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  • 1.
    Fu, Qiang
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Xue, Zhanggang
    Zhongshan Hospital affiliated to Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Zhu, Jie
    Computer Informatics College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Fors, Uno
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klein, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anaesthesia record system on handheld computers: pilot experience and uses for quality control and clinical guidelines2005In: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, ISSN 0169-2607, E-ISSN 1872-7565, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 155-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a mobile information system to collect patient information for anesthesia quality control. In this system, a mobile database program was designed for use on handheld computers (Pocket PC). This program is used to collect patient data at the bedside on the handhelds, with a daily synchronization of the data between the anaesthesiologists' handhelds with the anaesthesia database. All collected data are later used for quality control analysis. Furthermore, clinical guidelines will be included on these same handhelds. During the pilot phase, data from a sample set of about 300 patients were incorporated. The processes and interfaces of the system are presented in the paper. The current mobile database system has been designed to replace the original paper-based data collection system. The individual anaesthesiologist's handheld synchronizes patient data daily with anaesthesia database center. This information database is analyzed and used not only to give feedback to the individual doctor or center, but also to review the use of the guidelines provided and the results of their utilization.

  • 2.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Economy and Society, Computer Engineering, Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Westin, Jerker
    Department of Economy and Society, Computer Engineering, Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dougherty, Mark
    Department of Economy and Society, Computer Engineering, Dalarna University, Borlänge, Sweden.
    Groth, Torgny
    Department of Medical Sciences, Biomedical Informatics and Engineering, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A web application for follow-up of results from a mobile device test battery for Parkinson's disease patients2011In: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, ISSN 0169-2607, E-ISSN 1872-7565, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 219-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a web-based system for enabling remote monitoring of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and supporting clinicians in treating their patients. The system consists of a patient node for subjective and objective data collection based on a handheld computer, a service node for data storage and processing, and a web application for data presentation. Using statistical and machine learning methods, time series of raw data are summarized into scores for conceptual symptom dimensions and an “overall test score” providing a comprehensive profile of patient's health during a test period of about one week. The handheld unit was used quarterly or biannually by 65 patients with advanced PD for up to four years at nine clinics in Sweden. The IBM Computer System Usability Questionnaire was administered to assess nurses’ satisfaction with the web application. Results showed that a majority of the nurses were quite satisfied with the usability although a sizeable minority were not. Our findings support that this system can become an efficient tool to easily access relevant symptom information from the home environment of PD patients.

  • 3. Sarve, Hamid
    et al.
    Lindblad, Joakim
    Borgefors, Gunilla
    Johansson, Carina B.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Extracting 3D information on bone remodeling in the proximity of titanium implants in SR mu CT image volumes2011In: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, ISSN 0169-2607, E-ISSN 1872-7565, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone-implant integration is measured in several ways. Traditionally and routinely, 2D histological sections of samples, containing bone and the biomaterial, are stained and analyzed using a light microscope. Such histological section provides detailed cellular information about the bone regeneration in the proximity of the implant. However, this information reflects the integration in only a very small fraction, a 10 mu m thick slice, of the sample. In this study, we show that feature values quantified on 2D sections are highly dependent on the orientation and the placement of the section, suggesting that a 3D analysis of the whole sample is of importance for a more complete judgment of the bone structure in the proximity of the implant. We propose features describing the 3D data by extending the features traditionally used for 20-analysis. We present a method for extracting these features from 3D image data and we measure them on five 3D SR mu CT image volumes. We also simulate cuts through the image volume positioned at all possible section positions. These simulations show that the measurement variations due to the orientation of the section around the center line of the implant are about 30%.

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