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  • 1.
    Kolind, Torsten
    et al.
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Asmussen Frank, Vibecke
    Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Touronen, Jouni
    A-Clinic Foundation, Helsinki, Finland.
    Prison-based drug treatment in Nordic political discourse: an elastic discursive construct2013In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 659-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prison-based drug treatment (PDT) has increased markedly in the Nordic countries over the last 15 years. Based on data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, we outline the historical development of PDT and analyse the rationales employed in the political discourse in the Nordic countries legitimizing this development. These rationales relate to the reduction of criminality zero tolerance, rights and the modern welfare state, and managerialism. Though these rationales may appear dissimilar, they have been combined with relative ease in the political discourse. Actually, this elasticity may partly explain the popularity of PDT. We discuss whether the increased use of PDT reflects a criminalization of social problems and signals a rebirth of the treatment ideology in Nordic prisons.

  • 2.
    Källström, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parental imprisonment, child victimization and adult problems2019In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 671-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses, in a Swedish sample, whether exposure to violence and/or crime during childhood, and mental health and/or behaviour problems as an adult, are overrepresented among young men and women who had a parent in prison at some time when they were a child. Results show that almost all the studied types of childhood victimization and adult problems were overrepresented, but verbal victimization, neglect, witnessing violence, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and depression were significantly overrepresented. Although the associations between having a parent in prison and childhood victimization as well as having mental health and behaviour problems are weak, these results indicate that it is important for practitioners who meet such children to be aware that they are more likely than other children not only to suffer from mental health and/or behaviour problems but also to have experienced violence and/or neglect.

  • 3.
    Nylander, Per Åke
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bruhn, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Emotional labour and emotional strain among Swedish prison officers2011In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 469-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores emotional labour strategies among Swedish prison officers, and shows how these affect their well-being. Case studies of five Swedish prisons and a national survey of prison officers are used. Analysis indicates that prison officers perform complex forms of emotional labour. Owing to differences in subcultures and informal norms, the strategies officers use in managing their displays of emotion vary between wings and roles. Different strategies may cause different kinds of emotional strain. So-called ‘surface acting’ may lead to cynicism and alienation, whereas ‘deep acting’ may lead to stress and exhaustion. Finally, the lack of opportunities for recovery is discussed.

  • 4.
    Pechorro, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.
    Braga, Teresa
    University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.
    Ray, James V.
    University of Central Florida, Orlando FL, USA.
    Goncalves, Rui Abrunhosa
    University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Do incarcerated male juvenile recidivists differ from first-time offenders on self-reported psychopathic traits?: A retrospective study2019In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 413-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study analyzed the relation between recidivism and self-reported psychopathic traits, more specifically the callous-unemotional, impulsivity, and narcissism dimensions of the psychopathy construct. The Antisocial Process Screening Device - Self-Report (APSD-SR) and other self-report instruments independently measuring the three different dimensions of psychopathy (that is, Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, Narcissistic Personality-13) were completed by a sample of incarcerated male juvenile offenders (N = 244) who were retrospectively classified as recidivists versus non-recidivists. The only statistically significant relation found between recidivism and self-reported psychopathic traits after controlling for age and socioeconomic status was with the impulsivity dimension of the APSD-SR. Additionally, results showed that recidivism was associated with alcohol use but not with drug use or crime seriousness.

  • 5.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Bergman, Lars R.
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    On the utility of Moffitt's typology trajectories in long-term perspective2010In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 521-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used a prospective longitudinal study to examine the utility of Moffitt's (1993) trajectories of antisocial behaviour. Data on registered criminality in three time periods - before age 15 (childhood), from 15 to 20 (adolescence) and from 21 to 35 (adulthood) - were used to construct life-course trajectories of offending for males. Life-course-persistent and adolescence-limited groups were found. The life-course-persistent males had the most problematic upbringing conditions, school problems and adjustment difficulties in adolescence, and the highest social and mental health problems in middle age. Adolescence-limited offenders did not differ much from non-offenders. In these respects, Moffitt's typology was confirmed. However, there was an equally large childhood-onset desister group. They had many of the same problems as the life-course-persistent males up to age 15, but did not differ much from the non-registered males in mid-adolescence or at the middle-age follow-up. These males are not predicted from Moffitt's model, but cannot be ignored. There was also a group of males who started to offend in adolescence and continued in adulthood, who had about the same problematic upbringing conditions, mid-adolescent maladjustment, and middle-age social and mental health problems as the life-course-persistent group.

  • 6.
    Storey, Jennifer, E.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.
    Strand, Susanne
    Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    The characteristics and violence risk management of women arrested by the police for intimate partner violence2012In: European Journal of Criminology, ISSN 1477-3708, E-ISSN 1741-2609, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 636-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and management efforts in the area of intimate partner violence (IPV) have primarily focused on male perpetrators and female victims, resulting in more limited knowledge of female IPV perpetrators and their male victims. In the current study the violence risk assessments of police officers were examined in order to outline the characteristics of female perpetrators of IPV and their male victims. In addition, the officers' assessments of violence risk and proposed risk management strategies are presented. Results reveal some similarities between the female perpetrators and male victims and their more studied counterparts. However, differences appear to be present in the perceived violence risk posed by the perpetrators and the violence risk management strategies proposed to reduce that risk and protect the victim. The results suggest a need for further research in the area, particularly with respect to the violence risk assessment and management of female IPV perpetrators.

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