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  • 1.
    Bruhn, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Frick, Kaj
    Why it was so difficult to develop new methods to inspect work organization and psychosocial risks in Sweden2011In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 575-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2001–2003, the Swedish Work Environment Authority (SWEA) ran a project to develop better methods to inspect psychosocial risk factors at work. The objective was twofold: to develop methods to enable most inspectors to effectively inspect such health risks, and to set a standard for method development within SWEA. This article presents our evaluation of the project and a discussion of this as an example of regulatory implementation. The methods project largely failed. Major reasons were the lack of general provisions on psychosocial risks, isolation from other policies in SWEA that affect the inspection of such risks, and a lack of engagement and guidance by top management on how to prioritize and conduct this very challenging development project. Underlying this was possibly a preoccupation with other major internal reforms, a limited competence and an unwillingness to challenge the employers on psychosocial and organizational issues within SWEA’s top management. Yet, the project probably had some indirect positive effects by raising awareness within the authority of psychosocial risk factors, of the complexities of inspecting such risks and of the difficulty to develop effective methods to supervise them.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Social Sciences and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Denk, Thomas
    Department of Political Science, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Svedung, Inge
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Social Sciences and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    The typology for allocations of societal risk and safety management tasks at the local governmental level: Framing the current directions in Sweden2009In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 680-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting point for this article is the need to develop empirical insights about contemporary societal risk and safety management practice and executive structures. In order to facilitate insights about societal risk and safety management in a Scandinavian welfare context we use Sweden and its local governmental level (municipal) as an empirical frame in this paper. The aim for this article is to analyse how a variety of risk and safety management tasks are divided within the Swedish municipalities. The objectives are to frame the current directions for internal allocations of risk and safety issues by providing an empirically based executive typology and to contemplate the implications and future research needs that arise from that management pattern.The analysis is based on statistical analysis of information from a web-survey with chief officials (n = 1283) with responsibilities for different municipal functions and sectors. In this study the responses to one of the survey questions are used for statistical analysis. The analyzed question focused on the degree that the respondents estimated that their administrative sector or function handled a selection of risk and safety management assignments (n = 45). A factor analysis was applied to identify patterns in the dataset. The analysis resulted in an eight factor solution with a high degree of explained variance (74.3%). The results provide an elementary contribution to the understanding of the current societal risks and safety management directions.

  • 3.
    Kristianssen, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Centre for Public Safety, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Centre for Public Safety, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Belin, Matts-Åke
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; Swedish Transport Administration, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Swedish Vision Zero policies for safety: A comparative policy content analysis2018In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 103, p. 260-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Vision Zero policy was adopted by the Swedish parliament in 1997 as a new direction for road traffic safety. The aim of the policy is that no one should be killed or seriously injured due to traffic accidents and that the design of the road transport system should be adapted to those requirements. Vision Zero has been described as a policy innovation with a focus on the tolerance of the human body to kinetic energy and that the responsibility for road safety falls on the system designers. In Sweden, the Vision Zero terminology has spread to other safetyrelated areas, such as fire safety, patient safety, workplace safety and suicide. The purpose of this article is to analyze, through a comparative content analysis, each Vision Zero policy by identifying the policy decision, policy problem, policy goal, and policy measures. How a policy is designed and formulated has a direct effect on implementation and outcome. The similarities and differences between the policies give an indication of the transfer method in each case. The results show that the Vision Zero policies following the Vision Zero for road traffic contain more than merely a similar terminology, but also that the ideas incorporated in Vision Zero are not grounded within each policy area as one would expect. The study shows that it is easier to imitate formulations in a seemingly successful policy and harder to transform Vision Zero into a workable tool in each policy area.

  • 4.
    Landberg, Hanna E.
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Westberg, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tinnerberg, Håkan
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Evaluation of risk assessment approaches of occupational chemical exposures based on models in comparison with measurements2018In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 109, p. 412-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk assessments of chemicals in work places are needed to protect workers' health and safety. Several different strategies can be used for conducting risk assessments. The aim of this study was to investigate approaches to risk assessment of chemicals based on exposure assessment models relative to occupational exposure limits values (OELs) and derived no-effect levels (DNELs) and in comparison with measurements relative to OELs. A second aim was to evaluate the modelled recommended outcome and compare it with measurements of exposure. In this study, 29 situations were assessed with ECETOC TRA, Stoffenmanager (R) 5.1 and ART. Personal exposure measurements were also performed. The percentage of measured exposure exceeding the recommended output was calculated to investigate the level of conservatism. All the modelled exposures were compared with OELs and DNELs where possible, and the GM of the measured exposure was compared with OELs (risk quotas). For ECETOC TRA, 31% of measured exposure exceeded modelled exposure. For Stoffenmanager (R) it was 17% and for ART and ART B it was 3% and 0% respectively. Hence, according to our data, ECETOC TRA is the least conservative. An investigation of the risk quotas showed that ECETOC TRA had 4 false safe situations, meaning the risk was low when the model was used but was high when measurements were used. This may lead to underestimating risks. All models had an elevated proportion, ECETOC TRA and ART the highest, of false unsafe situations meaning the risk was low when measurements were used but high when models were used.

  • 5.
    Rasmussen, Joel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Understanding “communication gaps” among personnel in high-risk workplaces from a dialogical perspective2012In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our primary aim in this paper is to argue for a discourse analytical take on questions of how risk and safety are managed by personnel in high-risk workplaces, with a special focus on constructions of “us” and “them”. Thus, we approach the same issue investigated in many other studies, i.e., diverging safety-related understandings between people representing various occupational groups. We choose to examine so-called communication gaps as they are “talked into being” in discourse, meaning that we treat them as primarily socially constructed. A case analysis based on interviews will be used to illustrate how we can understand this phenomenon from a communicative perspective inspired by Linell’s (1998a) dialogue theory. While previous discourse and safety culture research emphasizes broad patterns and differences between entire professions and departments, we argue that researchers should hesitate to reinforce the notion of homogeneous groups. Instead, there is great value in demonstrating collective social construction processes and commonalities so as to facilitate inter-group solidarity and possibly productive change.

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