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  • 1.
    Brantefors, Lotta
    et al.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tellgren, Britt
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Thelander, Nina
    Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Department of Educational Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Human Rights Education as Democratic Education: The Teaching Traditions of Children's Human Rights in Swedish Early Childhood Education and School2019In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 694-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the teaching traditions of children's human rights in four levels of education in Swedish early childhood education and school by drawing on a three-year long didactic (Didaktik) research project on the teaching and learning of human rights. The purpose of the article is threefold. First, the aims, content and methods used in the teaching of the four levels are compiled. Second, the main characteristics of the observed teaching are analysed. Third, the question of why rights are taught is examined using Roberts' concept of curriculum emphases (1982). The article identifies the aims, content and methods used within each level of education and the main characteristics of the teaching of human rights and shows that the teaching of human rights often consists of the content themes interaction and the life conditions of others. When further analysed, the main conclusion is that the teaching tradition of human rights is strongly rooted in the fundamental and democratic values on which Swedish education is based (Education Act, 2010) - a democratic curriculum emphasis.

  • 2.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salmonsson, Lisa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Challenges in the Guardianship of Unaccompanied Minors Seeking Asylum2018In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 489-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the research literature relating to the guardianship of unaccompanied minors seeking asylum. In particular, we seek to find out what type of dilemmas have been identified by research concerning the guardianship of unaccompanied minors, and the focus that the literature has therefore taken. A comprehensive search of identified databases was conducted. Ultimately, 38 publications were selected for analysis. The review was qualitative and inductive. The results of the review suggest that research has identified and focused on challenges in the form of diverging policy such as gaps and inconsistencies in guardianship institutions, as well as challenges in balancing different objectives concerning the guardianship role, such as conflicting interest in the guardianship assignment or between different actors involved in protecting the child's interest.

    The conclusion is that different configurations of guardianship institutions, as well as the identified challenges for practice, appear to be related to the welfare state model. Therefore, future research concerning guardianship for unaccompanied minors needs to move beyond legal sources and policy documents by focusing on empirically informed research on the relationship between child care/protection, principles of assessing the best interest of the child and the welfare state systems.

  • 3.
    I'Anson, John
    et al.
    University of Stirling, Stirling, UK.
    Quennerstedt, Ann
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Robinson, Carol
    University of Brighton, Brighton, UK.
    The International Economy of Children's Rights: issues in translation2017In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 50-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (uncrc) is an international legal text that necessitates multiple translations into national policy contexts if it is to become mobilised within professional practice. The aim of this paper is to foreground this process of translation and to identify some of the limitations inherent within present mobilisations of the uncrc. On the basis of this diagnosis, we then raise a series of ethical considerations that might inform a more critical and open-ended approach.

    We characterise current approaches to mobilising the uncrc as an international economy of rights and we represent this diagrammatically. This economy, we contend, involves multiple translations of the uncrc text into a series of performative demands to which adults become accountable in situations of professional practice with children and young people.

    We then critically analyse this economy as presently instituted and point to a number of inherent limitations. We argue that a failure to address the issue of translation from legal text to relational practice has led to a technical resolution. The potential challenge of the uncrc as an authoritative text of critique is further weakened by the promotion of a consensus thinking that privileges agreement over the complexities associated with ethical thinking. In the light of this critique, the paper identifies new lines of questioning to inform debate concerning how a children's rights agenda might be refracted differently in future.

  • 4.
    Quennerstedt, Ann
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Children, but not really humans?: Critical reflections on the hampering effect of the "3 p's"2010In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 619-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the widespread use of the “3 p’s”, provision, protection and participation, to categorise children’s rights is critically examined. This conceptualisation is argued to have hampering effects on research in children’s rights, in that it frames the research in a problematic way and hinders the possibilities of attaining theoretically driven analyses. In the first part of the paper, the emergence and use of the 3 p’s is traced and discussed. Thereafter, an alternative language for constructing and analysing children’s rights is proposed, namely the vocabulary used for general human rights: civil, political and social rights. When children’s rights are placed within the development of human rights and conceptualised accordingly, a different understanding of the content of children’s rights surfaces. The theoretical contextualisation that is then added is suggested as a way of approaching contradictions and conflicts surrounding children’s rights issues with more theoretical depth and nuances.

  • 5.
    Quennerstedt, Ann
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Children's Human Rights at School - As Formulated by Children2016In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 657-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores 8- and 12-year old children’s own views on their rights in school. The aims of the paper are to expand the understanding of what human rights mean to children in the school setting, and to contribute to new ways of thinking about rights for children. Human rights theorising points to the temporary status of what we currently understand as human rights and the various ways in which human rights grow and change. However, children’s perspectives have rarely been used to question or develop human rights thinking. Responding to this, the article specifically seeks to represent children’s understanding of rights. Based on interviews with 32 children, a number of children’s claims for rights at school are identified and elaborated. Most rights the children claim fit into the established human rights framework, and some of the rights the children express go beyond this framework.

  • 6.
    Quennerstedt, Ann
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Children's rights research moving into the future: challenges on the way forward2013In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 233-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expansion of the research into children’s rights during the last 20 years has constituted children’s rights research as an established and legitimate field of study. The time may now be ripe to reflect on the work undertaken so far and to consider the future of children’s rights research. In recent years, self-critical voices have surfaced within the research field, pointing out possible areas of concern. The ambition of this paper is to contribute to such deliberations within children’s rights research. In the paper, comments and concerns that have been put forward are brought together and developed further, leading to the suggestion that research into children’s rights issues will need to address three major challenges on the way forward: advancing critique, increasing theorisation and contextualising research.

  • 7.
    Quennerstedt, Ann
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The construction of children's rights in education: a research synthesis2011In: The International Journal of Children's Rights, ISSN 0927-5568, E-ISSN 1571-8182, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 661-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a research synthesis that aims to clarify and discuss how children’s rights in education are constructed in research. A basic assumption is accordingly that research is an important participant in the process in which principal meanings and essential aspects of children’s rights take shape. In the synthesis, 35 research publications, published between1997-2008, have been selected and analysed. The main findings show that the research interest centres on four main themes: 1) Human rights orientation, 2) Education difficult to change, 3) Children’s participation rights, and 4) Children’s rights – parents’ rights. In research, essential aspects of education are highlighted as matters of children’s rights and the research construction give rise to some important insights that call for further research on children’s rights in education.

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