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  • 1.
    Holster, Savanne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Hooiveld, Guido J.
    Nutrition, Metabolism and Genomics group, Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    de Vos, Willem
    Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University and Research Centre and Human Microbiome Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    König, Julia
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Allogenic Faecal Microbiota Transfer Induces Immune-Related Gene Sets in the Colon Mucosa of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome2019In: Biomolecules, E-ISSN 2218-273X, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Faecal microbiota transfer (FMT) consists of the introduction of new microbial communities into the intestine of a patient, with the aim of restoring a disturbed gut microbiota. Even though it is used as a potential treatment for various diseases, it is unknown how the host mucosa responds to FMT. This study aims to investigate the colonic mucosa gene expression response to allogenic (from a donor) or autologous (own) FMT in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In a recently conducted randomised, double-blinded, controlled clinical study, 17 IBS patients were treated with FMT by colonoscopy. RNA was isolated from colonic biopsies collected by sigmoidoscopy at baseline, as well as two weeks and eight weeks after FMT. In patients treated with allogenic FMT, predominantly immune response-related gene sets were induced, with the strongest response two weeks after the FMT. In patients treated with autologous FMT, predominantly metabolism-related gene sets were affected. Furthermore, several microbiota genera showed correlations with immune-related gene sets, with different correlations found after allogenic compared to autologous FMT. This study shows that the microbe–host response is influenced by FMT on the mucosal gene expression level, and that there are clear differences in response to allogenic compared to autologous FMT.

  • 2.
    Lamichhane, Santosh
    et al.
    Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Ahonen, Linda
    Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Dyrlund, Thomas Sparholt
    Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Dickens, Alex M
    Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Siljander, Heli
    Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital and Research Program Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hyöty, Heikki
    Fimlab Laboratories, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland; Fimlab Laboratories, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
    Ilonen, Jorma
    Immunogenetics Laboratory, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Clinical Microbiology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Toppari, Jorma
    Institute of Biomedicine, Centre for Integrative Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Veijola, Riitta
    Department of Pediatrics, PEDEGO Research Unit, Medical Research Centre, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Children and Adolescents, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland; Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Knip, Mikael
    Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Hospital and Research Program Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Tampere Center for Child Health Research, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Oresic, Matej
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Cord-Blood Lipidome in Progression to Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes2019In: Biomolecules, E-ISSN 2218-273X, Vol. 9, no 1, article id E33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies suggest that children who progress to type 1 diabetes (T1D) later in life already have an altered serum lipid molecular profile at birth. Here, we compared cord blood lipidome across the three study groups: children who progressed to T1D (PT1D; n = 30), children who developed at least one islet autoantibody but did not progress to T1D during the follow-up (P1Ab; n = 33), and their age-matched controls (CTR; n = 38). We found that phospholipids, specifically sphingomyelins, were lower in T1D progressors when compared to P1Ab and the CTR. Cholesterol esters remained higher in PT1D when compared to other groups. A signature comprising five lipids was predictive of the risk of progression to T1D, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.83. Our findings provide further evidence that the lipidomic profiles of newborn infants who progress to T1D later in life are different from lipidomic profiles in P1Ab and CTR.

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