oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Linda
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Karpaty, Patrik
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Savsin, Selen
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Firm-level effects of offshoring of materials and services on relative labor demand2016In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 152, no 2, p. 321-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on firm-level data over the period 1997-2002 for the Swedish manufacturing sector the objective of this paper is to analyze relative labor demand effects due to offshoring, separating between materials and services offshoring and also geographical location of trade partner. Overall, our results give no support to the fears that offshoring of materials or services lead to out-location of high-skilled activity in Swedish firms. Rather, this paper finds evidence that the aggregate effects from offshoring lead to increasing relative demand of high-skilled labor, mainly due to services offshoring to middle income countries.

  • 2.
    Bandick, Roger
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Hansson, Pär
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Inward FDI and demand for skills in manufacturing firms in Sweden2009In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 145, no 1, p. 111-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We observe a substantial increase in foreign ownership in Sweden in the 1990s. Did that have any effect on relative demand for skilled labor? Has technology transfers-often associated with inward FDI-led to an increased demand for skills due to skilled-biased technical change? Are there any grounds for the concerns in the public Swedish debate that more skilled activities have been moved to other countries where the headquarters are located? Estimating relative labor demand at the firm level and using propensity score matching with difference-in-difference estimation, we obtain support for that relative demand for skilled labor tend to rise in non-multinationals (non-MNEs)-but not in multinationals (MNEs)-that become foreign-owned. Other interesting findings are that larger presence of foreign MNEs in an industry appears to have a positive impact on the relative demand for skills in Swedish MNEs within the same industry and that the elasticity of substitution between skilled and less-skilled labor seems to be lower in MNEs than in non-MNEs.

  • 3.
    Eliasson, Kent
    et al.
    Growth Analysis, Östersund, Sweden; Department of Economics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hansson, Pär
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Growth Analysis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Are workers more vulnerable in tradable industries?2016In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 152, no 2, p. 283-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced trade barriers and lower costs of transportation and information have meant that a growing part of the economy has been exposed to international trade. In particular, this is the case in the service sector. We divide the service sector into a tradable and a non-tradable part using an approach to identify tradable industries utilizing a measure of regional concentration of production. We examine whether the probability of displacement is higher and income losses after displacement greater for workers in tradable services and manufacturing (tradable) than in non-tradable services. We also analyze whether the probability of re-employment is higher for workers displaced from tradable services and manufacturing than from non-tradable services. We find that in the 2000s the probability of displacement is relatively high in tradable services in comparison to non-tradable services and manufacturing. On the other hand, the probability of re-employment is higher for those displaced from tradable services. The largest income losses are found for those who had been displaced from manufacturing. Interestingly, the income losses of those displaced from manufacturing seems mainly to be due to longer spells of non-employment, whereas for those displaced in tradable services lower wages in their new jobs compared to their pre-displacement jobs appears to play a larger role.

  • 4.
    Hakkala, Katariina Nilsson
    et al.
    Govt Inst Econ Res, Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Sch Econ, Helsinki, Finland.
    Heyman, Fredrik
    Res Inst Ind Econ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöholm, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University. Res Inst Ind Econ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Multinationals, skills, and wage elasticities2010In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 146, no 2, p. 263-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increase in foreign direct investments raises concerns about labor market consequences in many countries. It is feared that multinational firms are inclined to shift jobs abroad and increase job volatility. We use firm-level data to examine if multinationality and foreign ownership affect the wage elasticity of labor demand. Unlike previous studies, we distinguish the effect on different skill groups of employees. We find no general difference in wage elasticity between foreign and domestic firms but the wage elasticity is higher in multinational firms than in national firms, in particular for medium-skilled workers.

  • 5.
    Hansson, Pär
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Lundin, Nannan
    Örebro University, Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics.
    Exports as an indicator on or promoter of successful Swedish manufacturing firms in the 1990s2004In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 140, no 3, p. 415-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the link between exports and productivity at the firm level. Like in previous studies we get support for the hypothesis that more productive firms self-select into the export market. In addition, and contrary to many of the former studies, we also obtain evidence that exporting further increases firm productivity. Exporting firms appear to have significantly higher productivity than nonexporting. Moreover, exporters—mainly firms that increase their export intensities—have higher output growth than nonexporters. Reallocation of resources between firms may then have contributed to overall manufacturing productivity growth. Hence, we try to quantify the importance of reallocation.

  • 6.
    Karpaty, Patrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Kneller, Richard
    Demonstration or congestion?: Export spillovers in Sweden2011In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 147, no 1, p. 109-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key feature of the Swedish economy over the last two decades has been the rapid internationalisation of its economy, both through FDI and exports. In this paper we consider their inter-relationship, examining whether there have been spillovers from foreign firms to the export performance of domestic firms. We also contribute to the empirical modelling of export spillovers. We do this by exploiting information on whether foreign MNE sales are intra-firm or inter-firm, and by allowing for heterogeneity in the characteristics of the sender and receiver of spillovers. Our results indicate that foreign MNEs had positive effects on Swedish exports.

  • 7.
    Lodefalk, Magnus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Temporary expats for exports: micro-level evidence2016In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 152, no 4, p. 733-772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the relation between temporary expats in firms and exports, exploiting micro-level panel data on migration and trade. Temporary expats are positively associated with exports. Their link with export intensity is larger for services than for merchandise and for exports of differentiated services and merchandise than for exports of homogeneous products. Our evidence also suggests that temporary expats are positively related to exports by assisting firms in overcoming informal destination-specific barriers. Overall, our findings suggest the importance of the temporary movement of persons for providing firms with up-to-date links to export markets.

  • 8.
    Lodefalk, Magnus
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    The role of services for manufacturing firm exports2014In: Review of World Economics, ISSN 1610-2878, E-ISSN 1610-2886, Vol. 150, no 1, p. 59-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing firms have been increasingly focusing on services, a trend that is evident in their composition of bought-in input and in-house production. The services intensity of firms may affect their productivity and thereby their competitiveness abroad; services are also instrumental in connecting firms to foreign markets and can help them to differentiate their offerings from those of other firms. However, the relation between services and manufacturing exports has only been partially analysed in the previous literature. This study contributes to the field by discussing the role of services for firms and empirically testing a set of related conjectures. Export intensity is regressed on two services input parameters, applying a fractional model to a rich panel of firms in Sweden in the period 2001–2007. The microeconometric results suggest that, after controlling for covariates and heterogeneity, service inputs affect a firms’ export capabilities: raising the proportion of services in in-house production yields higher export intensity on average. Furthermore, buying-in more services is associated with higher export intensity for firms in some industries. Overall, the study provides new firm-level evidence of the role of services as inputs in manufacturing.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf