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  • 1.
    Barzangi, Jir
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service.
    Unell, L.
    Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro, Region Örebro County, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skovdahl, K.
    Faculty for Health and Social Sciences, University of South-Eastern Norway, Drammen, Norway.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Health Service, Örebro, Region Örebro County, Sweden.
    Knowledge, experiences and attitudes of dental and health care personnel in Sweden towards infant dental enucleation2018In: European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 1818-6300, E-ISSN 1996-9805, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine self-rated knowledge of clinical experiences and attitudes towards the practice of infant dental enucleation among dental and health care personnel in Sweden.

    A questionnaire survey was performed among 776 licensed dental and health care personnel working in emergency departments, midwifery, child health centres, school health services and public dental health services in 10 Swedish cities. The response rate was 56.2% (n = 436).

    Fewer than a fifth of the respondents reported self-rated knowledge of the practice. Approximately 13% of personnel encountering children professionally believed they had seen subjected patients in their clinical practice. Personnel with self-rated knowledge and clinical experience worked mostly in dental care. Additionally, the personnel had diverging attitudes regarding agreement and disagreement concerning professional responsibility for patients subjected to or at risk of infant dental enucleation.

    The study indicated there is need for increased knowledge about the practice and for clarification of obligatory responsibilities among dental and health care personnel regarding management and prevention of cases of infant dental enucleation.

  • 2.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden .
    Ordell, Sven
    Department of Oral Public Health, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Dental Commissioning Unit, Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden .
    Unell, Lennart
    Postgraduate Dental Education Centre, Dental Public Health, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden .
    Can caries in the primary dentition be used to predict caries in the permanent dentition?: an analysis of longitudinal individual data from 3-19 years of age in Sweden2012In: European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 1818-6300, E-ISSN 1996-9805, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 308-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate if active caries disease in the primary dentition can be used as a long-term predictor for active caries disease in the permanent dentition.

    STUDY DESIGN: Population-based longitudinal register study.

    METHODS: This study included all those born in 1987 living in Örebro county who came to the clinic for an examination at all three measuring points in 1990, 1993 and 2006 (n = 1,985, panel). The panel consisted of 77.3% of the baseline group (1990) and represented 60.0% of the three-year-olds in the population in 1990. Caries data were compared at the individual level and were broken down into the components of decayed, filled primary teeth (dft) and decayed surfaces (ds) (at three years and six years) and decayed filled permanent teeth (DFT) and decayed surfaces (DS) (at 19 years). DFT (dft) was used as an indicator of caries experience and DS (ds) as an indicator of active caries disease

    RESULTS: There was a poor correlation between active caries disease at six years of age and active caries disease at 19 years of age. A stronger correlation could be measured between dental caries experience at six years of age (primary dentition) and caries experience at 19 years of age.

    STATISTICS: Bivariate analyses were conducted by cross-tabulation and Chi-squared statistics. Multivariate analyses were conducted using binary multiple logistic regression with categorical data.

    CONCLUSIONS: The correlations between active caries disease in the primary dentition and active caries disease at 19 years of age were very low on an individual level. Using early caries disease as a predictive test for later caries disease showed low sensitivity and low specificity over a long time period.

  • 3.
    Ghanei, M.
    et al.
    Public Dental Service, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Arnrup, Kristina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Dental Research Department, Public Dental Service, Örebro, Sweden.
    Robertson, A.
    Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Institute of Odontology at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Procedural pain in routine dental care for children: a part of the Swedish BITA study2018In: European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry, ISSN 1818-6300, E-ISSN 1996-9805, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 365-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate the frequency and reported intensity levels of dental treatment pain and discomfort in children, in conjunction with regular dental visits.

    METHODS: The study included 2363 children in four different age cohorts. Data was collected from structured interviews by dental personnel regarding pain experiences or discomfort after treatments, including analgesia, extractions, operative treatments and radiographic examinations.

    RESULTS: One-third of all treatment occasions were experienced as painful and/or causing discomfort. Treatment sessions including analgesia were assessed as painful in 49.7% of occasions, with injection being the most common given reason for pain. Extraction was painful in 62.4% of occasions, with injection as the main reason for pain. Operative treatments were assessed as painful in 38.8% of occasions, with drilling as the most common reason for pain and discomfort. Pain was reported in approximately 19% of all radiographic examinations.

    CONCLUSIONS: Injection was the major reason for pain during treatment, including injection and extraction, while drilling was the most common cause of pain during restorative treatment. Dentists should try to minimise the experience of pain and discomfort by using all available measures to perform pain-free and effective dental injections.

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