oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Baker, Laura
    et al.
    Department of Psychology (SGM 501), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Department of Psychology (SGM 501), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Wang, Pan
    Department of Psychology (SGM 501), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Gomez, Karina
    Department of Psychology (SGM 501), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Bezdjian, Serena
    Department of Psychology (SGM 501), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Niv, Sharon
    Department of Psychology (SGM 501), University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
    Raine, Adrian
    Departments of Criminology and Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, United States .
    The southern california twin register at the University of Southern California: III2013In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 336-343Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    et al.
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Anckarsäter, Henrik
    Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Forensic Psychiatry, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljung, Therese
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nelson, Nina
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heritability of cortisol regulation in children2011In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 553-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The normal development of cortisol regulation during childhood is thought to be influenced by a complex interplay between environmental and genetic factors.

    METHOD: The aim of this study was to estimate genetic and environmental influences on basal cortisol levels in a sample of 151 twin pairs aged 9-16 years. Salivary cortisol was collected on two consecutive days when the children attended school--immediately after awakening, 30 min post-awakening and at bedtime.

    RESULTS: Heritability was highest (60%) for cortisol levels about 30 min after awakening. For samples taken immediately at awakening heritability was less pronounced (28%) and in the evening low (8%).

    CONCLUSION: The limited genetic influence on evening levels, moderate on cortisol at awakening and high on awakening response, might imply two genetic regulation patterns, one specifically for awakening response and one for the circadian rhythm proper. These findings could explain divergent results in previous studies and highlight the importance of taking the circadian rhythm into account in studies of cortisol levels in children.

  • 3.
    Hur, Yoon-Mi
    et al.
    Department of Education, Mokpo National University, Jeonnam, South Korea.
    Bogl, Leonie H.
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ordoñana, Juan R.
    Department of Human Anatomy and Psychobiology and Murcia Institute for Biomedical Research (IMIB-ARRIXACA), University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
    Taylor, Jeanette
    Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.
    Hart, Sara A.
    Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Ystrom, Eivind
    PROMENTA Research Center, Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Mental Disorders, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
    Dalgård, Christine
    Department of Public Health, Environmental Medicine, and Danish Twin Registry, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Skytthe, Axel
    Department of Public Health, and Danish Twin Registry, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Department of Biological Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Twin Family Registries Worldwide: An Important Resource for Scientific Research2019In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 427-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much progress has been made in twin research since our last special issue on twin registries (Hur, Y.-M., & Craig, J. M. (2013). Twin Research and Human Genetics, 16, 1-12.). This special issue provides an update on the state of twin family registries around the world. This issue includes 61 papers on twin family registries from 25 countries, of which 3 describe consortia based on collaborations of several twin family registries. The articles included in this issue discuss the establishment and maintenance of twin registries, recruitment strategies, methods of zygosity assessment, research aims and major findings from twin family cohorts, as well as other important topics related to twin studies. The papers amount to approximately 1.3 million monozygotic, dizygotic twins and higher order multiples and their family members who participate in twin studies around the world. Nine new twin family registries have been established across the world since our last issue, which demonstrates that twin registers are increasingly important in studies of the determinants and correlates of complex traits from disease susceptibility to healthy development.

  • 4.
    Jelenkovic, Aline
    et al.
    Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Genetics, Physical Anthropology and Animal Physiology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Leioa, Spain.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA.
    Silventoinen, Karri
    Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
    Zygosity differences in height and body mass index of twins from infancy to old age: a study of the CODATwins project2015In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 557-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A trend toward greater body size in dizygotic (DZ) than in monozygotic (MZ) twins has been suggested by some but not all studies, and this difference may also vary by age. We analyzed zygosity differences in mean values and variances of height and body mass index (BMI) among male and female twins from infancy to old age. Data were derived from an international database of 54 twin cohorts participating in the COllaborative project of Development of Anthropometrical measures in Twins (CODATwins), and included 842,951 height and BMI measurements from twins aged 1 to 102 years. The results showed that DZ twins were consistently taller than MZ twins, with differences of up to 2.0 cm in childhood and adolescence and up to 0.9 cm in adulthood. Similarly, a greater mean BMI of up to 0.3 kg/m(2) in childhood and adolescence and up to 0.2 kg/m(2) in adulthood was observed in DZ twins, although the pattern was less consistent. DZ twins presented up to 1.7% greater height and 1.9% greater BMI than MZ twins; these percentage differences were largest in middle and late childhood and decreased with age in both sexes. The variance of height was similar in MZ and DZ twins at most ages. In contrast, the variance of BMI was significantly higher in DZ than in MZ twins, particularly in childhood. In conclusion, DZ twins were generally taller and had greater BMI than MZ twins, but the differences decreased with age in both sexes.

  • 5.
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Carlström, Eva
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    The Swedish Twin study of CHild and Adolescent Development: the TCHAD-study2007In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Twin study of CHild and Adolescent Development (TCHAD) is a longitudinal study of how genes and environments contribute to development of health and behavioral problems from childhood to adulthood. The study includes 1480 twin pairs followed since 1994, when the twins were 8 to 9 years old. The last data collection was in 2005 when the twins were 19 to 20 years old. Both parents and twins have provided data. In this article we describe the sample, data collections, and measures used. In addition, we provide some key findings from the study, focusing on antisocial behavior, criminality, and psychopathic personality.

  • 6.
    Liu, Jianghong
    et al.
    School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, USA.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA.
    Li, Linda
    School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, USA.
    Raine, Adrian
    Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, USA.
    Baker, Laura A.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA.
    Medical record validation of maternal recall of pregnancy and birth events from a twin cohort2013In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 845-860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to assess the validity of maternal recall for several perinatal variables 8-10 years after pregnancy in a twin sample. Retrospective information was collected 8-10 years after the delivery event in a cohort of mothers from the University of Southern California Twin Study (N = 611) and compared with medical records for validity analysis. Recall of most variables showed substantial to perfect agreement (κ = 0.60-1.00), with notable exceptions for specific medical problems during pregnancy (κ ≤ 0.40) and substance use when mothers provided continuous data (e.g., number of cigarettes per day; r ≤ 0.24). With the exception of delivery method, neonatal intensive care unit admission, birth weight, neonatal information, and post-delivery complications were also recalled with low accuracy. For mothers of twins, maternal recall is generally a valid measure for perinatal variables 10 years after pregnancy. However, caution should be taken regarding variables such as substance use, medical problems, birth length, and post-delivery complications.

  • 7.
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almqvist, Catarina
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Women's and Children's Health and Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rahman, Iffat
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ganna, Andrea
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Viktorin, Alexander
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Walum, Hasse
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halldner, Linda
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundström, Sebastian
    CELAM (Center for Ethics, Law and Mental Health), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; R&D Unit, Swedish Prison and Probation Service, Norrköping, Sweden; Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ullén, Fredrik
    Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Långström, Niklas
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; R&D Unit, Swedish Prison and Probation Service, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyman, Anastasia
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gumpert, Clara Hellner
    Centre for Psychiatry Research & Education, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Råstam, Maria
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Anckarsäter, Henrik
    CELAM (Center for Ethics, Law and Mental Health), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cnattingius, Sven
    Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johannesson, Magnus
    Department of Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klareskog, Lars
    Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Division of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Swedish Twin Registry: establishment of a biobank and other recent developments2013In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 317-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Twin Registry (STR) today contains more than 194,000 twins and more than 75,000 pairs have zygosity determined by an intra-pair similarity algorithm, DNA, or by being of opposite sex. Of these, approximately 20,000, 25,000, and 30,000 pairs are monozygotic, same-sex dizygotic, and opposite-sex dizygotic pairs, respectively. Since its establishment in the late 1950s, the STR has been an important epidemiological resource for the study of genetic and environmental influences on a multitude of traits, behaviors, and diseases. Following large investments in the collection of biological specimens in the past 10 years we have now established a Swedish twin biobank with DNA from 45,000 twins and blood serum from 15,000 twins, which effectively has also transformed the registry into a powerful resource for molecular studies. We here describe the main projects within which the new collections of both biological samples as well as phenotypic measures have been collected. Coverage by year of birth, zygosity determination, ethnic heterogeneity, and influences of in vitro fertilization are also described.

  • 8.
    Sillanpää, Elina
    et al.
    Gerontology Research Centre, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Niskala, Paula
    Gerontology Research Centre, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Laakkonen, Eija K.
    Gerontology Research Centre, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Ponsot, Elodie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Alén, Markku
    Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kadi, Fawzi
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Kovanen, Vuokko
    Gerontology Research Centre, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Sipilä, Sarianna
    Gerontology Research Centre, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Leukocyte and Skeletal Muscle Telomere Length and Body Composition in Monozygotic Twin Pairs Discordant for Long-term Hormone Replacement Therapy2017In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 119-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estrogen-based hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may be associated with deceleration of cellular aging. We investigated whether long-term HRT has effects on leukocyte (LTL) or mean and minimum skeletal muscle telomere length (SMTL) in a design that controls for genotype and childhood environment. Associations between telomeres, body composition, and physical performance were also examined. Eleven monozygotic twin pairs (age 57.6 ± 1.8 years) discordant for HRT were studied. Mean duration of HRT use was 7.3 ± 3.7 years in the user sister, while their co-twins had never used HRT. LTL was measured by qPCR and SMTLs by southern blot. Body and muscle composition were estimated by bioimpedance and computed tomography, respectively. Physical performance was measured by jumping height and grip strength. HRT users and non-users did not differ in LTL or mean or minimum SMTL. Within-pair correlations were high in LTL (r = 0.69, p = .020) and in mean (r = 0.74, p = .014) and minimum SMTL (r = 0.88, p = .001). Body composition and performance were better in users than non-users. In analyses of individuals, LTL was associated with BMI (r 2 = 0.30, p = .030), percentage total body (r 2 = 0.43, p = .014), and thigh (r 2 = 0.55, p = .004) fat, while minimum SMTL was associated with fat-free mass (r 2 = 0.27, p = .020) and thigh muscle area (r 2 = 0.42, p = .016). We found no associations between HRT use and telomere length. Longer LTLs were associated with lower total and regional fat, while longer minimum SMTLs were associated with higher fat-free mass and greater thigh muscle area. This suggests that telomeres measured from different tissues may have different associations with measures of body composition.

  • 9.
    Silventoinen, K.
    et al.
    Department of Social Research, Department University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Center for Twin Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA.
    Kaprio, J.
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.
    The CODATwins Project: The Current Status and Recent Findings of COllaborative Project of Development of Anthropometrical Measures in Twins2019In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 800-808, article id PII S1832427419000355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COllaborative project of Development of Anthropometrical measures in Twins (CODATwins) project is a large international collaborative effort to analyze individual-level phenotype data from twins in multiple cohorts from different environments. The main objective is to study factors that modify genetic and environmental variation of height, body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) and size at birth, and additionally to address other research questions such as long-term consequences of birth size. The project started in 2013 and is open to all twin projects in the world having height and weight measures on twins with information on zygosity. Thus far, 54 twin projects from 24 countries have provided individual-level data. The CODATwins database includes 489,981 twin individuals (228,635 complete twin pairs). Since many twin cohorts have collected longitudinal data, there is a total of 1,049,785 height and weight observations. For many cohorts, we also have information on birth weight and length, own smoking behavior and own or parental education. We found that the heritability estimates of height and BMI systematically changed from infancy to old age. Remarkably, only minor differences in the heritability estimates were found across cultural-geographic regions, measurement time and birth cohort for height and BMI. In addition to genetic epidemiological studies, we looked at associations of height and BMI with education, birth weight and smoking status. Within-family analyses examined differences within same-sex and opposite-sex dizygotic twins in birth size and later development. The CODATwins project demonstrates the feasibility and value of international collaboration to address gene-by-exposure interactions that require large sample sizes and address the effects of different exposures across time, geographical regions and socioeconomic status.

  • 10.
    Silventoinen, Karri
    et al.
    Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA.
    Kaprio, Jaakko
    Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Education in Twins and Their Parents Across Birth Cohorts Over 100 years: An Individual-Level Pooled Analysis of 42-Twin Cohorts2017In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 395-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins differ from each other in a variety of phenotypes is important for genetic twin modeling and for inferences made from twin studies in general. We analyzed whether there were differences in individual, maternal and paternal education between MZ and DZ twins in a large pooled dataset. Information was gathered on individual education for 218,362 adult twins from 27 twin cohorts (53% females; 39% MZ twins), and on maternal and paternal education for 147,315 and 143,056 twins respectively, from 28 twin cohorts (52% females; 38% MZ twins). Together, we had information on individual or parental education from 42 twin cohorts representing 19 countries. The original education classifications were transformed to education years and analyzed using linear regression models. Overall, MZ males had 0.26 (95% CI [0.21, 0.31]) years and MZ females 0.17 (95% CI [0.12, 0.21]) years longer education than DZ twins. The zygosity difference became smaller in more recent birth cohorts for both males and females. Parental education was somewhat longer for fathers of DZ twins in cohorts born in 1990-1999 (0.16 years, 95% CI [0.08, 0.25]) and 2000 or later (0.11 years, 95% CI [0.00, 0.22]), compared with fathers of MZ twins. The results show that the years of both individual and parental education are largely similar in MZ and DZ twins. We suggest that the socio-economic differences between MZ and DZ twins are so small that inferences based upon genetic modeling of twin data are not affected.

  • 11.
    Silventoinen, Karri
    et al.
    Population Research Unit, Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
    Tuvblad, Catherine
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA.
    Kaprio, Jaako
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.
    The CODATwins Project: The Cohort Description of Collaborative Project of Development of Anthropometrical Measures in Twins to Study Macro-Environmental Variation in Genetic and Environmental Effects on Anthropometric Traits2015In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 348-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For over 100 years, the genetics of human anthropometric traits has attracted scientific interest. In particular, height and body mass index (BMI, calculated as kg/m(2)) have been under intensive genetic research. However, it is still largely unknown whether and how heritability estimates vary between human populations. Opportunities to address this question have increased recently because of the establishment of many new twin cohorts and the increasing accumulation of data in established twin cohorts. We started a new research project to analyze systematically (1) the variation of heritability estimates of height, BMI and their trajectories over the life course between birth cohorts, ethnicities and countries, and (2) to study the effects of birth-related factors, education and smoking on these anthropometric traits and whether these effects vary between twin cohorts. We identified 67 twin projects, including both monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins, using various sources. We asked for individual level data on height and weight including repeated measurements, birth related traits, background variables, education and smoking. By the end of 2014, 48 projects participated. Together, we have 893,458 height and weight measures (52% females) from 434,723 twin individuals, including 201,192 complete twin pairs (40% monozygotic, 40% same-sex dizygotic and 20% opposite-sex dizygotic) representing 22 countries. This project demonstrates that large-scale international twin studies are feasible and can promote the use of existing data for novel research purposes.

  • 12.
    Walum, Hasse
    et al.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westberg, Lars
    Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sex differences in jealousy: a population-based twin study in Sweden2013In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 941-946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the theory of evolved sex differences in jealousy, the challenge for women to ensure paternal investment increased their jealousy response to emotional infidelity, whereas paternal uncertainty exerted selective pressures that shaped men to become more distressed by sexual infidelity. Several studies have investigated whether the effect of these sexually dimorphic selection pressures can be detected in contemporary human populations, with conflicting results. To date, no genetically informed studies of sex differences in jealousy have been conducted. We used data from the Screening Across the Lifespan of Twins Younger (SALTY) sample, containing information concerning self-rated jealousy from 3,197 complete twin pairs collected by the Swedish Twin Registry. Intra-class correlations and structural equation models were used to assess the genetic influence on jealousy and to investigate sex differences at genetic level. We saw a highly significant sex effect on the relationship between infidelity types, indicating that men, relative to women, reported greater jealousy in response to sexual infidelity than in response to emotional infidelity. The twin models revealed significant heritabilities for both sexual (32%) and emotional (26%) jealousy. The heritabilities were of a similar magnitude in both sexes, and no qualitative sex differences could be detected. We show for the first time that variance in jealousy is to some extent explained by genetic factors. Even though our results from the mean value analyses are in line with the theory of evolved sex differences in jealousy, we could not identify any sex differences on a genetic level.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf