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  • 1.
    Durisala, Naresh
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Republic of Singapore.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont TX, USA; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore KA, India.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR), Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR),Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Determination and classification of the problems experienced by adults with single-sided deafness using ICF classification: an exploratory study using 26 participants2017In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 748-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     1. Previous studies have shown the application of ICF in classifying hearing problems using open ended questionnaire.

    2. The present study leveraged on that concept and used ICF in classifying hearing related problems and their effects on life style in adults with single-sided deafness.

    3. We have used "problem and life effects" questionnaire to which patients were asked to list the problems and effects of hearing loss on their lives.

    4. Apart from hearing and emotional related problems, use of an open ended questionnaire allowed tapping onto some of the non-auditory problems that these individuals may experience. 5.ICF classification provided basic information on the complex character of single sided deafness and can serve as a key element for rehabilitation.

  • 2.
    Faag, Carina
    et al.
    Red Cross University College of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergenius, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Red Cross University College of Nursing, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Symptoms experienced by patients with peripheral vestibular disorders: evaluation of the Vertigo Symptom Scale for clinical application2007In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 440-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe symptoms during an episode of dizziness in a sample of patients suffering from peripheral vestibular disorders and to compare them with the items in the Vertigo Symptom Scale.

    Design: A descriptive study from a sample of patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

    Setting: Patients visiting a department of audiology at a university hospital.

    Participants: Twenty patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. The inclusion criteria were that the patient had had at least three spontaneous attacks of vertigo and/or was constantly unsteady during the last 3 months for at least 75% of the time when awake.

    Main outcome measure: Patients were instructed to complete a diary where they recorded symptoms that arose during an episode of dizziness. These symptoms were compared with the content of the Vertigo Symptom Scale.

    Results: The most frequent symptoms as mentioned by the patients in their diaries were a feeling that things are spinning or moving around, nausea, feeling unsteady/about to lose one's balance, fatigue, headache, a feeling as if the ground you walk on is distant and ear-related such as tinnitus and a feeling of pressure in the ear. Pain in the heart or chest region, a heavy feeling in the arms or legs, pain in the lower part of the back and excessive sweating were not mentioned at all or by very few patients. Analysis showed that some of the symptoms included in the Vertigo Symptom Scale occurred less during an episode of dizziness than others in this sample of patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

    Conclusion: It was found that the Vertigo Symptom Scale is an adequate base but may need to be developed for use in patients diagnosed with peripheral vestibular symptoms to be able to evaluate care and treatment.

  • 3.
    Hessén-Söderman, Anne-Charlotte
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Aleris Sabbatsberg, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Odhagen, Erik
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hemlin, Claes
    Sollentuna Specialist Clinic, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ryhov County Hospital and Futurum, The Academy for Health and Care, County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage rates are related to technique for dissection and for haemostasis: an analysis of 15734 patients in the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden2015In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 248-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To analyse post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage(PTH) rates related to technique for dissection and haemostasis.Study Design: Register study from the National TonsilSurgery Register in Sweden (NTSRS).

    Methods: All patients, subjected to tonsillectomy (TE)without adenoidectomy from 1 March 2009 to 26 April 2013,were included in the study. The surgeon reports data abouttechnique and early PTH, while late PTH is reported by thepatient in a questionnaire 30 days after surgery.

    Results: 15734 patients with complete data concerningtechnique for dissec tion and for haemostasis were identifiedin the NTSRS. Techniques used were cold steel dissectionwith uni- or bipolar diathermy haemostasis (65.3%),diathermy scissors (15.7%), coblation (9.1%), cold steeldissection with cold haemostasis (7.4%) and ultrascision(2.5%). Early and late PTH were reported in 3.2% and 9.4% of the cases, respectively, and return to theatre (RTT) in2.7%. The rat es for PTH and RTT related to technique wereanalysed. Compared with cold dissection+ cold haemostasis,late PTH rate was 2.8 times higher after cold dissection + hothaemostasis, 3.2 times higher after coblation, 4.3 timeshigher after diathermy scissors and 5.6 times higher afterultrascision. The risk for RTT was higher for all hottechniques except for coblation, while ultrascision resultedin a lower risk for early PTH.

    Conclusions: All hot techniques resulted in a higher risk forlate PTH compared with cold steel dissection +coldhaemostasis. The risk for RTT was higher for all hottechniques except for coblation, while ultrascision resultedin a lower risk for early PTH. An early PTH was associatedwith an increased risk for late PTH.

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