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  • 1.
    Besen, Elyssa
    et al.
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA.
    Gaines, Brittany
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA; Department og Gerontology, University of Massachusetts, Boston MA, USA.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Shaw, William S.
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA; University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester MA, USA.
    The role of pain catastrophizing as a mediator in the work disability process following acute low back pain2017In: Journal of applied biobehavioral research, ISSN 1071-2089, E-ISSN 1751-9861, Vol. 22, no 1, article id UNSP e12085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to assess pain catastrophizing as a mediator in the relationships between pain and recovery expectations with work limitations and functional disability in a working population experiencing acute low back pain (LBP). Workers (n=241) with acute, work-related LBP completed measures of pain and injury at medical intake and then the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) shortly after the initial intake visit. At 3-months follow-up, measures of work limitations and functional disability were administered. Structural equation modeling was used to assess whether the PCS mediated longitudinal associations between pain and recovery expectations with perceived disability and work limitations. The PCS score completely mediated the relationship between initial pain intensity and 3-month perceptions of disability (40% explained) and work limitations (29% explained). The PCS also completely mediated the longitudinal relationship between pain recovery expectations and 3-month disability (50% explained) and work limitations (40% explained). Effective clinical management during this acute phase of LBP might be improved by incorporating early interventions to reduce catastrophizing in caseswhere pain catastrophizing may be especially problematic.

  • 2.
    Boersma, Katja
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    MacDonald, Shane
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Longitudinal relationships between pain and stress problems in the general population: predicting trajectories from cognitive behavioral variables2012In: Journal of applied biobehavioral research, ISSN 1071-2089, E-ISSN 1751-9861, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 229-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lately, cognitive behavioral models have put forth that the co-occurrence of pain and stress might be explained by mutually maintaining psychological mechanisms such as catastrophizing and avoidance. This study aimed to map the interrelationship between pain, stress, catastrophizing, cognitive, and behavioral avoidance across time. A general population sample (n = 551) was followed from baseline to 3-month and 1-year follow-up. The results revealed subgroups with stress and pain in combination as well as in isolation. The subgroups were highly stable across time, and catastrophizing, cognitive, and behavioral avoidance were related to the development of symptoms. The results support that shared, but also specific cognitive and behavioral, processes may maintain and drive the development of pain and stress problems.

  • 3.
    Flink, Ida K.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Engman, Linnea
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thomten, Johanna
    Department of Psychology, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The role of catastrophizing in vulvovaginal pain: Impact on pain and partner responses over time2017In: Journal of applied biobehavioral research, ISSN 1071-2089, E-ISSN 1751-9861, Vol. 22, no 1, article id UNSP e12093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this prospective study was to explore the role of catastrophizing in vulvovaginal pain. The study entails two research questions. The first question was whether catastrophizing predicts the occurrence of vulvovaginal pain. The second question focused on exploring the links between catastrophizing, partner responses and pain. Five hundred and ten women filled out questionnaires at two measurement points, 10months apart. The women were divided into three groups based on levels of catastrophizing. To study the first research question, the groups were used as predictors of pain at follow-up. To study the second research question, the groups were compared regarding their perceived solicitous partner responses. Subsequently, two mediation models were tested to explore whether catastrophizing mediated the relationship between solicitous partner responses and pain, cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Baseline levels of catastrophizing distinguished between pain and no pain 10months later. High catastrophizers reported higher levels of solicitous partner responses than low catastrophizers. The mediation analyses revealed catastrophizing as a significant mediator between solicitous partner responses and pain, cross-sectionally and over time. The findings support catastrophizing as being an important factor in women with vulvovaginal pain, cross-sectionally and over time.

  • 4.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A transdiagnostic approach to pain and emotion2013In: Journal of applied biobehavioral research, ISSN 1071-2089, E-ISSN 1751-9861, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 82-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotion and pain are known to be intimately related, but treating co-occurring problems is still in its infancy mainly because we lack a clear theoretical understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved. This lack of understanding is problematic because treatment has proved challenging and co-occurring pain and emotional problems are associated with poor outcome, relapse, and greater sick absenteeism.

    Transdiagnostics has emerged as one way of focusing on the shared underlying mechanisms that drive comorbid problems. This approach has not been thoroughly examined for pain and emotion. Hence, the purpose of this review is to describe a transdiagnostic approach to pain and emotion and its clinical implications. To this end, the transdiagnostic approach is applied to pain and emotion in a narrative review of the literature. A focus on the function of emotion and pain relative to the context is underscored as a way to understand the relationship better. Avoidance, catastrophic worry, and thought suppression are put forward as three examples of potential transdiagnostic mechanisms that may underlie a co-occurring emotion and pain problem.

    The approach is readily translated to the clinic where assessment and treatment should focus on identifying transdiagnostic mechanisms. However, additional exploration is needed and therefore suggestions for future research are presented.

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