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  • 1.
    Hort, Sofia
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Exploring the Use of Mobile Technologies and Process Logs in Writing Research2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 16, no 1, article id UNSP 1609406917734060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article explores and evaluates a method that makes use of mobile technologies as tools in combination with process logs to study writing (the Mobile Technologies combined with Process Logs (MTPL) method). New and changing ways for doing writing as well as limitations with the methods already in use in writing research grounds for new approaches for studying this practice. This article evaluates how the MTPL method can contribute to writing research as well as what process-oriented knowledge could be gained. Possible risks with using the approach are also outlined. The MTPL method is evaluated in relation to some challenges set up for writing research. The method should be able to capture the in situ participants' view on improvisational times, locations, and activities as well as their view on other people as resources or disturbance. It should also be able to address longitudinal aspects of writing and the material as well as the digital artifact use. The MTPL method is mostly shown to address all of the challenges set up for evaluation. One of the main contributions shown with the method is that it opens up for multimodal reporting in situ, where photos of workplaces in an actual writing process are one such example. There are however some risks, the main one being the uncertain ethical implications of new digital technology. In spite of such risk, the MTPL method is seen as a promising tool that should be used and developed further to gain new insights into writing research.

  • 2.
    Silfver, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Science and Mathematics Education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Gunnar
    Department of Science and Mathematics Education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bagger, Anette
    Department of Science and Mathematics Education, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Changing Our Methods and Disrupting the Power Dynamics: National Tests in Third-Grade Classrooms2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 12, p. 39-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on a research project relating to the newly implemented mandatory Swedish national mathematics tests for third-grade students (nine and ten years old). The project’s main research concerns the students’ ideas about and reactions towardthese tests and how the specific test situation affects their perception of their own mathematical proficiency. Drawing on theories that suggest identities are more fluid than static, we want to understand how students with special needs are “created.” The specific aim of this article is to discuss how our research methods have been refined during the various phases of data collection and report on the resulting implications. It discusses issues surrounding child research and how methods involving video recording and video stimulated recall dialogue (VSRD) can contribute to research on children’s experiences. Particular attention is given to methodological and ethical issues and how to disrupt power relations. In this article, we argue that the context of the test situation not only impacted upon the students but also affected how we changed, developed, and adapted our approaches as the project evolved. 

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