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  • 1.
    Hälleberg Nyman, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Karuna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jaensson, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Association Between Functional Health Literacy and Postoperative Recovery, Health Care Contacts, and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Patients Undergoing Day Surgery Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2018In: JAMA Surgery, ISSN 2168-6254, E-ISSN 2168-6262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Day surgery puts demands on the patients to manage their own recovery at home according to given instructions. Low health literacy levels are shown to be associated with poorer health outcomes.

    Objective: To describe functional health literacy levels among patients in Sweden undergoing day surgery and to describe the association between functional health literacy (FHL) and health care contacts, quality of recovery (SwQoR), and health-related quality of life.

    Design, Setting, and Participants: This observational study was part of a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of patients undergoing day surgery and was performed in multiple centers from October 2015 to July 2016 and included 704 patients.

    Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary end point was SwQoR in the FHL groups 14 days after surgery. Secondary end points were health care contacts, EuroQol-visual analog scales, and the Short Form (36) Health Survey in the FHL groups.

    Results: Of 704 patients (418 [59.4%] women; mean [SD] age with inadequate or problematic FHL levels, 47 [16] years and 49 [15.1], respectively), 427 (60.7%) reported sufficient FHL, 223 (31.7%) problematic FHL, and 54 (7.7%) inadequate FHL. The global score of SwQoR indicated poor recovery in both inadequate (37.4) and problematic (22.9) FHL. There was a statistically significant difference in the global score of SwQoR (SD) between inadequate (37.4 [34.7]) and sufficient FHL (17.7 [21.0]) (P < .001). The patients with inadequate or problematic FHL had a lower health-related quality of life than the patients with sufficient FHL in terms of EuroQol-visual analog scale scores (mean [SD], 73 [19.1], 73 [19.1], and 78 [17.4], respectively; P = .008), physical function (mean [SD], 72 [22.7], 75 [23.8], and 81 [21.9], respectively; P < .001), bodily pain (mean [SD], 51 [28.7], 53 [27.4], and 61 [27.0], respectively; P = .001), vitality (mean [SD], 50 [26.7], 56 [23.5], and 62 [25.4], respectively; P < .001), social functioning (mean [SD], 73 [28.2], 81 [21.8], and 84 [23.3], respectively; P = .004), mental health (mean [SD], 65 [25.4], 73 [21.2], and 77 [21.2], respectively; P < .001), and physical component summary (mean [SD], 41 [11.2], 42 [11.3], and 45 [10.1], respectively; P = .004). There were no differences between the FHL groups regarding health care contacts.

    Conclusions and Relevance: Inadequate FHL in patients undergoing day surgery was associated with poorer postoperative recovery and a lower health-related quality of life. Health literacy is a relevant factor to consider for optimizing the postoperative recovery in patients undergoing day surgery.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-04-25 16:03
  • 2.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Scott, Michael
    Royal Surrey County National Health Service Foundation Trust, University of Surrey, Guildford, England; Department of Anesthesiology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond VA, USA.
    Fearon, Kenneth C.
    Clinical Surgery, School of Clinical and Surgical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Enhanced Recovery After Surgery: A Review2017In: JAMA Surgery, ISSN 2168-6254, E-ISSN 2168-6262, Vol. 152, no 3, p. 292-298Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) is a paradigm shift in perioperative care, resulting in substantial improvements in clinical outcomes and cost savings.

    OBSERVATIONS: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery is a multimodal, multidisciplinary approach to the care of the surgical patient. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery process implementation involves a team consisting of surgeons, anesthetists, an ERAS coordinator (often a nurse or a physician assistant), and staff from units that care for the surgical patient. The care protocol is based on published evidence. The ERAS Society, an international nonprofit professional society that promotes, develops, and implements ERAS programs, publishes updated guidelines for many operations, such as evidence- based modern care changes from overnight fasting to carbohydrate drinks 2 hours before surgery, minimally invasive approaches instead of large incisions, management of fluids to seek balance rather than large volumes of intravenous fluids, avoidance of or early removal of drains and tubes, early mobilization, and serving of drinks and food the day of the operation. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery protocols have resulted in shorter length of hospital stay by 30% to 50% and similar reductions in complications, while readmissions and costs are reduced. The elements of the protocol reduce the stress of the operation to retain anabolic homeostasis. The ERAS Society conducts structured implementation programs that are currently in use in more than 20 countries. Local ERAS teams from hospitals are trained to implement ERAS processes. Audit of process compliance and patient outcomes are important features. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery started mainly with colorectal surgery but has been shown to improve outcomes in almost all major surgical specialties.

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery is an evidence- based care improvement process for surgical patients. Implementation of ERAS programs results in major improvements in clinical outcomes and cost, making ERAS an important example of value- based care applied to surgery.

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