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  • 1.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Cognitive media studies: Potentials for spatial cognition and AI research2018In: Cognitive Processing, ISSN 1612-4782, E-ISSN 1612-4790, Vol. 19, no Suppl. 1, p. S6-S6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive media studies has developed as an area of research at the interface of disciplines as diverse as aesthetics, psychology, neuroscience, film theory, and cognitive science. In this context, the focus of this talk is on the foundational significance of artificial intelligence and visuo-spatial cognition and computation for the design of inte-grated analytical–empirical methods for the (multi-modal) analysis of human behaviour data vis-a-vis a range of digital visuo-auditory narrative media (e.g., narrative film). The presentation focusses on the methodological foundations and assistive technologies for systematic formalization and empirical analyses aimed at, for instance, the generation of evidence, establishing and characterizing correlates between principles for the synthesis of the moving image (e.g., from a cinematographic viewpoint), and its perceptual recipient effects and influence on observers.

    In the backdrop a range of completed and ongoing experiments, we emphasize the core results on the semantic interpretation of human behaviour vis-a-vis narrative film and its visuo-auditory reception. We demonstrate the manner in which AI-based models for machine coding of narrative, and relational inference and learning serves as basis to externalize explicit and inferred knowledge about embodied visuo-auditory reception, e.g., using modalities such as diagrammatic representations, natural language, complex (dynamic) data visualizations.

    Demonstration: The presentation will particularly showcase methods and tools developed to perform perceptual narrativisation or sensemaking with multi-modal, dynamic human-behaviour data (combining visuo-spatial imagery such as film/video, eye-tracking, head-tracking during a perception task) for a chosen set of experimental material based on existing films, as well as lab-developed experimental content.

  • 2.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Embodied architecture design: On people-centered design of visuo-locomotive cognitive experiences2018In: Cognitive Processing, ISSN 1612-4782, E-ISSN 1612-4790, Vol. 19, no Suppl. 1, p. S5-S5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation focusses on the analysis and design of human-centered, embodied, cognitive user experiences from the perspectives of spatial cognition and computation, artificial intelligence, and human-computer interaction research. Focusing on large-scale built up spaces (in particular hospitals), this presentation will particularly address:

    ‘how can human-centered cognitive modalities of visuo-locomotive perception constitute the foundational building blocks of design education, discourse, systems, and the professional practice of spatial design for architecture’.

    The presentation will emphasizeevidence-based multimodality studies from the viewpoints of visuo-locomotive (i.e., pertaining to vision, movement, and wayfinding) cognitive experiences. Modalities being investigated include: (1) visual attention (by eye-tracking), gesture, language, facial expressions; (2) human expert guided event segmentation (e.g., coming from behavioral or environmental psychologists, designers, annotators); (3) deep analysis based on dialogic components, think-aloud protocols. We demonstrate (1–3) in the context of a large-scale study conducted at the Old and New Parkland Hospitals in Dallas, Texas.

    This research (and symposium) calls for a tightly integrated approach combining analytical methods (rooted in AI and computational cognition) and empirical methods (rooted in psychology and perception studies) for developing human-centered architectural design technologies, and technology-mediated (architectural) design synthesis.

  • 3.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Minds. Movement. Moving image2018In: Cognitive Processing, ISSN 1612-4782, E-ISSN 1612-4790, Vol. 19, no Suppl. 1, p. S5-S5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This symposium—conducted in two parts—explores the confluence of empirically-based qualitative research in the cognitive and psychological sciences (focusing on visual and spatial cognition) with computationally-driven analytical methods (rooted in artificial intelligence) in the service of communications, media, design, and human behavioural studies. With a focus on architecture and visuo-auditory media design, the twin-symposia will demonstrate recent results and explore the synergy of research methods for the study of human behaviour in the chosen (design) contexts of socio-cultural, and socio-technological significance.

    The symposium brings together experts and addresses methodsand perspectives from:

    •  Visuo-Spatial Cognition and Computation

    •  Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Systems

    •  Multimodality and Interaction

    •  Cognitive Science and Psychology

    •  Neuroscience

    •  Design Cognition and Computation

    •  Communications and Media Studies

    •  Architecture, Built Environment

    •  Design Studies (focus on architecture and visuo-auditory media)

    •  Evidence Based Design

    The symposium particularly emphasises the role of multimodality and mediated interaction for the analysis and design of human-centered, embodied, cognitive user experiences in everyday life and work. Here, the focus is on multimodality studies aimed at the semantic interpretation of human behaviour, and the empirically-driven synthesis of embodied interactive experiences in real world settings. In focus are narrative media design, architecture and built environment design, product design, cognitive media studies (film, animation, VR, sound and music design), and user interaction studies. In these contexts, the symposium emphasizes evidence-based multimodality studies from the viewpoints of visual (e.g.,attention and recipient effects), visuo-locomotive (e.g. , movement, wayfinding), and visuo-auditory (e.g., narrative media) cognitive experiences. Modalities being investigated include, but are not limited to:

    •  visual attention (by eye-tracking), gesture, speech, language, facial expressions, tactile interactions, olfaction, biosignals;

    •  human expert guided event segmentation (e.g. coming from behavioral or environmental psychologists, designers, annotators,crowd-sensing)

    •  deep analysis based on dialogic components, think-aloud protocols

    The scientific agenda of the twin-symposia also emphasizes the multi-modality of the embodied visuo-spatial thinking involved in ‘‘problem-solving’’ for the design of objects, artefacts, and inter-active people-experiences emanating there from. Universality andinclusion in ‘‘design thinking’’ are of overarching focus in all design contexts relevant to the symposium; here, the implications of mul-timodality studies for inclusive design, e.g.,creation of presentations of the same content in different modalities, are also of interest. The symposium provides a platform to discuss the development of next-generation embodied interaction design systems, practices, and (human-centered) assistive frameworks and technologies encompassing the multi-faceted nature of embodied design conception and synthesis. Individual contributions/talks within the two symposia address the themes under consideration from formal, computational, cognitive, design, engineering, empirical, and philosophical perspectives.

  • 4.
    Kondyli, Vasiliki
    et al.
    DesignSpace Group, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. DesignSpace Group, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Decision points in architectural space: How they affect users' visuo-locomotive experience during wayfinding2018In: Cognitive Processing, ISSN 1612-4782, E-ISSN 1612-4790, Vol. 19, no Suppl. 1, p. S43-S43Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision points in a wayfinding path are considered not only the intersections but also changes in geometry and in directions, merging of paths, or transitions. Carpman and Simmon (1986) pinpoint the need for environmental cues in these points where users’ confusion arises. In this study, we investigate the morphology and the manifest cues of the decision points in relation to the visuo-locomotive behaviour of users recorded during a wayfinding case-study conducted in two healthcare buildings at the Parkland Hospital (Dallas).

    We collect and analyse the embodied visuo-locomotive experience of 25 participants, using eye-tracking, external cameras, behavioural mapping, questionnaires, interviews, and orientations tasks. In our multi-modal qualitative analysis, founded in Spatial Reasoning, Cognitive Vision, and Environmental Psychology, we focus on the aspects of visual perception, decision making, orientation, and spatial knowledge acquisition. The comparison between users’ transition in eight decision points involves correlations between occurrences of confusion-related events, detection and categorisation of manifest cues, navigation performance, as well as visual attention analysis in relation to the available spatial features.

    Primary results suggest that (1) stop and looking-around behaviour mostly emerge in the decision points; (2) behaviour that indicates confusion is mostly encoded in narrow and enclosed decision points; (3) transitional spaces intensify visual search; (4) visibility ahead of time, and visual disruptions affect the visuo-locomotive behaviour; and (5) detection of manifest cues is affected by the morphology of decision points. The correlations between behavioural and morphological data encoded to conceptual language can be useful as a baseline for computationally-driven behavioural analysis.

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