oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Du Rietz, Sabina
    Norwegian School of Economics (NHH), Bergen, Norway.
    When accounts become information: A study of investors’ ESG analysis practice2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 395-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates how accounts are identified as information. A precondition for the interpretation and use of information is that it is identified as potential information. How does this happen? Using the empirical case of investor analysts and environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues, the study finds that to be able to distinguish information from irrelevant accounts, the analysts specify what they want knowledge about, the epistemic object. In fact, how the epistemic object is defined strongly influences which accounts are regarded as information. Still, the linking between accounts and what they are believed to reflect requires an interpretation. This effort is particularly visible when the ‘fit’ is lacking. Studying and reflecting on their informing process, the analysts acquire knowledge of what is captured but should not be and what is not captured but should be. Hence, the identification of accounts is not only the story of how available accounts are identified as information but also of how information is identified in its absence. 

  • 2.
    Forsberg, Per
    GRI, School of Economics and Commercial Law, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    False prophets: the gurus who created modern management and why their ideas are bad for business today: James Hoopes; Perseus Publishing, Cambridge, MA, 2003, 320pp., ISBN 0-7382-0798-52003In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 20, no 1-2, p. 200-204Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Gerdin, Jonas
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Messner, Martin
    Department of Organisation and Learning, School of Management, Universität Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Mouritsen, Jan
    Department of Operations Management, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    On the significance of accounting for managerial work2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 389-394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Greve, Jan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Ax, Christian
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bedford, David S.
    University of Technology Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia.
    Bednarek, Piotr
    Wrocław University of Economics, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Brühl, Rolf
    ESCP Europe, Berlin, Germany.
    Dergård, Johan
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ditillo, Angelo
    Università Bocconi, Milan MI, Italy.
    Dossi, Andrea
    Università Bocconi, Milan MI, Italy.
    Gosselin, Maurice
    Université Laval, Quebec City PQ, Canada.
    Hoozée, Sophie
    Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Israelsen, Poul
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Janschek, Otto
    University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Johanson, Daniel
    Norwegian School of Economics, Bergen, Norway.
    Johansson, Tobias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Madsen, Dag Øivind
    University College of Southeast Norway, Notodden, Norway.
    Malmi, Teemu
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Rohde, Carsten
    Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sandelin, Mikko
    Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
    Strömsten, Torkel
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Toldbod, Thomas
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Willert, Jeanette
    Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    The impact of society on management control systems2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether certain configurations of management controls dominate in certain societies (socio-cultural contexts) and whether the effectiveness of a given archetype of management control systems (MCSs) varies depending on the socio-cultural setting the society in which it operates. The study focuses on three socio-cultural groups and the corresponding institutional contexts (an Anglo-Saxon group, a Central European group, and a Northern European group) and three MCS archetypes (delegated bureaucratic control, delegated output control, and programmable output control). We use unique data from a cross-national, interview-based survey encompassing 610 strategic business units from nine countries (seven European countries plus Canada and Australia). The idea that firms tend to adapt MCSs to the socio-cultural context does not gain empirical support in this study. No significant differences in the distribution of MCSs between the three socio-cultural groups are noted. However, we do find that programmable output control has a more positive impact on effectiveness in Anglo-Saxon cultures, while delegated output control has a more positive impact on effectiveness in Northern Europe. Taken together these findings indicate that distinct differences between societies make a particular MCS design more appropriate in a given society, but where such differences are not dramatic (as in the present case), multiple MCS designs can be found in the same society.

  • 5.
    Hansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Wigblad, Rune
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Recontextualizing the Hawthorne effect2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 120-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the thesis that a threat to the vital interests of an entity, be it a single individual or a group, will lead to productivity increases in a variety of forms. We argue that because threat was present in the Hawthorne experiments, the adoption of a decline perspective is relevant to a recontextualization of the Hawthorne effect. This means introducing aspects of an open systems approach into the analysis. A comparison between the Hawthorne effect and the Closedown and Horndal effects reveals certain analytical similarities. In view of this, and because the threat factor is present in the Hawthorne experiments, we recommend that threat be taken into account as one component of the Hawthorne effect

  • 6.
    Hasselbladh, Hans
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Editorial2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hasselbladh, Hans
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Organizing disciplinary power in a knowledge organization2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 178-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a systematic attempt to analyze the effects of performance appraisals, here conceptualized as tools for executing disciplinary power, and how the agency of employees is shaped. The article demonstrates how agency is enrolled by a broad set of disciplinary technologies aimed at behavior as well as the self, orchestrated in way that effectively short-circuits resistance. Drawing upon data collected from a Swedish subsidiary of a large American consultancy firm, the article provides a detailed account for the use of disciplinary technologies in knowledge-intensive work and other types of high-commitment work settings. Furthermore, the article pays specific attention to how punishments, rewards and human agency interact in this context.

  • 8.
    Helin, Sven
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jensen, Tommy
    Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandstrom, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    "Like a battalion of tanks": A critical analysis of stakeholder management2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 209-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the literature on the political role and responsibilities of corporations. Following Deetz's (1995) critical reading of stakeholder management and a critical methodology, the paper analyses how a large Swedish corporation manages conflicting stakeholder interests and rationales in a multi-stakeholder context. Throughout the case analysis, it is suggested that the corporation reinforces what Deetz (1995) refers to as an information mode, thus effectively hindering it from reaching a communication mode in which more genuine stakeholder dialogues are performed. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Helin, Sven
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jensen, Tommy
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Johan
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    On the dark side of codes!: Domination not enlightenment2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 24-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we show how a middle manager interprets the action of two employees as problematic and how he solves it by using the company's code of ethics as the basis for firing them. Our telling of the story unmasks a darker side of codes and we conceptualize it in terms of power and domination. The paper contributes to the literature on corporate codes of ethics (CCEs) and corporate ethics programs by showing that such codes need not necessarily play an enabling role in organizations. Rather than being instruments of enlightenment and self-regulation, they may be used as instruments to further domination.

  • 10.
    Wäraas, Arild
    et al.
    UMB School of Economics and Business, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Sataøen, Hogne L.
    UNI Rokkan Center for Social Research, Bergen, Norway.
    Trapped in conformity?: Translating reputation management into practice2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 242-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the translation rules used by Norwegian hospitals to adapt reputation management to their context. Drawing on a linguistics-inspired approach to organizational translations developed by RÞvik (2007), the study identifies the application of three such rules, copying, omission, and addition. The study contributes to our understanding of organizational translations by pointing to their regularities, challenging the Scandinavian translation theory assumption that every translation leads to the emergence of new and unique local versions. The findings show that the hospitals intentionally remove from and add components to the reputation management idea in a strikingly similar way. In so finding, the study also challenges the assumption often put forward by branding and reputation textbooks that similarity implies being trapped in conformity.

  • 11.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Using network pictures to study inter-organisational encounters2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 136-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and illustrates how a network picture methodology can create understandings of external parties in mergers and acquisitions (M&As). Recent studies have brought attention to the limited use of qualitative research methods and the overlooked marketing perspective in M&A studies. Network pictures refer to how individual actors in companies perceive their company's business network. The paper develops a protocol and illustrates its use through a single case study. Network pictures are described in terms of actors, resources and activities on a relational level and on a network level. Using such pictures enables the capturing of how M&As are processed by business partners and how external parties' activities impact M&A decisions, knowledge which will contribute to the M&A literature.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf