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  • 1.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Denk, Thomas
    Department of Political Science, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Svedung, Inge
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Institutionalization of risk and safety management at the local governmental level in Sweden2009In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 687-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting point for this article is the need for empirical knowledge about organizational configuration for societal risk and safety management activities in a modern welfare society. In this paper, we use Sweden as an empirical frame to analyze the administrative management structure at the local governmental level. The analysis is based on statistical analysis of information from a web‐survey with administrative chief/head officials (n = 1283) with responsibilities for different municipal functions and sectors. The sample represented 25% of the Swedish municipalities (n = 290) and the response rate was approximately 60% (n = 766). The responses to two sets of questions (25 and 45 questions) are used for statistical analyses of management structures and task distribution within the municipal organizations. Principal component factor analyses with Varimax and Kaiser's Normalization was applied as a structure detection method. The results indicate a clear and uniform way to institutionalize societal risk and safety management at the local level. Furthermore, the management course of action is found to have different types of value characters. The implications that arise from the patterns identified in this study are considered to be of general relevance and topicality for research and practice in this area.

  • 2.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Scientised citizens and democratised science: Re-assessing the expert-lay divide2008In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 11, no 1-2, p. 69-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade there have been growing calls for increased public inclusion in risk regulation. This paper investigates three of these proposals for a new relationship between science and the public, namely New Production of Knowledge, Postnormal Science, and Scientific Citizenship. These all concern how science can be democratised and how new relations between expertise and citizens can be negotiated and designed. By critically discussing the similarities and differences between these proposals, this paper examines the implications of the call for public inclusion in risk regulation. By way of conclusion, some warnings are raised concerning the belief in public inclusion as a cure-all for making knowledge production and risk regulation more publicly credible and socially robust. The space created for public inclusion may work as means for legitimating decisions, diluting accountability and persuading the public, with the consequence that the expert-lay divide may be reproduced rather than transformed.

  • 3.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Siting conflicts: democratic perspectives and political implications2005In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 187-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All citizens, irrespective of their geographical location, have a stake in the global environment. At the same time, they have different interests as well as unequal resources concerning the possibility of developing strategies and influencing environmental agendas and decisions. This forms the basis for the quest for an ecological citizenship, where people, wherever they are located in the world, have a voice in matters that concern their environment. This article takes the search for ecological citizenship as its point of departure in discussing democratic aspects of siting controversies. From a national perspective a certain plant may be seen as a necessity, whilst from a local perspective it is a disturbing nuisance. Thereby the question of spatial equity is in focus, not least to what extent and in what cases an individual person, a local community or a municipality should be subordinated to a national decision which implies local environmental consequences. The author argues that there is not only a need to create new forms of dialogue between stakeholders, but also to develop new institutions for collective decision making and mechanisms for public participation, democratic decision making and ecological responsibility.

  • 4.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sjödin, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Risk governance through professional expertise: forestry consultants’ handling of uncertainties after a storm disaster2016In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 1275-1290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do forestry consultants provide advice when facing a situation of great uncertainty? This question serves as the point of departure in analyzing how forestry consultants provide guidance in extreme situations. Three empirical cases are analyzed, all related to a storm that caused the most severe damage in Swedish history. The first case concerns how forestry consultants handled the immediate uncertainties in their advice on how to manage the windthrow. The second case concerns how they handled the risks associated with the large-scale timber depots that resulted from the decision to transport all windthrown trees away from the forest. The third case concerns how forestry consultants handled uncertainties regarding the reforestation of the area. Whereas there was discursive closure in the two first cases, and the forest owners followed the recommendations made by the forestry consultants, there was no discursive closure in the third case, resulting in the forest owners deciding against the advice provided by the consultants. In conclusion, this result is explained with reference to the epistemic authority and embodied knowledge of the forestry consultants.

  • 5.
    Sund, Björn
    et al.
    Karlstad Business School, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency (MSB), Karlstad, Sweden; Department of Economics, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Toulouse School of Economics (LERNA, UT1C, CNRS), Toulouse, France.
    Demographic determinants of incident experience and risk perception: do high-risk groups accurately perceive themselves as high-risk?2017In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes demographic determinants of incident experience and risk perception, as well as the relationship between the two, for eight different risk domains. Analyses were conducted by merging the results of a Swedish population-based survey, which includes approximately 15,000 individuals, with demographic and socio-economic register data. Being male was associated with higher incident experience yet a lower risk perception for nearly all risk domains. Lower socioeconomic status was associated with higher incident experience for falls, and being a victim of violence but lower incident experience for road traffic accidents. Lower socioeconomic status was also associated with higher risk perception for falls. On aggregate, ranking the different domains, respondents' risk perception was in almost perfect correspondence to the ranking of actual incident experience, with the exception that the risk of being a victim of violence is ranked higher than indicated by actual incident experience. On a demographic group level, men and highly educated respondents perceive their risks to be lower than what is expected considering their actual incident experience.

  • 6.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Strategies to create risk awareness and legitimacy: the Swedish climate campaign2008In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 719-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social means of risk regulation often only arise in response to media attention and public opinion. In contrast, in the case of climate change, the Swedish government proactively launched a public information campaign to promote public awareness and knowledge of the risks associated with climate change, with the explicit objective of promoting acceptance of public means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This paper analyses the framing of climate change in the Swedish climate campaign and its communication strategy. What was the message of the campaign narrative? What did it imply concerning the causes, effects, and management of and responsibility for climate change? What means were used to communicate the risks of climate change? The paper analyses the campaign narrative, its references to various affective images of climate change, and the various storytelling techniques it used. It concludes that the Swedish climate campaign relied on a unidirectional view of risk communication and proffered a narrative containing inconsistencies and ambivalence. The analysis demonstrates that despite a thoroughly worked-out strategy, a well-defined message, and the intention to speak clearly, a complex problem such as climate change cannot easily be transformed into a single, coherent story.

  • 7.
    Wester-Herber, Misse
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Warg, Lars-Erik
    Did they get it?: Examining the goals of risk communication within the Seveso II directive in a Swedish context2004In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 495-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the success of a risk communication programme conducted in two municipalities in Sweden is evaluated. The communication efforts were initiated in order to comply with the Seveso II Directive, passed as a national law in July 1999. Data from two different questionnaires are used. Between the distribution of the two questionnaires, an information campaign took place in the communities. The first questionnaire was aimed at measuring the public's opinion and understanding of the risks related to chemical industries in their communities, as well as the public's knowledge of emergency behaviour in the event of an accident. The second was aimed at measuring the effects or impact of the risk communication programme on the public. A total of 346 respondents participated in the study by answering two questionnaires. An evaluation of the risk communication efforts was focused around three dimensions: comprehension, audience evaluation and communication failures. The results showed differences between the two campaigns that gave significantly different results in the two communities. In the community with the multimedia channel campaign, the respondents showed greater knowledge of the production process at the local industry, they also judged the health threats for that industry to be less after the campaign, and they saved the information material to a greater extent. However, the overall effects of the information campaigns were weak. Future research is needed to explore the relation between people's emergency behaviour and risk communication.

  • 8.
    Wester-Herber, Misse
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Warg, Lars-Erik
    Gender and regional differences in risk perception: results from implementing the Seveso II directive in Sweden2002In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 69-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper attempts to investigate whether there are gender and regional specific differences in risk perception in three municipalities in Sweden. It focuses on differences between gender and region with regard to risk perception, issues of trust and credibility as well as attitudes towards local industry and emergency response behaviour. This study is based on results from a larger study investigating the Seveso II Directive in Sweden. The aim of this paper is to investigate how gender and regional differences appear and in what way they should be taken into consideration when it comes to implementing national laws that deal with information to the public. The results show that there are differences between gender consistent with earlier findings, and also that there are regional differences which may influence the risk communication effort. Men tend to report having more knowledge of the industrial activities in their community and estimate the possible effect of an accident to be smaller than do women. Regional comparisons show that there are local variations with regard to estimated knowledge and the credibility of a source. Attempts are made to explain the gender differences from a power/influence perspective, and attribute the local variations to specific cultural contexts.

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