths surveyed twice), we found that political talk promotes political participation over time when people perceive their discussion partners as politically active and that this effect is especially pronounced for agreeable people. Findings from this study provided support to the idea that political talk translates into political action under the condition of social influence and for people who are particularly susceptible to social conformity.

1 - 9 of 9
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