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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Mia K.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. SIK AB, Göteborg, Sweden; Institutionen för restaurang- och måltidskunskap, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Hall, Gunnar
    The impact of the meal situation on the consumption of ready meals2005In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 485-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The context in which a meal is eaten is known to affect intake and choice of food. The purpose of this study was to investigate in what typical situations ready meals are consumed and if consumer demands vary according to different situations. With a market survey four typical ready meal eating situations were identified, and the respondent's ready meal consumption was shown to be affected by situational factors. In the different eating situations there were dissimilar reasons for consumption. Two ready meal eating situations were investigated in greater detail in order to establish what triggered the ready meal consumption in these situations. One of these meal situations proved to be convenience driven and the other time driven. A situation-oriented approach is suggested for further ready meal product development.

  • 2.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Lillemor R.-M.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Cultural foodways in Sweden: repeated focus group interviews with Somalian women2002In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 328-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to provide increased understanding of what 'feeding the family' means to Somalian women in Sweden. Focus group interviews were carried out with Somalian women, analysed by means of the Grounded theory method. The results show that factors both in the family and in the outside world influenced their food choice and traditions, both in their home country of Somalia and in their new country, Sweden, after migration. The categories generated in the analysis were brought together in a model showing the women 'struggling for their own cultural identity' and oscillating between 'remaining Somalian' and 'becoming part of Swedish society', food being an important instrument in maintaining the cultural identity of their families. Cultural identity in this respect is a matter of the wishes of the husband, followed by those of the women and children and, at the same time, the strong pressure of the Swedish host country. This indicates how important it is for professionals to be aware of the trust people have in their own cultural food and therefore also how necessary it is to give culturally adapted food advice through public health work, in this case to Somalian families.

  • 3.
    Jonsson, Inger M
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Department of Home Economics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Swede.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Department of Home Economics, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Swede.
    Appetizing learning in Swedish comprehensive schools: an attempt to employ food and tasting in a new form of experimental education2005In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 78-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The word taste has several meanings: biopsychological, and cultural and social. Taste also influences food choice, though there is a widespread belief that tasty food is not synonymous with healthy eating patterns. In Sweden compulsory school daily meals are provided and Home Economics is a compulsory subject, while tasting lessons form an additional experimental form of education. The aim of this study has been to make a general evaluation of tasting lessons in four fifth-year classes. The focus of the results is on pupils’ learning about, and interest in, food, and the opinions and reflections of teachers, catering staff and school heads. The participants were three professional focus groups comprising staff from four schools, and 48 pupils (eight groups with boys and girls in separate groups) from the same schools. Results showed that the children were prepared to be exposed to different foodstuffs, and the adults were prepared to be exposed to new educational methods. Two stages of children's learning have been described in connection with tasting: practice and experience, and verbalization and reflection.

  • 4.
    Klintman, Mikael
    et al.
    The Research Policy Institute Lund University, IDEON Alfa 1, Lund, Sweden.
    Boström, Magnus
    Stockholm centre for organizational research (SCORE), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Editorial: for a special issue on ”Political and Ethical Consumerism Around the World”2006In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 401-404Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This Special Issue of the International Journal of Consumer Studies focuses on ‘political and ethical consumerism around the world’. An increasingly debated consumer issue – both in academia and among various stakeholders – is whether, or how, the market can function in new ways as a political arena, and to what extent consumers can use the market to become (sub)politically active. ‘Political and ethical’ here denotes social, cultural, animal-related and environmental concerns that go beyond the immediate self-interests of the individual consumer or household.

  • 5. Marell, Agneta
    et al.
    Garling, Tommy
    Laitila, Thomas
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Need vs. opportunity recognition in household car replacements2009In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 639-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is hypothesized that an intention to replace the owned car initiated by need recognition (a decrease in perceived current quality level of the old car) or opportunity recognition (an increase in aspired quality level of the new car) will result in purchases of different new cars. A sample of 1083 car owners were interviewed over telephone every fourth month during 2.5 years. The results showed that replacement intentions were not affected by how the intention was formed but that the choice of model year of the new car was. A younger car was chosen if the aspired quality level increased faster across interview waves than the current quality level decreased, and an older car was chosen if the current quality level decreased faster than the aspired quality level increased. As a consequence, if replacement intentions are the result of opportunity recognition, rejuvenation of the car fleet will be faster than if replacement intentions are the result of need recognition.

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